xt71rn305924 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71rn305924/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19701208  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  8, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  8, 1970 1970 2015 true xt71rn305924 section xt71rn305924 Fired Professors to Speak Out at Forum

By MIKE MILAM
Kernel Staff Writer
Four UK professors all of them to
be fired at the end of the academic year-w- ill
join several University administrators on a forum to discuss the subject
of "hiring and firing" and "publish or
perish" in a two-paprogram Wednesday
in the Student Center Ballroom.
rt

The program, sponsored by the Student Government, will be held in two
sessions, the first at 1 p.m. and the
second at 7 p.m.
Cene Mason, assistant professor of
political science, will head a
platform at the 1 p.m. segment, vhen
he will speak on "The UK Administra
three-speak-

THE

tion and the Eichmann Dilemma." Byron
Petrakis, assistant professor of English,
and Wimberly C. Royster, dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, will round
out the afternoon session.

Mason has been a center of controversy since he was convicted of a felony
last summer in Fayette Circuit Court.
Recently the political science teacher has
charged the FBI with intrusion into his
class.
Byron Petrakis is one of three members of the English Department's faculty
whose contracts are not being renewed.
The other two English professors, Clayton Reeve and Patrick White, will speak
at the evening forum.

Student Government President Steve
Bright, who organized the forum, said
there is more than considerable interest
for students in the hiring and firing of
faculty members. "There's a petition in
the Political Science Department containing some 2,000 names of interested
students," Bright noted. The petition objects to the firing of Mason.
"So it seems to me that we should
get some idea of the controversy," Bright
said, referring to the forum. "It also will
give the administrators a chance to give
their side of the story."
There was some mention that Don
Shall, vice president of the National Student Association, would attend, but Bright

TUCKY

ECEMNEL

Tuesday, Dec.

University of Kentucky, Lexington

8, 1970

9-- 4.

Because of controversy surrounding the recent Student Government elections. Speaker Buck
Pennington cancelled the Student
Covemment meeting scheduled
for last Thursday night.
But meetings may be called
by the SG speaker, the president, or a petition of at least
seven members and seven repre-

sentatives decided to reschedule
the meeting for Friday night.
Pennington said he had cancelled the regular meeting because he was "un sure what co urse
of action the assembly should
take at this time" and was "not
aware of whether the election
itself was validated and whether

,

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biased Elections Board, with the
exception of the chairman," was
Each of the three motions tabled with a vote of
introduced condemned the ElecCumer, a Student Coalition
candidate who was disqualified,
tions Board ruling that disqualified the Student Coalition party said he felt the Elections Board
and its candidates, although only had in effect said "some rules
are more important than others"
one motion passed.
Representative Lynn Mont- and that the election results had
y
dealt
gomery moved "that this assem- been
bly go on record as saying. . . with."
V"
S;
A third motion, by Lynn Montthat the students of this University be represented by their gomery, stated that". . . in the
elected and designated represen- future no candidates shall stand
tatives at the properly scheduled in jeopardy because of their
time and. . . that this assembly friends and their enemies, and
Kernel Photo By Dick Ware
will not tolerate the authoritarian that actions committed by a party
dismissal of said students' will have no effect on the canSophomore Hobie Thomas got into the spirit of Christmas by
rights . . ." The motion passed didacies of the party members
unless members of said party helping decorate the Student Center Christmas tree, a part of the
64.
activities of Peace, Love and Brotherhood Day held Sunday. The
Jeff Cumer's motion that "the have contributed to the particular action of that party." The program replaced the traditional "Hanging of the Creens" but
assembly condemn the questionit was still obvious what holiday was being celebrated.
able actions of the obviously motion was defeated

the elected representatives could
have taken seats Thursday."

Kernel Staff Writer

h

p;

Vol. LXII, No. 61

Rescheduled SG Meeting Debates
Election Board Disqualifications
By NANCY WEBB

r-rh-

stated that Shall would not make the
trip. Shall was to talk on the hiring and
firing of faculty members on other college
campuses.
The speakers at the night forum will
be Clayton Reeve, assistant professor of
English; Patrick White, assistant professor
of English; lewis W. Cochran, vice president for academic affairs; Stephen Manning, chairman of the English Department; and Carrett Flickinger, Privilege
and Tenure Committee chairman for the
University Senate.
"Since it's late in the semester, I expect a small but interested group of students to attend," Bright said. "After all,
the credibility of the University is at
stake."

"high-handedl-

In the Spirit

8-- 4.

Hoivard U. Refuses Use of Facilities

Convention Turns Into Panther Defense
-

In
WASHINGTON (CPS)
the wake of federal harassment,
Black Panthers and 5,000 of their
supporters gathered in Washington for the convening of the
Peoples Constitutional Convention.
It never happened.
At a press conference early
Friday morning Nov. 2- 7- the scheduled start of the conference-par- ty
Deputy Minister of Education Elbert "Big Man" Howard
told reporters that negotiations
with projected host Howard University had fallen through. The
Panthers had previously been de--

with insurance loss if the convention occurred in the promised
three buildings and the school's
"administration" capitulated to
the pressure.
While sleeping arrangements
and food were provided by the
Panthers, cites for the multitude
of workshops, plenary and drafting sessions could not be secured. The result was a shortened weekend event, more like a
test of those there in their
support of the Panthers, and an
indication of the direction of the
American radical movement.
The convention had been

proach for uniting black, Third come expecting to be able to meet
World and white people.
together without having to hassle
the logistical problem of walking
Ad hoc workshops did coalblocks and blocks just to find
esce Friday afternoon and continued through Saturday and the people they were meeting
Sunday. About 1,500 women met with, under the threat of police
at Trinity College, a Catholic intervention, since thousands of
Women's school. Other groups people were streaming up and
like Cay Liberation and people down the streets all day and
from localized geographic areas, night.
and men who wished to discuss
Earlier, on Friday night, a
their own chauvinism, met in or mass rally of 5,000 flocked to
around Malcolm X Park or one Malcolm X Park to hear calls
for the liberation of Howard and
of the two churches.
The workshops, which were to the music of the Panther band,
the Lumpen. Saturday evening,
have been directed toward honing down proposals for sections Huey P. Newton addressed a
of the new constitution, were
often consumed with reacting
against the objective conditions
people found themselves confronted with: no site for their
convention.
nied use of Washington's federal called originally to map out a
All of this was done in the crowd of about 1,500, inside and
exoutside Washington's St. Stecontext of tremendous uncertainArmory and the campus of the revolutionary constitution,
tracted from workshops and plen-ariUniversity of Maryland.
ty and confusion. People had phens Church. Many people, exthat occurred during and
Conflicting stories abound for
pecting a constitutional convention and disappointed with its
the reasons of the Howard situa- after the summer preliminary session in Philadelphia. That event
tion: Panthers claim a down payabsence, had left the city by the
ment on facilities was refused drew 10,000 participants, 70 perevening of Newton's speech.
cent of them black.
Newton was preceeded by
while spokesmen for the univerForecast for Lexington and
sity cite the Panthers' inability
In Washington, perhaps a vicinity: Partly cloudy and warm- Michael Tabor, one of the New
York Panther 21, arrested a year
to meet payments by deadline. tliird of the 5,000 were black. er
today and tonight. Increasing and a half
Howard, a black middle-clas- s
ago for the bombing
cloudiness and warmer WednesThe convention's constitution
Naming
school, is federally charted and
day. High temperature today, conspiracy charges. as "world
run by a congressional commit- was to have pressed for revolunear 50; low tonight, 32; high American imperialism
tee. Its president, James E. Cheek tionary demands from the existing temperature tomorrow, 60. Pre- enemy number 1" Tabor called
ourselves with
for blacks to
has not commented on the affair. power structure, served as a guide
cipitation probabilities today 5 the oppressed "ally
communities of the
However, there is indication that for a future socialist America, percent, tonight, 20 percent
world" and to shed the "con- the university was threatened and become an organizing ap

Huey Newton tells crowd - 'The
revolution is not tomorrow.9

stricting" and "false" ideology
of black nationalism. Citing
China, Algeria and Korea as examples of expression rising up
against oppression and seizing
Tabor urged his .listeners to follow their examples.
"We resolve," he said, "to
liberate our communities in order
that we might serve the true
interests of the community." The
primary forms of oppression, Tabor said, were capitalism, imperialism and racism.
While Tabor spoke several
times of the existence of the
constitutional convention, New- self-contr-

Blacks told to ally with 'oppressed,
world communities.9

es

Weather

ton said it is "absurd to hold
a constitutional convention while
we're enslaved." Reflecting apparent differences in the leadership of the party, Newton said
he understood how people felt
"disturbed and confused."
"A raincheck," Newton said,
"should be put on the convention until we have liberated
Washington. Newton expressed a
willingness for accepting criticism of the party's actions and
his speech. In that speech, he
introduced the theory of
on Pace 8, Col. 1
"inter-Continu-

* KENTUCKY KERN FX, Tcs.!ay, Drrcmlicr 8, 1970.

2-- TIIF.

Scholarship Funds Sought
For UK Black Students
The King Scholarship Committee has launched a special
emergency fund drive to raise
money for UK black students.
According to Mrs. Evelyn
about
Black, secretary-treasure- r,
$2,000 is needed to pay for books
and tuition for 12 students who
are attending the University on
King Scholarships awarded this
fall. As yet, only $267 is available to help these students.
Committee members are attempting to raise funds for the

special emergency drive by soliciting money from the faculty,
staff, students and friends.
In addition, the Committee
is sponsoring a movie, "A Raisin
in the Sun," which will be shown
at the Student Center The ate at
1
p.m. and 3 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday Dec.
Contributions
to the King
Scholarship Fund are
and may be sent to
Mrs. Evelyn Black, School of
Social Professions, Patterson Office Tower.

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The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40900. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Hox 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1913.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
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* .THE KENTUCKY KENKEL, Tuesday, Dot emlicr 8,

Record Review

'Superstar' Rock Opera Sells a Million
-

Christ
Superstar," a who wrote the music, and Tim
set on Decca records. Rice, 26, who wrote the words,
are amazed that on Nov. 16,
By MARY CAMPBELL
two and a half weeks after the
AP Newsfeatures Writer
A big demo record has
just record went on sale in the United
States, it has become a gold
turned gold. It is "JesusChrist
Superstar," a rock opera which record, meaning $1 million in
is a two-L- P
set on Decca, about manufacturer's sales.
the seven last days of Christ.
They always had in mind a
Andrew Lloyd Webber, 22, staged work, the British-bo-

"Jesus

1970- -3

two-L-P

composers say. But they didn't
think two unknown writers without a performing group of their
own had much chance getting
it staged. So they made the recordto be a good record, Rice
assures-a- nd
to be a big demonstration record of what "Jesus
Christ Superstar" could be like
on the stage.
Now, with the record a hit,

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Who the Hell
are we?
We belong to the 21 national fraternities
at UK and we'd like to destroy a few myths
about ourselves.
Myth 1. Guys who join fraternities are
ticket to
just looking for a first-clas- s
"estabstatus selling out to the

they have made a deal to have
their modem Passion Play performed, probably on Broadway,
and to have full artistic control
over the production.
Most reviews, and there have
been many, of "Jesus Christ-Supers- tar"
have been very favorable. Webber says people who
like hard rock or people who like
entirely rock or entirely classical,
won't like it, since it contains
several musical styles.
He says clergymen have liked
it. Those who have thought it
was blasphemous are peoplewho
used to go to church and don't
go any more, who think that
church things should remain the
same and not be touched by
rock music.
Another criticism the writers
expect is from the underground,
which tends to suspect anything
on which a record company
spends promotion money, which
the establishment press approves
and which established churchmen approve. However, so far,
reviews in the underground press
have been mostly favorable.
When "Jesus Christ Superstar" was played for New York
reporters in St. Peter's Lutheran Church, on Oct.27, it was announced as a quest for truth by
today's youth. Judas thinks that
Jesus probably isn't really the
son of Cod, but he isn't sure.
In the title song, Judas sings.

up."

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Ask.
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lishment."

Myth 2. The guys in any given fraternity
are all stereotypes of each other a clique
on the crutches of group security.
Myth 3. Joining a fraternity is the best
way to lose your individuality. Frat guys
come out of college spouting the same
philosophy of
meaningless
"Don't bug me unless it makes me
lot of bread."
a
We say this. We know those statements
just aren't true. Not today. Because times
have changed. Values have changed.
People have changed.
And so fraternities have changed for the
better. But the only way for you to find
out for yourself whether fraternity life
could be a great part of your life, is to
meet the guys who belong to them.
That's us. And we're looking forward to
meeting you. We will be in the Residence
Halls' Cafeterias December 7, 8, 9 to
explain our new rush system. Or come by
the Interfraternity Council Office, Room
208 of the Student Center, between 5
p.m. any weekday.

'"Jesus Christ, Superstar, do You
think You're what they say You
are?"
Rice says, "We don't want
the idea that Christ was Cod or
wasn't to be dominant. We want
the idea that if He was Cod He
was also a man. It's a very
human story."
He says they aren't trying to
convert anybody either to or away
from religion, and they hope that
nobody's previously formed beliefs will be shaken. "We find
Christ as a fascinating man who
had his ups and downs a remarkable bloke."
Musically, Webber says,
"There are two places I want
to get an emotional reaction. 1
want people to be moved by the
Carden of Cethsemane bit and
to be shattered by the end. 1
would like people to listen to it
as a work, forget it is about
Jesus and see whether it stands

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* The Kentucky

Iernel

UnIVI NSITY OF KENTUCKY
ESTABLISHED

1894

TUESDAY, DEC. 8, 1970

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Frank S. Coots III,
Bob Brown, Editorial Tage editor
Joan Kcnakrr, Managing Editor
Mike Ticrncy, Sports Editor
Dahlia I lays, Copy Editor
David King, Business Manager
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Jane Brown, Hon Hawkins, Bradley Jeffries, Jerry Lewis, Mike Wines.
Assistant Managing Editors
Editor-in-Chi-

tV".

Firing of Teachers: Why?

i

Some of UK's best teachers are being fired for the most unacceptable
reasons. Lack of valid information leading to their dismissal, ignorance
of tactics to be used in support cf the teachers and bureaucratic frustration cause concerned students to splash about in helpless confusion.
A Student Government forum on hiring and firing of faculty seeks
to fill in some of the gaps which engulf students. The forum will be
held tomorrow, Wednesday, December 9, in the Student Center Ballroom. Some of the exceptional teachers who are being fired will participate on the forum, as well as those administrators who are responsible
for the dismissals.
The 1 o'clock session will consist of speeches by Drs. Gene Mason
(Political Science) and Byron Petrakis (English) and Dean Royster of
the College of Arts and Sciences. These three speakers should provide
an informative experience. Much of the university community is especially
anxious to hear why Dean Royster is dismissing two of his most

dedicated teachers.
A panel discussion will be held Wednesday night at 7 o'clock.
Clayton Reeve, Stephen Manning and Patrick White (all in the
Gene Mason (Political Science), Garrett Flickinger (Chairman of the Privilege and Tenure Committee) and Vice President for
Academic Affairs Lewis Cochran will participate. Flickinger has prostituted his position as faculty defender to the whims of his administrative superiors; his reports of what action the faculty feels appropriate
will be especially anticipated.
For many years the firing of faculty members has been unjust,
capricious and politically motivated. These conditions have been passed
over lightly until a few of the faculty members involved decided to
expose some of the reasons for their dismissal. This process of resistance
has not been an easy one for the teachers involved. They must be
respected for their fortitude.
The teachers who have been fired have expressed a sincere concern
that this institution rise above the concept of education it now employs.
It is altogether appropriate that both the executed and the executioners
be given the opportunity to express their grievances before the students
and faculty who are so directly involved.

English-Department-

Creeping Insensitivity
The official toll is 200,000 dead
and missing. With 90 percent of
the rice crop destroyed the casualties are sure to rise. The number
of corpses is so high they are simply
left in the fields to decompose.
So read the descriptions of the aftermath of the East Pakistani cyclone
and tidal waves.
It is admittedly difficult for
Americans, reading their morning

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Winston

"By the powers vetted In
hereby declare each of you

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STRANGELY ENOUGH?

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Collegiate Preis Service

Kernel Forum: the readers writel
A Conditional

Plight of the Poor

Welcome to SC

To the Editor:
The attitude of too many Americans

To the Editor:

toward poor people was summed up by
one man: "That's just tough, lady", and
for social workers "Wake Up!"
That's just what has happened to too
few. They have "awakened" to just what
a "tough" situation the poor in our state
and country live in.
It's appalling to see such an attitude
of unconcern toward people in poverty.
But a distance, both physical and mental,
from any situation, can breed hostility,
indifferences, and a generally detached
attitude.
It is this very detachment which must
have us in its grip, or why would
conditions as the poor live in
foot long rats, empty cupboards, substandard plumbing and heating, insufficient and inadequate clothing. If we
haven't seen it and merely read of it,
it can't be real so we remain detached.
Is it our right to judge how or why a
situation has arisen before we are willing to try to help alleviate its victims?
That seems to be our attitude toward the
a judgmental one followed by
poor
either indifference or sympathy.
Or are we detached because of judgmental reasons as the worth or merit of
our time, energy, finance? The reality
is here; it's time for all to "Wake Up"
and see how "tough" it is.
CAROLE WUERSCII
A&S Senior

A recent editorial in the Student Coalition newspaper, The Kentucky Wildcat,
branded the $15 expenditure limit in
the Student Government elections "unreasonably low" and "a repressive and
unjust legislation and impossibly difficult to enforce" since anyone could
disqualify any candidate by spending
over the limit in his behalf. They claim
their candidates were not responsible
for the advertisements in the Kentucky
Wildcat favoring them and invoke the
First Amendment as giving their newsdepaper the right to print "anything it
overof any
sires,, regardless
broad student assembly rule."
Now, as any reader of that worthy and
unbiased publication knows, the political
ads in the Kentucky Wildcat did not appear to have been designed by enemies
of Student Coalition. It would then, appear that if not SCP, then at least its
friends have put the SCP candidates in
grave danger of disqualification in order
to show the unreasonableness of the election regulations. This would be an admirable case of civil disobedience if
only it had been announced beforehand
as such.
The difference between an act of civil
disobedience and a blatant violation of
rules for convenience is that civil disobedience requires that the violation be
acknowledged from the outset and that
the persons involved be willing to accept the punishment prescribed for violators. The Student Coalition has not,
as yet, met either of these criteria, but
they are new in the protest business and
should be excused some lapses in their
application of the theory of civil disobedience. In view of this, we feel that
if the Student Coalition will confirm
the truth of our theory, that all who
choose to be men first and subjects
second should spare no effort in welcoming Student Coalition members into
the ranks of dissenting students.
TOM NICK ELL
A&S Senior
BOB AS 1 1 FORI)
A&S Freshman

we-allo-

half-bake-

newspapers over their plentiful
breakfast tables, to identify with
the Pakistani victims, but if we do
not feel any bond at all then we
must take a deep look at what is
happening to us.
In a recent column James Reston
said "A decent,
people somehow do not
act upon and often do not even
think about the information they
have, not because they are wicked
or pitiless but because they do not
feel what they know, or if they do,
think they are helpless to do anything about it."
Have Americans become so conditioned to the reverence of objectivity that as a people we have
lost the value of certain kind of
subjectivity and emotion necessary
for community with other peoples
that is, a real sharing of the pain
as well as the Joy of a common
being? And even if this bond is
felt have we lost so much respect
for ourselves that we feel impotent
as individuals and often because of
fear of
fail to act?
Janis Ian, a rock singer, touches
another strand of the same thought
in one of her songs:
"You're ail against the Viet
Nam War you make it plain
You go to all the marches in an
ecstasy of fame but you
couldn't spare a quarter for
a blind man on the comer
standing there in the rain."
fair-minde-

,VKA

A Social Responsibility
To the Editor:

unemployAfter reading of the 5.8
ment rate in the United States today I
am increasingly aware of the social
responsibility that the government has
for those whom the economic system
cannot contain.
I am often appalled at the illusion
that many citizens have of a "parasitic
subculture of lazy people" who prefer
to loaf rather than work. They are failing to realize that when jobs are not
available the first to be affected are
those who do not have a specific skill
or little formal education. And in turn
these are the ones whom society has
EDITOR'S NOTEj All letters
deprived of training and education.
and not
tor must be typed, double-spacePeople must begin to realize that if
mure than 250 words in length. The they are to be participants in our demowriter must sign the letter and give classi-,- ; cratic government it is our responsibility
ftcation, address and phone number. Send to provide for those persons for whom
or deliver all letters to Room 113-of; our economic system cannot provide jobs.
the Journalism Building. The Kernel re--,
CHERYL CALLERY
serves the right to edit letters without
College Social Professions
Senior
changing meaning.
,

d

.

* 1

"1 --

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.THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, December 8,

-

CLASSIFIED

CUtnlded advertising will be aeeeptrd
n a pre-pai- d
basis only. Ads may be
plarrd In person Mandar tbroefh
Friday ar by mall, payment Incl.sed,
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prlar ta pablleatian. Na advertisement
may clta race, religion ar national
arlfln ae a qaallfleatlan far renting
rooms ar for employment.

1970- -5

-

FOB RENT
EFFICIENCY apartments $120 per mo.
plus electric. Mid-tow- n
Terrace, 256
Lyndhurst PI. See Mgr. Basement
1D8
Apt. or phone
efficiencies
to 6
person units. $90 up. Adults. SpeHnl
rates for doubling up. Between
n.
Nice.
2
FOR RENT Sub-leamodern efficiency, $120 plus electricity. One block
from campus. Call Kathy at UK ext.

8D10

REWARD
LOST Long, red beaded necklace on
campus Mon Nov. 23. Sentimental
1D8
value. Reward. Call
REWARD Hazel's
Dec. 2
from Maxwell, Rose, to Fine Arts.
Gold monogram. Initials HRC. Deep
value.
Reward.
Call
sentimental
4D10

...

ONE BEDROOM AND EFFICIENCIES
furnished
Completely
apartments
for rent. Also apply now for the
spring semester with semester leases
available.
TOWN and COUNTRY
APTS.. 444 South Ashland,
or
8D10

MISCELLANEOUS

SERVICES

SUMMER EUROPE $199
May
14. New York to Amsterdam round trip. 'Price based on 60
passenger occupancy. Open only to
studenU and educational staff and
their immediate families of UK. Call

PIANO TUNING
Reasonable prices.
All work guaranteed.
Trained by
Stelnway & Sons ln New York. Mr.
2D-F- 3
Davies,

Jfvfes...

Shiver

FOR RENT Furnished apt. close to
campus. 468 Rose Ln. Available for
8D10
Spring Semester. Call

To be number one in line for tickets of UK's first home basketball
game of the season Saturday night, it meant arriving at Memorial
Coliseum's door at 2:30 in the afternoon for these UK students and
Kernel Photo By biu Craig
being prepared for a long, cold wait.

Jill,

8.

23N-D1-

TYPING

0

EXPERIENCED typist will do theses,
dissertations, research notes, manuscripts, resumes, etc. on IBM typewriters. Reasonable rates. Call 277- 8270

A forum on the

or

17N-D1- 0

1.

TYPING
and delivery, 50c
per page. Call Wlni Mastin,
5:30 p.m. or call Nicholasville,
after
2D10
collect.
Pick-u- p

TYPED
Theses, dissertations, research papers.
IBM, pica, carbon
ribbon, 60c pp. GIVENS, dally after
3D10
5:00 p.m., Saturdays.
WANTED

jUUUuUW in

jUlrjUuv
of University Faculty

ROOMMATE needed to share extra
nice place. Choice location. Extras.
See at 657 Maxwelton Ct., Apt. D or
9.
call
19N30
MALE roommate wanted to share one
bedroom furnished apartment close
to campus.
or 255-43for
information.
8D10
NEEDED Male roommate, efficiency
Pk. Apt. 23.
apt., 318 Transylvania
FOB SALS
FOR

SALE

1964

Chevrolet. 6 cylGood condi-

inder, standard shift.

Several student petitions protest the termination of faculty

What is expected of University faculty? Do
good teachers get fired? Who decides? Is there recourse? Publish or perish? An examination of both sides of the issue:

appointments.

At

1

Three Speakers

p.m.

Gene Mason

Wimberly Royster

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Dean of Arts and Sciences

Byron Petrakis

tion. Call

with 292 engine; no rust;
good transportation; will trade for
motorcycle or sell. See at 606

1960 FORD

Mill-va- le

Dr.

2D10

One standard Underwood
typewriter. Elite .type, $50. One
typewriter, standard.
2D10
Pica type, $55. Call

FOR SALE
Smith-Coro-

4.

FOR SALE G.E. TV $45. Call
2D10
after 5 p.m.
1962
GOOD TRANSPORTATION
Dodge Lancer; 6 cylinder; automatic
transmission; radio; heater;
white, red interior; bucket
seats. Asking $300.
8D10
FOR SALE 1966 Simca. $300. Good
body, mechanically sound. Call
8D10
after 6 p.m.

TODAY and
TOMORROW

ft

Tha deadline

Assistant Professor of English

19N30

8.

7:30 p.m.

publication

tw.

far anneancementi

Is

days prior to th. first
of Items in this column.

TODAY

At

7

p.m.

The Margaret I. King Library will
remain open until 2 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 7 through Dec. 20 for studenU
wishing to study for finals.

A Panel Discussion

Clayton Reeve

Lewis W. Cochran

Assistant Professor of English

Wee President for Academic Affairs

TOMORROW
Th. University Chorus, directed by
Sara Holyrod, will present "Sounds
of Christmas" at 8:15 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 8. in Memorial Hall. The public
is invited.

COMING UP

Gene Mason

Stephen Manning

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Chairman, English Department

Patrick White

Garrett Flickinger

Instructor of English

Chairman, Privilege

&

Tenure Committee

Participants will respond to questions and comments from
the audience at each session.

Professors Gene L. Mason and Byron Petrakis and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences William C.
Koyster will speak at a Forum on
Faculty Hiring and Firing, at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 9 in the Student
Center Ballroom. A panel discussion
will follow the speeches.
Br. II. Wonsl, Oak Ridge National
I.abs, will speak on "Hall Effect and
Methods to Study
Magnetoresislance
Configurations of Defects in Metals,"
at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Pec. 9, in
room 453P, Anderson Hall. The public
Is invited.
Phi Alpha Thcta, Tau chapter, national honorary society in history,
presents in cooperation with the His