xt71rn30587h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71rn30587h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670227  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 27, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 27, 1967 1967 2015 true xt71rn30587h section xt71rn30587h "I

Inside Today9 s Kernel
A

er

page of pictures from the FoundBall: Poge Two.

The CIA fuss is merely a symptom,
not the problem: Page Five.

t

"The Medium" opens this Thursday in
the Lob Theatre: Page Three.

The Cats lose another;
Alabama: Page Six.

Editorial discusses the
situation: Page Four.

The second in a series of theological
programs was held Sunday: Page Eight

UK

housing

this one to

Vol. 58, No.

IS. IE m. JaT
University of Kentucky

Eight Paics

LEXINGTON, KY., MONDAY, FEU. 27, 1907

1(H

UK Political Scientists
Plan To Ask Impeachment
Of Two APSA Officials
By JOHN O'BRIEN

The Kentucky Kernel

1967

The two highest ranking ofAmerican Political
ficials
Science Association have become
the target of a movement of "national scope" which will be instituted by several members of the
Political Science Department-herin the "near future."
n
The officials involved, Dr.
M. Kirkpatrick and Max M.
Kampelman, have been involved
in the recent
dollar
CIA fund controversy.
Dr. Kirkpatrick serves as executive director of the APSA and
Mr. Kampelman is the organization's treasurer. However, their
role in the CIA controversy stems
from the fact that Kirkpatrick is
president and Kampelman is vice
president of Operations and
Policy Research Inc., an organization which government sources
say has been receiving CIA funds.
Dr. Fredrick J. Fleron, instructor of political science, said,
"At least eight of my colleagues
share my opinion that to have
them (Kirkpatrick and Kampelman) continue in their APSA
positions would be intolerable.
Were the negative effects of this
of-th- e

e

Ev-ro-

multi-millio- n

linkage to accrue only to them,
there would be no problem. But
these effects accrue to the association."
Mr. Fleron pointed out that
"there is enough trouble already
in doing research in foreign countries. This act raises the integrity
question to everybody in APSA.
"It was a risk Kirkpatrick and
Kampelman took. They didn't
have to do it," Mr. Fleron said,
but he would not predict whether
the
would
ouster attempt
be successful.
He said that one reason he
views the ouster attempt with

caucious optimism is because
"too many social scientists are
interested in getting their hooks
into government research money.
If they (the other members of
APSA) were to reject the impeachment for this reason, I
would find this totally disgusting."
Mr. Fleron said he and his
colleagues were not sure at this
point what form the impeachment procedure would take, but
it may be in the form of a petition or a nationally circulated
statement.
"I would be willing to start
a petition but I can't speak for

Polling Places Told
For A WS Election
9-- 6

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Ward.
Vice

President, Sue Hage-dorJulia Kurtz, Mary Alice

Panhellenic Representative,
Jennifer Burcham, Christine
Ellen Dunker, Jill Ceiger, Kathy
Crayson, Beverly Moore, Norma
Newett.
Town Women's Representative, Roxana Jacobs, Linda J.
Manning, Pat Nickell, Kathleen
M. Wall, and Patricia Diane
Wykstra.
Women's

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8

's

The Cows Come Home
Some of the cows sniffing around the base of one of the towers
in the new dormitory complex may have been yearning for her old
pasture. The complex is going up on a portion of the old Agriculture Experimental Farm.

More Cadets Leaving

In Air Academy Scandal
Bv MARTIN ARNOLD
New York Time

New t Service

an evening or a Sunday the eleva-rnr- c
COLORADO SPRINCS-- On
oaAimr rr tVip Air Fnrrp Aniflpmv's farnltv offices are blocked
by heavy chain gates that roll down from the ceiling six inches
in front of the doors.
guarded by an Air Force police
To pass through, a faculty man.
member must reach through the
The gates are the visible symelevator opening, turn a lock on bol of academic cheating, the
the chain gate and roll it up. more jarring because they are in
On a Sunday, when some facan institution which is operated
ulty members are working, one of under an honor system. They w ere
Continued On Page 7
the gates is kept open. But it is

n,

Shipley.

Residence Halls
Representative, Mary Korfliage,
Kelly Kurtz, Donna Kay Wyatt.
Senior Representatives, Patricia Fogarty, Joyanne Cocker-maVicki Knight, Jane E. Tier-naVicki Vetter, Cleo Vradelis.
Junior Representatives, Bunny Baldwin, Cathy Cropper,
Mary Jo Heathman, Jane Kling- -

LJLJL

n,

Kirk-patrick-

Polling places and hours for the AWS Senate election Wednes
day have been announced.
ner, Barbara B. Meyer, Rebecca
on Elizabeth (Libby) Politano.
Voting will be from
the first level of the Student
Sophomore Representatives,
in the lobby Peggy Diane Brown, Katherine
Center, from
of the Fine Arts Building, and (Kate) S. Elliston, Anne T. La
from 11:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. and
Master, Woodford
Reynolds,
4:30 p.m. 6 p.m. in the Blazer
Mary Ixni Swope, and Laurel
Hall lounge and the Complex
Vandemark.
Two class representatives will
Dining Hall. All women students are eligible to vote in the
be elected in each instance. In
election. I.D.'s must be prethe other races, the first runner-usented.
will become a regular memof candidates with ber of the Senate.
Rosters
The AWS Constitution says
information about each will be
the "slate shall include at least
distributed Tuesday evening in
two (2) nominees for president
the residence halls and sororiand for vice president. There
ties, according to AWS adviser shall be at least four (4) nomiSandra Kemp.
nees for each of the other elected
Posts open and the candipositions of the Senate."
Asked why there are only
dates for them are as follows:
three nominees for representaBrandenPresident, Beth
tive to Women's Residence Halls,
burg, Winnie Jo Perry, Jean
Continued On Pare 8
9--

the others in thedepartment right
now. We'll probably move slowly and try to cool off a little. At
we're
this
morally
point
outraged," he said.
Mr. Fleron said there is plenty
of time to develop a plan of
action because the annual meeting of the American Political
Science Association doesn't take
place until September.
The public became aware of
the CIA's contributions to private firms two weeks ago "when
it was discovered that the government agency had been giving
money to the National Student
Association since the early 1950 s.
Since then the list has grown
to include the International Student Conference in Leyden, the
Netherlands; the American Fund
for Free Jurists in New York; the
Foreign Policy Research Institute
of the University of Pennsylvania;
the National Education Association; the American Newspaper
Guild; and an "endless' number
of other national and international groups, according to
government sources.
When Mr. Kampelman was
asked if his organization had any
relationship with the CIA, he
said: "I don't know." Mr. Feron
did not know if the third member of the APSA hierarchy, Associate Director Don C. Tacher-sowas involved in Dr.
firm but stated that he
and his colleagues plan to investigate the matter.
Mr. Kampelman is a former
aide and personal friend of Vice
President Hubert Humphrey. Mr.
Fleron said he plans to bring
the impeachment issue up for
discussion at a political science
convention in two weeks but
feels that it "would not be appropriate to name the convention at
this time."
He stated that a nationally
circulated statement may be the
best method because it would
give Dr. Kirkpatrick and Mr.
Kampelman a chance to resign
their APSA positions.
Dr. Kirkpatrick has served as
executive director of APSA since
1934 and Mr. Kampelman has
been treasurer and general counsel of the organization since 1956.
Mr. Fleron feels that the involvement of the two association
officials will not particularly
damage political research relations with the Soviet Union. "It

New Law To Cost UK At Least $17,000
By JOHN A. ZEH
Kernel Associate Editor
It's going to cost the University at least
$17,000 in additional payroll yearly to comply
with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act
now that colleges are no longer exempt.
The University's payroll currently is about
$43 million a year.
The extra cost is not the only headache for the UK Business Affairs Office.
It has had to juggle the current pay-

labor, and pay rates have been necessary.
Briefly, they are:
hour work weeks have been
Forty-eigshortened to 44 hours, at no decrease in
pay. Food Service, Safety and Security,
Physical Plant, Heating Plant, and Agricultural Services are affected.
Overtime will be virtually eliminated now
that the rate is one and a half times the
regular wage. Special permission from the
department's appropriate vice president is
necessary before overtime will lx? permitted.
ht

roll budget, "robbing Peter to pay Paul,"
to find the approximate $8,500 compliance
Employes paychecks will lie smaller,
will cost for the remaining six months of the but they will come more often. Checks will
fiscal year.
be issued biweekly instead of semimonthly,
And several changes concerning minimum cutting up yearly salaries into 26 parts inwages, work week length, overtime pay, child stead of 24.

The 30 or so employes working for two
or more departments can now work for only
one. UK business manager Ceorge J. Ruschell
cited the example of a janitor working a
parking lot gate for a basketball game after
completing a full day's work, calling this
"moonlighting within the University."
Pay discrimination on the basis of

sex

is forbidden.
About 30 new jobs will be created by
these changes, mainly in the steam plant
and ixdice department, where
woik is absolutely necessary, Ruschell
said. More people will have to le added to
other departments by I960, when a maximum
work weeks becomes effective.
He noted that more supervisers are being
Continued on Pagr 3
round-the-cloc-

40-ho-

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* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb.

27,

1

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The Ball Was A Ball
The third annual Founder's Ball Saturday concluded

a

somewhat lackluster Founder's Week in which the traditional convocation was cancelled. Hut the relatively small
crowd at the dance enjoyed the music of the Dorsey orchestra, with Lee Castle, and otherwise had a ball.

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Photos by Dick Ware

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KENTUCKY

KTUNKC. Moml.iy, IYI. 27.

'Medium' Opening Set
For Thursday Evening
"It

Menotti's small opera, "The
"The Medium" tells the story
This was the reaction of Com- of Madam
Flora, a medium who
monwealth magazine's theatre
pretends to
when "The Medium" but who is contactanthe spirits,
critic
elaborate
just
opened in New York in 1917. trickster. However, during one of
Since that time Menotti's work her
seances she believes that she
has been hailed as an exciting
has been touched by an actual
American opera all over the world
and has proved to be one of his spirit. Terrified by this encounter,
she blames it on a mute whom
most popular works.
The Opera Theatre here will she has befriended and who is
be producing this modern classic in love with her daughter. Her
Thursday through Sunday in the frenzy over whether or not she
Laboratory Theatre of the Fine has been tricked culminates in
tragedy.
Arts Building.
is best
Mcnotti
his opera, Menotti
known to the American public saidDiscussing
"This opera symbolizes the
for his television opera, "Amahl
beof a person
and the Night Visitors," the tragedy two worlds acaught of
world
tween
first opera written especially for
she
television. But Mcnotti is also reality which and a can't wholly
comprehend,
supernatural
a Pulitzer Prize Winner for his
world in which she cannot beCondistinguished opera, "The
lieve."
sul," and has written not only
but ballets, plays, piano
opera
Appearing as Madam Flora in
concertos, and orchestra works. the production will be Phyllis
Jenness, an associate professor in
His operas have proved popular with American audiences the Department of Music, Director of the Lexington Singers
as indicated by breaking records
in places where American opera and former director of the Opera
Theatre.
is not usually received as popular entertainment.
Sheila House, voice instructor
seems to me that Cian-CarlMedium," is a masterpiece."

W

hm

ANDRE WATTS

Walls Piano (Doner rt

Sri WVdncMla) Nilil

seum.

The association does not sell
tickets for any individual programs, and attendance at Mr.
Watts' concert will be limited
holders and to
to season-tickUniversity students with validated ID cards.
Children under five will not
be admitted.
et

Continued From rage
added to see that efficiency of
employes is increased.
Echoing other officials across
the country, Ruschell is critical
of the
act for its
"blanket" coverage of colleges
without the exemptions that certain private businesses are allowed. For example, he said, a
restaurant near campus can hire
people at 85 cents an hour, but
UK, because it is an institution
of higher education, must pay the
minimum wage.
The hourly minimum wage increases gradually to $1.60 in the
1

d

newly-amende-

next five years.
The American

Council on
Higher Education in Washington
is trying to get the law's provisions defined. At least one suit
has been filed testing the act's
constitutionality as it applies to
colleges.

The law

is

not

"clear-cut- "

in its definitions of workers exempted from it, Ruschell said.
The only automatic exemptions
go to the legal and medical professions. "Bang, it hits us," he
said. "We didn't have much
to ask questions."
Federal officials "have told us
they will go easy" on checking
for compliance for a while, Ruschell said. "Besides I think all
the inspectors are too busy on
their phones clarifying the law.
But that won't last forever."
Additional costs in food services resulting from the policy
changes were anticipated and
provided for the last room and
board increase.
Student employes are covered
by the new law. Only a few have
been paid less than the mini

tmruetm
NOW SHOWING!

mum wage, Ruschell said, and adjustments will be made. His office is trying to decide what to
do in the case of a graduate
assistant who is paid for a certain number of hours a week,
but really puts in more. Some

courts have ruled that the employer must pay overtime, Ruschell said.
"We are also having a hard
time defining the work of vari-

like dorm counselors, housemothers, etc. They are
there 24 hours a day, but how
much do they really work? And
where do you draw the line be-

ous employes

tween an administrator and an
executive?" (The law allows certain exemptions, loosely defining administrators, executives.)
Robert F. Kerley, vice president for business affairs, has
issued a memorandum to UK administrators outlining his interpretations of the new
act. He says additional changes
in operation procedures may be
necessary as additional informa- -

2nd
Week!

ISUGGESTtO

m VAtl

MMtiiuSl

cinema
A

MELVIN FRANK

Production

WAFUNNV THING

HAPPENED
ONTriEWAYTO

since

sunscniPTioN

ratks

$8.00
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports

2320
2447

Advertising, Business,
Circulation

2319

Pin on a Dazzling
New Hairstyle

n
PHYLLIS JENNESS
in the Music Department, will be
musical director of the production. Charles Dickens, assistant
professor in the Department of
Theatre Arts and managing

For Formal or
Casual Affairs

...

CHIGNON

of the Centennial Theatre

by

will stage "The Medium."

BNMe

Bulletin Board
The College of Agriculture
and Home Economics will have
its annual awards banquet at
6:30 p.m. Thursday in the Student Center Ballroom. The
speaker will be Dr. Emol A.
Fails, of North Carolina State
University. Tickets are $2 each
and are available at the Dean's
office or from any member of
the Agriculture and Home Economics Council.

Let Billie blend a Chignon
to perfectly match your hair
while you wait, for only

$14.98

This week is the last week
for Kentuckian residence hall sittings. All men and women, except those in Complex No. 5

Call

233-137-

7

for appointment

BILLIE WHITE

and men's Cooperstown, must

call 2825 immediately or go to
Room 214, Journalism Building.

357

ROSE STREET

EUROPE TOUR

low-pai-

$628

Includes First Class Hotels, All Expenses
7 COUNTRIES
2 WEEKS
Phone254-117- 7
Ext. 134 9:30a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

TAYLORS
TROUSERS
SKIRTS
SWEATERS

La

EANERS

SUITS
DRESSES

TOPCOATS

-5

14 Socks, 8 Hanks

T-Shi- rts,

IN BY 9:00

...

'X?

1

1

3 DAYS ONLY

MARCH

r3

:ut"

y Stoll

Field

in

Win

COLOR by DLum

V UNIT

76c

OUT BY 4:30

EUCLID AT ROSE
L--

$ "fl.25

for $1.25 (on hangers only)

SATURDAYS TOO

v"i.

tO AKIISrS

14,15,16

2321

News Desk

d

time.

1915.

Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

Example: 8 Shorts, 8

THE FORUM"

BUX OFFICE NOW OPEN

ses

newly-amende-

Ipk-irift'i-

TROUSERS LAUNDERED - 50c
FLUFF DRY - 18c per pound

2nd FUN WEEK?

utcU4ii o w
luruki oo.nu

tttK jami's jurats

s.

SHIRTS

TtCHNlCOLOR

wmMA

14-d-

Un i vtr'-i- t v

PRICES

,

..(.

tion is supplied by the U.S. De- partment of Labor.
A special provision of the act
permits the University Hospital
to operate on a work period of
14 consecutive days for purposes
of overtime computation. Overtime is paid for work in excess
of 80 hours in the
period, since in medicine tradition
and personnel shortages often
cause scheduling shake-upThe assistant administrator of
the hospital, Richard Warren,
said he "doesn't have a real
notion" of what the
act is going to cost his
d
facility. In most hospitals,
workers got raises under the
new minimum wage rate.
Warren said some overtime
will be necessary despite the
Office of Business Affairs ruling
virtually forbidding it, since, for
example, "you can't stop an operation just because it's quitting

Tho Kf nttif ky KrrnH,
Ion. t'nivrrsity of

Krnturky 4nrir Second rl.n
post.igp paid nt I.oxincWi. Krnturky.
Published fivr timr wrrklv during
thr school yrnr rxtrpt holidays find
rx.im periods.
Published bv the no.ird of Student
Publications, UK Post Offirp Ilox 4SV"?.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
on the Cadet in 1R!)4 and
MeRun
published continuously ns the Kernel

"IRRCSISTIDLEI-i- fc

WAUDISNEY5

c

S

o

Fair Wage Act To Cost UK

:J

The Krnliicky Kmicl

Cian-Carl- o

The Central Kentucky Concert and Lecture Association will
present Andre Watts, brilliant
young piano soloist, at 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday at Memorial Coli-

Ili7--

EUCLID AT VOODLAND
ROSE AT LIMESTONE

Y

Med

Vrte.

OPEN 7 - 6

j'

Nt.

!)im

* The Kentucky Kernel

err

cr

rrr

The South' Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

MONDAY, FEB. 27,

1894

1967

EditoriaU represent the opinions of the Editors, not of tfie University.

Walter

M.

Grant,

Steve Hocco, Editorial fage Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

William

KNArr, Business Manager

Thoughts On Housing

The University this academic
year has made impressive strides
to end the old in loco parentis
philosophy which guided it for so
many years, but this progress seems
to be headed for some needless
slowdowns.
While the University is to be
praised for finally finding solutions
to its housing difficulties, the student may find himself asked to
pay the price for it not only in
dollars and cents but in the surrendering of his maturity. By September, 1968, all underclassmen
will have space available for their
housing.
This imples that virtually all
freshmen and sophomores, except,
perhaps, those who are veterans,
over 21 or married, will be required to live in University-provide- d
housing. We suggest that to
alleviate a student's choice to live
either on or off campus is an affront to his maturity.
When a student comes to the
University, it should be assumed
that he is a mature person, and
therefore capable of accepting the
responsibilities which accompany
maturity. A student should possess
the maturity which allows him to
us

President's Stand

President Oswald is to be commended for his televised statement
"public censure plays no part in
the athletic program," which he
made Thursday on a WHAS program.
The stand was obviously made
in reference to the highly questionable and ungentlemanly manner in which Basketball Coach
Adolph Rupp recently fired guard
Bob Tallent from the Team. Oswald added that he had "called
both (Athletic Director Bernie)Shi-vel- y
and Rupp" to "make it clear
to them" that he did not approve
of public censure.

The Tallent incident brought
e
to a head a series of
radio programs with announcer
Claude Sullivan in which Rupp
has verbally whiplashed his playpost-gam-

ers numerous times. We cannot
but wonder how ethical it is for
an angry coach to go on the radio
immediately following a game, especially when the coach shows as
little restraint as does Rupp.
The Kernel has previously been
critical of big time athletics within
the University framework, and remains so. We have criticized Football Coach Charlie Bradshaw as
wcl! as Rupp for their "total athletics" programs. But we must at
least commend Bradshaw for never
pubicly throwing mud at one of
his athletes and for acknowledging,
from time to time, his own coaching errors.
Coach Rupp, on the other hand,
needs to learn a lesson in humility. Perhaps Dr. Oswald will
prove to be an effective teacher.

if he desires, withlive
out becoming a disciplinary problem for both the City of Lexington and campus authorities.
It should also be assumed that
a student has entered the University to obtain an academic degree and the knowledge which accompanies such an achievement;
where the student lives is irrelevant to this goal.
We believe that University housing is not only good but that it
is essential, for there are many students who prefer to live on campus, for pecuniary and other reasons.
But to force a student to live
in University housing, just because
the room has been built and the
University has to pay for that room,
or because the University feels that
a student, is not mature enough to
live as he desires, is not in keeping with an academic framework
which should expect a student's
maturity and his sincere desire to
obtain an education wherever he
lives.
off-camp-

fx
The Kentucky Kernel

'Are Yon Thinking What I'm Thinking?'
(OR, A penny for your thoughts!)

Letters To The Editor:
CIA-NS-

Issue: Why Should U.S. Be Ashamed?

A

To the Editor of the Kernel:

It seems a pity that certain
officials must now deny association with NSA for fear of Communist attack on the United States
government. Why, after all, should
we publicly admit that we fight
Communism not only with human
bodies, military aid, rehabilitation
d
of
countries, etc.,
but also with financial aid to student organizations within our country? Student organizations, I might
add, which strive to preserve
ideals?
under-develope-

pro-Weste-

rn

After all, the United States cant.
We can
not be publicly
send our college students to die
in a vaguely defined war in Southeast Asia to support "Western"
political philosophy, but, oh, my
goodness! let us not come right out
and say that we support Western
thought in student organizations!
pro-Wes-

We have learned to fight fire

with fire. We fight

Communist-backe-

d

d
funds to
nations with U.S. funds. We fight
Communist troops in Southeast
Asia with U.S. troops. We fight
ideology with ideology. And yet,
we fear to admit our support of
the NSA. We could do so, it seems,
in the 1950's, because the NSA was
in financial straits in its attempts
to counter the wave of Coinnuinist
backed student organizations in
this country. But to publicly acknowledge this fact would be a diplomatic faux pas.
under-develope-

Since when has the U.S. government been so concerned about

public or international opinion?
If it were, indeed, so concerned,
there would be no sense in its
participation in such an unpopular war as is the one in Vietnam.

"law of supply and demand," to
expect that where there is a demand or a scarcity, there will come
about some means to fill this de-

Good God, can we not be a
States as the Communists
are so openly
Diplomacy exists, I admit, in
the international propaganda of
the U.S.S.R. and Red China. But
they follow an ideology which is
clearly definable through all that
they do (if not all that they say).
They tend more toward the
in actions than to the
varied shades of grey which the

Education is perhaps the most
worthwhile endeavor that the
United States of America advocates. Every year the expense of
higher education rises. If one does
not have a rich "sugar-daddy- "
to
support him, agencies such as the
Carnegie Foundation, the Ford
Foundation, and, yes, even the CIA
help to fill this need.
It amazes me to see our public
applaud the social benefits of the
Great Society when it is doing some
good in raising the status of our
poverty-stricke- n
Negro populations,
yet cringe with fear because this

pro-Unit-

ed

black-and-whi- te

United States has so frequently
displayed. I suggest that there
is something admirable about an
admission of intent a "stand," in

mand?

fact.

same government aids, covertly or

suggest that grey (however
common) is an irritating color in
international relations. I would
hope that someone will wipe the
embarrassed blush from his face
and take a definite stand in support of the United States government's policies.
Julie Anne Bcasley

otherwise, the American student in
holding up his head at world student meetings.

I

A&S

Sophomore

Supply And Demand
Are Americans really so shocked

and horrified that the CIA would
dare to do such a terrible thing
as support American students?
Don't we know enough about some
of the basic laws of economics, such
as "the law of scarcity" and the

The shock would have been the
same to the public had it been
the John Birch Society that supported these students. No great
shock, however, is shown when
students from Communist countries, supported by their governments, attend these world meetings.
When is the American society,
"intellectespecially the
ual community," going to awaken
to the realities of life? Santa Claus
is just a figment of one's imagination, or, as the Latin American
would say, "Gratis se Murio!"
Angel E. Trujillo
A & S Senior
so-call-

* MiJnriay, Fc5 27,'

THE'.kENTUCKV-.kERNE-

Washington Insight

CL4 Fuss
By JOSEPH KRAFT
WASHINGTON
Everybody knows that unstable people react to the complexities of
modern life by aligning themselves with the extremes of right
and left.
Hut how about us undoctri-nairproblem-solver- s
of the center? How do we cope with diffiin scale, reculties
mote in cause, and with many
facets only obscurely connected?
The answer, I think, is that
we trivialize. We focus on matters symbolically related to what
really bothers us, but much simpler to understand. And that, I
believe, is what the current fuss
over the Central Intelligence
Agency is all about.
Intrinsically the agency's
practice of giving secret support
to groups of students and other
private persons is a trivial affair.
It did not debase free institu- -

-

e

super-huma-

n

7iWW!,
'Oh,

Is

He C.I.A.?

I

I,

imrifM

ii

Thought He Wo F.B.I.'

Mauldin in The Chicago

Sun-Tim-

tions nor baffle unfrce ones. Fifteen years of it have had less
effect for better or worse than
one day of the Vietnam War or
the civil rights struggle.
But symbolically the agency's
dark practices are related to a
problem that bothers us all. It
is the problem of how we run

the country.
Like it or not, the country
is dominated by large units-b- ig
companies, big unions, big
cities, big universities, big government and mass media. These
large institutions are staffed by
faceless bureaucracies. They are
increasingly led by faceless man-

Is Only A Symptom

tervailing wwer" as Prof. J.
Kenneth Calbraith once called
it, has been our surety for competition, initiative and change
for a free society.

But recently conflict has more
ami more given way to working
partnerships arranged in invisible inside bargains among
managers. There has
been a harmony, a universal
like-mind-

interpenetration among government, business, labor, education,
and communications. We are all
part of a seamless web a system.

I think, and I think most
people think, the system works.
But it is clear that there have
been some shabby bargains in
the past, some harmonics achieved at heavy cost to some
groups notably Negroes and
poor people.
What, is worse, we are really
never certain as to how well or
ill the system is working. For
institutions are too interconnected, causes and effects too
much mixed up, heroes too much
like villains, for anybody to define trouble spots with confidence, or affix responsibility with
clarity.
All thoughtful people, accordingly, are unremittingly anxious,
doubtful about the social bargains we have struck, uneasy
about the partnerships between
traditional opposites.
All of these doubts and misgivings have found the solace of
an emotional jag in the case of
an intelligence agency known
to practice black arts working
secretly with institutions supposedly pure in heart. The young
have had a chance to blow the
whistle on their elders and to
do it not through an established
publication but through one that
expresses their worst doubts
Ramparts Magazine.
Precisely because so much
emotion is at stake, it is im- -

portant to settle the present trouble sensibly and with dispatch.
This means spinning off to other
agencies all of the CIA's commitments in the fields of education and culture. It means setting
up an effective review brochure
not one dc)endcnt on eople
with a hundred other things to
do for assessingall agency operations and periodically killingoff
those which have outlived their
use.
Hut no one should oppose
that doing these things is going
to make much of a difference.
For the truth is that the whole
CIA fuss is only a trivial expression of the far deejKr pain
that comes from living in a world
without clean boundaries and

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