xt71c53dz877 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71c53dz877/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1898 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending 1898 June 2) text Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending 1898 June 2) 1898 1898 2012 true xt71c53dz877 section xt71c53dz877   ` 7;-. 
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 I   CATALOGUE
I  
I I OF THE
I . .
    OFFICERS, STUDIES, AND STUDENTS
I S’‘T'` ’—
I . OF THE
  Y
  I STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY,
    LEXINGTON
I   WITH A PART OF THE REGULATIONS,
I
I I I
i I FOR THE
I
I
Il I SESSION ENDING JUNE 2, 1898.
I 1
II I
I
` }
I  
    LOUISVILLE:
I joux P. M0R*r0N & COMPANY.
` ISQS

 
   CONTENTS.
  THE STATE COLLEGE oa KENTUCKY, .........,.... . I
 `Y’ History, ....... . ................... 1
  Object, ............................ 2
  ‘·`' The Normal School, ...................... 2
  The Kentucky Experiment Station, .............. 3
 T, Location, ........................... 4
  Grounds, .......... . ......... . ...... 4
gii*“ Buildings, ........,................. 5
i `v·.v· Development, .................... . . . . 6
i BOARD OF TRUSTEES, . ..................... 8
- FACULTY, ............ . ............... g
ASSISTANTS, ..........,................. IO
  OTHER OFFICERS, ......................... IO
T" THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION, .............. II
1 Board of Control, .... . .................. II
ii Officers of the Station, ..................,. II
DEPARTMENTS, . ......................... I2
Z COURSES OF STUDY, ........................ I3
. History, Political Economy, and Metaphysics, ...... . . I3
  Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture, ............. I3
Q The English Language and Literature, ............ 20 I
  Military Science, ....................... 2I
  Chemistry, .......................... 22
i · Mathematics and Astronomy, ................. 26
· Modern Languages, ...................... 27
Greek and Latin, ....................... 28
The Academy, .............,.......... 29
i The Normal School, ...............,...... 29
i Civil Engineering, ...................... 33
. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, ............ 36
. Anatomy and Physiology, ................... 43
Geology and Zoology, .......... . ......... 44
  Physics, ........................... SI
`°, D1=:oREEs, ........................... 53
_; GROUPING OF COURSES FOR DEGREES, ............. 54
I For the Degree of B. S., without Major Study, ......... 54
  For the Degree of B. S., Major Study, Chemistry, ........ 56
For the Degree of B. S., Major Study, Biology, ......... 58
· For the Degree of A. B., .................... 60
C For the Degree of B. Ped., ................... 62
For the Degree of B. C. E., .................. 65
For the Degree of B. M. E., .................. 67
For the Degree of B. Agr., ................... 69
_   3 r · [

 iv STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. {
./.
THE ACADEMY, .......................... 71  
‘ ASSOCIATIONS, ................. . ....... 77  
Literary Societies, . ..................... 77 `iv 
Engineering Society, ..................... 77 ‘  *
Biological Society, ...................... 78 it
Linguistic Society, ...................... 78 , 
Athletics, ..................... . .... 78  ‘
ALUMN1, ............................. 79 T; 
MILITARY DEPARTMENT, RosTER, ................. 84  
Pos'1‘-GRADUATES,. . . .................. , . . 85  
UNDERc.RADUATEs, ........................ 85  
REGULATIONS, .......................... 96  
Traveling Expenses of Students, ............... 96  
College Expenses, ............... . ....... 97  
Boarding, . ........................ 98  
Beneficiaries, ......................... gg  
Free Tuition, ................. . ....... gg f ·
Appointees to the Normal Course, ............... 100 I
Special Courses of Study ................... 100  -'
Change of Classification, ......... . .,....... 101 L
Accredited Schools, ...................... 101 _
Manual Labor, ........................ 103  `
Certificates of Character, ................... IO3  
The Monitress, ........................ 103  `
The Appendix, ........................ 103  
CALENDAR, . . ..................,...... 104  2,
COLLEGE DIRECTORY, ...........,........... IO5  
APPENDIX, ....,....................... 106  ·
I r

 ./.
7  THE STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
°  msronv.
 · AGRICULTURAL and Mechanical Colleges in the United
 7 States owe their origin to an act of Congress, entitled " An
  act Donating Public Lands to the several States and Territories
  which may provide Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the
  Mechanic Arts," approved july 2, 1862. The amount of land
 li donated was 3,0,000 acres for each representative in the National
  Congress. Under this allotment Kentucky received 33,0,000
  acres. Several years elapsed before the Commonwealth estab-
  lished an Agricultural and Mechanical College under the act.
V  When established it was not placed upon an independent basis,
  but was made one of the Colleges of Kentucky University, to
;_ which institution the annual interest of the proceeds of the Con-
_ gressional land grant was to be given for the purpose of carrying
Q.  on its operations. The land-scrip had meanwhile been sold for
g  fifty cents per acre, and the amount received—$ 165,000-invested
 V. in six per cent. Kentucky State bonds, of which the State be-
QY  came custodian in trust for the College. I
g   The connection with Kentucky University continued till 1878,
,   when the act of 1865, making it one of the Colleges of said Uni-
  versity, was repealed, and a Commission was appointed to rec-
 ·_ ommend to the Legislature of 1879-80 a plan of organization for
 °· an institution, including an Agricultural and Mechanical College,
"  such as the necessities of the Commonwealth required. The
  city of Lexington oifered to the Commission (which was also
 ° authorized to recommend to the General Assembly the place
—, which, all things considered, oH`ered the best and greatest induce-
  ments for the future and permanent location of the College), the
  City Park, containing hfty—two acres of land, within the limits of
  this city, and thirty thousand dollars in city bonds, for the erec-
if tion of buildings. This offer the county of Fayette supplemented
, by twenty thousand dollars in county bonds, to be used either
for the erection of buildings or for the purchase of land. The
offers of the city of Lexington and of the county of Fayette
° were accepted by the General Assembly.
. · -    I

 2 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. _
By the act of incorporation, and the amendments thereto, `
· constituting the charter of the Agricultural and Mechanical ·
College of Kentucky, liberal provision is made for educating, I
free of tuition, the energetic young men of the Commonwealth J
whose means are limited. The Normal Department, for which  i
provision is also made, is inte11ded to aid in building up the Com- ji 
mon School system by furnishing properly qualified teachers.  
This College, with the additional departments which will, from  K
time to time, be opened as the means placed at the disposal of  
the Trustees allow, will, it is hoped, in the not distant future, do  
a great work in advancing the educational interest of Kentucky.  
Being entirely undenominational in its character it will appeal  
with confidence to the people of all creeds and of no creed, and  
will endeavor, in strict conformity with the requirements of its  
organic law, to afford equal advantages to all, exclusive advan- ' T
tages to none. The liberality of the Commonwealth in supple- i _
menting the inadequate annual income arising from the proceeds  p
of the land—scrip invested in State bonds, will, it is believed,  .
enable the Trustees to begin and carry on, upon a scale commen-  fl
surate with the wants of our people, the operations of the insti—  {
tution whose management and oversight have been committed  »
to them by the General Assembly of Kentucky.  Q
LEADING OBJECT.  
In the act of Congress making provision for the class of col-  
leges to which the State College partly belongs, it is declared .
" that their leading object shall be, without excluding other  _
scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to ._ 
teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and  ·
the mechanic arts, in order to promote the liberal and practical j
education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and ,_ 
professions in life." To the departments contemplated in the  J
` act, a Normal School has been added by the State and an Experi-  i
mental Station by the United States.  Q
I THE NORMAL SCHOOL.  
The Normal Department of the State College exists under  
the authority of acts of the General Assembly, approved April ‘
23 and April 29, 1880. Section 7 of the first act briefiy defines S
the object for which the Department was established, " a Normal
i . · . ..  "'j" ]' ’

 _4 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 3
l Department or course of instruction for irregular periods,
Y_ designed more particularly, but not exclusively, to qualify
~  teachers for common and other schools, shall be established in
* S connection with the College." The second act provides the
a;  necessary endowment to make the Department effective.
  The number of students annually enrolled in the Normal
  School has exceeded expectation. As they come from all parts
? of the State, and many of them return well prepared for the pro-
  fession of teaching, they must greatly promote the efficiency of
  our common schools generally, and demonstrate the wisdom of
  the General Assembly in providing an inexpensive Normal
  School, centrally located and easy of access, to keep the State
  always supplied with well—trained teachers.
*  THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION.
 l This Department of the State College originated in a resolu~
 _, tion of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees,.
 _ adopted in September, 188 _5,when the Department was organized.
w  ,‘. and a Director appointed. In 1886 the Station was recognized
 1 and named by the General Assembly, and in 1887 it and a similar
 " Station in every other State were each endowed by Congress
A  with an annual appropriation of $15,000. I
  The work of the Station is directed to two objects: 1. To a
Y  constant succession of experiments made by specialists, in order
  to learn what applications of science will insure the best returns
 * from the farm, the garden, the orchard, the vineyard, the stock-
 · yard, and the dairy. 2. To the publication of bulletins announc-
 A ing such results of the experiments as are found to be valuable
V to any of our people that seek profit from either of those prime
~ sources of wealth——the soil, the flock, or the herd.
‘·  Results of experiments have been published i11 nine reports
  and seventy-three bulletins, and general appreciation of their
 lp utility is shown in the fact that, while no bulletin is sent except
 F upon application for it, the mailing list of the Station contains
  more than 8,ooo names, and is ever increasing.
  With an ample endowment, a large and commodious building
V planned for the purpose, adequate apparatus, a good experimental
. farm conveniently situated, and seven capable scientists always
employed and in correspondence with other stations, The Ken-

 4 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. I
tucky Experiment Station is not only an important adjunct of
the College in the education of students for the leading indus- -
trial pursuits, but directly or indirectly through the wide and
_ continual diffusion of knowledge for the benefit of so large a A
proportion of our population, it is bound to be extremely useful .
to the Commonwealth at large. gi
LOCATION. V
The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky is  Q
established in the old City Park grounds of the City of Lexington,  
given to the Commonwealth for this purpose. The site is elevated,  
and commands a good view of the city and surrounding  .
country. `  Q
Lexington is now the most important railroad center in Ken-  
tucky, being in immediate communication with Louisville, Cin-  ·
cinnati, Maysville, Chattanooga, and with more than seventy  ,
counties in the Commonwealth. The long-established reputation  V
of the city for refinement and culture renders it attractive as a  {
seat of learning, and the large body of fertile country adjacent, {_. 
known as the " Blue Grass Region," with its splendid stock  
farms, aifords unsurpassed advantages to the student of agricul—  _
ture who desires to make himself familiar with the best breeds  
of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in America.  
onouuos.  
The campus of the College consists of fifty-two acres of land,  A
located within the corporate limits of Lexington. The South  —
Limestone Street electric car line extends along the greater part T 
of its western border, giving opportunity to reach in a few min- 'Y
utes any part of the city. The campus is laid out in walks,  
drives, and lawns, and is planted with a choice variety of native ¤  
and exotic trees and shrubs, to which additions are constantly I 
being made. A portion of the land has recently been reserved  
for a botanical garden in which will be grown the more desirable _. ·
° native plants, with a view to testing their adaptability to cultiva—  
tion, and to give increased facilities to students taking agricul—  
tural and biological courses. Two and a half acres, forming the ii
northeast portion of the campus, inclosed and provided with a V.
grand stand, is devoted to the field sports of students. g
. , _ Y.  {T" J ’

 I STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 5
‘ About three quarters of a mile south of the campus, on the
- Nicholasville pike, an extension of South Limestone Street, is
the Experiment Station Farm, consisting of forty-eight and a
, half acres. Here the iield experiments of the Station are con-
; ducted, and students have opportunities to witness tests of vari-
  eties of field crops, dairy tests, fertilizer tests, fruit-spraying
  tests, in short, all the scientific experimentation of a thoroughly
·:  equipped and organized Station. The front of the farm is past-
,l  ure and orchard. The back portion is divided off into two hun-
  dred one-tenth acre plots, for convenience in making crop tests.
°  Buntnmcs.
A  The main college building is a structure of stone and brick,
  140 feet long and 68 feet in width. It contains the office of the
 I President and of the Business Agent, and on the third floor,
 , counting the basement floor as one, is the chapel, in which each
 A day the students and Faculty meet, and in which are held public
T i gatherings and such other meetings as bring together the entire
..  student body. The remaining space in this building is occupied
»   by recitation rooms and by the society rooms of the students.
·  jp The Station building is a handsome structure, well planned I
¤ .g_  for the object for which it is made. It is seventy feet in length
  by Hfty-four feet in width, with a tower projection in front, and
T  an octagonal projection eighteen by eighteen on the north side.
 *; The building is two stories high, and a basement eleven feet
,   from floor to ceiling. The main entrance is on the first floor, on
i , the west side of the building, through an archway fifteen feet
t  , wide. The basement is occupied in part by the Station and in
- 9 part by the College. The next floor above is devoted to oHice
,   and laboratory work of the Station, while the upper floor accom-
g P.  modates the College work in Chemistry.
r   The building devoted to Mechanical Engineering covers alto-
l -_ gether an area of about 2o,ooo feet, is constructed of stone and
2  · pressed brick, and is well furnished with modern conveniences
-   for work in this branch of engineering.
-   Two large brick dormitories on the campus afford boarding
2   conveniences for students who wish to lessen expense in this
i  Y direction. Other buildings on the campus are a brick dwelling
for the President and a cottage occupied by the Comniandant.
. ;  ;'?"‘ J ’

 6 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. ~
Science Hall, built during the last year for the Departments i
of Natural Science, is 96 x Q7 feet, of pressed brick trimmed with  `
Bowling Green limestone. The wide halls, the numerous and
4 spacious lecture-rooms, laboratories, and oflices in its three stories
are well lighted, well furnished, and conveniently arranged.
On the Experiment Farm are a brick dwelling occupied by  _
A the Director of the Station, and the usual farm buildings for the  Y
care of tools, the protection of stock, and the like. K
DEVELOPMENT. ,
The growth of the College from year to year is shown in the  
following summary :  
1862. To establish and endow a college, chiefly for instruction in t
agriculture and the mechanic arts, an act of Congress apportioned to each .
State, for each of its Senators and Representatives in Congress, 30,000 V
acres of the public land. i
1865. The General Assembly of Kentucky having accepted the State’s
portion under the conditions prescribed, established the Agricultural and i
” Mechanical College, making it one of the colleges of Kentucky University, ‘`_ 
then recently united with Transylvania University and located at Lex-
ington, citizens of Lexington and its vicinity donating $110,000 to the  I
Curators of the University to buy a site for the College. The General >
Assembly having authorized the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund to  
sell the 330,000 acres apportioned to Kentucky, by the mismanagement of { 
the C01nrnissi0uers‘ agent the State realized for its land only $165,000.  y
1866. The College opened with a President, four Professors, and a i
Cominandant. `
1878. Dissatisfied with the management of the College by the Cura-  
tors, who were engaged in a long factional strife, the General Assembly
severed the connection with the University, and appointed a commission ‘;
to re—l0cate the College, to provide for its continuance in operation till  _
re—located, and to prepare " a plan for a first-class University." Kentucky ~
University claiming and retaining the former site of the College, the sole `1 
property left the latter after the severance was an income of $9,900 derived  —
from the land-grant. V
I 1880. The City of Lexington offering the City Park of fifty-two acres  
as a new site for the College, and also $30,000 in bonds, and the County of  Q
Fayette offering $20,000 besides, the General Assembly ratified the selec- ii 
tion of a site made by a majority of the commission, and located the  
College permanently in Lexington.  it
ISSO. To provide teachers for the Common Schools of the State and  `
for other schools, the General Assembly added to the College a Normal `

 l STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 7
, i Department, which should admit, besides other students, one from each
Q representative district every year free of tuition.
i 1880. To further endow the College and to enable it to purchase
` apparatus, machinery, implements, and a library; to maintain the Normal
i . Department, and to defray other necessary expenses, the General Assem-
bly imposed a tax of 0ne—half cent on each hundred dollars of the assessed
· ; value of all property in the State liable to taxation for State revenue and
.  I. belonging to its white inhabitants.
i ° 1880. The Classical and Normal Departments and the Academy added.
  1882. The College Building, the First Dormitory, and the President’s
House completed. `
i. 1885. The Commandant’s House reconstructed.
Q}  1887. To enlarge by experiments and to diffuse the knowledge of
E   agriculture, an act of Congress established, under the direction of the
 . Agricultural and Mechanical College in each State, an Agricultural Exper-
.§  iment Station, appropriating for its support $15,000 per annum.
I ` 1887. The Department of Civil Engineering established, an experi-
l  . mental farm of forty-eight acres purchased, and the College greenhouse
’  · bum.
. 1889. The Experiment Station Building completed.
5 1890. The Second Dormitory completed.
1   1890. For " the more complete endowment " of Agricultural and
¤  ‘ Mechanical Colleges, an act of Congress appropriated to each State
`  T $I5,000 for the year ending june 3,0, 1890, and the same sum with an
5 I  increase of $1,000 per annum for ten years, after which the maximum of I
1 . $25,000 should continue without change. Of the amount thus annually
D   appropriated, the College receives 85 per cent. and the school of the col-
ti  *‘ ored people at Frankfort I5 per cent.
  1891. The Department of Mechanical Engineering established.
a  · 1892. The Mechanical Building and 'Workshops completed.
"  1894. Greenhouses for the Experiment Station built.
L'  I 1895. The Annex to the Mechanical Building and the Insectarium for
Y Q the Station built.
U 1897. The Department of Electrical Engineering established. Addi-
H  , tions made to the Greenhouses and Insectarium.
Y   1898. The Building for Natural Science completed.
e  . Increase of Pr0perz'y——The property of the College is estimated to be
d F worth $500,000 more than it was eighteen years ago.
 3 Increase af Teac/zers—Bef0re 1880 the College had six Professors; it
*5 ·.  now has sixteen Professors and eight Assistants.
’f  j Increase 0f C`0ur.re.s—Before 1880 the College offered a single course
?'   of study leading to a degree; it now offers eight.
·e ié Increase of Graa'uaie.r—No fact more distinctly marks the growth of
· the College than the increase in the number of its graduates. More _
d students were graduated in 1897 than were graduated in the iirst seven-
il teen years, and more in the last five years than in the first twenty-seven.
` ` .. v.  ,`T‘ I "
I

 BOARD OF TRU STEES.
Hrs EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR WILLIAM O. BRADLEY,  —
CHAIRMAN Ex-OFFIQIO. ,
PRESIDENT JAMES K. PATTERSON, ,
MEMBER EX-oFE1c10.
TERM EXPIRES JANUARY, 1900. V
GEN. D. C. BUELL, ....... Paradise, ..... Muhlenberg County.  
]. C. FLOURNOY, Esg., ..... Fulton, ...... Fulton County. Q
HoN. j. T. GATHRTGHT, ..... Louisville, .... jetferson County.  
HoN. A. P. GOODING, ...... Mayslick, ..... Mason County. j
HON. NV. F. PEAK, ....... Bedford, ..... Trimble County.
TERM EXPIRES JANUARY, 1902.
GEN. E. H. HOBSON, ...... Greensburg, . . . Green County. I
]0I»IN G. MATTHEWS, ESQ., . . . Barbourville, . . . Knox County.
HoN. HART BoswELL, ..... Lexington, .... Fayette County. ‘
JOHN B. KENNEDY, Esg., .... Paris, . ...... Bourbon County. `
CAPT. THOMAS TODD, ...... Shelbyville, .... Shelby County.  
TERM EXRIRES JANUARY, 1904.
D. F. FRAZEE, ......... Lexington, .... Fayette County.  ,
JUDGE WILLIAM H. HOLT, . . . Frankfort, .... Franklin County.  
JOSEPH I. LANDES, ....... Hopkinsville, . . . Christian County.  Y
]. B. MARQUM, ......... jackson, ..... Breathitt County. l
R. C. STOLL, .......... Lexington, .... Fayette County. `
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.  
JOHN T. GATHRIGHT,  
C/za1`2·mau. ~
HART B0swELL,
A. P. Gooomo,  `
I JOHN B. KENNEDY, ig 
THOMAS TODD.  
‘ 
·—·; 2
L VIcToR E. MUNQY, I
Sxcrzlzz»j· af the Board and of the C0mmz`l{uA.
" . .. »r= :.<· r ~· 

 _ (In the order of appointment.)
JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON, PH. D., LL.D., F. S. A., President.
5 Professor of H1·IZ07j/, Political Economy, dHd;M€Id#h]&1·CS.
JOHN SHACKLEEORD, A. M., Vice-President,
Professor of English and Logic.
JAMES GARRARD WHITE, A. M.,
_y   Professor ofMat/1ez1zatz`cs and Astronomy.
  JOHN HENRY NEYTLLE, A. M.,
~`  Professor of Greek and Latin.
. VVALTER KENNEDY PATTERSON, A. M.,
Princzllaal of the Academy.
A JOSEPH H0E1Nc. KASTLE, PH. D.,
Professor of Chemistry.
·s RURH: NE\’ILIoE ROARK, PH. D.,
P Princifal of the Normal School.
‘ JOSEPH V/vILLIAl\I PRYOR, M. D., |
 ; Professor ofAnotomy and Physiology.
  FREDERIC PAUL ANDERSON, M. E.,
i Professor of lilec/zanical Engineering.
 _ CLARENCE WENTWORTH MATHE\\'S, B. S.,
J Prifnssor of Botany, Hur/ic1¢l1‘1zre, and Agriculture.
 , ARTHUR McQU1sT0N YMILLER, A. M.,
i Pro_;i‘ssor of Geology and Zoology.
  MERRY LEWIS PENCE, M. S.,
· Professor (y' Physics.
 l SAMUEL IVIILLER Sw1cERT, CAPT. 2D CAv., U. S. A.,
  Coinnzamhrni and Professor of Dlili/ary Science.
E;
  PAUL YVERNICKE,
‘ Professor of lllorlern Languages.
JOHN PASCAL BR001;s, M. S.,
Professor of Civil ElIgl'?lFL'}'l'}lg.
. _ _ M- ;·r· r ~·
I

 ASSISTANTS.  `
J0HN LEWIS L0GAN, A. B., }
First Assistant in the Academy. 1
ROBERT LEE BLANTON, M. LIT.,  3
I Assistant in Greek and Latin.  
J0SE1¤H M0R*r0N DAVIS, A. B., B. S.,  
Second Assistant in the Academy. '  
VICTOR EMANUEL MUNcY, B. S.,  
Third Assistant in the Academy. Q2
JAMES HENRY WELLS, M. E.,  
Assistant in Mecltan1`cal Engineering,  
JAMES RICHARD JOHNSON, B. M. E., Z
Assistant in Shop-work and Drawing.  
ERNEST FRANK BROWN, A. B., A
Instructor in Elocutimz. `
CHARLES RALPH STURDEVANT, M. E., E. E., j
Assistant Pro/essor of Electrical Engineering.  Y
SAMUEL CARRUTHERS DEBOw, B. M. E.,  
Laboratory Assistant in Ex_/Jerimental Engineering.
MILFORIJ YVHITE, B. C. E.,  i
Awistant in the Normal School.  I
OTHER OFFICERS.
MISS LUCY BERRY BLACKBURN,  ‘
Ilfonftress. I
JAMES GARRARD VVHITE, ·
]iltJ`Z·Il¢’S.Y Illanager. .
JOSEPH VWWILLIAM PRYOR, M. D., .
Surgeon of the b’o/tation. · L
I v
MISS MARY PIODGES, -
Stenographer.
VICTOR EMANUEL IWIUNCY,
Secretary of the Faculty.
.. V . -#·¢   P "

 THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION.
  BOARD OF CONTROL.
·  A Ho}:. A. P. GOODING, Chairman, ......... . . . Mason County,
 T Hou. HART B0swELr., ................ Fayette County.
E,  _]oHN B. KENNEDY, ESQ., ............... Bourbon County,
 .. PRESIDENT JAMES K. PATTERSON, Ex-o_