xt71ns0kt98v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71ns0kt98v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581125  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 25, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 25, 1958 1958 2013 true xt71ns0kt98v section xt71ns0kt98v Thanksgiving Observed On Varied Dates
By FRANKIE SHARP
Associated Tress Newsfcaturcs Writer
The late president Franklin D. Roosevelt sparked a thundering
row In 1939 when he proclaimed Thanksgiving Day for the third Thursday in November.
"Thanfcfgiving has always been on the last Thursday in November."
maintained the irate traditionalists. The chorus grew so loud that in
1931, Ccn press passed a Joint
Since the first Pilgrim feast in
resolution declaring that Thanks- - 1G21, Thanksgiving has been
should fall on the fourth ding around like a ball of butter
Thursday in November.
on a hot skillet and once it dis- Thanksgiving hasn't always appeared entirely for 47 years,
But
been on the last Thursday in No- The Pilgrims themselves skipped
vember it hasn't always been in their own day in 1G22 the harvest
November and a few times it hasn't was very poor and they didn't feel
even been cn Thursday.
they had much to give thanks for.
skid-givi-

iv V 'ih

in July. The Thanksgiving custom
gradually spread through the New
England towns and states. The
Thanksgiving was
first nation-wid- e
declared in 1777 by the Continental
Congress.

There was one every year until
then the custom died for
six years. After the states reorganized into the present union.
Congress decided to revive Thanksgiving and asked George Washington to proclaim a Thanksgiving
1783,

Day.

The vote was over the bitter opposition of a suspicious-mu.v'.r- d
gentleman from South Carolina.
Thomas Tudor Tucker.
"Why should the President tell
the people how to do something
they mieht not have a mind to
do?" demanded Tucker.
"How do we know the people
are thankful for a Constitution
that hasn't been tried out very
long? We do not yet know but
they may have reason to be dissatisfied with the effects it has
already produced."
Nevertheless. Thanksgiving Day
was proclaimed in 178!) by Presi

dent Washington and popped up
irregularly for the next 70 year
Thomas Jefferson was a strict
man. feeling It
was a "monarchical" practice. Put
other presidents took more kindly
to the idea.
ing
The New England Thank-cbeen a fall celebration, but
had
presidents proclaimed national
Thanksgiving Days in hop .scotch
patterns.
There are only three months
that haven't had Thunki in
Days: March. June, and Ovtober.
President James Madison
On race 1C.
ng

i

--

pro-Continu- ed

'

i

I

ng

The Pilgrims reinstated Thanksgiving in 1623 but it wasn't always
in the fall. Once they gave thank

I

j

IEIB-IE- K

2

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Vol. L

LmtJLA 1

SENr.

ym

..

PAUL DOUGLAS

Miwmii

.if,,,.

KENNETH CRAWFORD

SW

LEXINGTON, KY., TUESDAY NOV.

No. :7

l!l."8

LV,

Football Team Re j ects
Bine. Grass Bowl Bid.
The University loothall team

:

"

-

,(

Cuts Rule Is Dropped

4

Jy

.....

J

A

-

r
JOHN METCALFE

FRANK IIOLEMAN

"Break The Hews" Panel

Sen. Paul Douglas

and three Washington newsmen
Kenneth Crawford, John Metcalfe and Frank Holeman will appear,
cn a "Break the News" panel at 8:15 tonight in Memorial Coliseum.
Ihe program is part of the concert and lecture series.
(D-Ill-

The ruling adding one hour
and one quality point to graduation requirements for class cuts
immediately before ' and after
holidays has been dropped.
The ruling is not among- the
new set of rules adopted Wednesday by the University Faculty.
A
faculty
spokesman said
yesterday that the ruling was
dropped because it was felt class
attendance on these days before
and after vacations should be a
matter of personal responsibility.

.)

Dickey Says:

Governor Didn't Know
About Faculty Decision
Gov. A. 11. Chandler was unaware oi the University Facul
ty s decision
not to dismiss
classes when he proclaimed
tomorrow a state holiday, President Frank. G. Dickev said Sun- day.
; The governor's announcement of
4

did not pertain especially to UK.
means that
The proclamation
all state offices, including those at
University,
the
will be closed
Wednesday and Thursday. They
will reopen again Friday. University students will be free to leave
campus after their last class today.
Classes will be resumed at 8 a. m.
Monday.

his intention to proclaim the holiday came immediately after Saturday's 2 win over Tennessee in
Nominations
Knoxville. It later was released as
an official proclamation from the
Nominations for "Man and
Woman of the Month" for Nogovernor's office in Frankfort.
President Dickey said he had vember must be brought to Room
122, SUB by 5 p. m. Dec. 1.
talked to the governor Sunday concerning- the proclamation's relevancy to the University. The derision to dismiss UK classes tomorrow was due to the "feeling
that the governor has the final
authority to proclaim a holiday,"
Tucky, UK's stuffed wildcat
the president said.
mascot, remains in the possession
President Diclcey officially an- of Tennessee students, after efnounced the holiday Sunday after- forts Saturday of UK band memnoon, following his telephone con- bers to regain him.
versation with Gov. Chandler.
The mascot was stolen Saturday
game. A
governor knew of before the
Asked if the
band member said the mascot was
the University Faculty's
decision before he proclaimed the in the Tennessee section of the
state' holiday,
President Dickey stadium, but that it was impossible to reach it.
said.
Later, Vol fans attempted to take
"Got. Chandler was unaware of possession of the beer keg. but were
the fact that the faculty had voted foiled by band members. When the
against the holiday." The gover- band took the field at half-timnor's proclamation was meant' to' they asked
Knoxville police to
apply to the state as a whole and guard the keg.
6--

hist' night (let lined a hid to
meet Paul Bryant's Alabama team in the Blue Grass Bowl in
"Louisville Dec. 13.
At that time Collier said he felt
The decision was announced at
the game would give the team
the annual Football Banquet in
the SUB. Of the 30 lettermen who added experience and help toward
voted, less than 20 were in favor of next season. It also was mentioned
vote that; the Wildcats might accept
the game. A
would have been necessary to ac- the bid because of the Rame's being played in Kentucky, and becept the bid.
cause this is the
Coach Blantor Collier expressed inaugural year. Blue Grass Bowl's
his disappointment that the team
In declining the bid, the team
He
had declined the invitation.
expressed appreciation for the In2
Saturday's
stated, following
win over Tennessee, that he favor- vitation to Gov. A. B. Chandler
and to the bowl committee. The
ed playing in the bowl.
governor yesterday issued a proclamation praising the athletic accomplishments of Kentucky
two-thir-

ds

6--

Governor's Proclamation

WHEREAS, the University of Kentucky, the other institutions
of higher learning, and the elementary and high schools of the
Commonwealth of Kentucky have demonstrated by their athletic

endeavors great sportsmanship, courage, and manliness, and
WHEREAS, the University of Kentucky Football Team under
the leadership of Coach Blanton Collier have defeated the Tennessee Football Team in their annual 1958 rivalry whieh was hard-fougbut demonstrated good sportsmanship on both sides, and
WHEREAS, the University of Kentucky Basketball Team under
the leadership of Coach Adolpli Rupp played a hard schedule and
earned national recognition as NCAA champions, and
WHEREAS, many other schools of the state through the lessons
learned on basketball courts and football fields have developed
leaders of men, and
WHEREAS, many parents and other loved ones of these boys
and girls, who participated in athletics and sports, are thankful
for the advancement made by their proteges;
. Now, therefore, I Albert Benjamin Chandler, Governor of the
Commonwealth, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, November 26, 1958,
a holiday for all schools in order that the parents and children may
spend this additional day together at this period of Thanksgiving
and I wish to add this day to honor the boys and girls who have
demonstrated excellence on the playing fields of the Commonwealth.
Done at Frankfort,
Kentucky, this twenty-fourt- h
day of
November in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and fifty-eigh- t.
ht

Signed:' Albert Benjamin Chandler

schools.

Kentucky's last bowl
mr was
in the Cotton Bowl in Dallas on
New Year's Day. 19.12. where tlity
beat Te;:.s Christian University,
20-The Wildcats al.M beat Okl.i-hnm- a
11-- 7
in the Suar Bowl in
lit.il mid lost to Santa Clara.
in the Orange. Bowl m 1!"') All
three teams were coached by Paul
Bryant and quartcrbacked
by
Vtto Babe" Parilh.
7.

21-l-

;t.

an

Library Schedule
Wed.. 26 Nov.

Thurs.,

27

Closed

Nov. Closed.

Fri.,

28 Nov.

8:30 - 4.

Sat.,

29 Nov.

8:30 -

Sun., 30 .Nov.

Monday, Dee.
is resumed.

12

noon.

Close d.
1,

regular

Band Members Recover Beer Keg
UK-Tennes-

see

no-holid- ay

e,

--

Upon returning to their seats,
the band discovered that the keg
was gone. After some checking, it
was learned that the barrel was
at the Knoxville police station.
About this time, the band decided to go after Tucky who was
still in the hands of Tennessee
fans. Knoxville police learned of
the band's plans, and intercepted
them on the way to the mascot.
A week or m before a riot took
place following the Chattanooga
game. With this in mind,
the
police promised to return the mas
rot after the game.
After the game, about 75 band

members went to the police station to claim the keg arid Tucky.
Chants of "we want the keg" encouraged the police to turn th
keg over the the band.
Knoxville Police Chief Joe Kim-se- y
promised the band that he
would get the stuffed wildcat and
return it to Lexington. The band
then paraded through the streets
of Knoxville with the keg.
It was learned that the mascot
was In the football player' dormitory, but the Knoxville police aaid
they had
on tho
campus. Campus police aaid they
coald not do anything without a

search warrant.
Upon returning to Lexington, tho
band members hid the keg in tho
Fine Arts Building, where it remained until ' yesterday morning.
The keg was turned over to Bernie
Shively to be used at the football
banquet last night.
A band spokesman said that
several band members approached
Gov. Chandler after the game and
requested they be given Monday
off because of the victory. Chandler
replied that he
would declare
Wednesday a state holiday.
v- -

* t

KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tucm1.iv. Nov.

2-- TIir

IT,.

IO.'iS

Drive On, Henri McElroy

Service
Maintains 3,000 Films

Audio-Visu- al

By CIIAIU.OTTK

KINGSTON

The UK Department of
Fervices maintains a library
Audio-Vi.-u-

al

of more than 3.000 films for use
in the classroom and by campus

organizations.
Accordinc to Mrs. Ruby Evans
Hart, director of the film library,
UK is one of very few colleges
in thf country that provides free
film service to its students. It
is financed by a film rental
organizafor
pro-pra-

non-camp-

m

us

tions and elementary and secondary schools.
Anyone
!o schedule a
film may preiev it in the preview
room of the Department of Audio-VisuServices in the basement
of 1''ra.re Hall. This enables the
scheduler not only to know he's
petting what he wants but also
enables him to summarize the
film for his class or group
Applications for films should be
in the film library at leatt-fou- r
days before the film Is to be shown.
Films are delivered the day before the showing is scheduled, f
Film orders must include the
following information: correct title
of film and catalog number, date
the film is to be used, hour the
film is to be shown, building in
which the film is to be shown, the
room number, user's name, and
a request for projectionist service
and equipment.
;

al

student projection-

Twenty-fiv- e

ists are hired by the Department
Audio-VisuServices-anare
the only ones who may show films
on campus. Larry Montgomery,
electrical engineering, is senior
projectionist and is responsible for
training the other projectionists
and maintaining the audio-visuequipment. Student film technicians are Larry Bruce, sophomore, Ollie Ramey, sophomore, and
Newt Wilson, graduate student in
medicine.
Equipment available for Univer- of

al

al

sitv me includes twenty 1G mm
projectors, slide projectors, film-stri- p
projectors, opaque projectors,
an overhead projector, record
players, and a vide variety of
screens and miscellaneous equipment. The department also owns
the dual art projector in Memorial Coliseum.
Defore films are distributed, they
are thoroughly inspected and
cleaned. .This is done; by an
machine which cost
iUr00. Employees have nicknamed
this machine the "brain". This
machine detects sprocket hole defects, thickness defects such as
scotch tape or safety pins on the
film, the" number of splices, film
footage, cleans the film, and automatically rewinds tJie film. All
this is done in a very few minutes.
Films are also cleaned at least
twice a year in a liquid bath of
cleaning fluid.' so that they remain in good shape for a Irtng time.
As to the quality of films avail
able, Mrs. Hart said. "We try to
as
keep the library as
we possibly can. When a film is
obsolete in any way other than
fashion or the model of cars, we
withdraw it from the library.
She went on to say in this regard, "We are not allowed to take
out one frame of our films" to
bring them up to date. "If there
in the film that outdates
it, all we can do is pray for damage to that part of the film."
are all teaching
"Our films
films," Mrs. Hart said. "They are
not chosen for entertainment.
up-to-da-

te

some
However,
entertainment
films, such as "Magnificent Obsession." are purchased for literary or
technical value. They are films
that should be entertaining as well
as enlightening."
e
emA staff of seven
ployees is maintained to keep the
full-tim-

I

-

f

"V

800-mi- le

al

Business Oisis
(AP)

Va.

RICHMOND.

Larry

Robertson, already a youns

i

mi irtM

nit

C

T

WED. ONLY
At 2:30 - 8:30 p. m.

,

0

17

A

ORGANIZATION

PRESENTATION

'if

Filmed In
London in
EASTMAN COLOR

ELECTRIC "In-CaHEATERS!
Open 5:45 p.m.
Admission 65c
Final '2' Nircs!
FIRST OUTDOOR SHOWING!
Gary Cooper - Julie London
Lee J. Cobb. .
colorScopc- r"

"MAN OF THE WEST"
Mat. $1.25 - Eve. $1.50
Buy tickets now
at our box office

1st. Run

Bill

Williams

"LEGION OF THE
DOOMED"
STARTS THURSDAY

THANKSGIVING!
1st. Area Showing
Glenn Ford - Ernest Borgnine

"TORPEDO RUN"

HOUSEBOAT'
TECHNICOLOR

mmtm -

i

ii

m

f

"THE RELUCANT
DEBUTANTE"
Howard Duff

'

in

"SIERRA STRANGER

mm
f"

U

-

Tommy

w

Smcwes

nrwvi ni in

'f

2

r....TX"?....

WIDE

1

VISION
SCREEN

fM

1

LAST TIME TODAY
"PARTY GIRL"

tlKIMCTON

WfNTUCWT

They Raved About
This At Our Sneak
Prerue!

starts T03IORHOW

FROM BLUSHING STAGE HIT OF SEX IN THE SUBURBS!

TOMORROW

Doris Day

"SAGA OF HEMP

JOSEPH

-

FIELDS PRODUCTION

sianirj

Richard Widmark

BROWN"

Richard Eycr - Philip Abbott

CIGYODNG-GIASCALA.coeni-

Breathing
Kools for a
, fresher
taste all day
Half a pack of
Kools .
5.
pickle
(2 words)
6. Mornings

ACROSS
1.

--

No. 9

ICROSSWORD
Desirt plants

6.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
13.
16.
19.

Pair-u- p
hoata
Steverino
Cat chat
Italian city
Wild j.lmn
A Gabor
de France
Blue panting
It ustains the
boom
20. ilarriaijcs are
made for
22. Th lustt word
24. Tho oarlior
Henry Morgan
26. Postgrad degree
21C World government
30. Kools will
you
32. Thee and
3.'1. Car fare

n

L,

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n

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ARE VOU KGDL
ENOUGH TO
KRACK THIS?

f

fs

In

(abbr.i

T?

"Hol"

to
9. The Adeline
17.

type
Matchmaker
Kreuger

18. 89.37 inches
19. Go together
21. Thev call thp

20
24

22. Kool is
ni'wt refreshing
cigarette
23. Kind of meeting
21. Type of dog
25. Cornered

25

ugly head
3d. Beaut
37. Juicy ferk
39. Old
Portuguetie coin
40. Fire, nark,
oust
41. Kun against

!

Kools are

40.

46. Chinese laborer
47. A Daht
4S. Puts an edge on

,34

"

31
'

""'

"

27

ii..

"

1

28

32

.

in,

35

36
.j
"39

38

40

.

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woriN)

27. Leading 28. Little
reputat ion
31. Girl"s name
34. Flavor
36. B. vend the
pale?
35. Horsey hockey

Naturally

'

37

23

26
20

33

j 22

21

shots

its

33.

n

P

2

1. Dependent
8. Switch from

Soft-drin-

41

43

42

46

45

77

48

44

49

k

tlavor

--

study
of a joint

Kay Kendall
Sandra Dee
-- in
Blushing Color

-

TOMORROW

PreMnn

STARTS

DOWN

STYLE'.'
John Saxon Rex Harrison

--

Gj n e maScoPEz

"DESERT HELL"

1. Made a

"SADIE HAWKINS

"AT WAR WITH NO
ARMY"
"LETS GO NAVY"

COLOR by DE LUXE

Brian Keith
Barbara Hale
Cartoon

49. Up

Blue-Bloo-

ENDS TODAY

o

Also

(colorScope)

Open 5:45 p.m.
Admission 65:
First outdoor showing
A High Society MirthQuake
d
As The
DIBS Open
The Mating Season . . .

the process.
Progress was slow .but fairly sure
until one angry station owner put
the police on his trail.

Tab Hunter - Gwenn Verdon

43.

FOR

STARTS THURS.

pet-tin-

"DAMN YANKEES"

--

12:00, 1:51, 3:44. 5:45. 7:46. 9:47.
STRAND
"Party Girl" - 12:00.
2:01, 4:02, ".5:03, 8:04. 10:05.

BALLET .
ANK

n

"THE INVISIBLE BOY"

6:45, 10:25.
"Legion of the Doomed" - 9:00.
FAMILY "The Reluctant Debutante" - 6:45 Sc 10:20.
"Sierra Stranger" - 8:50.

"Matchmaker"

- starts

41. Lieutenant's
Alma Mater
'
42. A bit of
40 diwn
44. Table scrap
43. The t hing
(legal)

lo

Show fmh
KGDL
1

What a wonderful diJorcnce whn you
switch to Suow lvTt sh KOOL! At oncv
ckwn ami cool . . .
your mouth fe-your throat ftcN .nouthpd,

ml

Enjoy the most refreshing experience
in smoking. Smoke KOOL . . . with
mild, mild menthol ... for a cleaner,
fresher taste aH through the day!
Answer On Pag
KOOi. GIVES YOU
OR.l.KJNO-SJZ-

INI.

A

A

CHOICE-.REGUL-

WUUamu

MiLBMINTNOC

11
A.

"WITH "FlkTEIM

E

Tuoo

'

Cf.

w

-

.

.

ts

the Warsaw
talks between U. S. and Red China
ambassadors Induced him to believe the Chinese Reds were unwilling to start a general conflict.
"The Chinese Nationalist s a t o
showing commendable restraint."
he said. "It is paying off in
';
more supplies to Queri.oy."
ncwi'r-.e-

Rory Calhoun - Beverly Garland
Also

ASHLAND "Damn Yankee" - 2:20
5:55. 9:25.
"Desert Hell" - 4:10. 7:45.
BEN ALI "Lets Go Navy" - 12:00,

KENTUCKY

THE

war.
He tola

POCOVCTI3N

3:59. 6:49, 9:39.
'OTYBOMfUONy KMC

i;i-is-

nP

NOW SHOWING

up-to-da- te.

CIRCLE 25 "Man of the West"

HONOLULU (AP)
IVfen i
Secret aiy Neil McFlroy h.
iKy
he believes the Chinese Coi.:iv.
are not anxious to start a ii.il

11

2:50.5:40.8:30.
"At War with the Army" - 1:09,

H

20.

busi-

ness man delivering 60 papers,
faced a business crisis when someone Mole his bicycle. lie borrowed
a bike and started saving his
money to buy another. Executives
at an oil company's division office
on his route stepped into the'
crisis and pave him a bike. Larry
promptly used his savings to buy
:
a lock.
.

Don't Want !(.;. I War

aw

jm

on-camp- us

library and
records
Often, as many as 300 films are
booked for one day. Detailed rec- -

MOVIE GUIDE

LAST TIMES TODAY
t

Tolire
France (AP
describe Henri Guilbaud as a determined motorist, one undaunted
by the Ir.ct that he had no auto
license, no ownership papers, no
tax payment slip, no driver's liords are kept of these films show- cense and no pas.
Despite such obstacles, he was
ings and of the condition of each
only f0 miles short of his
film in the library.
Marseille-to-Pari- s
Roal when
Service offers
The Audio-Visuthe cops caught up and hauled
one vrry unique feature to UK
students. If a student should miss him off to Jail.
Police said his travel plan called
a showing of a film in any of his
classes, he may request a special for walk ins up to a filling station
showing of the film in the preview with a small can in hand and the
room and he will be shown that story that he had run out of pas.
film, even if he is the oTily person He would be given a can of fuel
who will see it. According to Mrs. on his promise to stop in and fill
Hart, UK is the only college or his tank. Then he would breeze
university in the country which of- on to another station and repeat
fers this service.
Films are also made sellable to
students doing practice teaching to
be ued in the classes which they
i
teach. The student must have the
approval of his
advisor.
MF.LU.V.

Says MviU

,

'

t.

fVli

.

t

y.

is

.r--

* TIIL KENTl'CKY KEKNEI

'Cook Up 'A Facial For Added Sparkle
ny TECCtY nRlTMLEVE
Face tiled from mid-tercramming? Budcet
exhausted from
shopping? Solution:
Christmas
One free facial, cooked up for
holiday sparkle.
As mid-terand research papers pile' up on your desk, tired
lines pile: up on your face. Shop- ping bills pile up in your budget,
and you can't afford a beauty-sa- Jon facial.
You can afford to be resource- ful and cook up your own facial,
courtesy of mother's kitchen and
grandmother's ideas.
Start with a clean face water
splashed briskly will perk you up.
If you suffer from blemishes,
rub moistened oatmeal over them,
Remove blackheads with a wet
washcloth, sprinkled with salt.
A milk treatment, using whole
milk, will help restore your milk- white complexion. Pat it on gen- -

then spread it
remove when dry.
To tighten skin on throat and
face, wrap several ice cubes in a
wash cloth for an excellent homemade astringent.
You might even want to extend
your facial beyond your face to Include vour hair. A rinse in tea will
brlng out highlights, or equal parts
nf vineear and wafer will mau
tired hair 5parvtje.
After you have completed your
facial, ue lemon to clen.se your
stained hands,
the

slowly,

epa:

.

X

.

.

,

'

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'

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"

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"

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'

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......

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--

.

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..

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.

Iniiij.

v

1

w,

During

it.

Promi. o yourself
lettliu:
your hair grow at least enough
to try out Ll 10 ravishment of a
Psyche or topknot. Be sine t
brush it oi.e hundred times a day.
to-star-

Alice Aikin, freshman Delta Delta Delta pledge, after her first
experience studying for mid-terexams in dismay lamented:
"Why, this is the first time I've ever needed a facial:"
m

...

Cord's Wisdom

gnuermg ,

Today's coed manages to remember bits ( f philosophical wisdom to
steer her through the rough days
ahead. It takes spunk these days
to manage
dispositions through
supermarkets, car pools, and demanding families.

&t

scqiflnsT
Thi.5 apron

can be adapted to a
number of treatments, to take
care of a variety of personalities
on your list. For example
the
same apron can be cut in green
felt and appliqued with a bright
red Poinsettia. In white felt it
can serve as a background for a
string of appliqued reindeer or a
cherry Santa.
The apron may be made with a
standard pattern, and nearly all
such patterns include transfer
designs for . Christmas motifs,
which may be cut from a contrasting felt and appliqued in place.
A Christmas apron is required
equipment for the hostess presiding at holiday parties, for it can
transform
the simplest
little
black dress into a gala holiday
costume. Carry out the Christmas
.theme in the rest of your outfit. For example, pin a sprig of
holly in your hair or tape a tiny
felt flower to the toe of your 'shoe.
If you are making a series of
the aprons, make a miniature of
the apron design to enclose with
the gift package, to be used as a
collar or shoe ornament.

n bout

There are available temporary
hair cnloniiKs that are suppoed
to "hist thnuih three shampoos,
more than a rinse, but not quite
permanent hair coloring.

start checking

,

Permanent waving mnkrs hair
"inore" receptive to color.
mo,t
liair experts, auce. but it
to wait a few days after tlve permanent wave before having the
color job done, although the color
could be tested on a .small section or the hair, if there is .my
doubt

Wanted By Every Woman

.ticciwititu-wi-

us.

tst

.

Bright Christmas Apron

iiu ien.

In that connection A typlfaJ que,
tkm K "ny hir is very diy. ..s
it tafe to
a trlor rinse?"
Color experts say "yes" if thn
c)Kr rinse contain a conditioning; agent.
Some manufrirtureiN
claim tliat
the
creamy color
rinses restore
normal motsturt;
to dry. brittle hair.
Tim claim
has been made for a number of
year, and only thetest of time
and your hair can prove it. You
should desist from usinu nmthlni;
on yoir hair shamptM) or color
if your hair becomes dry from
U.--C

A

Thanksgiving vacation
over your Christmas
list and setting a head start on the
gifts you will turn out on your
sewing machine.
A popular gift and
one easy
to make is a simple felt apron,
done in a bright holiday color and
decorated for the Christmas season. Local sewing center experts
suyye.-.- t
a simple style in bright

--

-

..

.V

-J

Tin Mid
that million
of
women color their lulr. but mnn ,'
of them
rtn to huve problems

,

Wc Aren't AIoilC

clipping from an Indiana
newspaper reveals this: Some men
are having grey hair colored!
Makes them feel younger.) That's
not all: According to the article,
men get facials, too! A few have
permanent waves. Sounds "sissy"?
It's all in the way we look at
tl.v.
things. European men have been
If your skin is dry, use glycerine setting their hair, curling it and
overnight to retain moisture.
coloring -- it" for" years. And you
If oiliness is your problem, try know how glamorous women think
an egg mask. Beat the white of they are!

IM.S-

Hair Color
Poses Some
Real Snags

on evenly

m

r.

Tiiexl.., Nov.

t

WomOIl

for and about

v

A'

W

Happiness is nothing more than

7

'

good health and a" bad memory.

human wisdom is summed tip
in two words: wait and hope.
All

t

4

.

-

.;

,t '"I

Real difficulties can be overcome, it is only the imaginary ones

that are unconquerable.

:

Who will ever forget that
time? The whole town turned
out . . . welf, maybe not the
7ofetown...to see little Bobby Collegebound off to the
University. There he was in

J
PARTY APRON Easy to make
in bright red felt, sparked with

'

--

bright red sequins. (Simplicity

Pattern.

and

'

his hancf-staine- d
bucks . . .
pleatles3 khakis . . . and his
varsity Bweater. (Badminton
1, 2, 3, 4.) Sonja ... ah, Sonja,
his homeroom sweetheart,

2781).

fobbed quietly. Sonja had

heard stories about the

! BAY

She was worried.

As, the Toonerville local
pulled in, another small cry
was heard. It was Bobby's
mother. Who will look after
him? Who will warm his milk
and care for his shirts? Then
came the unforgettable reply,
Bobby, head high, shoulders
back, answered . . . "I will!
I will wash my shirts." Ah,
smart boy. He'll make the
grade. Gone was the callow
adoleacence .
. for Bobby
Collegebound had bought Van
Heusen"Vantage"Shirts with
his allowance. No longer need
he be tied to Mother's apron.

Lake Cumberland

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NO ADDED COST

State Park
(

Jamestown)

!(y. Darn

Village

(Gilbertsvilte)

Ky. Lake State Park
(

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Phone 3 - 0235
265 Euclid Ave.
Next to Coliseum
1966 .Harrodsburg Road
880 East High Street

15? Discount
Cash

&

Carry

co-ed- s.

i

His all cotton Van Heusen
"Vantage" Shirts need not b
ironed. Bobby Collegebound
could wash his Van Heuseii
"Vantage" Shirts himself . . .
and in a matter of hours they
would be ready to weir. Day
after day
far from home
. ....Bobby would sparkle at
college in his Van Heuseii
"Vantage" all cotton, wash
and wear, no-irshirtt.
"Now," Sonja cried hysterically . . . "I've lost him forever. With all that free time"
in thoM handsome shirts, he'll
be the target of every girl on
campus. If only I had passed
bookkeeping I could have
gone, too."
As the train pulled away,
Bobby 'm mother faced east
and said . . ."Thank you, Van
lb usen "Vantage," for being
like a mother to my son!"
In white, choice of collar

...
on

styles, $4.00 at better

sUres everywhere. Or write
Heusen Corto: rhillips-Va- n
poration, 417 Fifth Avenue,
New York Ifl, N.V.

Hardin)

VAN HEUSEN

HUNTING atKENTuVkYi

rid
J

DAM VILLAGE
i
r"-- FROM CCTOBIR - MARCH
?-Z-

AT

For i.'!(crmafion, vvri'e

nriswrN-park- s
DIPT- - CF CONSERVATION
fk AMKFORT, KY.

i

TU CENTER -1- 35

WET

MWN

* The Kentucky Kernel

,epPp

University of Kentucky

Frt Offlc t Lriington, Kentucky f Mvond clinn matter tinder tn Act of March 3, 1879.
Publi&brd lour timrt a ynk during the regular tthnol year except bolidayl and (iimi.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Entered at the

Jim Hampton,
Andy Epperson, Chief News Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Larry Van IIoose, Chief Sports Editot

Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Fnuvr Ashley, Business Manager
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Mitchell, Staff rhotographer
John
Marilyn Lyvcw and Judy Pcnnebaler, Proofreaders
,

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan Millott, Editor
Alice Reddinc, Associate Editor

Taul Scott, Sports Editor

Elegy On Tradition
The tradition has dial.

at American education, of its prob-

Its final hours began last week and lems. Vet we sincerely felt as do many
ended Wednesday when the Univers- others in the University community
ity Faculty did not approve the tradithat the tradition should be upheld,
tional Tennessee-victordismassal of even at the expense of missing an enclasses. Those
last hours were not tire day's classes.
We opposed and still oppose the
peaceful and calm, as those of a good
tradition should be; they were hectic, University Faculty's decision, but we
bitter ami surrounded by furor much are equally opposed to the holiday
of which continues.
being granted after they decided not
The tradition was young when it to allow it. We disagree with their
died, but like many young things it decision but the fact remains that
had taken root and become strong. So the decision ivas theirs to make and
strong, in fact, that in its passing it the University
should have been
left behind a number of muddled bound by it, like it or not.
situations and bequeathed to us the
This is not hypocrisy on our part,
responsibility of clarifying them.
we think, and neither is it a subtle
Before the University Faculty met, slap at Gov. Chandler. The. governor
the Kernel and SC President Pete was unaware of the University FaculTerlman presented what we thought ty's decision when he proclaimed the
to be the student attitude to a dis- holiday, and it was not his intention
missal of classes. We asked that they to interfere with their decision.
approve such an action not because
Tomorrow's holiday is not a victory
we wanted to get out of class but befor the students or tradition, and
cause students felt the tradition of neither is it a defeat for the Univer"Beat Tennessee, take Wednesday sity Faculty.
off" was something worth preserving.
About all it amounts to is that
We were aware, then as now, that the official proclamation exhumed a
every class missed is something to rebody that the faculty had just finished
gret. We know of the criticism leveled burying.
y

NOV

1958

'

f

..

t

....

:
.

:

.

:

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..

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.P. .

r

4;i:,.::
j-'-

yiTj--

l

Rupp's 29th Season

One Violin, Several Fiddles
Coach Adolph Rupp, starting his
29th season as head basketball coach
here at the University, has only one
violinist returning from last year's
NCAA championship quintet as he
prepares his squad for its 1958-59

curtain raiser against Florida State
in Memorial Coliseum.
The Baron will be faced this year
with a situation similar to that which
confronted his last season. No. 24,
Johnny Cox, a sharpshooter from
Hazard, is back, but the other four-fifth- s
national champs are
-- of-the

--

gone.
Most Wildcat backers figured the
Man in the Brown Suit would win
tome "games last year at least more
than he would lose but few felt he
could take his "Fiddling Five" all the
Vay to the top as he did. This year
his task looms even greater.
The Baron has never served up a
diet of losing backetball, and this
gear's campaign appears to be no different. He has a good sophomore
crop to work with along with two
junior college transfers who will add
depth to the team.
Kentucky will be gunning for its
fifth NCAA title and its L'Oth SEC

championship, a retold in both departments. Backing up the -l Cox
will be G Don Mills, who played so
well in the NCAA finals last ear:
l
Sid Cohen from Kilgore's (Texas)
national junior college championship
club; Ned Jennings, tallest of the

and another.sophomore,
'Cats at
guard,-whcan do
Billy Lickert,
just about anyt