xt71vh5ccc0v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71vh5ccc0v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19300124  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 24, 1930 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 24, 1930 1930 2012 true xt71vh5ccc0v section xt71vh5ccc0v Best Copy Available !W

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

REGISTRATION
.Innunry

Jnnunry

248 :30
301 :30

:30

11

5 :00

UNIVERSITY
LEXINGTON,

VOLUME XX

if'

Guignol Actors Rehearse Nightly
For Production of "East Lynne"

PUBLICATIONS
Kentucky Kernel

and

Excellent Cast for Thii'd Play of Yenr at University
Theater Is Selected by Director Frank Fowler
to Revive Famous Play Adapted from
Novel by Mrs. Henry Wood

n

Will be Placed Under
Supervision of Group
UNIVERSITY SENATE
ADOPTS RESOLUTION
Plan Will Become Effective
When Personnel of Body
is.- Selected
-

At the Instance of officers of the
men's student council, of the women's self governing association,
and of the Junior class, the university senate adopted a resolution
In Its regular monthly meeting
Monday, January 20, the effect of
which was to establish upon the
campus, an executive board which
shall henceforth have control of the
Kentucky Kernel, student paper;
and the Kentucklan, annual year
book published by the student body.
This action was taken after due
deliberation on the part of organizations mentioned, and officers of
the Junior class who annually elect
during their Junior year the editor
and business manager of the Kentucklan. The Journalism department
Joined heartily In the request that
a governing board of these publications be established.
The resolution was adopted by the
senate with the understanding that
the Junior class shall have representatives on the board, and as soon
as the class shall have named Its
representatives, the instrument becomes effective.
In 1914 when the department of
Journalism was installed in the university, The Idea, which was the
name of the student paper at that
time, was controlled by a governing
board; but when its name was
changed to The Kentucky Kernel,
the governing board ceased to function for some reason, and since that
time, the student paper has been
running without such authority except such as came to it in an adw
vteory-wafrom the department of

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i'

By Martin R. Glenn
The Guignol actors, under the direction of Prof. Frank C. Fowler,
are holding nightly rehearsals for
their third production of the season
that will be presented at the
Oulgnol theater during the entire
week of February 10. An excellent
cast has been selected for the
of "East Lynne" and it is
already rumored by dramatic critics that it will be one of the outstanding plays of the season.
Include
The cast of characters
Glenn Baylor, formerly of the University of Virginia, as Sir Francis
Levison; Martin Olenn as Lord
Mount Severn; Claude Walker as
Richard Hare; John Noonan as Mr.
Dill; Margaret Lewis will enact the
dual role of Lady Isabel and Madam
Vine; Helen King as Barbara Hare;
Mary Louise McDowell
as Miss
Carlyle;
Christine
Johnson as
Joyce; Lola Robinson as Wilson.
"East Lynne" was adapted from
the novel of that name by Mrs.
Henry Wood, and was given Its premiere presentation at the Boston
Museum in 1865. It was Immediately acclaimed as a masterful drama
that truly depicted life In the gay
sixties. Across the Atlantic came
troupe after troupe of English actors
to invade the American field and
reshare in the huge
ceipts of the new drama.
Dramatic production has undergone great changes since "old

AG.

within.
years iTIie 'Xerael has
purchased and virtually paid for
by Its own efforts a plant worth approximately $19,000 and now has a
gross annual Income of approximately $14,000. It was deemed wise
to establish an executive board to
handle it and kindred publications.
The resolution provides that two
members of the teaching staff of
the department of Journalism shall
be members of this board. This
board, therefore will be controlled
entirely by students as has been the
constant desire of the department
of Journalism.
The Kernel purposes, beginning
to publish a
with session of 1930-3- 1
paper with the intention
of ultimately changing to a daily
publication.

ith'kwt.sir

"Local Color" Gets
Recognition From
New York Times
Frank O. Davidson, Barbourville,
Ky., student of the University, and
president of Strollers, dramatic
organization, received early this
week a letter from the New York
Times, asking him to send to the
paper his picture and also the pictures of Miss Katherine Davis, Lexington, Ky.. and Earl King Senff,
Mt. Sterling, Ky. The pictures will
appear in the Tuesday edition of
the New York newspaper.
Mr. Davidson Is the author and
producer of "Local Color," the Stroller musical comedy offering of the
season. He was assisted In his work
by Miss Davis and Mr. Senff, who
collaborated with him and composed the musical scores.
Among
the offers which Mr.
Davidson has received, as the result of his production, are home
talent and professional offers. Miss
Mildred E. Murphy, dramatic instructor of the Orlando High school,
Orlando, Fla., has extended the
first offer, and has written to the
Stroller organization, proposing to
rent the play for production by high
school talent. T.wo professional
companies have made offers to buy
the play from Mr. Davidson. These
offers have not yet been accepted.
Some of the musical numbers
from "Local Color" will be broadcast from the Edgewater Beach
The date for
vinfoi in rhlrniro.
broadcasting depends on the length
It will take for the songs to
of time
be sent away.

Anderson to Leave
Sunday for Meeting
Dean F. Paul Anderson will leave
Sunday morning to attend the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating
Engineers In Philadelphia. Monday
afternoon he will make a special
Inspection trip with invited guests
to the Frost Research Laboratories
at Norrlstown. Penn.
Tuesday night Dean Anderson
will preside at the Past Presidents
dinner of the Society. On Saturday,
February 1, Dean Anderson will be
the guest at the Annual Sales Convention oCtthe York Heating and
Ventilating Corporation of which
Thornton Lewis Is president.

CONVENTION

OPENS JAN. 28
Annual Farm and Home Sessions Feature Prominent
Speakers During Four-Da- y
Conference

.JoHrnallsm.

4f$jtoviewGf the fact that

m

KENTUCKY

KENTUCKY,

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n. m. 2:00 p. m.
21-3-

8:00

JANUARY 21, 1930

NUMHEIt 17

Mississippi Aggies Will Face Wildcats Tonight
NEW BOARD WILL
CONTROL CAMPUS

k

OF

EXAMINATIONS

--

Sponsored

by

University
Thopentag'asaB'oVthc'aiiual

Farm and Home Convention will be
held at the University, Tuesday,
January 28. Many phases of the
present farm problems wll be discussed during the four day session,
and hundreds of farm men and
women will be able to hear speakers
who are authorities in the fields of
homemaking and the problems
rural communities.
James C. Stone, vice chairman of
the Federal Farm Board, will deliver two addresses during the convention. On Wednesday morning,
January 29, he will discuss the Federal Farm Board, and on Thursday
morning, January 30, he will discuss the tobacco situation and the
possibilities for another cooperation
of the tobacco growers. Mr. Stone
will come to the convention from
Washington, where he has lately
been called into service.
Tobacco growing and marketing
as well as sheep raising will be the
discussions during the first day
while pasture improvement and
dairying will feature the second day.
The third day will be devoted to
live stock Improvement and the control of diseases. Farmers and home-make- rs
will hold separate sessions.
James E. Poole, who has attended
the convention the last three years,
will give an address on Friday. He
is a noted live stock marketing
specialist. Other subjects to be discussed" during the meeting will be
homemaking, poultry raising, beekeeping, and veterinary questions.
Many farm men and women are
expected to attend the convention
this year, and the railroads have offered reduced fares for the benefit
of those attending.

Pettigrew Resigns

Band Sponsorship

Successor Will Be Selected
Early in February,
Says Sulzer

jtlmers" crowded Into the Boston
theater 6S years ago to sob to the'
pathos emanated by Miss Kate Den-I- n,
who played the leading female
role, and that one fact alone Insures
the success of the Guignol undertaking. No part of the performance
will be a burlesque of the old favorite that has moved audiences to
tears. On the contrary, the actors
will closely adhere to the manuscript. So close, Indeed, that the
drama will contain so much
action that a modern
audience may have difficulty in
knowing Just when to laugh and
Just when to cry.
The entire performance will be
modeled upon Christopher Morley's
recent revival of "After Dark" that
was staged at his theater in Hobo-ke- n.
The production was immediately acclaimed as one of the
outstanding plays of the year and
Mr. Morley was highly praised for
his historical contribution to the
field of dramatics.
"East Lynne" wjll be the second
antiquated play that has been reLexington
vived In this manner.
theater goers are fortunate in having the opportunity to witness such
a performance. The play, which is
in five acts and thirteen scenes,
with ballet
will be Interspersed
numbers, aesthetic dances, and
other musical numbers that were
the talk of Broadway in the bicylce
days of 1865.

The Last Kernel
Next Issue of University
Paper Will Appear
February 7
This is the endl
Today marks the final appearance of The Kentucky Kernel on
the campus until thesecond semester gets under way and final
past.
Robins have been reported at
Stamping Ground, Ky., but The
Kernels not so optimistic over
the outlook of bleak days during
the exam period. The staff Is In
hysterics over the prospects of
"flunking." The world Is fraught
with "cramming."
The result Is that there will be
no issue of the paper until
February . At that time, the paper will resume Its regular weekly Issues.

DEBATING TEAM
TRY0UT PLANNED
Aspirants Will Be Given an
Opportunity to Show Their
Forensic Ability on Feb. 6
Second semester tryouts for the
Unlversty debating team will be
held In room 111 of McVey Hall at
7:30 o'clock on the evening of February 6. Any student of the University in good standing is eligible
to participate In the tryout and take
part on any one of the 60 debates
which will be held during the second semester. '
Np special preparation will be required of entrants in the contests.
They will be given a mimeographed
article concerning some public controversy, after which 30 minutes will
be allowed for reading and analysis.,
A subject then will be announced
and .the contestants will be given
the opportunity to participate in a
purely extemporaneous discussion.
Five faculty judges name themen
and women deemed Qualified to an- pear In public as representatives of
I
the University.
There have been 38 debates this
year. During the second semester,
the University teams will oppose
Berea College, Bucknell University,
Centre College, the University of
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania State University, Swarthmore College, Princeton, Harvard, Northwestern, Florida and Miami Universities, and
other institutions.
Anyone Interested in debating,
regardless of whether or not they
wish to tryout for the team, is Invited to attend the trials. At the
present time there are only nine
students actively engaged in the
work, and it Is the desire of th
faculty advisors to Interest more
students In forensic work.

twice elected
T.Piim Ppttlerew.
sponsor of the University band, will
ena oi tne nrst
be graduated at tne
semester and as a consequence will
resign her affiliation with the band.
It become know during the past
week. She will return to her home
in El Paso, Texas, after the commencement exercises.
elected
was
Pettigrew
Miss
sponsor of the University band one
vpnr nt?o nnd her term exnires with
the end of the first semester. Re
cently, the band elected her to serve
until June 1.
&
now Knnnsnr will be selected
sometime during February, accord
ing to a statement issued Dy rroi.
Elmer O. Sulzer, director of the
TTnlvorcltv hnnH
Twn nnmlnntincr
committees of three men each will
The study class In International
be named by the director to consider relations of the University held a
applicants for the position.
the
dinner meeting Thursday evenng in
honor of Oscar Jaszi, of Austria and
Oberlln, Ohio. Mr. Jaszi was the
REGISTRAR'S NOTICE
speaker of the evening. His subStudents may register either this ject was: "Is a United States of
Europe Possible?" He gave a clear
morning or the afternoon of Thursday, January 30, according to an picture of the modern situation and
announcement
issued yesterday the possibilities, in his opinion, of
Mrs.
from the Registrar's office. Regis- I Kiirh n. union in EuroDe.
tration will not be held on January Troxell presided and Introduced the
speaker.
31 as previously announced.

Jaszi Is Heard by
Relations Students

Woman's Club
Members Hear

DELEGATES HEAR
DR.

H.L DONOVAN

Book Reviews AT ANNUAL MEET
Miss Marguerite McLaughlin
Discusses Biography by
Lexington Man
The reading lrcle of the Woman's
Club of the University, which met
with Mrs. Harry McEldowney at her
homo on Richmond road Tuesday
afternoon, had the pleasure of hearing reviews of "Bird of God" by
Virginia Hersch; "Journey's End,"
by R. C. Sheriff and "Lincoln and
His Wife's Home Town," oy W. H.
Townsend. Mrs. B. P. Ramsey,
chairman of the circle, presided.
Mrs. Alfred Zembrod gave nn extended review of "Bird of God,"
which Is the story of the romance of
El Greco the Crete artist who fled
from his home at the age of 16 and
went to Venice where he worked
with Titian.
Perhaps no play of 1929 has been
as generally discussed, especially by
critics outside the metropolitan
cities as has Sheriff's "Journey's
End" which was considered In an
excellent paper by Mrs; Albert
Olney. The play deals with English officers in a dugout in the British trench before St. Quentin.
March 1918 and has been presented
first In London, where the author
Is so prominent, and simultaneously
In New York and in Paris, France,
where the play was given in English.
"Lincoln and His Wife's Home
Town" was reviewed by Miss Marguerite McLaughlin who told of the
extent of research required for such
authentic reporting of history as
told In the Townsend work and
reading many selections from the
various chapters, closed her review
with the remark that the biography
Is Interesting to the point of fascination.
In the social hour which followed
the presentation of the program the
books were discussed generally and
Mrs. McEldowney, assisted by Mrs
D. H. Peak, Mrs. W. E. Freeman
and Mrs. D. V. Terrell, served tea.
sandwiches and cakes. The meeting
next month will be held, with Mrs.
w f! Tuvlrvr nn the third Tuesday

Katherine Davis'

Musical
Scores in 'Local Color'

Attract Attention

Educators Discuss Quarter
System and Problems

Visitors Have Won Three Out
of Four Starts Against
Strong Opponents

of Colleges
KENTUCKY DEANS OF
MEN ORGANIZE HERE

MILWARD WILL START
AT CENTER FOR 'CATS

Dean C. K. Melcher Elected
President of New
Association
Approximately 50 delegates from
Kentucky colleges and universities
assembled at McVey hall Saturday
at 10 a. m. for the opening of th
annual meeting of the Association
of Kentucky Colleges and Universities. Dr .H. L. Donovan, president of the association, presided.
Dr. Donovan, who is also president of Eastern State Teachers College, made the opening address on
"Changing Conceptions of College
Teaching." This talk was followed
by " A Study of the Quarter System," by Dean Paul H. Farrier of
Kentucky Wesleyan College, and Dr.
F. C. Grlse of Western State Teachers' College. The morning session
was concluded by the appointment
of various committees.
The afternoon program Included
addresses by Prof. E. H. Smith of
Murray State Teachers' College;
Prof. Ezra GlUls, University of KenL.
Dr. Frank
tucky registrar;
Rainey of Centre College, secretary
God-mof the association; Prof. Mark
of the state department of
education; and Dean Paul P. Boyd
of the University of Kentucky.
Members of the Executive committee of the organization are Dr.
Donovan of Eastern State Teachers'
College, president; W. V. Cropper of
Kentucky Wesleyan College,
Frank L. Rainey of Centre College, secretary; Dean J. B.
Kenyon of Asbury College; Dean T.
A. Hendricks of Berea College; Dr.
T. E. Cochran of Georgetown College; Sister Mary Adeline of Nazareth College; Prof. Charles Maney
of Transylvania College; Dean Paul
P. Boyd of the University; Dr. F. C.
Grlse of Western State Teachers'
nnllngp;. DffnlntyiWelteAJXatfc-- ,
dent or Muarry state Teacners' college; and Dean William H. Vaughn
of Morehead State Teachers' Col-

Kentucky Quintet Will Make
Journey Through South
Next Week

'
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;
!

Miss Katherine Davis, pictured
above, a member of the Alpha XI
Delta sorority, assisted in composing
the musical scores of "Local Color,"
Stroller production that has brought
offers from Chicago and New York
to those who conceived the play.
Miss Davis is a senior in the Col- -j
lege of Arts and Sciences and is a
resident of Lexington.

SKELETON SENT
TO FUNKHOUSER
Remains of Elephas Columbi
Excavated in Louisiana
Are Shipped to Scientist
For Exhibition

Professor O'Bannon
Present Paper

William R. Pearce Proves to be Star
During Annual Southern Debating Trip
JAMES S.. PORTER, JR. knight there and continued their
Journey Friday morning, stopping
Six members of Professor SutherIn Atlanta, Ga., long enough to arland's University debating team range a series of arguments with
spent the annual southern trip in a Emory University. The group arthrough Florida, rived in Cordele, Ga., Friday night
13 day journey
Georgia, and Tennessee, participat- and spent the night at a hotel
15 intercollegiate debates.
ing in
there. The next day they reached
William R. Pearce, of Mott, N. D., the semi-tropiand spent the day
sophomore, was the star of the trip, driving through northern Florida
debating eight times and speaking They arrived at their destination,
extemporaneously in such an im- Winter Park, Fla., at about 11
peccable fashion that he drew o'clock Saturday night, January 4.
praise from the authorities of the
Sunday the Kentuckians went to
colleges whose teams Kentucky deDaytona Beach, where most of them
bated. Others who made the trip got their first view of the Atlantic
were Richard M. Weaver and James ocean. After being entertained at
S. Porter, Jr., Juniors; Sidney T. Daytona Beach, they returned to
Schell. Jr., T. Clifford Amyx and Winter Park where they prepared
Hugh R. Jackson, sophomores.
for a series of seven debates with
Kentucky won the one and only the representatives of Rollins Coldecision debate when Weaver and lege.
On Thursday, January 9, over 100
Schell defeated Emory University
debaters at Decatur. Ga., by popular Rollins students and Dr. Hamilton
decision of the audience 206 to 87. Holt, president of Rollins College,
thing about heard Jackson, Amyx and Pearce
The remarkable
this victory was that both the debate for the seventh consecutive
Emory debaters were graduates of time. Kentucky's speeches were of
variety. Rollins
Decatur high school, yet the Ken- the impromptu
tuckians argued so efficaciously speakers for the most part used
deluged memorized forms.
that the home team was
under the verdict. The other 14 deWeaver and Schell had left
or split-teaWednesday, January 8, by train for
bates were
meets.
Atlanta, where they met Emory
Prof. Sutherland and his debaters University In three debates, two of
affairs.
left early Thursday morning, Jan- them split-teaJackson.
Professor Sutherland,
uary 2, and arrived at Cleveland,
Tena, late that night, due to an un- Porter, Amyx and Pearce started
expected delay In Knox county, their return trip from Winter Park,
Tenn. The Kentuckians spent the Friday morning January 10. They
Bv

By VERNON D. ROOKS
With most of us staging battles of
our own In the annuel duel with
examinations,
the
Kentucky Wildcats will stage a
major attraction with a brace of
games with Mississippi A. and M. in
the Euclid avenue gymnasium to- -I
night, and Saturday night.
The
exams, as usual, arc proving a tough
morsel so will the MisslsslpDi
Aggies.

The executive meeting of the officials and coaches of the Southern
Conference, held in December .at
Baton Rouge, La., did not occupy all
time
of Dr. W. D. Funkhouser's
lr
mrulee--arjcrCoacDamaged wee;
looKing arter tne university's atn-let- lc
interests. This fact was revealed recently when Dr. Funk-houslege.
received two large packages
Members of the association at- from Prof. L. F. Broussard, of
tended the organzatlon of the Asso- Louisiana State University, which
Prize Winning Specimens to ciation of the Deans of Men of Ken- contained the remains of a pretucky Colleges and Universities, of historic mammoth.
Appear in This Week's
which Dean C. R. Melcher, of the
Kernel
Dr. Funkhouser
the
unearthed
University of Kentucky, was elected skeleton while attending the conW. J. Craig, dean of ference.
G. R. Terrill, Francis Day, and president.
of the pieces of
Not all
men at the Western State Normal the skeleton were recovered In the
Thomas C. Gaines, Jr., 'have been School was made secretary-treasur- er
excavation. The scientific name of
announced as winners of the anof the new association, and the animal Is Elephas Columbi,
nual advertising contests, conducted other officers will be elected at the which inhabited the lower portion
by Dr. J. B. Miner in his Psychology meeting at Centre College In 1931. of the Mississippi river more than
a constitulon and by- 2,500 years ago. The findings reof Advertising and Selling class. At that time adopted.
laws will be
vealed a perfect se of teeth and
and L. Paul
Claybrooke Turner
pieces of fossil ivory which are the
Blanchard won second place in two
remains of tusks, from 10 to 12 feet
contests.
of the
in length. Dr. Funkhouser said that
ad written by
The
the scarred bones had signs of havMr. Day in the Kernel contest will
To
ing been gnawed in places by some
of the
be published In this edition
sabre-toothe- d
animal.
paper, as will Mr. Terrlll's ad for
In the same excavation weiie
Prof. L. S. O'Bannon. head of the
the Kentucklan.
of found the remains of a prehistoric
The Kernel and Kentucklan con- Heat Engineering Department
tests each gave as the reward to the College of Engineering, will bear, and the Jaws and horns of a
general present a paper on "Suggested prehistoric elk.
the winner. $1.00. In the
E. M. Perry, on whose farm the
Methods for Testing Unit Heaters
contest the prize was $2.
Thirty members of the class par- Suitable for Field Tests" Wednes- fossils were found, reported the disday afternoon, before the session of covery to Professor Broussard who
ticipated in the contests.
Judges for the Kernel contest the Annual Meeting of the Ameri- asked Dr. Funkhouser to conduct
were Prof. E. J. Asher, of the can Society of Heating and Venti- their excavation. The bones will not
Roy H. lating Engineers in Philadelphia. be mounted because of the loss of
psychology department;
of the Professor O'Bannon is a national several of the larger bones, but will
Owsley, business manager
Helen King, oi autfiority in this country In the be placed in the old library building
Kernel; and Miss
the University publicity bureau. , field of heating and ventilating. His upon the completion of the new
Miss King and Prof. Asher acted as I. work In engineering research has library, which will then become a
museum.
attention.
judges in each of the other contests. attracted wide-spre-

Terrill, Day Write
Best Contest Ads

BIG BLUE TEAM
HAS CHANCE TO
TOP CONFERENCE

A Composer

the night at Valdosta. Ga.,
and arrived in Atlanta aaiuraay
afternoon, January 11, at about 2
The debaters spent the
o'clock.
night In Alabama Hall and Dobbs
Hall, men's dormitories, and left
Sunday morning for Harrogate.
Tenn. That night they arrived and
were quartered in a hotel at Cumberland Gap, Tenn.
Pearce and Porter debated Ford
and Finell at Mddlesboro. Ky., high
school, Monday morning, January
13, while Schell and Weaver debated
the Lincoln Memorial University
debaters at Powell's Valley, Tenn..
that morning. Later Amyx and
Jackson met the Lincoln Memorial
men at Tazewell. Tenn. Monday
afternoon Pearce and Porter argued
with Haeberllng and Finnell, of L.
M. U., on "Resolved. That a Substitute for Trial by Jury Should Be
Found" at Duke Hall before 100
Lincoln Memorial students. Pearce
and Porter defended the affirmative.
Monday night the only formal
debate of the trip was held.. Schell
and Jackson arguing with Haeberllng and Fields on the chain store
question. Approximately 800 heard
this debate, many people coming
from Mlddlesboro and other surrounding towns to hear the arguments.
Tuesday morning the final day of
the return trip was begun and the
Kentuckians arrived In Lexington
at about 3 p. m., January 14.

The Mississippi games will be the
last for the Wildcats this semester
and the last in Lexington before
the annual southern trip which begins January 31.
Kentucky has a chance to move
into tfie lead of the Southern Conference with victories in both of the
games. The Washington and Lee
Generals, leading at present with
three victories, will be forced to step
back into second place should the
Wildcats make their total four.
Coach Johnny Mauer is not looking for an afternoon tea dance. The
Big Blue team is having trouble
with nightmares that bring back
moments in the first game of the
southern trip last year when they
barely eked out a 25 to 23 win over
the Aggies in an extra period. True
enough, Kentucky came back in the
second game to win 32 to 14, but
Johnny RTauer says they were playing In their best form of the" season
that night.
And when you lcokvat the trial,
the Mississippi team Is leaving in
the 1930 season, you can have a few
nightmares of your own. The Aggies ran wild through the Mississippi State Teachers' team, 47 to
series. Their 22 to 20 victory over
Tulane's Green Wave Is offset onfy
by Tulane's win in the second game,
23 to 19.
Tulane Is going, strong
this year and Kentucky is not
placing hopes on the Tulane defeat.
The Aggies have three veterans
back from the 1929 quintet and a
group of spohomores that rank with
the best in the South. The Aggies
freshman team last year included
and disfive men, all over six-feplayed the fastest floor work in the
conference.
Coach Mauer has decided to start
Louis McGinnis and Carey, Spicer
at the forward positions. Stanley
Milward has recovered from the
pulled tendon in his leg to the extent that he will start tonight.
Captain Paul McBrayer and Lawrence McGinnis have been named
the starting guards.
x
Following the Mississippi games,
l tne
wnacats wii journey to Knox- vllle, Tenn., to meet the Volunteers
January 31. Before returning to
Lexington they will meet Georgia at
Athens February 1, and Clemson at
Clemson February 3. The next
home game will be played with
Georgia Tech February 8.

Strollers Consider
Mystery or Comedy
To Stage In Spring
Thomas L. Riley, Pi Kappa Alpha,
chairman of the committee appointed by Strollers to select the
play to be produced by that organization for the spring show, has
announced that a number of excellent plays are under
consideration. Early in the second semester, the committee expects to
decide definitely on the play to be
used.
Other members of the committee
besides Mr. Riley are Miss Mary
Virginia Halley, Kappa Delta; and
Len Weakley, Delta Tau Delta.
Two types of plays, mysteries and
comedies, make up the following-lisfrom which the spring show
will be chosen.
Mystery plays: "The First Floor
Front,"
"Easy Pickings,"
"The
Laughing Guest," "The Rear Car,"
"Call of the Banshee," "The Inner
Circle," and "Scarlet."
Comedies:
"Peekaboo
Lady,"
"Help Yourself,"
"Stray
Cats,"
"The Easy Mark." "The Fall Guy,"-"ThShow Off." "Wedding Bells,"
"Tommy," "Fast Workers," "Laff
That Off," and "Go Easy Mabel."

Roscoe R. Dalton is

Wayne County Judge

Roscoe R. Dalton, graduate from
the College of Law at the University last year, has assumed his
duties as judge of Wayne County,
according to information received
here this week. Mr. Dalton wus
well-knoon the campus wliile
attending the University, and was a
member of Phi Alpha Delta and
Sigma Chi fraternities. Mr. Dalton's
popularity in his home county is
evidenced by the fact that he led
his party to its first victory In 20
years.

mm m

t

* Best Copy
PAGE TWO

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

1

FOOTBALL PRACTICE TO OPEN FEBRUARY 4
WILDCATS

HAVE

A few of the hcndllncrs of last years
varsity and freshmen teams will not

report Including: Splccr, Bronston,
and Yates, who arq working under
GOOD
I Coach Johnny
Mnucr, and Johnson,
Krcutcr and Darby who arc mem- bcrs of the freshmen basketball
squad.
lly LAWItENCK CttUMr
In the event that the present cold
The opening of the second semester will nlso be the occasion for spell does not abate, n great deal of
some 50 candidates for Hnrry Dam- the preliminary work will take place
age's 1930 gridiron machine
Indoors and under the stadium.
lug on Stoll Field. This group In- Fundamental work will occupy the
cludes 18 lcttermcn, several first time of the squad until the weather
class reserves, and 23 sophomores. breaks when actual scrimmage will

MATERIAL

jjiiiiniiintaiiiiitiiiitiC3i!iiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiitiiuiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3intiiititiiC3t

STUDENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME
at the

iThe Viaduct Barber Shopi
East
Street
177

High

MR. A. E. WARREN, Proprietor

I

"WE AIM TO PLEASE"

I

ffsiiiiiiiiiiiicsiiiiiiiiiiiiraiiiiMiiiiitcaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaimiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiifiicaiiiniiiiiifF
iiiniiiHictiiiitiiiiiictiiiiiiHiiiniuiiMiiiMHiiitiiiiiiiitiiinniiiMCiiiiiiiiiiiic3iuniiiHiit

!

ON THE

I

PROMPT DELIVERY SERVICE
imiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiimiuiiiiiiimiic
'

PHONE 9191
icaiiiiiniiiticatiiiiiiiiiiicaiiitiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiititcaiitiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiic'

AIR

With

U

OF K.

"RUNS"TOlNITBAC'
our fliwltis repair strvic
for silk hosiery.

"Runs" happen everywhere . . . anywhere ... as every
woman knows. But the woman who knows Knitbac
flawless,
quickly despatches them all. to Wolf-Wile- s
prompt hosiery repair service that returns all one's
silk stockings restored to their original beauty and
strength at triflng cost.
Minor Repairs From 30c

Others in Proportion

Wolf Wile s

Students Try one of our Delicious Hot
Chocolates with a Tasty Sandwich

DENTISTS
Drs. Slaton Slaton

Kodaks

j
1

1

Films

Valet I ALEXANDER'S
CLEANERS

mm,

i

telephone
SERVICE

North

to Students
on all Cleaning and
Pressing Work,
cluding Hats

HUTCHINSON'S
Prescriptions

fSBSm

CJ&Bpi&

PHONE

A.

LAST

Stars

CREATE ADS

Beauties
IN ONE

that will last

obtain a more permanent form of
advertising put your advertisement in

,1.

The Kentucky Year Book

It not read just
and put aside,
but remains as a climax to fondest and
most fervent memories

A

100 Per cent

Advertising Scheme!

The Centuqkian

One Ad

of the

UNIVERSITY OP KENTUCKY

-

THE PHOENIX HOTEL
Better Way,

mat.

i

"SHOW of SHOWS"

"Don't tell a soul I says Horace
nucit,
'But I'm a dud at selling stock."

BEST?

BBKB5P

SANDWICHES

Bring your dates to dinner at the
CHIMNEY CORNER before the
game.

A?

Special Rental Rates to Students

STUDENTHEADQUA

YEAR

SERVING

Ik

TYPEWRITERS

STANDARD

'

Hosiery "runs" by "Candlelight"
. . . join the rush by day . . . of

All Makes

Team
W. L. Pet.
Washington and Lee..,. 3 0 1.000
Sale or Rent
2 0 1.000
Scwanec
2 0 1.000
Kentucky
2 0 1.000
Georgia
2 0 1.000
Alabama
Dealer: L. C. Smith and Corona Typewriters
.Mississippi
31
.750
.CCu
21
Duke
DEAN ANDERSON SPEAKS
.500
33
Clcmson
Major Owen R. Meredith, com1
1
.500
Tennessee
mandant of the Reserve Officers
1
1
.500
Auburn
"Where Do We Go From Here?"
Opp. CowlhouH
Training Corps at the University of was
WEST SHORT ST.
Phone 1792
1
1
Maryland
.500
the topic chosen by Dean F.
Kentucky, will address radio friends
1
1
Miss. A. and M
.500
Paul Anderson of the College of
University Tuesday, January Engineering
of the
1
1
N. C. State
.500
for his address deliver28, from the remote control studio
1
Georgia Tech
2
.333
on the campus in connection with ed in Memorial Hall the third hour
1
L. S. U
3
.250
before
station WHAS. The subject of his Wednesdayassembly. the general en1
Tulanc
,
3
.250
talk will be, "Some Educational and gineering
Florida
01
.000
Mr. and Mrs. Foster Krake enEconomic Aspects of the Reserve
01
.000
North Carolina
Officers Training Corps." Other, tertained the engineers with several
V. P. 1
01
.000
musical selections which included
features of the University
02
South Carolina
.000
radio