xt71rn303h7b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71rn303h7b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19431105  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1943 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1943 1943 2013 true xt71rn303h7b section xt71rn303h7b The

THIS
WHIRLING
WORLD

VOLUME XXXI

By Don Lail

ABf iinnM

The Hitlerites and their satellites are doomed. This announcement was brought forth for the
world to acknowledge by the Moscow conference. This doctrine was
given birth by the Big Four of the
United Nations. The consultation
and its proof in the declaration
brings to us the plans. First, unconditional surrender of the common foe, even though Russia is
not at war with Japan: restoration
of free Austria. France, and a new
Italy. One main factor
that is to be planned and sought
for is the principle of sovereign
equality of all peace loving states.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Mr'

Y

Ol

t

-

TOSAV

Fifteen rtP5 late-

Oil.
wu. roe. xr
Tf

03&PATCM HJW iUL

A

f

COMt AM HAIN'T

AMY

C

DW NOW .

n

OF OOGTCM HCKZLB'AM
was rut MOHCLtrsroM.

HS'1
Aiinm

AM

f

VT

few

o to HA
L0"A

NONE

HARRV MAM DOTTCR

KIMS

AW

AM DtCLARC b T CMY'lAMl
HAWKINS DAT " WHEN AH
F(R"i ALL O' VO KIN TART
rtUNHIH'.' WMN AH PlRC
A&IM - ATTETR CTVtN VO A
I I rAiR
5 TA R.T-- AtXC STARTS
A RUNNIN . TH ONE SHI.

r5 vrAws
HAWK'N

VADF

MOMrL--

rAit.ro
M
CATC

to
A

I

J'

CVAY

Ji v

ry. rj.t:

i

i

.

vr. u. ' - i

i

w.

,n.

j

A

t.tt

Start Runnin';

LiV Abners,

The Chasin' Begins Monday!

ego-min-

SuKy Sponsors
Girl-Date-B-

oy

Week On Campus

Flcg To Talk
To
the

Kentucky coeds will jump
gun on leap year when they take
over the male prerogative in social
affairs Monday as Sadie Hawkins'
Week Is launched on the campus
by SuKy.
week
Climax ot tne
will be SuKy's dance on Saturday,
November 13 in the Bluegrass room
of the Union. The Kampus Kats,
University soldier band, will furnish the music for the reverse procedure affair. Tickets, purchasable
only by the female contingent, will
sell for 50 cents stag or drag.
The Date bureau will provide
dates for girls mho desire them.
Interested girls should sign at the
information desk in the Union.
Proclamation
The rules for Sadie Hawkins'

break-throu-

meek

are:

Some young men ain't
havin' the social life they oughter,
and
Whereas:

Whereas:
Some young ladies,
ditto, and
Whereas: Male pocketbooks need
a rest.
Be it resolved and proclaimed:
University
of Kentucky's, Sadie
in
Hawkins' week, November
the year of our Lord one thousand
will Ha
n.na K rH vtH frtrt
j
governed by the following:
1. It's the ladies who pay and
pay during the week.
2. Joe ASTP shall be the one to
sit by the telephone waiting for
pretty coed to call for a date. (We
mean It. Girls do the asking to
shows, cokes, walks, etc.)
3. Now about doors. Girls open
'em, men go out 'em foist, see.
Girls also pull out chairs.
4. Boys when escorted
by girls
must keep to the Inside of the sidehorses and
walk so as
things won't endanger 'em.
P.S. When it is dark and scary
after dark, the powers that be rule
that boys are still the ones to see
the girls home. No ladies out after
3,

...
. . . association will meet at 7 p.m
Monday, to room 204 of the Union,
Oating elub
. . . will leave at 2 pjn. Sunday
from the Union for a bike hike.
Datch Lnnch . . .
. . . will meet at noon today at the
Colonial Bowling lanes.
Fellowship groua
of the Maxwell Street Presbyterian church will meet at 5:30
pjn, Sunday for supper, 6 pjn. for
Evensong, and at 6:30 for a discussion of The Origin of the Negro,
led by Griffin Anderson.
T L'pperclasi
. . . groups will meet at 6:15 p.m..
Tuesday, in the serial room of the
Union for a discussion of "Judaism"
led by Rabbi Fleg.
dark.
TWCA . . .
. will hold a special recognition
..
aervice for all members at 7:15
Tuesday, in the Music room
of the Union.
TWCA Membership committee . . .
19
. . . will meet at 5 p.m, Wednesday,
Tau Sigma, modern dance fraUnion,
in the social room of the
ternity, has announced the pledgpoultry club
ing of Grace Cavender, Mary Jane
election of officers Dorsey,
. . . will hold an
Martha Paries, Lyde Goodat 7:30 p.m, Thursday, in the ing, Zelma Goldenberg, Dorcas
Dairy building.
Hollingsworth, Martha Belle Hood,
Phalanx club . .
Myra Lee Howard, Helen McMur-tr- y.
. . . will meet at noon Tuesday in
Martha Mann, Helen B.
Gwen Pace, Marjorle Palmore,
the Colonial Bowling lanes lounge.
Ivalou Ross, Ruth Ellen Schroeder,
Mortar Board . . .
. . . will meet at 5 p.m., Tuesday, Margery Schwartz, Charlotte Terry,
Corlnne Wade, and Bettye Jo
in Room 205 of the Union.
Woollum.
baKy . . .
Formal pledging was held Monday
. . . will hold an important nieetirtg
gym. Inifor all old members and try outs night In the Women's
at 4:30 p.m, Monday, in the Union. tiated at the same meeting was Ann
Barron.
FootUgbt Serenade . . .
Officers of the fraternity for the
Victor
featuring John Payne,
... IpohU V'ill bf year are Marian Harris, president;
T3
a' CI ' Priscilla Graddy, vice president;
shown at 6:15 pjn, Monday, in the I Ellen O'Bannon, recording secre
Union.
tary; Mary Shaw, corresponding
Dancing lemon . . .
secretary; Jean Crabb, treasurer;
by Howard Hall will be held at Sara Rhodes, business and pub6 pjn, Wednesday, in the Blue-gralicity manager.
Miss Margaret
room of the Union.
Warren is faculty advisor.
sing . . .
. . . will be "held at 6 pjn, Thursday In the Bluegrass room of the
Union.
Activities, committee . . .
Alice Jacobson, Danforth Fellow
. . . will meet at 5 pjn., Monday,
on the University campus, will exin the Union.
plain the Danforth Foundation and
KAA . . .
speak on her work here, at the
. . . asks women interested in bowlDutch Lunch club meeting at noon
ing team to sign with Miss Warren today at the Colonial BfVHng
in gym before 5 pjn, Monday.
Lanes.
Date bureau . . .
All town girls, commuters, and
. . . for soldiers will open Wednes- - residence
students are Invited to

iSGA Assembly

YM-YWC- A

Discussion Is
Second Of Series

I

Rabbi Julian Fleg of the Adath
Lexington,
Congregation,
upper
will speak to the
class meeting on Elements of the
Jewish Faith at 6:15 p. m.. Tuesday in the social room of the
Union.

Israel

Spragens Installed
Y Freshman Head

A

A

This is the second in a series of
discussions being held this quarter
on the
faith, the
Jewish-Christi-

J

an

first of which was given by Rob
McNeill, student minister of the
secretary-treasure- r.
Maxwell Street Presbyterian church
Carolyn Spicer, president of the
gave lie
last Tuesday, when he
historical background of the sub- YWCA, and Norman ChriSman.
president of the YMCA. presided at
ject.
the ceremony. A series of discusLater discussions will Include sions on "How We, As Freshmen,
The Seven Sacraments of the Can Fit into Campus Life" is being
Catholic Church, by Father George led by Jay C. Doyle.
O'Bryan of St. Joseph's hospital,
Tuesday, November 16; and Tue
Contribution of Protestantism, by
Dr. W. C. Bower, retired professor
Miss Rosalie Oakes, secretary of
of Religious Education of the Unithe YWCA, requests that anyone
versity of Chicago and former prointerested in working on the "Y's
fessor at the College of the Bible Owl" see her in the office at the
In Lexington, on Tuesday, NovemUnion. The. "Y's Owl" is the offiber 30.
cial publication of the
A special Thanksgiving
service and contains the news and
be held Tuesday, November 23. dar of the organization.

'Y's Owl" News

A

j

Applicants Begin
Classes On Dec 1
Applications for a nurses' aid
class to begin around December 1
will be accepted on Tuesday and
Thursday,
November 9 and 11,
from 10 to 2 p. m. in the Mary Ott
room of the Good Samaritan hospital, Mrs. John Good has announced.
Meeting five days a week from
1 to 3 p. m. at
the hospital, the
will complete half of the
course before Christmas and the
remaining portion after the holidays, Mrs. Good said.

Powers To Judge Pictures
Of Kyian Beauty Queens

run-aw-

...

Dance Fraternity
Announces Pledging
Women
Of

pa,

...

War Chest Drive Tops Goal;
$930 Is Netted By Students
Faculty Reaches
$6,300 Toward
Final Quota
With an
record $932 already on the campaign books, leaders of the student campus War
Chest drive today appeared con2
fident that the final total would
clear the $950 mark.
"Successful" was the term chairman Algernon Dickson applied to
the drive which opened November
25 with a goal of $700. Over 200
volunteer workers were used In
reaching every student on the campus by the personal solicitation
method.
University faculty and stall members reported a total of $6,312.80
and Comptroller Frank D. Peterson, chairman of the drive, expressed a guarantee that the $6,600
goal would be topped by November
Mrs. George Edwin Smith
9. closing date of the Community
War Chest drive.
Declaring that the faculty and
staff raised a goal 15 larger than
that of last year with a force of
e
exigworkers slashed by
encies, Peterson congratulated them
Cleo Dawson (Mrs. George
Miss
"whole-heartsupport
Edwin Smith), former teacMer of for the
re- - they have given the War Chest."
English at the University, will
This amount is the largest the Uni- iHdw ti.r nnvnl Sh f!nm tn th
Valley, at 5 p. m., Friday in the wslty has contributed in history
Dean W. S. Taylor, who headed
Music room of the Union.
the entire University campaign,
Prior to its release on October 6, commented yesterday that a "very
the book was acclaimed by Norman splendid piece of work" had been
Cousins of the Saturday Review of done.
Literature as "as close to being an
Kairi Vlnrpnt Snairniinln
rrsi- American 'Good Earth" as anything
Qf
bich sponsored
I have ever read." Since then it drive this year for the first time,
has been favorably received by "On behalf of the Student Govboth critics and the reading public. ernment Association, I want to
The author based the story . on thank each individual responsible
the life of her mother in the wild for this success of the War Chest
days of Pancho Villa. The locale is drive- the tip of Texas where the Ria l Largest contribution by a -- single
Grande meets the Gulf. Mrs. Smith j unit wa5 that of Jewell haU. Under
knowledge chairman Martha CockrelL the hall
d
writes with
for she Is a native of the RW residents donated $112.80
Grande country. There she early
Highest sorority total was that of
became familiar with the ranches, Delta Delta Delta, which contrihorses, Mexicans, bandits, which buted, in addition to $1.00 from
make the section so colorful, and each girl, $20 from the chapter
are a part of her novel.
treasury. This contribution is the
After extensive travel, and study highest per capita donation from
such a group.
, at the university oi Mexico, uay-claSorority totals Include both house
j lor,
and Southern Methodist, she
took her Masters degree at the Uni- and town girls in each instance:
versity of Kentucky and remained Delta Delta Delta. $65.00; Chi
here as instructor in English for Omega, $35.75: Alpha Delta Pi,
$22.50; Zeta Tau Alpha, $17.50;
ten years.
Mrs. Smith will be the guest of Alpha Gamma Delta, $25.00; Kappa
the Koffee Klub of the Student Delta. $17.00 (incomplete); Kappa
Kappa Gamma, $11.25 (incomplete) ;
Union board Friday.
Alpha XI Delta, $1735.
Helen Harrison, Morrison Swift, and
Other women's residence halls
Phyllis Wat-kiEvelyn Thompson, and
are members of the committee totaled as follows: Lydia Brown
house. $15.00: Patt hall annex,
in charge.
$14.25:
$5.25;
Hamilton
house.
Shelby house, $14.00; Sigma Nu
house, $26.05; Kappa Sigma house,
$1738; Phi Delta Theta house,
$13.00;- - Sigma Chi house. $18.90;
and SAE house, $2130 (incom
In a letter received by Dean Leo plete).
Chamberlain, John Temple Gntves,
Independent town girls gave
newspaper editor and speaker at $65.62
reported
and
an $730. Town commuters
the last convocation, enclosed
men's contributions
article he published after his visit totaled $73.35. Phi Beta, honorary
here.
fraternity, gave $10.00 and the
In his dally column, Mr. Graves YWCA gave $15.00 as organizations.
said, "At the storied and beautiful
Bill Barton, military division
University of Kentucky in Lexing- chairman, reported the following
ton last week, I found President totals in the drive which was based
Herman Lee Donovan as finely re- on company organization:
Co. A,
solved to carry on for his country $41.25; Co. B. $26.65; Co. C. $89.10:
In the American ideal of education Co. F, $63.15; ASTP-ROT$61.85.
as in the winning of this war."
For the entire military canvass,
He went on to say, "Crystal clear the total was $281.00.
in Dr. Donovan's mind Is the fact
that this America of ours Is a liball-ti-

I

1

Book Review
Set For Today

Jacobson Talks
To Dutch Lunch

Soldiers

cn

sign for dat

at desk. chairman.

hs

announced.

war-tim-

ed

first-han-

ss

ns

Convo Speaker
Writes Of UK

C,

eral arts yistitution, that its

j

Bandage Rolling
Unit To Organize

Photographs of the four women
as Kentuckian beauty
queen candidates at the contest
at Memorial hall Saturday
will be sent to John Robert Powers,
of the Powers Model agency. New
York, for final judging, Virginia
Long, editor of the Kentuckian,
announced today.
The four winners were Lyde
Gooding, Kappa Kappa Gamma,

r)ft9 Delt'

Lexlngton;

Pfltsv Hor'

'

kan. Alpha Delta PI, Gainesville,
Ga.; and Doris Smith, Chi Omega,
Lexington. The three girls receiv-hel- d
ing honorable mention were Penny
Shively, Alpha XI Delta, Greens- burg; Minkie Clark, Delta Delta
Delta, Maysville; and Adelin Stern,
Lexington.
Miss Long said there would be a
full page picture of the seven girls
al
In the 1944 Kentuckian and
cuts of the queen and her
lrJl-vldu-

three Pttppri.Pts.

The 1944 queen, as chosen by
Powers, will be announced at the
Kentuckian dance, according to
Micki Bogan, business manager of
the yearbook. Miss Bogan lias not
yet announced definite plans for
the dance.
Judging the preliminary contest
were Lieut. William Scully, Marine
Air Corps; Lieut, (jg) Fobes, Navy,
and Lieut. Arthur A. Erikson, Jr.,
C O Co. o.
,

j

Plans are being made for a band- age rolling unit in the Home Eco- nomics building to begin early In
January, according to Dr. Statie
Erikson, head of the home econom- -

Six of the seven candidates for Kentuckian beauty, queen selected Saturday night in Memorial
hall are. reading from left to right: Penny Siiively, Alpha Xi Delta; Doris Smith. Chi Omega; Lyde
Gioding. Kappa Kapna Gamma; Lucy Meyer, Delta Delta Delta; Minkie Clarke, Drlta Delta Delta:
and Patsy Horkan, Alpha Delta PL Not pictured Is Adalin Stern, Independent.

chosen

Today Last Day
For Directories

demo-

cracy won't run without what he
calls 'social engineers' and without
what he would agree to call excellent human beings. The social
engineer must be a generalist, and
not a specialist as the scientist has
been."

"

ss

t

Trainees
Are Transferred
Here For Study
390

MU-ma- n,

...

6

Body Altered
As More ASTP Men Arrive;
Size Of ASTRP Is Reduced
Military-Studen-

Unil To Open
Drive Monday

MOAJ

PLAN

I

NUftAftO- -

Schlkelgruber will probably
have a tough time controlling himself.
Berlin Regrets
By the "Wehmacht," a Hitler instrument, it was announced that
although regrettable a Russian
had been accomplished. In this statement the Germans admitted a serious defeat, if
not a disaster. On the Dneiper,
Hitler has said "do or die" but they
just simply cant "dood" it. The
break-throuwas a distinct triumph for Russian tactics. Many
men and much equipment was
rushed to Russia but it was not
enough to "plug the leak in the
dam" as the Germans now find
themselves like the dams of the
Dutch which they have been trying to control for several years.
After two days the Russians had
opened a gap 28 miles wide and 16
miles deep making the Germans
evacuate many towns and a little
closer to the burned Reichstag
which Hitler decided had to go.
Perhaps now they will rebuild it
and Hitler "will have to go."

...

V

Post-Wa-

Number

Coed Service

The Coed Service unit of the
University,
a new organization
under the direction of the Women's
House President's council, will begin a campaign Monday to encourage women students to help in the
war effort.
The unit will ask each coed to
sign a pledge to help in the war ef- fort, and to list any activities in
which she will participate. Mimeographed blanks will be distributed
by house presidents and representatives.
The Student Union war effort
THAT J4
tAWfJVft.f 4
committee will be in charge of en.4
Yj.f.
rollment of Lexington students.
These persons are requested to
watch for a bulletin in the Union
to give exact date and time of en- -j
rollment.
Activities in which coeds are
asked to take part are the buying
and selling of war stamps: rolling
surgical bandages or knitting for
the Red Cross; doing volunteer
clerical work in the campus offices; taking first aid, home nursing, or nurse's aid courses; dona- ting to the Red Cross blood baric
(with parent's permission);
and
AsThe Student Government
acting as hostess for soldier's social
sembly will meet at 7 p. m,
programs.
Monday in room 204 of the
Members of the house president's
Union. The last regular meetcouncil are Margaret Davis, Miling was not held last Thursday
dred Jones, Ivalou Ross, Joan Henbecause of the War Chest drive.
dricks, Betty Broaddus, Elizabeth
Ann Hines, Eloise Ammerman,
Nancy Lee Bird, Helen Davis, Pat
Wallace, Mildred Buchanan Doris
Enlow, Amanda Hamblett, Helen
Arnold, Jean Ranyon, Lelia Nichols, Georgianna Young, Jean GalBilly J. Spragens Lebanon, was
loway, Frances Bell, and Ruth
installed as president of the YMCA-YWCBaker.
Freshman club Tuesday
Alice Freeman, Mary Elizabeth
night. Other officers installed were!
Stlgall, and Bernice Herman will
Betty Shelley, Lexington,
contact Lexington students.
and John Cashman,

.tj.

BDVaT v

German Jitters
The German home front has
been warned about the landing of
Allied preparations for amphibious
operations on a grand and versatile scale. This can possibly mean
one big thing again the Marines
have landed and have the situation
well in hand. Even with his

...

-

Government May Pay
r
Education
For

5. 1943

Women Asked
To Pledge Work
In War Effort

Hart-Kar- l.

Stadeat Government

RrtTO tit
J

-

AU. rr yry

A

Mf ONYOHAwOS
TO TW
NArcMTRAL .
MAvIL

lift.'.-

So Solly, Tojo
Premier General Hideki Tojo is
in the future to be the cause of all
the mistakes made by the honor- able descendants of the honorable
ancestors. We hope his people
won't hold It too hard for him
when after the surrender he publishes a paper with two words "So
Solly" and then with the meeting
of his ancestors in mind comes the

Kampus
Kernels

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

Z246

V

NEL

EC ENTUCKY

ON PAGE TWO

j

les department.
All women interested will be wel-

comed

I

at that

jjj js Name(J
As President
last

Cov- -

Ington, was elected president
Jewell hall.
Other officers elected were
Carolyn Hill, Carrollton, vice pres- ident; Charlene Burlss, Paris, sec- retary; and Jacqueline Wiedeburg,
Hore Cve. socinl chairman.

that

Logsdon To Speak
Dr. Richard Logsdon, head of the
library science department, will
speak on present and future opportunities in library work at 4
p. m. Monday, November 15 in the
Music room of the Union. This
will be the second In a series Of
vocational meetings sponsored by
Mortar Board.

time, she said.

After the final election
Thursday Nancy Lee Bird.

Student Directories will be
issued for the last time from 2
to 5 pjn. today In room 127 of
the Union building, Vincent
Spagnuolo,
Student Government association president, announced today.
Spagnuolo said
this
would be "positively the last
day that the directories will
be issued."

,
i

T

iiiiuaito

pledges initiated into the
Phalanx club recently are: Gene
Whicker, Clyde Cropper, Mason
Noyes, Fuzzy Wells. Arthur Scott.
and OrviUe Miller.
Six

Changes of the military student
body on the campus, including a
large reduction in the number of
ASTRP men. and the bringing in
of ASTP personnel
from other
schools, were announced today by
military officials.
At the end of their vacation Sunday night. 75 men of the ASTRP
who have not yet reached their
birthday, will return to the campus for further
training. Sixty-on- e
of the ASTRP
personnel were transferred
week to Purdue university, and the
remainder of the original 400 were
sent home and were placed on inactive reserve, awaiting call to active duty, it was said.
Approximately 390 men of the
ASTP have been transferred to the
University from Antloch college, the
University of Nebraska. Georgia
Teachers college, Grinnell college.
Pasadena Junior college. Sacramento Junior college, Chaffee Junior college, Ohio State university.
University of Mississippi, and John
B. Stetson college. These men will
begin classes on Monday and fol
low the same curriculum as other
ASTP personnel already on the
campus, officials said.
Men of the ASTP who have com
pleted their third quarter of training on the campus will be shipped
back to troops at the end of their
furlough. They will report To the
University Sunday night, and await
further orders.
Company E, which will largely
be composed of new men on foe
campus, will be housed in Boyd
hall Companies A and B, ASTP
students, will live in Breckinridge
and Bradley halls. The remaining
ASTRP personnel, Co. F. will be
housed in Klnkead hall. Company
C will remain In Patterson haU.
The curriculum of the ASTP students returning to the campus for
further training will not be altered. Approximately 1450 military
men will be on the campus Monday
when classes are resumed.

eighteenth

last

Pages In Kyian
Any organization
Interested
in having page in the Kentuckian must notify Mickie
Bogan, business manager, by
Friday, November 12. The Kentuckian office will be open
every afternoon from 1 until
4 pjn.. Miss Bogan said.

Angelo Eagon
Replaces Geiger
At Guignol
Angelo Eagon, instructor in English, has replaced Clarence Gejter
as technical director of Ouignol
theatre. He is also teaching history of the theatre.
Eagon, who received his A. B. at
Marshall college, W. Va . and his
Master's degree at the University
of West Virginia, is from Huntington, W. Va.
An accomplished concert pianist,
he studied music at the Cincinnati
conservatory. Cincinnati College of
Music, and at the Juilliard foundation. New York city.

S0 THLT
By Shirley Mebter
Question: What are yon going to
do with your "big opportunity"
Sadie Hawkins' week?
Betty Lee Fleishman, A AS. sophomore: I've been waiting a long
time for that week now 1 11 make
the most of It.
Lucille Clark, td, senior: We're
going to listen to Juke boxes,
drink nickel cokes, hell have to
laugh at my Jokes, and listen to me
talk about myself, and do all the
other things we girls put up with
the rest of the year.
Virginia Gregory. A AS. sophomore: Fm gonna get me a
man with black hair and
black eyes. He must also smoke a
pipe.
Pat Griffitt,
sophomore:
I'll get him anything he wants as
long as 25c holds out.
Ruth Ann Earnest. A AS, Junior:
Being engaged. I ain't got a
chance.
Jeanne Elliott, AAS, sophomore:
I'm gonna take him out and feed
him. (They say the way to a
man's heart is through his

.$,

* oesi oopy Avanaoie

The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Criu Rfpfrm an

PUBLISHED WEFRLY DURWO THE SCHOOL TEAR
PERIODS
EXCEPT HOLIDAYS OR EXAMINATION

1.

MEMBER

Presa Association

Board of Commerce
Kentucky Presa Association
National Editorial Association

Rminess

i

Mnnnrr

Folks in Uniform

LtYlng-to-

fO

MPMMMT

NATIONAL

JANET EDWARDS
Assistant Managing Editor
Society Editor
BETTYE MeCLANAHAN
Advertising Manager
VINCENT SPAGNUOLO
Circulation Manager
LEI.IA NICHOLS
Proofreader
BETTY 1 EVIS

0IttilM

National Advertising Service, Inc.

Iimm

CtU
AWuain
Nf
410 MOIOM AVI.
Cll(iH aocroa Lea aaatita

H

OHK.

a

N. Y.

All tlgned irticlew nd rolwmat are to be coftxfrfererf the
nerejt7rf
npintfrnt o th trriferr fliensefrea. aurf tfn
relerf he opimiom a) Th Krrnel.

at

A certain butk private in Co.
B was telling us the other day

about the latest advertising
scheme adopted by a certain
Lexington theatre which has
long been the butt of many,
many slams. Said the private:
"Jf you catch a WHITE rat.
von get two free tickets.".

It's Back To School For Many
If Education Bill Is Passed
iomsc1 to
President Roosevelt last week
Congress that servicemen and women lie allowed to return to. college after the war at government expense.
view of the
Taking an intelligent long-rangeducational problem created when hundreds of
thousands of undergraduate college students
were taken, into the armed forces, the President
recommended that provisions for the educational program be made immediately.
The President pointed out that if action were
taken on the proposal at once it would help to
maintain the high morale of our troops. The
morale factor assumes large pro port ions lor
those acquainted with the disillusionment ami
the pessimistic attitude toward the future taLen
by the impecunious college student, drafted
from his studies with little hope of completing
his education after the war. when he will lie
financially on his own.
The bill, developed b a committee of educators appointed by the President last November when the draft age was lowered to 18. provides for one vear's studv in a college or oilier
educational institution alter the war for even
qualified man or woman who serves six months
in the armed forces and desires additional education. A limited group of service jiersonnel
wiih special aptitudes would lx" cniiittei? to
carry on their education at government
for three xears.
The government would pav the tuition and
fees of each
student and also pav S."0
a month living expenses for single persons.
e

ex-jxn-

full-tim-

e

Halpert

Morale is a lot of things like
knowing what you're fighting for,
and how you feel about your outfit. It functions in a rather curious
way. and is built up in a sort of
pyramidal fashion.
a soldier first of
all believes in himself, and feels
that he mill always come through
in the pinch when his outfit nefts
him. His next loyalty is to his
squad, which he thinks is the best
squad in his company.
He will give you the impression
that he doesn't think too much of
the other squads, but let some
stranger make a remark about
them, and your GI will be ready to
fight, for he's convinced that even
the worst squad in his platoon is
better than any other outfit.

For instance,

Will Make a Pretense
Similarly, he will make a pretense of having no use for the
company across the street in his
battalion, but taken as a whole,
his battalion is unbeatable.
This
attitude is cumulative, reaching up
to divisions and armies, and the
American GI is thus convinced
that the United Nations have a
winning team.
With this complex set of attitudes, three different units of soldiers are living and training together on the UK campus: the
regular ASTP men, the ASTP Reserves, and the former ROTC juniors now attached to ASTP for

would like to be Kornel of the
Weak." We smiled and said.
"We are very sorry but we already have chosen the
Fred Hill, of Lexington, as the Kornel." But. we'
wanted to mention our little
friend, so all we can sav is this
week's NONDESCRIPT is Joe
Mettler,
student from
someplace or other. He doesn't
do anything on the campus,
and nobody knows who he is
and nobody cares either. He is
the "least known student on
the campus." So we just wanted
to toss a few ignominious remarks to an inconsequential
erson . . . oe Mettler.

e

That the proposal is not a political move is
indicated bv Roosevelt's indorsement of the
committee's recommendation that control of
the program be centered in the states, which
would be charged with the responsibility of
certifving. individuals to the government for
linanrial help.
With the rcMrt. the President sent Congress
a message saving that the nation is "morally
obligated" to provide training to equip service
jiersoiinel for gainful pursuits in peacetime and
that, moreover. tle nation itself will hae need
for trained men and women.
"We must replenish our supply of crsoiis
qualified to discharge the heavy resnsibilitles
of the Hist war world." he said. "We have
taught our youth how to wage war: we must
also teach them how to live useful and happv
lives in freedom, justice, and decencv."

Out of the armed forces numbering 12 million, it is estimated that a minimum of one
million might be expected to take advantage of
the free-e- uca tion offer. On this basis the cost
ol the program would he approximately one
billion dollars.
d

Congress, in debating the bill, would do well
to consider that in comparison with billions
sK'iit for defense, a billion spent to ensure the
kind of postwar America we are fighting for
fades into insignificance.

does not make our job less
important, and the best way we
can keep the faith with them Is to
do the job we've been assigned to
with the same spirit that they
have shown in theaters of operations.
We're AU In It
It will take everyone from the
Chinese guerilla and the Russian
infantryman to the British bom
but

aa

A blonde bov walked up to
us the father day and said, "I

Married students would receive S75 a month
students
plus SIO for each child. Part-timwould reteive tuition and fees.

Morale Is A Lot Of Things
By Saul

that

bardier and the American tanker
to win this war. And the total
effort for victory requires that every soldier on the campus do to
the best of his ability the job that

well-know-

pre-me-

"Strange ihiiU-

After Four Beers

In the early days, American pioneers were often faced with unusual
and unique problems arising out of
their conquest of the New World.
Their efficiency, in solving these
problems and their successful establishment of the United States of
America as one of the powers of
the earth have made them famous
the world over. In fact, Yankee Ingenuity in the face of new and un-

usual problems is expected to prove
the determining factor in the decisive vistory of the United Nations over the forces of the swastika and the rising sun in the pres-en- t
struggle. However, times have
training.
changed and the American fronemphasizes,
What ought to be
tier is gone. Has the period of
however, is the similarity rather Yankee ingenuity perished with
than any minor differences in the the frontier?
character of the several organizaIngenuity Goes On
tions. All the men are here together for one purpose: to acquire
to prove that it
An example
specialized training in technical hasn't is shown by the following
skills that will enable them to be story. A young Future Farmer of
more effective and more valuaCTe America was raising a flock of
soldiers to the Army and the cause sheep and. much to his dismay, he
of victory.
discovered that ail of the lambs
neither the
had tails, although
ASTP Is Important
Army considered ASTP im- ewes or the bucks possessed one.
The
portant enough to withdraw 150.000 Moreover, these long woolly tails
men from combat units
the dragged in the mud, and provided
equivalent of 10 full fighting di- the young lambs with a very cumbersome rumbleseat; He considered
visions and organize the specialized training corps. The Army's cutting off these unwelcome tails
action was not for the purpose of with an axe or a knife but it was
preserving the character of Joe his experience that such an opCollege in American
life. The eration might easily result in the
Army is righting a war, not run- loss of life. After considering the
problem for some time he finally
ning a school system.
The point is, we're all in this hit upon a plan that he believed
war together, and it will take all of might work.
He found his father's pick-ax- e
us including the civilians on the
home front to win it. Every man and put a metal handle in it so
in uniform on the UK campus has that it wouldn't burn. He then
an obligation to fulfill, to himself heated it to a white heat. When
and to the cause that uniform rep- the pick had reached the right
resents. The lot of the men in the temperature he pulled it from the
ASTP is certainly easier than that fire and stuck the pointed end into
of GI's in combat units' overseas, a convenient tree stump. Grab- -

-I

keep bearing pianos nppro:iclui;.;.

What Goes On There . . .
By Helen Carroll

Scandal struck Indiana U. last
week when the hint that a woman
had entered the barracks was uncovered by a company commander.
In a routine inspection of the Phi
Gamma house, the captain was
reprimanding the "housepoppa,"
Cadet Erik Simonson, for some dust
fingers
and dirt his white-glovrevealed. The cadet grinned and
beared this, but when the captain
opened one of those standing ashtrays in the