xt71c53f1d6c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71c53f1d6c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690312  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 12, 1969 1969 2015 true xt71c53f1d6c section xt71c53f1d6c rm
14

he Kentucky Kebnel

Wednesday Evening, MarcJi 12, 19G9

Vol. LX, No. 114

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

UndergraduateCouncil
Proposes Abolishment
Ut Midterm Grades
By DANIEL E. GOSSETT

V

-

1...

JV

V

A

Speaker

Listens

Kernel Staff Writer
The Undergraduate Council, one of four "councils" of the University Senate, has voted to submit a proposal to the Senate Council recommending the abolishment of all
grades.
Tlne
i
recommendation is an
The system then would be
embellishment of a proposal sub
to evaluation by the
mitted by the University Student subject
Undergraduate Council during
Advisory Committee (USAQ,
spring 1970.
which calls for retaining midTwo major criteria were given
term grades only for freshmen for
the expansion of the USAC
and sophomores.
proposal by the Undergraduate
Dr. Lewis Cochran, vice presCouncil.
ident for research and chairman
"First of all, some of the
of the Undergraduate Council, council members
question the
said the recommendation could
grades
utility of using mid-terbe implemented by a trial susat all," Dr. Cochran said.
pension of
grades for
"Secondly, USAC cited probthe academic year 1960-7lems of the pressure of examinations and regular class work
all together. We don't feel that
the pressure idea is sufficient
to warrant the distinction between upperclassmen and

Sen. Strom Thurmond (D-S- . C.) listens to a question at an
informal session following his address Tuesday in the Student
Center. Sen. Thurmond said during his talk that he would vote
against the
treaty, but predicted he would be
in the minority in the Senate.
Kernel Photo By Paul Lambert

Advocates Resumption Of Vietnam Bombing

mid-ter-

m

mid-ter-

m

0.

Thurmond Lists Nation's 'Paramount Issues'
By SUE ANNE SALMON

Kernel Staff Writer
"There's so little poverty in
South Carolina, it's hardly worth
mentioning," U.S. Sen. Strom
Thurmond
told an audience Tuesday night in the Student Center.
(R-S.C- .)

Three-Phas- e

Solution Set
For Parking

"You have to have access
facilities (streets) in order for
parking structures to function
properly," said Dr. John VV.
Hutchinson, piofessor of civil engineering and member of the
President's Committee on Parking and Traffic.
Dr. Hutchinson andCol.F.G.
Dempsey, chief of Safety and
Security, spoke Tuesday night
at the Sigma Phi Epsilon Discussion Series on parking and
traffic problems on campus.
According to Dr. Hutchinson and Col. Dempsey, the two
parking structures which are now
under construction will not solve
major parking problems on campus, but will help mitigate the
present parking space shortage.
The structure under construction near Cooper Drive has only
one entrance and one exit bestreets encause of
compassing the University. Lack
of proper access facilities will
inhibit the proper functioning
of the new parking structure, Dr.
Hutchinson implied.
Safety and Security director
Dempsey said that in order to
eliminate some of the present
parking problems in the core of
campus, new spaces are being
provided In areas comparatively
remote from the central campus.
The overall parking plan, in
fact, falls into three phases. The
first moves commuting students
to the Cooper Drive parking lot;
the second phase moves staff
members to more remote parking
lots, and the third phase will
remove faculty parking from the
main campus also. The transit
system would also be revamped.
According to Col. Dempsey,
the plan should take full effect
within the next five years.
over-crowd-

Several people in the audience reacted to his statement
with groans of disagreement.
During a question and answer period following the senator's reading of an hour-lonprepared speech on the "paramount
issues" facing the United States,
a student mentioned recently reported hunger conditions among
the people in several counties
'
in South Carolina.
Before the student could ask
his question, Thurmond interrupted with his own explanation of the situation.
"If you go into any county
in the United States you'll find
some problems. Some
reporter went down there and
wrote-abothe conditions," he
said.
When another student asked
the senator about U.S. Sen. Ernest F. Hollings'
reports
of widespread disease and malnutrition in South Carolina,
Thurmond answered:
"How could he (Sen. Hollings) tell if those people had
worms. He's not a doctor."
The Select Senate Committee
on Nutrition and Human Needs,
headed by Sen. George S.
has been seeking the cause and cure of hunger
through investigations in South
Carolina and other states.
Thurmond stressed the teaching of sanitation and health as
"a way to help the poor."
"Where they (the poor) go
barefooted, they get worms and
those worms take years to get
out," Thurmond explained in a
heavy Southern drawl.
He discounted any need for
welfare programs except"thedis-able-d
when the state or community won't take care of them."
During his speech Thurmond
noted five "paramount issues"
facing the country electoral college reform, the Panama Canal,
the nuclear
treaty, the Vietnam war and the
missile (ABM) system. He said of each:
"The electoral college acts
as a buffer between the federal
government and the people."
Thunnond said he favored a
"proportional system" of reform
which he said would "split the
electoral vote the same as the
popular vote."
Whether to modernize the
Panama Canal or build a sea

level waterway" is
issue, he said. "We
(control of the canal)
the primary goals of

g

ut

(D-S.C-

.)

Mc-Gove- rn

"I will vote against the

treaty, but I will
be in the minority in the Senate.
I think the Senate will ratify it
treaty) in
(the
the next few days," Thunnond
said.
"The Vietnam war is not a
war between the north and the
south; it's a war between the
Communists and the free world,"
Thurmond declared.
As a solution to the war, he
advised, "We could do just like
we did in Germany(during World
War II). We could give notice we
were going to bomb the country
so the civilians could move out."
He advocated the resumption
of bombing North Vietnam since
"the Reds have got to be taught
a lesson that when they begin a
war they will be punished. If
South Vietnam goes down the
drain, the hope of Southeast Asia
goes down the drain.
"Before you know it the Communists will be upon thebeaches
of Hawaii," he warned.

(D-S.D- .),

anti-ballist-

ic

major
know it
is one of
the Com-

munists."

g

left-win-

a

m

lower-classmen-

Thurmond recommended
n
abandoning the 1963 nuclear
test-ba-

treaty to conduct atmomisspheric tests of
siles. The ABM's are being tested
underground at present, he noted.
The ABM "is a mark of our
good faith in keeping the peace
of the world and assurance that
we are facing up to our responsibilities.
anti-ballist- ic

"The U.S. ABM is the world's
great hope for stabilizing world
tensions," he said.

."

Dr. Cochran also pointed out
grades do not go
home to parents.
Both sets of proposals by
USAC and the Undergraduate
Council come in the wake of
recent complaints from students
and faculty that mid-tergrades
are
and generally
interrupt class work.
An informal study by the College of Arts and Sciences indicates UK is one of the few universities in the nation requiring
mid-tergrades for all

that

mid-ter-

m

m

time-consumi-

m

Juul, Futrell, Dean Hall
Discuss Housing Policy
By TOM HALL
Kernel Staff Writer
In a talk before a group of Jewell Hall women Tuesday night,
which evolved into an unexpected debate with SG Vice President
Tim Futrell, SG representative Thorn Pat Juul outlined his "central theme" for the reform of present University housing policies.
Dean of Students Jack Hall
was also present at the discussion to live University housing if
which centered on the Board of "necessary."
Trustees' decision that all stuDean Hall said Tuesday, "By
dents could possibly be required building the complex we've
more housing into the system than we have a demand for."
fun-nele-

Fall Preregistration
To Begin March 24

Juul, a candidate for SG president, called for
the University to rescind its
policy that all freshmen live in the

Advance registration for the fall 1969 semester will be March 24
through April 4.
e
and
All currently enrolled students, including
students, should register, except transient students, students
In medicine or dentistry, those entering graduate school or pharmacy for the first time, and students enrolling in evening classes
only.
To preregister for courses
The dates for advance regison the pass-fa- il
system, students
28:
tration are: March
on their IBM
must place a "P-F- "
4: M-StuMarch
dents are to go to their dean's cards in the lab column next to
office for preregistration instruc- the course name.
tions.
A maximum of four free elecCopies of fall schedule books tive courses may be taken on the
will be available in deans' offices pass-faoption by sophomores or
beginning Thursday.
upperclassmen not on probation.
Changes in the new schedule Pass-famay be applied only to
books include a listing of tenta- courses not in the
general studies
tive courses offered for the 1970 area, not
major requirements and
spring semester, the new general not in the area of concentration.
studies requirements and the new
Before p reregistering for pass-faprobation rules. Honors courses
which do not have the abbreviacourses, students are advised
tion "Hon." before them will be to confer with their advisers to
identified by the number 99 af- make certain their desired courses
are free electlves.
ter the course number.
part-tim-

d

non-degr-

A--

il

il

il

dorms.
the recruitment of incoming
students from the community colleges to live in the dorms.
a sociological study to determine how the dorms can be made
a better place in which to live.
tudies to determine how
costs in the dorms, auxiliary services and the bond issue can be
cut.
Juul blamed all of the dorm
problems on student leaders,
saying, "Students haven't demanded of their student leaders
effective leadership."
Futrell countered, "I think
Thorn is trying to deceive students with his claim of ineffective leadership."
He also said concerning women's hours, "I think that it was
the AWS that two years ago
voted the 10:30 hours." Futrell
said he believes that the hours
question ought to be reconsidered
every year.
Continued on Paje 3. CoL 1

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March 12, 10G0.

TIIE

r7

H3

llmurrmtij

IW

1

TOUCM OF

COOL
SKARF-SKIR-

T

by Peerless

of Boston

iik:
I

1

f

:

i

L

Headed south? Dress the
part. The U. Shop's new
array of sail jackets,
mock turtlenecks, etc.,
will top off the latest in
ducks, stripes and other
warm weather favorites
in slacks. You're all
girl if you're heading
south with this spring
season's new dash of
color, styles and
patterns. Get with it anc 7
he'll get with yc

'Revolutionary Socialist' To Talk
On The State Of Affairs In Cuba
David Prince, "a revolutionary socialist," will speak at 7:30
p.m. Thursday in the Student
Center Theatre on the current
state of affairs in Cuba.
Prince, a member of the Young
Socialist Alliance (YSA), was one
of 13 YSA leaden from the United
States invited by the Cuban government to help celebrate the 10th
anniversary of the Castro revolution.
The Oberlin College graduate
spent a month in Cuba as the
guest of the Castro government,
touring the country and talking
with the people.
A veteran of other socialist
and antiwar movements, Prince
helped found the Oberlin Fair
Play for Cuba Committee and is

currently touring colleges and
high schools making speeches
about the accomplishments in
Cuba after 10 yean under Castro.
Prince's speech at UK is being sponsored by CARS A.
Jose Madrigal, a Cuban exile
and graduate assistant in the UK
Spanish Department, said Monday that native Cuban faculty

-

and students will attend the meeting to "refute" Prince's "distorted" views with statistics.
Madrigal said that during a
speech Prince gave at Ohio State
University his "praise" of Castro's regime provoked a Cuban
exile, who had been imprisoned
by Castro, to physically attack
him.

Classified advertising will be accepd
basis enly. Ads may
ted mn t
ba placed la person Mendar threats
Friday ar by mall, payment Incloied,
U THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Been

FOB SALE

pre-pai-

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Bates are S1.2S far tO words, $3.00
far three contecatlve Insertions of the

same ad of 20 words, and $3.73 per
week, SO words.

FOR SALE 1960 Buick iieSabre convertible. Recently owfrhauled. New
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the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority
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CELEBRATE the downfall of Barad-Oand the passing of Sauron. Gild-e- r
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Student University Advisory Committee

ur

Name
Classification

KENTUCKY REGKJN of
S.C.C.A. General Meeting .arid Rallye
March 14,
School, 7:30 pjn.,
Thoroughbred Restufant, Leestown
Rd. Guests welcomed
llM3t

Phono Number

Cumulative G.P.S.

PEBSONAL
DEAR DAD: No
money. Sold my
Book Store and
anced the bank.

Address

need

me

tpsend
booksXsTt Wallace's

toaKtop cash
iMSusan"

bal-

10M4t

ATTRACTIVE, Intelligent petite
student. 29. finds It difficult
to meet unattachjbdyoung men ages
If InteresttfT write P. O. Box
7213. Duke Rd., LexlngtonKy. HM5t
DEAR JANE? (Who live! In the
er). call Ed again t
fe-m-

Organizations and Activities

28-3- 5.

S

References (Administrative, Faculty, and Student Personnel with whom you have worked)
Name, Position and Phone Number
1

2
3

4
5

PRIVAJE BANQUET ROOM
Reservation

This committee acts as an advisory body to the President of
the University, his Cabinet, and the Faculty Senate Council on
Student Affairs and problems. It also serves as liaison between

Administration, Faculty, and the student body.
RETURN THIS APPLICATION
DEAN OF STUDENTS OFFICE,

TO ROOM 206 ADMINISTRATION

BUILDING

.

DEAN PALMER.

ALL APPLICATIONS DUE BY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26!
Include schedulo of times when you can appear for interviews.

.

.

119

South

252-934- 4

Limestone

The Kentucky

1ernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station. University of Kentucky. Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4tab
Begun as the Cadet In 18D4 and
as the Kernel
published
since 1913. continuously
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
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KERNEL TELEPHONES
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Associate Editors, Sports
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2447
Advertising. Business, Circulation 2319

........

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wcilnrclay, March

12, IWtt-- S

Juul Blames Dorm Problems On Student Leaders
Continued from Page One
for fighting the present housing
Juul said he is definitely ad- policies are Ihe rights of Univeradministrators to search
vocating radical change, but it is
to be achieved through channels. sity
rooms and their policy of proHe added that he didn't advocate
hibiting solicitation of literature
violence, but he wouldn't speak in the dorms. He considers the
against it.
latter to be an encroachment on
"I would make it a point to freedom of speech.
seek out and talk to these
Juul outlined past efforts to
people
(radicals) about their problems,"
affect housing policy. These inJuul said, rather than merely cluded his distribution of letters
talk against their actions. He in the dorms in October of 1967,
added, "I hope sincerely that the April 3 Student Government
this campus will never experience resolution against forced housing,
anything like Berkeley or Colum- the student housing referendum,
bia."
and the recent SG bill suggestAmong the reasons Juul listed ing a housing 'boycott.

He went on to criticize other
aspects of University service.
"The food service is not representative of the dietary habits of
the students," he said. He also
mentioned the unwillingness of
the University to start a lunch-dinnmeal ticket and the inadequate phone service.
"You've been locked in for
er

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m

University Students and Faculty Only!
THURSDAY of Each Week

Aspirants for editor are asked to deliver a
summary of attributes and reasons
for desiring the position, together with a transcript of all college work, to Mr. Reynolds
in Room 109 of the Journalism Building before April 7.
The Board of Student Publications will
meet later in April to choose the editors.
Applicants will be interviewed by the board.
two-pa-

IfEWSPAMSl

Dry Cleaning

The Kentucky Kernel
Applications arc now being
taken by Publications Adviser
Ciarlcs Reynolds
for next year's editors of
The Kentucky Kernel
and The Kentuckian

Jack Hall, Dean of Students,
later said that the girls chose to
come here, and so they implicitly
agreed to abide by the established rules, including hours.

the night," he said to the girls
while gesturing at the wooden
partitions set up before the locked
doors. He said that freshman students, most of whom are 18 and
legally adults, are deprived of
their rights when they are fo recti
to live in the dorms and live
by such rules as the freshmen
girls' 10:30 p.m. weeknight hours.

9

FOR

JERSEYS

Book tore

YOUR MONEY"

* The Kentucky

Iernel

of Kkviucky

Univi-rsit-

KSTAHLISHKD 1891

WEDNESDAY, MAIICH

Editorials represent

12, 19C9

i)c opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Ia c

B.

UVvt,

Editor-in-Chi-

Darrcll Rico, Editorial rage
Cuy M. Mrndcs III, Manning Editor
Tom Dvtt, Business Manaper
Jim Miller, Associate
Howard Mason, Photography Editor
Chip Hutchcson, Sports
Jack Lync and Larry Kclloy, Arts Editors
Prank Coots,
Dana Ewcll,
Janice
Terry Dunham,
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors

Editor
Editor
Editor
Darbcr

Focus
The speakers confirmed so far for this year's Focus program are
not nearly so glamorous as were those lined up for last year's, but
the symposium nevertheless should be stimulating and worthwhile.
Focus 1969 will center on the issue of social morality, a very germane issue in these days when fundamental questions are being raised
about what our society is doing and where it is headed. It is time
that the University of Kentucky also addressed this question, and the
speakers scheduled by the Focus committee should be able to handle
the order quite adequately.
William Kunstler, an outstanding Yale law school graduate who has
turned his energy into the field of civil liberties, certainly promises
to have much to add to the program. His clients have ranged from
Jack Ruby to Jerry Rubin and from H. Rap Brown to Adam Clayton
Powell. Currently active in constitutional challenges aimed at the
draft, Kunstler has handled the cases of draft resisters Muhammad Ali
and Mike Fallahay, a UK student.
A view of social morality with a somewhat different emphasis will
be provided by Anson Mount, Playboy magazine's public affairs manager. Mount has spoken frequently on Hugh Hefner's widely discussed
"Playboy philosophy" and is writing a book dealing with the issues
involved.
The other two speakers, T. George Harris, a former Look senior
editor and managing editor of Careen Today, and John Sigenthaler,
editor of The Nashville Tennesseean, both have spoken well to contemporary issues also.
9
Students should plan ahead to attend the March
program,
an event promising to present intellectual challenges.

University of Tennessee Daily Beacon

'We, The Majority Of The Students, Believe
In A Closed Speaker Policy, Strict Hours
For Men And Women, And Anything Else The
Administration Tells Us To Believe In . .'

28-2-

Kernel Forum: the readers write
More Hearings
To the Editor of the Kernel:
On March sixth, the College of Arts
and Sciences sponsored a hearing in the
Student Center Theater entitled Climate
For Learning. This committee hearing
had received wide publicity prior to it's
meeting, with emphasis being placed on
student participation. I certainly hope
for this hearing was
that the tum-onot representative of the attitude of students on this campus, i.e., apathetic,
which by the way, was suggested by one
of the participants. The contemporary
student is crying for a voice in his educational system; the chance is being
offered, let's hope that we will take
advantage of it more fully in the future.
For those who were unable to attend,
let me throw out an exemplary idea which
seemed very relevant to me . . . and
perhaps to most of my fellow students.
There seemed to have been a great deal
of discussion concerning grades, those
awful little letters we receive as an indi
ut

L

cation of our progress at the end of each frequent intervals of time, such as at
least once each semester.
semester. Do we want them or not?
R. I. Gerrish
sysThere were suggestions of pass-faA & S Sophomore
system of excellence,
tems, a three-poipassing, or. failing or perhaps no grades
at all, with emphasis on LEARNING.
In my own opinion, I think that the one
Inside Man
thing learned from all of these suggestions
is that the present system is inadequate,
By this time, it has come to the atbut that it will be revised only if WE see
tention of most of the student body
that it is. Grades have been a problem
that we have been without a permanent
of controversy throughout our entire education. Perhaps, as was suggested, the president at the university for a considerable length of time. But before one
problem relates to the basis of success
can criticize such a delay, he must first
our society. Are grades
as measured in
consider the demanding qualifications
to the student like income to the
which have been set by the selection
Are we here to leam, or to
committee in its evaluation of prospecmake those grades? What do WE think?
Well, we can let the University know if tive nominees.
The man must first, of course, be a
we will.
Protestant (preferably
white,
In conclusion, I would like to say Southern Baptist or Methodist) with the
that I think the most valid suggestion of ostentatious look of an intellect and with
THIS particular hearing was that simthe air of Bluegrass nobility. His gradilar hearings be instituted on a departuate work must be in either engineering
mental level and conducted at relatively
or P.E. (Those with degrees in higher
il

nt

entre-prenue-

r?

Anglo-Saxo-

By David

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions ex--' are presently in front of the Pennsylvania
legislature, for example.
pressed in this regular column are those
of its author and do not necessarily repMoreover, President Nixon's recent leti ter to Notre Dame University President
resent the opinions of the Kernel.
Fr. Theodore Hesburgh clearly indicates
that the Administration is going to crack
Anyone who thought that the condown heavily on student protest and acfrontation in Chicago at the Democratic
tion, and that others who do so will
National Convention was a war against
have the support of governmental policy
youth and social change, and who was
and action.
horrified by the thought, had best seek
Another related area of governmental
some place to hide in the next fewmonths.
action concerns private foundations. A
has
The change in administrations
recent investigation of a house committee
apparently freed a lot of people around the
was aimed at shaking the tax structures
country to take out after students, Blacks
of those foundations and at seriously
and their supporters in ways which they
curtailing their ability to finance political
could not last year.
projects. This move, which was, inciAt the moment, for example, there
dentally, a plank in Ceorge Wallace's
are bills in the legislatures of several
platform, is clearly aimed at one of the
states which would make it a crime to few sources of money left open to students and poor people working for social
obstruct "the normal educational function" of a college or university. Such a change.
This is not to say that the Nixon
bill and 15 others with similar content,

n

education are automatically eliminated).
He must also be an active member in
either the Masons, the American Legion
or the John Birch Society. In addition
he must be an avid basketball supporter.
With such stringent guidelines, the
formidable task of the selection committee is understandably evident.
I personally hope that the committee will chose a man within our own
University community. I shutter at the
thought of an outsider being selected
who might place educational standards
above political expediency; a president
who would feel the pulse of the student
body before feeling the pulse of the state
legislature; a president who would dare
to tamper with the administrative power
structure of this great institution. Such
unspeakable behavior could possibly occur if the committee chances to invite
another outsider into our peaceful little
paradise of learning.
Richard Johnson
A & S Senior

Holwcrk

administration has no plans for the use
of students in its programs. Indeed, there
are many plans for the institutionalizing
of volunteer efforts on the part of young
people In the coming four years. Plainly
and simply what this means is that the
stuNixon administration hopes to
dents into meaningless government programs which are really aimed at keeping them out of meaningful work aimed
at changing the structures of universities.
co-o-

Clearly, then, the war on youth is
only beginning. But there is a good
chance that the battle lines are much
deeper than that. The McClellan committee is now in the process of investigating various programs and organizations (among them Louisville's Southern
Conference Education Fund) and The
House
Activities Committee has just changed its name to avoid
controversy and bad publicity. The clear
implication is that a time of political

harassment is brewing in this country
which will probably rival and perhaps
surpass the McCarthy circus of the early
50's.

.

For there is no doubt that what the
various kinds of activities now in progress represent-stud- ent
protest, black
militancy, poor white organization, farm
unionization is the formation of a meaningful left in American politics, a part
of the political scene which has not been
present since the 30s. If this political
Left is to mean anything, it must withstand the coming attempts to crush it.
And if these attempts can be withstood,
then the forces for change in this country can perhaps grow into a movement
which will make this a decent society
for everyone. At any rate, it is clear that
the crisis is here, or is Just below the surface of the national political scene. The
way in which we can deal with it will
indicate, one suspects, what the future
of this nation will be.

* .f

.THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

Apollo To Make Additional Orbit
SPACE CENTER, Houston
(AT) Flight controllers today delayed Thursday's Apollo 9 landing by one orbit 90 minutes
seas
to escape
southwest of Bermuda.
By circling the globe an extra
time, the astronauts will land
430 miles south of the main
splashdown area, near Crand
Turk Island in the Bahamas,
where weather conditions are expected to be excellent.
The new splashdown time is
11:56 a.m. EST.
Before making the decision,
flight director Eugene Kranz
weighed such things as how fast
storm-lashe- d

We

s.n.c

the recovery ship, the carrier
Guadalcanal, could reach the

12,

From triggerman for the mafia
to ru!er of it until his 'family
1

six to eight feet and swells 10
to 12 feet, McDivitt commented:

called on him to die.

new touchdown point, tracking "Visibility's good."
facilities for the new
Hearing that the prediction
track, and where Apollo 9 would for the GrandTurk area forThurs-daywa- s
10 miles visibility, winds
failed to
land if its
fire and if it had to make emerand variable, waves two to
light
gency use of Jet controls to come three feet and swells six to seven
home an orbit or two later.
feet, the Apollo 9 commander
exclaimed: "Hey, let's go there!
Astronauts James A. McDi-vitDavid R. Scott and Russell Let's go there!"
L. Schweickart favored the alLater, with the Guadalcanal
ternate landing plan.
reporting 14 foot swells and 2,000
When astronaut Stuart Roosa, foot visibility, McDivitt said: "I
the capsule communicator, re- don't think anybody up here is
good enough sailor for that."
ported the forecast for the Bermuda area was "grim" 10 miles
"Roger, we agree down here
23 knot winds, waves too," Roosa said.
visibility,
ry

retro-rock-

et

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University of Kentucky
)

A Contemporary Issues Forum

Entitled

"Focus On Social Morality"

I
f

Featured Speakers Include

...

T. GEORGE HARRIS

JOHN SEIGENTHALER

Managing Editor, Careers Today Magazine

Editor of The Nashville Tennessean

WILLIAM M. KUNSTLER

ANSON MOUNT

Noted Defense

Attorney-Autho-

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Public Affairs Manager for Playboy Magazine

Tickets for the entire Forum

March

20, 29

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* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wrtlnrsl.iy, Manh 12,

(V-- TIIE

1

Plans Publication At Eiul Of Month

Poetry Guild Sets Friday Deadline For Contributions
of poetry for publication, according to the editors. The only restrictions are that the poetry must
be written by a student and that
the work must not have beeni

The deadline for copy forUni-versit- y
Poetry, a new publication
offering poetry by UK students,
has been set for March 14.
Students may submit any kind

IERNEL

If the poems are to be returned, the writer should include

published previously.

John Cooper, managing editor, said if possible submitted
poems should be typed and that
a brief biography should be included.

envea stamped
lope. Cooper said the editors
hope to notify students whether
their work is accepted for publication.
Plans call for the magazine,
sponsored by the Poetry Guild,

The poems should be sent to
University Poetry, co John Cooper, 655 South Limestone Street,
Lexington, Ky. 40506.

ADVERTISING

WORKS FOR YOU!

Today

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Income tax forms and information
will be available between 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. on
Tuesdays and Wednesdays
in the Student Center until April IS
at the tax booth sponsored by Beta
Alpha Psl.
Students interested in participating
In a
student exchange program from March 14 thru 21 at
Institute in Alabama can apply
in the Human Rela