xt71ns0kt93x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71ns0kt93x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19360506  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May  6, 1936 text The Kentucky Kernel, May  6, 1936 1936 2013 true xt71ns0kt93x section xt71ns0kt93x Best Copy Available

SEMI-WEEKL-

Y

KERNEL

UNIVERSITY
I.F.XIM. ION.

VOL. XXVI.

1936

KYIAN

Change In Name 'CAT

TO

New Tide,
Women

Women, Thoroughbreds,
eps, Colonels, Pioneers, Tobacco Are Featured
in Yearbook

of

"Association

Students,"

cludes

Jul-

AH

features and their arrangement
lake It one of the most distinctive
books put out In the past few years
yearbook
contains
The
pictures of social, professional and
honorary fraternities and sororities
of the campus, activities and sports,
scenes of the campus and Junior
and senior Individual pictures. The
fraternity section Included pictures of house mothers and houses
of fraternities and sororities. Fifteen pages of student snapshots
and campus scenes are also includ-

Courses To Re Offered Public
Health Officers and Nurses
At Regular Summer Session
The University will sponsor again

this summer at the regular summer
school session, the fourth annual
school for public health officers.
Enrollment will open June 15, and
classes will last for seven weeks,

ed.

followed by five weeks In field
work in keeping with the requirements of the United State public
health service.
Prominent public health, men
who will serve on the teaching staff
are: Dr. H. S. Mustard and Dr.
J. L. Reed, Baltimore, both members of the Johns Hopkins University school of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Mustard will offer
two courses to the health officers;
Diseases,"
"Communicable
and
"Health Administration," and Dr.
Reed will teach a course in
course
Dr. Reed's
will
continue through four weeks and
Dr. Mustard's through six weeks.
The health officers will have their
field work in the counties of Fayette, Scott, Madison, Mason and
Anderson, where each of the health
officers of the respective
counties
have had at least one year of postgraduate work at Johns Hopkins or
Harvard university.
At the same time the school for
public health nurses and sanitary
inspectors will be held at the University, with a specially
trained
staff. The requirements in the
course for public health nurses and
sanitary Inspectors will be the five
weeks' courses of academic
work
and seven weeks in the field. Those
who will teach courses to the nurses are: Miss Charlotte Pitman, Dr.
Robert Griffin, Dr. J. S. Chambers,
Dr. Henry Beaumont,
assistant who will serve as director of the
professor of psychology, has been school. Miss Reba Harris, and Dr.
granted a leave of absence for the Charles D. Caywood.
remainder of the semester. On
Saturday, a cablegram Informed
him of the critical illness of his
mother, Mrs. Y. van der Veen, in
the Hague, Netherlands.
Dr. and Mrs. Beaumont will leave
Lexington Wednesday to sail on the New Officers To Be Installed;
'Herengaria" on Friday. They plan
Advisory Hoard Named ;
to return during the latter part of
Key To He Awarded
summer.
the
"Blo-statics- ."

I

editor-i-

n-chief

Beaumont Granted
Leave Of Absence

Final "Y" Banquet
To Be Held Tonight

The filial "Y" Banquet of
FORMER KYIAN EDITOR
(chool year will be held at the
GETS NEWSPAPER JOR alry Baptist church, Tuesday,
6,

at 6 o'clock.
The program

the
Cav-

Mav

The condition of James Stephens,
junior in the College of Agriculture, who was Injured Sunday evening when the car in which he was
riding collided with another automobile on the Hurrodsburg pike,

two miles south of Lexington, was
reported as improved yesterday by
attaches of the Good Samaritan
hospital, where he was taken after
the accident.
Stephens sustained a broken collar bone and lacerations about the
face. Jack Carty, Junior in the
College of Agriculture, was driving
the car when it collided with a
oar driven by James Pyles. 252 W.
Main street.
Neither Curty nor
Pyles were injured.

ALPHA ZETA ELECTS
OFFICERS AT MEETING
Alplui Zet.i, honorary agriculturfor
al fraternity, elected officers
the ensuing year. They are: Charlie Dixon, Hullie, chancellor;
Jus.
Stevens,
Indeieiidence, censor;
Ctiarlus Barrett, of Sacramento,
jcrlbe; P. M. McOoldnck, Lexing-k- i,
treasurer;
Biukley,
Harold
Pulton, chronicler;
David Pettut,
Stanford, guide, and Prof. Dana
Card, faculty advlaer.

Senior Dues Must
Be In For Kyian

MAY

.

Classes Ending in "I," "6,"
Cla.su of Ml Will He
Honored

Rogan Surprises With
Win Over
Pick

The tentative plans for Class Reunions to be held in connection
with the Alumni day celebrations
by the
have Just been released
Alumni office. The celebrations
will be held on Thursfor alumni
day, June 4, and Friday,
June S,
Robert 8alyers, head of the Alumni offices announced yesterday.
Reunions will be held this year
for classes ending in "1" and "6"
1934. Special
of
and the class
will be
luncheons and meetings
held for these classes while they
are on the university campus.
The feature of the program for
Alumni is the
annual banquet
which will be held Thursday night,
June 4, at the Lafayette hotel. Governor A. B. Chandler, an alumnus
of the university, will make
the
principal address, and a special entertainment feature which will be
prepared by Miss Helen King and
Mr. E. O. Sulzer of the university
publicity department will be presented.
The registration for all alumni
will be held at the Alumni office
from 9 until 12 a. m. Thursday. At
10:30 a. m. the group will attend
the class day exercises and at 12:30
p. m. the Reunion class luncheons
will be held. The alumni will go
to the baccalaureate exercises at 3

KENTUCKY FRESHMEN
ARE VICTORIOUS

75-4- 7

Yearlings Take Eight Firsts;
Rankin, Spivey Make
13, 11 Points
The University of Tennessee
amassed an early lead to down the
Wildcats 66 to 51, in the dual track
meet held Saturday at Knoxvllle.
Although Tennessee won, it's triumph was completely overshadow
ed as a result of the performances
of Kentucky's, "Iron Man," Dave
freshmen
Rogan. The Kentucky
took part of the sting out of the
varsity's defeat by routing Tennessee's freshmen,
Rogan entered and won his us
ual mile and two mile events; but
as a surprise to the spectators he
turned In another victory over
Tennessee's highly touted Pick, to
run in record
win the
time. Kentucky was handicapped
by the loss of Stanley Nevers, shot
and discus man and Steckmest,
half miler. Nevers was confined
to his hotel room by sickness and
Steckmest's leg was Injured in the
work-opractice
held Friday.
out
With these sure point-getteof the meet, Kentucky still gave
the Knoxvllle boys a hard battle.
Ben Willis was the Wildcat high
880-ya- rd

p. m. and
well Place

ut

then attend a tea at

Max-

at 4:30 p. m. At 7 o'clock
they will attend the annual banquet for alumni.
Friday, the group will go to the
point man as he garnered three commencement exercises at 10 a. m.
firsts and one second for a total and at noon they will attend a
At 1:30
of 18 points. Willis was defeated special alumni luncheon.
rd
dash by Anderson, p. m. the annual meeting of the
in the
Tennessee's star sprinter. Ander- Alumni association will be held.
son was clocked at 9.6 seconds in
the hundred to set a new school
record.
Varsity
100 yard dash Anderson
(T);
Willis (K); time, 9.6.
220
yard dash Willis (K);
Campbell (K); time, 23.
440 yard run Pick (T): Miller,
Other Appointments To Law
(K); time. 50.4.
Journal Staff Announced
880 yard run Rogan (K) ; Pick
(T); time, 1:56.2.
By Professor
Hill-ar- d
One mile run Rogan K);
Moreland
K); time, 4:34.
(K) ; HanTwo mile run Rogan
John L. Davis has been appointed
sard (T); time, 10:01.4.
of the
student editor for 1936-120 yard high
hurdles Willis Kentucky Law Journal, the official
15.4.
(K); Blackburn (T); time,
publication of the State Bar as220 yard low hurdles Willis(K) ; sociation, it was announced today
Blackburn T); time, 24.2.
by the College of Law. Davis is
Pole vault Creswell
(T); Hay from Paris and is a second year
(K); 11 feet.
law student at the University.
Shotput Anderson (T) ; DoughBert Combs. Manchester, is manerty (T) ; 142 feet, 11 inches.
aging editor; Emerson Salisbury,
(T) ; Charleston, W. Va., business manThrow Anderson
Discus
Dougherty (T); 128 feet, 10 Inch- ager, and Charles Tlgnor, Hind-ma- n,
circulation manager.
es.
Other
Javelin Simpson (K) ; Jeffries students on the staff are Joseph
Freeland. Paducah, and Dorothy
(T); 170 feet, 3 inches.
High Jump Carlisle (K) and B. Salmon, Paducah.
Appointments to this staff and
Anderson (T), tied for first, 5 ft.,
to the Order of the Coif are among
8 inches.
highest) honors to
Broad Jump B. Anderson T); thethe College of Law. be obtained
In
Blackburn (T); 21 feet, 6 inches.
Other students who make a
Mile relay Tennessee (Campbell.
standing of two for the present seDuren, Sledge, Pick); 3:28.6.
mester will be added to the staff.
Freshmen
Prof. Roy Moreland Is the fac100
yard dash Rankin (K); ulty editor of the publication.
Henry (T); time, 10.6.
220
yard dash Rankin (K); PROFESSOR KNIGHT
Henry (T); time, 23.2.
WINS RECOGNITION
440 yard run Plunkett (T) ;
K); time, 52.5.
Prof. Grant C. Knight of the Dea
880 yard run Ward T);
partment of English of the Uni(K); time, 2:12.6.
versity has won European recogniOne mile run Ward (T); Dur-bl- n tion by his book, "James Lane Al(K); time, 4:43.8.
len and the Genteel Tradition,"
Two mile run Wright T) ; Dur-bl- n which was published by the Univer11.
(K); time.
sity of North Carolina press.
120 high
hurdles Doyle
K);
The literary supplement of the
Spivey (K); time. 17.4.
London Times recently carried a
220 low hurdles Herring
review of Professor
(T);
Rankin (K); time, 27.2.
Knight's book. "As a biographer,"
Discus Spivey K); Hall (T); commented the Times, "Professor
119 feet, 9 Inches.
Knight is careful, candid and sensi(Continued on' Page Four)
ble."
rs

100-ya-

DAVIS

AM)

2 P. M.,

EDITS

LAW JOURNAL

37

!

Rel-ye-

two-colu-

'LOHENGRIN' TO
BE RENDERED BY

WOFM. I)

AFFAIRS

THl'RSDAY

before him.
The plot, typical in every way,
concerns the rich Courtlund family,
their daughter Laura, and her ardent lover. Ray Trafford. When
Ray discovers that his beloved is
not really a lady of line birth, but
a street waif picked up by the
Courtlands and brought up as
their daughter, the plot begins to
thicken. Trafford learns about this
through a lowly sneuk named Byke.
who claims that Laura Is his
Believing it to be true,
daughter.
he renounces lus relations with
Laura, In a note.
However, while writing the note,
he is forced to hide it when Laura
apiiears. The note is found by a
group of ladies at a ball, and the
terrible facts become generally
known. Laura, disgraced, flees and
hides in a tenement cellar where
she tries to find work. Here Byke,
always on the lookout, finds her
'

...

:

..

f

IS PART OF LOCAL

MUSIC WEEK PROGRAM

Chorales From Meistersinger,

Tannhauser Will Also
He Presented

'w

In observance of National Music
Week the Music department of the
University will present Richard
tonight at
Wagner's "Lohengrin"
with
8 o'clock in Memorial hall,
the men's and women's glee clubs,
and the University Symphony orof
chestra, under the direction
Prof. C. A. Lampert, participating.
Mrs. J. P. Johnston, soprano,
will be the soloist, and Mr. John
Toohey, organist.
In addition to "Lohengrin," the
ensemble will present the chorale,
"Awake! The Dawn is Near," from
the Meistersinger, and the "Pilgrim's Chorus," from Tannhauser.
The prelude to Act I of the Choral Fantasia from Lohengrin was
scored by Lee Crook, Junior in the
Music department.
This presentation was scheduled
earlier in the semester but was
postponed until tonight,
because
of conflicting campus activities.
Every year the Music department
presents a program by the combined glee clubs and the orchestra.
Last year Barre Hill was featured
In the
"Elijah" which
was given in the gymnasium during
High School week.
The program for tonight follows:
Chorale "Awake! The Dawn is
Near." The Meistersinger.
Pilgrims' Chorus Tannhauser.
Choral Fantasia Lohengrin.
Prelude to Act I.
Preparation for the Tournament.
Elsa's Dream.
well-kno-

"J

-

X
:

ASSEMBLY

Slahr. Kerr Are Recipients;

Elvis J. Stahr, Hickman, senior in
the College of Arts and Sciences,
and Frances Kerr, Lexington, sen"
- 7A
.
'
ill ior
?
in the College of Arts and Sciences, were awarded the Sullivan
Medallions at the annual May Day
GOV. A. a CHANDLER
convocation Friday morning In the
Training school auditorium.
Dean W. 8. Taylor, of the College of Education, presided at the
convocation In the absence of President McVey who was in Florida on
a speaking engagement.
Dean T.
T. Jones awarded the medallion to
Mr. Stahr and Dean Sarah B landing to Miss Kerr.
Banquet, Reception, Dance Pledging exercises for Mortar
Board, honorary women's society:
on Program as State DeleLamp and Cross, honorary fratergates Meet
nity for men, and Cwens, honorary
sophomore organization for women,
Final arrangements were made were also held at the convocation.
last night for the University Young The following new members of MorDemocratic club banquet, dance and tar Board were tapped: Helen Farreception to be given in honor of mer, Lexington; Sara Louise Cun-dlf- f,
Governor Chandler and the State
Somerset;
Nell Nevins, LexDemocratic clubs as they convene ington; Theo Nadelstein, New York
McVey hall at 6:30 o'clock
in
City; Dorothy Whalen, Lexington;
Thursday night.
Betty Earle, Urbana, Ohio; VirginReservations have been made for ia Robinson, Lexington; Mary Rees
guests.
more than 100 distinguished
Nell Shearer,
Among those to be present are Land, Lexington;
Whs-le- y,
Lieut. - Gov. Lexington; Margaret Lewis
Governor Chandler,
Flemingsburg,
and Camilla
Keen Johnson, Pres. Frank L. Mc-

Young Democrats
Meet Tonight To
Honor Chandler

193 6 TESTS

Outstanding honors in characterization go easily to Jack Nelson as
Ray Trafford. Barbara Smith as
Laura Courtlund. and Mary Armstrong Elliott as Pearl Courtlund
The true melodramatic touch which
each of this trio give to their part
provides the greatest fun of the
pluy, and the other characters
seem to revolve about them. Walter Kirk putrick as Byke, the villain, does a good piece of work,
sneaking
making the supposedly
villain a truly amusing character.
In true following with the melodrama, the play contains many
minor characters, several of whom
play two and sometimes three
on Page Three)

GIVEN AT MAY

Triangle, Pi Kappa Alpha, Independents, Delta Zeta
Receive Float Prizes

Science Academy
Will Meet Friday

ment.

NO. V.

HONORARIES HOLD.
PLEDGING EXERCISES

DATE IS GIVEN

and drags her into Tombs police
court, charging that he is her father and should be given custody of
her
The subsequent chain of events
which lead Laura finally out of this
dreadful situation to a happy reunion with her lover and complete
detent of the treacherous Byke provides a rioutous climax that keeps
one in suspense until the last mo-

S

Dean Taylor Presides In
Absence Of President
Frank McVey

Vey. Thomas M. Logan, president
of Young Democratic clubs in Kentucky; John Dugan and Mrs. Sam
Conner of the National Committee, committee of welfare; Frederick A. Wallls, Secretary of State;
Charles D. Arnett, Clerk of the
K.
Charles
Court of Appeals;
The Tournament.
O'Connell, and presidents of the
Wedding March.
College Young Democratic clubs
Festival.
of the state. G. D. Kincaid, president of the University Young Democratic club, is n charge of arrangements for the banquet and
will act as toastmaster.
Hon. Alfred E. A. Hudson, of
London, England, and Goldsboro.
N. C, will be the guest speaker of
the evening. Mr. Hudson In his
May 9 Announced As Date travels has seen much evidence of
For High School Achieve- the cooperation and the unity prevailing among the thousands of
ment Tests Sponsored By Young Democratic clubs that he
has had the occasion to come In
Extension Department
contact with. The theme of his
Kentucky Interscholastlc talk will be "The Beneficial InterThe
league high school achievement ests of Our Nation As Derived from
tests, sponsored by the University the New Deal Program."
Department of Extension, will be
held on Saturday, May 9. beginning
at 10 a. m. Copies of the tests are
available to all high schools which
are registered with the Department of Extension as members of
the Kentucky Interscholastic league. U. K. To Have. RepresentaThe tests for 1936 will bo: given
tives At Rowling Creen
in the following subjects: English,
Session
literature. American history, world
history, civics, general science, bitwenty-thi- rd
ology, physics, chemistry, elemenannual meeting
The
tary and second year algebra, plane of the Kentucky Academy of
geometry, general scholarship, ac- Science will be held at the Western
counting,
shorthand, typewriting State Teachers' college at Bowling
and home economics.
May
Green, beginning on Friday,
All papers will be sent to the De8, and continuing through Saturpartment of Bxtension for grading day, May 9. Several representaand correction. The only awards tives of the University of Kenwill be the lithographed certificates tucky are scheduled to speak.
given to the pupils who rank in
The purpose of the Kentucky
the highest tenth of all those in Academy
of Science is to encourage
the state taking the test. Only one
Investigation
problems
pupil from each school Is eligible to scientific
pertaining to the economic develtake a test in any one subject.
opment of the State's natural resources, to promote the discussion
THETA SIGMA PHI TO MEET
There will be a meeting of Theta of useful knowledge through the
Sigma Phi, at 4 p. m. Wednesday, publication of its transactions, and
In the Woman's building. Officers to unify the efforts of the scientific talent in the state.
will be elected
Representatives from the University division of biological sciences
will be R. H. Weaver, M. Scherago,
J. L. Stokes, H. A.
Raidt. R. P.
Kerr. W Lowenthul. J. W. Lancaster, T. C. Sherwood. A. Biend, E.
A. Roper, and L. M. Bowers

FOR

SKRII

I

DAY

t

V

HIGH HONORS ARE

SPEAK Eft
,

i
Combined Glee Clubs, Symphony To Give Presentation Tonight In
Memorial Hall

"Under the Gas Lights" Presented with
All Pomp, Vigor of Gay Nineties Drammer
think he were really sitting "under
the gas lights." watching the fiendish plans of the villain, the coquetry of the ladies, and the heroic accomplishments of the hero unfold

M

I'.VM

Released By Office U. K. MUSICIANS

SCORE

1

will consist of an
address by Dean Taylor on "The
Professor's Attitude Toward
the
Student." Elvis Stahr will respond
with "The Students Attitude Toward the Professor." After that
the Y key will be presented to the
person who has rendered outstanding service. The new officers will
also be Installed. They are: Don
Riester, president; Billie Leet.
Mark Marlowe, Secretary; Bob Freeberg, treasurer.
The new advisory board consists
of: Bob Freeberg, James I. Stephens, John Holmes, Frank Ellis. Don
Riester, Mark Marlowe, Dr. W. L,
Roberts, Dr. E. Z. Palmer, and Dr.
By DAVE SALYEKS
O. T Koppius
Bringing to the legitimate stage
Special music will be furnished
and tickets are 25 cents and may anew the glory of "gay nineties"
be obtained at the Y office or at melodrama, with its prologues, epilogue, its dramatic and soulful
the banquet.
gestures, its "between the act" specialty numbers,
its luvishness of
PAKIS TEACHERS HEAR HOSS
costumes and simpleness of scenery.
Guignol players last night opened
Dr. C. C. Ross, head of the Department of Psychology in the Col- a week's run of "Under the Gas
lege of Education,
spoke to the Lights," by Augustin Duly, an exParts county teachers lust Satur- citing melodrama first produced
in the "guy nineties" in New York,
day, May 2. on the subject, "Teiu-h-luwith an attention to detail and a
Pupils How to Study."
satisfying completeness that would
do credit to any professional company.
Frank Fowler left no
Director
stone unturned in making sure that
the production would enirege with
all the trappings of the true melodrama. Tiie painted backdrops, the
greatly overacted characterizations
All seniors must
have paid
of the players, the flowery costumes,
their senior fee of $10 and prethe blowing of the whistle which
sent receipt before they may obbrought the players into action
tain their Kentuckian Wednesfrom the "pose" with which every
day, James Bersot, business
scene opened; even the plot ltsell
manager of the yearbook, has
served to take one completely back
announced.
to the closing years of the nineteenth century and make him
nt;

Reported Improving

66-5-

75-4- 7.

HEALTHJCHOOL

288-pa- ge

BY

Willis Leads Wildcat Scorers;

U,K. TO SPONSOR

Injured Student

TRACKMEN Tentative Plans For

In-

Women

The name of the Women's
association was cl ng-r- d
to the Association of Women
Students (A. W. S.) by members
of the organization who voted on
SNAPSHOTS
STUDENT
the change Friday.
Since the new name Included all
TAKE UP 15 PAGES
women on the campus and not Just
residence halls and
Fraternity Section Includes those who live in it was felt advisaRorority houses,
Pictures of Housemothers
ble to offer the opportunity of getting a new name to members of
and Houses
the organization.
organizations
on the
Similar
The 1B36 Kentuckian is due to
strive today from the binders and campuses throughout the country
will be put on sale Wednesday have already changed from the W.
A.
naming la the University postoff-l- e, S. O. A. to the not W. S since the
as restrictive as
James Bersot, business manag- latter name la
other.
the
er, announced yesterday.
Six Kentucky traditions, beautiful women, thoroughbreds, mint Juleps, Kentucky Colonels, pioneers,
and burley tobacco are featured In
the new yearbook. The choice of

Basil Baker, Georgetown, senior
in the college of Arts and Sciences,
ha.T accepted a position with the
Middlesboro Daily News.
While In college he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha, Omicron
Delta Kappa, editor of the Kentuckian for the pasc year, associate editor of the Kernel, member
at Scabbard and Blade, member
of the Y. M. C. A. and of Strollers.

ICKV IlIsDAY.

Co-ed-

AT POST OFFICE

The publishing of a Kentuckian
is the result of months of careful
work. Each spring, the Board of
Student Publications awards the
various contracts for the next
year's book and appoints the editor and business
manager.
In
September the different editors ot
the various departments are assigned and given their duties. Taking of Individual pictures, sorting
and cutting them to fit is the first
Job to be worked on, and this is
usually finished during the closing
days of the first semester. Lists
of names are copied, carefully
checked to avoid mi spelling or
placing of wrong
names under
wrong pictures. All copy is then
sent to the printer, proofs are made
and returned to the editor, who examines the stories,
pictures
and
names for possible
errors. The
opt Is then sent back to the nrint.
r. who makea the nnvMnr
rectlon8, and begins to run off the
specified number of copies. The
final step is sending of the books
to the binders, after which they
are put on sale.
,
Bazil Baker, senior in the Ool-- ke
of Arts and Sciences, is
of the 1936 Kentuckian.

KKN I

YOUTH

KENTUCKY

OF

Of W.S.G.A. Is
LOSE TO VOLS Class Reunions Are
s
Voted by

BE SOLD MAY 6

SYMPOSIUM

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION

STAIIK APPEARS IN MAGAZINE
The photograph of Elvis J. Stahr.
University of Kentucky seniur and
Rhodes Scholarship
winner, recently appeared In the April, 1936
edition of the Bantu's Greek Exchange, In connection with an article on the Rhodes Scholarship
winners of the United States.

Hop
To Be On Friday

All-Camp-

us

There will be an
dance on Friday evening in the
Alumni gym. with Shinny
und his orchestra supplying the music. The dance
will last, from 8 until 10: JO p. in
and the admission price will be
twenty-fiv- e
cents per couple.
Tins is the next to the last
dance of the year.
The last will be held on Saturday. May 1. from 6 until Vi at
will
which Tommy Marshull
furnish the music.
tlcr-ringl-

Hedges, Morganfleld.
Cwens, honorary sophomore organization for women, pledged the
following: Frances Young, Frankfort; Catherine Crouse, Lexington;
Helen Ralston, Lexington; Mary A.
tt,
Stilz, Lexington; Elizabeth R.
Danville;
Grace Silverman,
New York City; Carolyn Sigler,
Morganfleld; Sue D. Sparks, . Lexington, Roberta Wilson, Somerset:
Margaret Stewart, Lexington; Dorothy Clements, Lexington; jAn
Abel, Lexington; Mary Jane Roby,
Lexington; Leslie Lee Jones, Grayson; Joan Brettschneider, Covington, and Ruth Johnson, Birmingham, Ala.
Lamp and Cross, senior men's
honorary, announced the following
pledges: Dick Butler, Lexington:
Wilgus Broffitt, Lexington; George
Kurtz, Lancaster; Lloyd Hankins,
Constance; Charles Graves,
Tommy Atkins, Hopklnsr-villLabe Jackson, Eminence; J.
E. Klser. Covington; James Barton,
Lexington; John Traynor, Lexington: Everett Metcalf, Louisville;
Wallace Briggs. Covington; GranJames
ville Byrne, Brooksville;
Hagler, St. Paul, Minn., and Dave
Flanders. Battle Creek, Mich. Lamp
and Cross also presented its plaque,
awarded annually to the most
on Page Four)
TU-lc-

Camp-bellsvil-

le;

e:

Kampus
Kernels
There will be an important meeting of the Society Staff at 1 p. m.
today in the Kernel office. All
those not present, unless previously
excused by the editor, will lose their
places.
The library of the YWCA will
close next Tuesday, May 12. It is
requested that all books checked
out before that date be returned
by the following Tuesday, May 19.
Members of the Pitkin club will
meet for the hayride at Maxwell
Presbyterian Church ut 5 p. m. Friday, May 8.

There will be a short business
sod
meeting of the Pryor
ciety on Wednesday afternoon. May
6. in room 207 of tiie Science building. Candidates will be nominated
for the ll)3(i 37 offices.
Pre-Me-

There will be a Flench talking
at
picture, tilled "La Maternelle"
the Ben Ali Theatre, Saturday.
May 10. Th.' feature begins at Hi
a. m.

The International Relations club
meet at 4 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon In the Administration
building.
Dr. Schick of the Department ot Romance languages,
will speak.
will

The hay ride for members of the
Pitkin club will leave the Maxwell
Street Presbyterian church at 5:30
p. m. Friday

Time shots for all student
workuig under the National Youth
Admuiistrutlon will be due at the
oltices of the Dean of Men and
the Dean of Women by Tuesday.
May 12

* Best Copy
pgc Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
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M. Si'KN:iR
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Ross J. Cmri

Managing Editor

in

MERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL

STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN
ASSOCIATE EWTORS
Tom Atlcln

SorlfTT

AMT.

SPimTfi

Kllrntwth

KTTOB

AMRTAKT

FrTnir

John Christie?

Theo N1Htom

BMtfEnrle

Krwl

Elmnor Randolph

floOFTT EotTnH

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Frank Burger

Odls Lr

Entron

FATttlt

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ElHTOH

Joe Qulnn

Eorroa
WRITERS
Mini Lancaster

Bobby Evans

Billy Evmn

ASSISTANT NBWS EDITORS

Raymond Lathrem

C. T. Hertsae h
REPORTERS

Betty Murphy
Marlnrlf Reter
Thomas Humhla
otn Harrm

Connie Blbee
Orar Winner
Willi Jonaa

Herman Dotaon
.lnhn Mnntan
Oraee Silverman

Andre?

Katherine

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BUSINESS STAFF

-

PENN

r"orster

Arthur Doton
Carl CamenUeh
Robert Rankin
Bidnry Buckley

Ctiff Bhaw

IKE M MOORE
Al, VOOFX, EDOAR
NFVILI.E TATOM

-

.

THE ALLEGIANCE

Business Manager
AdvertislnR
Circulation Manager

LAWS

However, college is Mippewd to be an insti
union in which young eople are taught to
iliink for themselves, to express their own opin
ions, and to develop individuality.
Heme, there aie frequently insiuiclots with
whom we would enjoy a shoit chit in the ptiv
iiey of an olfice, merely lor die sake of coming
into closer tont.Kt with that person. Just as we
make fiiends among the eople of our own age.
so woiihl we like to do the same occasionally
with older jhtsohs, and not with a view of trying to get a grade.
I he ililfieulty lies in
lie fad that although
(his is given a trial on a purely fair basis, the
students' idea is usually misunderstood by
except himself. Leaving the professor's,
ollice, he has mental pictures of a disdainful and
a "Well I'm glad 'that's over" look on the face
of the K'ison within. Met by a classmate who
says. "Ah, ha. dirty noisin'l" he comes to the
conclusion that fuither visits are futile.
Cannot professors receive such meetings in
the spirit in whirh they arc meant and not with
a suspic ious gleam of the eye?
In return we believe students will arrord them
the corresxnding courtesy of not playing upon
their good graces, hut will attain a higher opinion of them as a result of the more democratic
altitude with which thev were met.

Cuttlv

Up

The Campus

with "Scoop"

It is indeed fortunate for the University and
it her State educational institutions that the
General Assembly has seen fit to "snub" any
move toward making of the "I Pledge Allegiance" laws a requirement for teachers and students in this state.
The utter incongruity of forcing college professors to take these oaths has certainly been
sufficiently demonstrated in eastern cities to
prove that it is a worthless practice, too childish
for even the slightest consideration from the
mature and intelligent minds of the majority of
our professors.
It seems ridiculous to Iielicve that the mere
taking of an oath would thereby automatically
hange a h.tsoii of Socialistic instincts into one
of a conservative nature. The watchword of
many radical organizations is "Iloic from Within" and under the protection of such an oath,
the liberal coidd more easily expound his dogma.
Naturally, we do not want teachers who
Communism on the immature and
brains of the young collegian. The way
10 avoid this, however, is not to be found in required oaths of allegiance. Every person goes
through a period in which socialistic theories
become very ap'iealing, and he is the better for
it when the idea passes. Hence, such procedures
as taking an oath would tend to draw the student t loser to the liberalism which the Allegiance laws attempt to control.
It has been humorously written that the
of such a law might lead the way toward a furtherance of this practice whereby one
would lie forced to make an oath of allegiance
lie (ore he could be married or execute a contract. A year or two ago, the statement that a
college professor would be required to pledge
allegiance would have seemed just as ridiculous
as the above statement appears to us today. It
merely proves conclusively the utter worthless-ncs- s
of the allegiance laws.
It must have been the brain child of some
litician with a highly distorted idea of creating patriotism. When a man loves and respects
his country he does not have to be coerced into
an ostentatious display of it. On the other
hand, if he does not resect the laws of the land,
such
i lie mere taking of an oath will not create
im-pie-

half-forme- d

a

Tnesel.iy, Nfay f lOIrt

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

iesjc(t.

For just this reason the esteemed eastern educators who so strenuously objected to be forced
to take the oaths were mostly men of
conservatism. Teachers who obviously leaned
toward Communism or some other 'ism, preset ved a
jicacc.
Outtioppings of Communistic teaching have
Urn negligible at Kentucky. If such doctrines
have been presented, it has been done with the
idea of giving the student a
jxiint
view and not of converting him to the other
cause. It seems to The Kernel that Communism
and Socialism lost, a round by virtue of the Assembly's failure to consider these allegiance
oaths.
well-know-

well-rounde-

Al'l'l.E POLISHERS
I'd students who have a genuine desiie to
accomplish the work set forth for them by University piofessois the
pi ac lice of "apple
jiolishiiig" or "cliily nosing" is as obnoxious as
it is to the instiuctois theuTselves.
I liis is ceitaiuly most unethical, since it is
oltcn used as an unfair advantage ovei the less
foiward type of students. Professors aie even
at limes deceived by it and thus it achieves its
pin xse.
The instances in which they are not in the
least fooled by it aie much more numeious.
One who has sat hcfoie huudieds of students
vear after year can scaicely avoid kee