xt71g15t7w0c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71g15t7w0c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420512  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 12, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 12, 1942 1942 2013 true xt71g15t7w0c section xt71g15t7w0c Medill Wrote Editorial
That Is Good Todav

VOLU ML XXXII

ntucky" Kernel

The

ON PAGE TWO- -

l.KXIN(;rON. KENTUCKY. TUESDAY.

New Legislature Orders
Probe Of SGA Eleelion

TWELVE-WEE-

Investigation
Tenlavique Society
Initiates 21 Men

IS SCHEDULED
Program To Be
Presented At
Guignol Theatre

NUMBER

V)V

Defense

a course in

Coiiiiiiiuii(uc!
Brewer Says Locks
Be Trimmed

sentative.

PALMOKfc

12.

.'

Course To Be Open

Lost Delegates, Umbrellas
Exhaust Inaugural Pages

To All Students

Having Experience
In Communication

Decide That One

By HAROLD WINN
luncheon, and answered telephones.
Prerequisites
to
By JOE BOHNAK
for admission
Kernel SUIT Wrifcr
course are a high school educa- 25
Then came the inauguration.
long nowmg loc
iroiiicn's luminary this
stipliinnorr
of the de- A Signal Corps company will he
Hoods were fastened on. and the
tion and employment
in some bonair Joe College are being
on the University cam-up- s
hudcrslu j Imlrrnily.
mass moved to Memorial hall tdarn established
capacity in defense in- - carded for the more fashionable
at the beginning of the summer
ausiries or selection Dy sucn nrms G. I." cuts that are requested by
jthat rain. The pages were able to quarter, the second ROTC unit at
By JESSIE MAY
to receive this training.
StaV for most Of the rprpmnniH Kut
the military department,
UK and the third signal corps outfit
The delegates to the inauguration
to leave early
some of of its kind in
The course, which will be
new tvpe of halr.do was Wednesday must have drawn a deep
the United States.
tnem had
cnosen to help a( (he
for a period of twelve weeks, will inaugurated last week by ROTC
President Herman L. Donovan
,
....
when the banquet was over
be given free of charge. Although officials who finally became disgust-jn- o breath
r
nounced "terdav that the
and they could go home and rest
wtoww he"o nV was
college credit will be given, a ed witn the
Trustees had accepted the in- bush their
but they could not
.certificate of merit will be given sported by most of the basic stu-- I have been'any more happy than the
l
W"
upon successful completion of the dents
greater part of the ad-- ; nag ps
ratauudu sul.ii luult uh una Cttin- important
course.
pus.
vanced students have already short- The latter, composed of new mem- hin fmm ar
Subject matter of the course will ened their hair without complaining. bers to Mortar Board spent Wed- - , Armsl
The Signal Co.ps training will
cookies (tnere must nave
include labor and personnel man but tne basic men walk around the nesday in a kind of frenzy trying
be open primarily to students enmni(ms of tnem, th
tucked
agement problems, collective bar- - campus saying things like, "What to locate lost delegates or umbrellas,
rolled in electrical engineering and
hurrled )
Saining.
physics courses. Col. B. E. Brewer
mausiriai neuun, ana the. I've trained my hair for years They trotted from the Union build- - theif ,on(j sklrts
x4
n
techniques of management..
Em and now I've got to cut it all off!" ing to the Administration building Umm
indicated however, that the course
as jne visitors had set- - would also be open to students enphasis is given the opportunities or "My gal is gonna be mighty sore to Maxwell place to the Adminis- - pUe
Marjoi ie Palmore. Horse Cave, was
tled Into their seats the soup was rolled in
for trained workers in manufacturwhen she sees me without any hair vrauuii opiums
other colleges who hav"
served, all except one or two of the experience
announced as president of Cwens, ing industries
and Federal and on th(Miead."
in signal work.
to the Union building ad Infinitum,
Jn
sipp home to streU.h
sophomore women's leadership hon- - State positions under Civil Service
The barbers at the Union buildWILL ENROLL 20A
Those who stayed in the Union a
feet
t0 soeik their
orary, at the annual initiation ban- and the Merit System. The course ing are having a field week, and
The new company will have a total
buUding chased around with mes- - (pr0Vided they did not have
term
quet held Thursday night in the is based on the dual relationship were stubbing hair every day. There sages (important and unimportant), paper
of 200 cadets enrolled of which 40
or book report to do.
employers and employees'.. som. taIk about reducinr hair
between
Thoroughbred
me xng giris M id, however, that will be in the advanced course.
room of the Phoewith a general coverage of Indus- - cutting rates because of increased helped iate comers una seats ai
nix hotel.
they enjoyed the busy day and were ' Student, both advanced and baic.
trial relations centring on a war demand
genuinely glad to do anything they already enrolled ln ROTC infantry
Other, officers chosen were Vir- economy.
Maybe the reserve trainees don't
who are qualifyed for the new traincould to facilitate the exercises.
This course is only one of thirteen know it, but the military department
ginia Baskett, Casper. Wyoming,
"We felt as though we had done ing will be transferred to the new
courses now in progress on the is doing them a favor. When you
Ann Carter Pelts.
a little bit to help the new presi- -' unit.
campus. Three of the classes are
Colonel Brewer said that three
secretary;
Margaret taught full time and the others are think of the hot summer days comRussellville.
dent," one girl stated.
ing, that short hair will be mighty
be
i
Erskine. Danville, treasurer; Betty night courses. There are 291 people comfortable,
"I don't know what we would have men v. ;will ..... added v. to ithe military
i
and it won't be so hard
l
done without all of them." Miss
Aldrich. Indianapolis. Ind.. histor-- 1 enrolled in defense classes on the to get the knots out when you get up
He added tnat th
woukl
Margaret Lester, who was in charge
of in the morning, or to slick it down
ian; and Elizabeth Faulkner Lex. campus which is about
probably be t wo officers of the signal
of the pages, said.
19
the total in this training through after a swim.
ington. ritual chairman.
The guides who were to give perout the state. All applications for
So don't take it so hard, men, it
Over 3500 high school students sonally conducted tours of the cam- officer. Colonel Brewer will corn- May 19 is the last day for
Retiring officers of the organiza- entrance in courses should be mailed
will all grow back after a while.
attended the eighteenth annual pus were noticeably unoccupied all mand.
the payment of the senior fee
tion are Frances Jinkins. Nashville. to D. V. Terrell, Institutional RepReserve officers in the Signal
Kentucky music festival held here day. but the men from the advanced
of $9. Registrar Leo M. ChamTenn.. president; Carolyn Spicer. resentative. College of Engineering,
Corps will be classified ' into six
YW-Y- M
lat week under the direction of the military classes were kept busy.
berlain announced today. Any
at the University.
Virginia
Lexington,
groups. They will be combat, cryp- department of University extension.
senior who fails to make this
All in all. It was an eventful day tfieranhif
nirro,n
nhntnoranhic
secretary;
Lexington,
Lipscomb.
payment is not eligible for grad-- .
The program included solo in- in the life of the University and
supply and technical work.' Transfers
Virginia Wesley. Lexington, treasstrumental competition, marching
nation, he Lated
Hi-Y- s
between classifications will be made
contests, massed bands, parades,
urer; and Charline Lisanby. Lexin 25 years.
only in the interests of the service.
orchestra.
Senior members of Girl Reserve and an
ington, historian.
At present Ohio State is the only
Luncheons for directors and adgroups from Lexington
and Hi-Attending the banquet were the
university offering the signal corps
Fayette county high schools judicators were held on Friday and
and
present members; the initiates:
course, but West Virginia universirr
Although the rlay to be pro- - win ftUend .
"eet Saturday in the Union building.
Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes, dean of
along with UK wUl install the trainduced this summer by Guignol acquainted" meeting at 7 o'clock
Presiding at the various
women, and Dr. Margaret Ratliff,
ing at the summer term.
not yet been selected, tenant ln the Music room of the of the festival were Jack Thoman,
assistant professor of psychology Theater has
The University already has liH'"
Perry Adams, and Donald Gallo
faculty advisers of the group: Mil- - Director Frank Fowler announced Union buUcung.
j students enrolled in infantry train- way. students; Leia Mason, training
Murray, junior adviser; Betty
dred
The program will consist of talks j
nig iiu vi wiucn are in tne aavanrej
South, senior adviser; and Miss remain open during the summer hi. ..,v....v.o nf tViA VH7 an1 VHf school music instructor; uonaia
muTkarc
. ...v.
Jppnnrl
course. The present system of mili"
IJ
.u K. "J rdi
"mw
n"- -t.
Jane Haselden. assistant dean of
various Phases of the All ton, and Charles V. Magurean,
tary training was established here in
nerea ln dramatic production ana groups work WaUer
University band director.
wm
Alpha Gamma Rho made the women.
1920.
""bhighest averaee scholastic stand ine
The banquet table was decorated
cuss the freshman Y club: Dorothv
A parade of the various bands
The summer play will be present- - Collins will talk on membership in led by the University band was held
for the fraternities for the first se- - with red carnations and roses,
Dr. E. G. Trimble, for the past 11
mester of this year. The average evergreens, and red candles. In the ea m July ana win oe or somewnat tne Y; Bob Davis, work of the on Saturday. Following the parade
cm contor- rf ths tahle was- u frown onri tne same nature as laSf. years pro- - uroow. , Villi Ui.f tv
Tim
ic
.
,,
V Knlr- the massed bands performed on
. " . . v. v..w
. UI
.lantin v.. ih.
1 L.
'
.v...l.V.tl., r.t ttlC
7 the Univertisy.""""
lil
J'
1000
has
duction. which was a modern ver Betty South and Jean Ewers. Blue field and the marching contests
The SAE's and Delts were second scepter, symbol of Cwens
accepted an appointment as examin"Lysis-trata- ."
Tne Program followed the old sion of the Greek classic.
Ridge. Talledega,
and other Y were held.
1000 visitors to SuKy-LOver
and third with an average of 1.460
rices
d
er for the
President's
Work on the play will privide conferences; Mary Elizabeth Stigall,
ritual which is the
Climax of the festival was the
Spring Carnival
and 1.359. Of the 18 fraternities Anglo-Saxo- n
Saturday night
formal ceremony of the organization summer students with an oppor- - interracial activities; Margaret; concert of the All Kentucky orches- - committee on fair employment prac- helped to create a new
on the campus, only four failed to
tradition at
Initiates of Cwens are Misses Pal- - tunity for laboratory work in stage- - Graham, social service work; Mil tra which was held Friday in tices.
have an average standing of 1
Dr. Trimble plans to leave today the University.
craft.
Almore, Baskett, Felts. Erskine.
dred Murray and Elliott Peel, posi- - Alnmnl Dvmnainm
The Carnival, which supplanted
During the first semester there
Washington, where he will con-tivdrich, and Faulkner; Mary Eliza- The comedy, "Claudia." a play tion of YW and YM on the campus;
Schools sending bands to the fes- - 'or
the annual May Day festivities, dowere 562 men affiliated with the 18
fer wlth Laence Cramer,
Rosalyn
Danville;
Stigall,
beth
from the Claudia magazine and Mabel Murray, Dutch Lunch
were Augusta,
Cynthiana,
nated its entire profits to the Amer-ca- n
fraternities. The average standing Freedman. Port Chester. N. Y.; adapted is tentatively set as
stories,
Williamsburg. Ken- - tlve secretary of the committee. He
the club. Betty Aldrich and Fred Erwin
Red Cross. According to John
of the fraternity men was 1.214. For Sonya
Gravenkemper,
Norwood, opener for the 1942-4- 3
will conduct the worship service.
tucky Female Orphan school,,18 scheduled to open a series of
theater
Kerr and Gerald Schaeffer. treathe most part, the standings of the Ohio; Ruth Pace. Ridgeway. Va.; season, which will
amuier's hearings May 25 at
Shelbyville. Benham.
include five major
D. Akers' orchestra will furnish
surers of Lances and SuKy. respecactives and pledges were about the
Char lee n Burrus, Paris; Mattie productions. "Life with Father," music for dancing after the program.
Williamstown. Middles- - nungham.
tively, the Carnival netted between
same.
- -- Arsenic and Old Lace," "My Sister
Evelyn Douglas. Lynch; Mary ElizDr. Trimble, who holds a doctor of
Committees in charge of arrange- - boro. Maysville, Louisa, Jackson,
$250 and $300. A more exact figure
Complete standings and rankings
abeth Crawford, Lucy Meyer. Mar- - Eileen.
Spirit," "Angel ments are Jeannette Graves, pro- - Columbia, Carrollton, Danville. Bell philosophy degree from Yale unl- - will be tnncunced
"Blithe
follow:
later in the week,
ian Yates, Carojean Elsey. Alfarata Street," "Letters to Lucerne," and gram; Ruth Wheat, Wanda Scriv- - County, Ludlow. Somerset, Bar- - versity and was admitted to the they said.
1. Alpha Gamma Rho
1504
Haas, Ellen O'Bannon. Edith Co- - "Skylark" are among the plays now ner. and Mabel Murray, contacting bourville. Mt. Sterling,
Jenkins, practice of law in Kentucky in 1935.
2. Sigma Alpha Epsilon
1.460
Jessica Gay. nomuiee of the Kapnant, and Priscilla Graddy. all of being considered for next season's high school groups; and Frances Henry Clay. Harlan, and Louisville has done extensive research in the
pa Kappa Gamma sorority, was
1.395
Tau Delta
Lexington.
schedule.
Kendall, refreshments.
Male.
field of labor relations.
4. Gamma Tau Alpha
1.362
elected Carnival queen. The Cam
As designated by President Roose-- j ival queen was selected on
5. Kappa Alpha
1.313
the folvelt, the job of the fair employment lowing points: the most original,
6. Alpha Tau Omega
1.275
practices committee is "to prevent most popular, most attractive booth,
7. Triangle
-discrimination against employees in and the best girl for Carnival Queen.
8. Phi Sigma Kappa
1.193
war industries on basis of race, color, The Kappa's booth was "African
9. Sigma Chi
1.190
religion, or nationality."
10. Kappa Sigma
1.169
Baseball."
As an examiner. Dr. Trimble will
11. Sigma Phi Epsilon
1.129
work under an executive committee
12. Delta
Chi
1.102
13. Phi Delta Theta
which Includes William. Green, head
1.046
14. Sigma Nu
"Education must go on; other - ?'
of the A. F. of L.; Philip Murray.
1.010
15. Phi Kappa Tau
head of the C. I. O.; Mark Ethridge.
979 wise chaos and the long night."
auguraI
Gov. Keen Student Union building, where ar- - of the board of trustees.
ceremonies.
'
Courier-Journ16. Alpha Sigma' Phi
852
More than luu persons,
Caps and gowns for graduaritii:
Johnson, Judge Richard C Stoll, rangements had been made to
Dr. McVey. who was president of of tne Louisville
85
Lmbd 0111 A1Pha
ing delegates from 200 of the na- - president of the board of trustees, broadcast the ceremonies surround-an- d the University from 1917 through and other leading labor relations seniors are now available at th'
18. Pi Kappa Alpha
leaders appointed by the President. book store, it has been revealed
776 tion's
colleges and universities.
President Emeritus Frank L. ing the first inauguration of a 1941. told his successor that:
Wednesday met at Memorial hall, McVey. himself a war president of University president in 25 years,
Dr. Trimble's request for a leave Any senior who has paid his senior
"The holder of the office has
built on the campus to commemor-- j the University, also called attention
many joys and many difficulties; of absence from the University will tee of $9 may get his cap and gown
Speaks
Governor
ate student dead of the last World to the necessity of the University
Brief addresses of welcome were he has much opportunity, some in- be presented by President Herman by paying a $3 deposit. This deWar. to hear the sentence pro-- ; maintaining its service both now made bv Governor Johnson, reure- - fluence, and even at times, a lit- L. Donovan at the next meeting posit will be returned as soon as
'
nounced.
the cap and gown is returned tn
and after the war.
of the board of trustees.
senting the state. Judge Stoll, re- tle power."
r
Tne annual
It. was sijoken hv Dr Hermann
Morning threats of rain caused presenting the board of trustees, and
He expressed the belief that Dr.
the book store. The book store w.ll
meeting of the Dutch Lunch club Lee . Donovan, the stocky, smiling cancellation of the academic probe open the night of commencement
Dr. McVey, representing past presi- Donovan would administer "to the
.Hiipatnr.farmAi- . jinctwill be held at linnn Fridayj ill the Trit-..
-- - for the convenience of students
" cession which was to precede in- - dents, in the interim before the Seal needs of the University well."
twMfc. . . . . . .
football room of the Union. Mrs. sixth president of the University auguration of Dr. Donovan on
At the outset of his address. Dr.! UoXeS
:r
Graduation announcements
of tne university passed from the
Sarah B. Holmes, who was the first of Kentucky.
Stoll field, and Memorial hall was hands of Dr. McVev to Governor Donovan commented that Dr. Mc- also available now. A limited numto realize the need of such a group
Put tersely by Dr. Donovan in chosen instead.
ber has been received by the lyK
Johnson to Dr. Donovan. Thus the Vey had also assumed the presi- and to suggest it to Augusta Roberts, his inaugural address as a ehal-als- o
store and there will be no addiI informs in Evidence
former U. K. student formally be- dency in a war year.
Col. B. E. Brewer, head of the tional supply.
Y. W. C. A. secretary who founded lenge that the nations educational
"With statesmanlike vision he
Uniforms, the order of the times. came the sixth president of the
department,
University's
well
military
the organization, will speak. The system would stand in war as
Text books will be boimnt by the
charted the course of the Univer- were the order of the day. Most of University.
box seats will book' store beginning May 20. acmeeting will be th elast one of the as in peace, it was the theme of them, however, were the uniforms
The seal was in a sandlewood box slty through the storm" and "we has announced that
n
group this semester, and all girls daylong inaugural ceremonies at of scholars the caps
cording to the manager
endeavor be reserved for parents of graduat-ishall give no
and gowns and was not displayed.
who are planning to attend are ask- - the University.
our attempt to weather this ins seniors on Field night. May 20
with multicolored hoods and linBefore Governor Johnson pretnis year.
i?d to sign up in the office of the
gale."
Thought Is hmphasued
ings signifying various dergees from sented Dr. Donovan, he declared:
Y. W. C. A secretary before Thurs"It is our determination," Dr.
"In past years the boxes on the
Dr. E. O. Holland, president of various universities. Yet there was a
"I can say to all those assembled
day, according to Mary Rion. presi Washington State College, emphagarments, here and to those in every part of Donovan continued, "to chart a south side of McLean stadium have
sprinkling
of
khaki
dent.
sized it as a necessity for a strong worn by former University of Ken- the state that you, Dr. Donovan, safe course for the University dur- - been reserved for faculty members
educational system in lasting de- tucky faculty men now in the Army, will be loyal to your profession as a ing these evil days. We shall re- - and other friends, but this spring
All members of the Kernrl
mocracy in his address immediby the R. O. T. C. students and teacher, that you will maintain the main essentially an educational in- - parents are to be guests of the Uni- staff are requested to attend
versity and military department.
ately prior to the Donovan in- their instructors.
purposes for which the University stitution."
staff meeting at 3 p m. todav
Objectives Cited
Colonel Brewer said yesterday.
Memorial hall was tilled to capa- - was founded and that you will co- Mary liouise Barton, Falmouth; auguration; Dr. Howard L. Bevis.
two objectives
in the News Room. Those planhe
He cited
Field night exercises are scheduled
Charles V. Shipley, Cecilia; and president ol Ohio State University, city for the inauguration and late operate with all who work for
ning to attend the staff picnic
stood outside on the cam- - ther progress in the commonwealth." thought universities should strive to get under way promptly at 6:30'
Roy M Vance. Padueah ; have been emphasized that niuht at the in- Sunday must attend this
to attain: 1. Producing "social en-- 1 p.m. and will last from two to three
Pledged
named to the Order of Coif, honor- - augural dinner at the Student Union pus and filled the doorways.
Judge Stoll pledged the new gineers" and 2. "Education of a hours. The general public is also
Other students and guests tilled
ary legal fraternity, it, was announ- - building.
'CVrntinnpfJ 0 P.ge FotT
'(.'tnuipte
A!! of .!
pnnc.pi'ls in the in- - he U. K. radio st
.nd the present
ced recent'v.
Jefler-sonvill-

Kvi.

ilmsiu firt:idi'iil of (.wi

ii.i.

j

Ceremony In
Years Is Enough

j

'

PALMORE NAMED

taiht

PRESIDENT OF

j

tv.,

j

ZZ Zl

OVENS SOCIETY
Women's Honorary
Initiates Twenty

e,

tr.

At Annual UanQUei

3500

Senior Fees
Due May

one-thi-

rd

Guignol To Remain
Open This Summer;
Plan Play In July

ATTEND

i

MUSIC FESTIVAL
Band Contest Held
On Stoll Field

I

TOP STANDINGS

!

""f

University
To Honor Lexington
Girl Reserves,

.

I

J

,

Y

TRIMBLE GETS

A

iMADE BY AGR
SAE And Delts
ThirH
Tal

Bortkiewiez will be danced by Elizabeth Lewis.
Another number by the ensemble
will
be
"Temple
Beethoven's
Dances." The Oriental dance is concentric, the knees bend in, the arms
embracing the body, with everything
converging to the center. In direct
contra.' t to this will be the "Indian
Ode." by Mainville. The bodies of
the dancers are extended, the arms
and legs turn outward, all pointing
to the exterior.
Another of MHrDowell's ninoes
Ws(err. Humor." will be presented
by Linda Mills.
,A percussion selection. "Namoluk
Rhythm", will appear as one of the
ensemble numbers.
"Mechanism and Sabotage." writ
ten by Frances Gufley. a University
student, will also be danced by the
ertsemole.
A Spies and Rogers piece. "4 4
for Three, will be given by Sara
Revel Estill. Elizabeth Lewis, and
Charlote Sale. "Myth of the Metals"
written by Spies and Rogers,
will be danced by Sara Revel Estill,
Tlie ensemble will present "Three
Moods and a Theme." by Klemn. A
medley of modern design. "On land,
on sea. and in the air." will be given
by Marie Bracken Letlia Hicks and
Louellen Penn.
.. Grieg's "Dirye oi the Departed"
will appear in all its awe as presented by the ensemble. In the same
type will appear "Lile alter Death."
written by MacDovieli and Deuricii- ODonnell. and danced by Charlotte
Sale.
l.
"Conflicl" by
will bv the last number on the pro

'FEDERAL POST
Political Science
Professor Named

'

V.

7

'

j

Examiner

StoU;'" "7?

-

1

Carnival Draws
Over
Visitors

.r r?

a

newly-forme-

partment.
The program will be divided into
two parts, the first called 'Flights
of the Hemisphere."
the second
"Dance Choreography." The members of the club did the choreography, or arrangement of the dance.
MacDowell's "Spirit of the North"
will be presented by the ensemble,
the arrangement being made by
Margaret Brown and Charlotte Sale.
"Aurora Borealis" written by S.

graai

is

Relations" which will meet in Room
102. White hall each Tuesday and
Thursday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.,
beginning today, according to Prof.
D. V. Terrell, institutional

j

MARJORIE

k.

Modern Dance club will be presented
at 8:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday
at Guignol theater, under the auspices of the physical education de-

Deitnch-OConnel-

ing. Science. Management

Training program
"Personnel and

of

t

The fourth annual recital of the

'

Latest addition to the Engineer- -

The Tenlavique Society of Lamp
and Cross, honorary fraternity for
senior men. held its annual spring
initiation recently at the home of
"enry miienmeyer on tne oeorge-whotown Road.
Those initiated were: J. T. Jack-th- e
son. III. George E. Barker. William
A, Wilson. Brooks M. Coons. James
13. Lail. AJvin L. Chambers.
Jr. and
William P. Wilson, all of Lexington.
Ben H. Lowry. Jr.. Catlettsburg;
Joseph A. Bohnak. Northampton.
Mass.; Robert B. Myers. Paris; Roy
H. Hunt. Vine Grove; Sam C. Mc-C.
Mclvin
Elroy. Morganfield;
Brewer, New Albany. Ind.; James
W. Crowley. Butler; James A. Por- ter. Mansfield. Ohio; Othor R. Shad-wicOwensboro; John R. Casner,
Ft. Thomas; Thomas L. Walker,
Louisville; Marvin L. Akers.
Ind ; Charles R. Steinfort.
Jr.. Covington;
and Gerald J.
Schaffer. Henshaw.
Officers for the past year have
been: Arthur Sanders, president;
William Johnston, first vice president; Bronston H?dmon, second
vice president; Ivan Potts, secretary;
and James Ison, treasurer. Professor Thomas R. Bryant, Director of
Agricultural Extension, is the faculty advisor and Alumnus Counselor
of the Society.
New officers will be elected on
May 14.

The Student Standards committee, composed of the dean of men.
dean of women, one faculty mem
ber. and three students, one of
must be the chairman of
the Judiciary committee, will begin;

DANCE RECITAL

Will Teach New

Relations Course

Plans for investigation of the alleged fraud in the recent SGA
election formed the major portion of
the business session at the first
meeting of the new legislature last
week.

investigation immediately. Scott
Reid. president of the Independent
association was appointed to assist
the group.
Prof. John Horine. of the engineering college, was named as faculty
and
member of the committee,
Henry Bramblet who is chairman
the judiciary committee will fill
one of the student positions. Bram- blet's duty is to appoint the other
student representatives to the standards group.
Marcus Redwine. law college representative to the legislature, asked
that Bramblet appoint non-lamembers to the committee.
This request. Jim Collier. SGA
president, said, was made in order
that the investigation committee
might be kept absolutely impartial.
"We asted that members of the
faculty conduct the investigation,
but they refused on the grounds
that students should solve their own
problems," Collier said. "So we are
anxious that the investigating group
be composed of
and
non-lastudents in order to keep
it as impartial as possible."
During the meeting Elizabeth
Chapman, arts and sciences senior
women's representative, was named
secretary of the legislature, and Jim
Hurt, Independent, was appointed
chairman of the loan committee.
Richard Adams, retiring representative from the graduate school,
addressed the legislature briefly, as
did Collier. The latter outlined a
plan for the organization of a legislative cabinet next year, Tt. will
be composed of the chairmen of the
various committees, whom Collier
asked to be allowed to appoint.

STARTS TODAY
Dr. D. V. Terrell

Vs

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MAY

UK Military Department Plans
To Establish Signal Corps Unit;
Third Of Kind In Americai

K

DEFENSE CLASS

LAMP AND CROSS

To Undertake

Summary Of Cat Sports
Is In "Sporting Way"

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Z2

Committee Named

ON PAGE FOUR- -

'

'

'

i

'Education Must Go On - Otherwise Chaos,'
New President Tells Inaugural Group
nu-luo-

j

Caps, Gowns Available
At Dook Store

-

,

3lOtherS, Daughters
To Attend Luncheon

j

mother-dauchte-

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(Parents To Get

-

At Field
Night Exercises

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half-heart-

Kernel Staff
Meeting Today

Named To Coif

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* im Kesmei'. Sdtfcrticd Pace

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
FfBI-ISHE-

EXCEPT

OF THE UNIVERSITY

NEWSPAPER

OFFICIAL

PFMI WFFTRt.Y DHRINO THE SCHOOL VFAR
HOLIDAYS OR EXAMINATION
PERIODS

PATRICIA SnIDTR

-- MEMBER

Rol'.IRI

Kentucky Press Association
National Editorial Association
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Air Raid Signals Wail
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RllsineSS Manager

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T.e Ker.,e

Mi dill, editor
ni the Chicago Tribune, who had given the
party its name and hail helped l.nuidn
win the presidency, wrote the editorial below.
It was reprinted in the Washington Tinus-Hei-aion Marth 31. 192.
We are printing it in The Kernel because it
seems to fit the present World Men as we 14 us it
fitted the Civil War.
The editorial, whiih was entieled "The Duty
of Xewspapers." follows.)

Ottohci

.1.

I

Wil. Joseph

VICE OF THE PFOPI
The air wardens had moved lf iheir osi in
orderly manner and the first short blasts from
the sirens had already liccn heard. The steam
whistles, which were sounding to augment the
sirens, blended in a note of agony and suffering'
that might fall on the communitv.
I he eneniv was within a few minutes of the
In the distance we could hear the drone of
t it v.
the approaching ImiiiiImts. Filings became confused and reasoning became an arduous lask.
W'e had forgotten our insirut l ions a a depuiv

The country is engaged in a war iimii which
hang momentous consequent es. not alone to our
government considered as an iinjKTsoiiation ol
die nation' dignity and honor hut to even man.
woman and child living heneaih our toimirv's
flag. It is a war lor national existent c. :md lor
individual freedom, and prosjjeritv, and happiness. It tomes lit ime to every man's heart; ii
tout lies him nearly in all the relaiions ol lilt
is a pan ol his dailv thoughts and his set ret
prayers. For the lime il is the universal business.
.
Our interest in it is not less than our
Our feelings arc as vitallv concerned, our
proKTty is as seriously inieriled In wain ol
nw. or complete failure bv and lv. But we
tail not regard ii alone from an individual and
selfish standjxiint. We have duties to the public
which we must distharge.
P.v their own assumptions, or hv (jii.isi jxiptil.ti
tonscni. 'leading and inllueiui.il journals like
tMir own are in some sort regarded as walthinen
tin the walls, to hxk for approach of danger
hev have
toward what their leaders hold dear.
had thrust upon them the dutv. not alwavs
pleasant, of acting as conservators ol the public
good, often at the expense of their private interests. Men look to them not onlv lor fails Inn lor
opinions. They do not often create, but lliev
shajx- and give direction to public sentiment.
1 hev are the narrators of tails, the exponents
of policy, the enemies of wrong.
Their olfice. in time of war. is noi a whit less
lespinsible. ho infinitely more tlelitate. than
in a hti'h1 ol eae. 1 hev deal with cxtiicd
opinion, with passions painfully arousccl. and
with fears thai know no reason. Their duties
aie quadrupled and their liabilities to the public indefiniieiv magnified. On that aidiunt iliev
should not shrink from the rcsjioiisibilitics ol
ilitir (Million. As dangers thicken, their courage
:

neigh-Ui's-

stic-tes-

s

1

-

I

should rise to meet ihem. In avoid expiession
f what high public interests demand, because
of probable offense to this t lass or ihat or because of prosiettive loss ol xace. would be to
t
cowardly abandon dutv and float willi the
safi-tv- .
tif
cui-len-

The Tribune, whatever
its oilier faults, has not that of limidilv. W'e are
not of ihose who believe thai. l)ccause the country is in danger and all private interests arc
iliicaiened. or because military jxiwer overrides
i lie tivil law. ii
is the province of journalism of
i he better son to keep silence when incompeien-cundertakes the management of public affairs,
or hold iis eate when unblushing rascality under the guise of patriotism is doing its deadly
work.
W'e know ol no reason that exempts the
man from criticism and. if necessary, vigorous denunciation, that dins not apply to the
civil servant in public life. There is nolhing
spec ially sacred in epaulets tho worn by a popular idol. On the contrary, we hold il to be a
dutv to denounce all who stand in the wav of
the triumph of the good cause, and il matteis
little to us whether those impede it are of our
own laiih and party or belong avowedly to the
cneniv. The salelv and the honor of the iiitin-- i
i v ai slake, and the
eril is greater todav from
certain ol our friends than from Beauregard
and Davis.
Ii would le as recreant and cowardly not to
sK-aout plainly as on the field of battle to refuse to fire ai the foe. The country, we say. is in
danger. Its salvation is the f