xt71vh5ccr23 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71vh5ccr23/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19600107  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January  7, 1960 text The Kentucky Kernel, January  7, 1960 1960 2013 true xt71vh5ccr23 section xt71vh5ccr23 Reader Reports
Test Stealing;
Sec Page 4

A

University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

Vol. L

KY., THURSDAY, JAN. 7,

Weather Today:
High 37, Low 23
Cloudy, Cold

10

No. 53

New Political Order

Started On Campus
1

r
SIGMA NU HOUSE

University Will Buy
Sigma Nu Property
The University will purchase have the choice of any type and
the Sigma Nu Fraternity House style of house up to $150,000.
Two lots on Rose Lane have
far $37,(00 and will use it as an
been offered to the fraternity by
auxiliary dormitory for girls.
Dr. Frank D. Peterson, vice the University, on which to construct a new house, Dr. Peterpresident of Business Administration, said yesterday the Univer- son said.
The present Sigma Nu house
sity has offered to enter into a
with the Sigma Nu Cor- was constructed in 1920 and has
contract
poration in the construction of a 16 rooms and three baths. It will
be used as a girls dormitory until
new house.
Phil Austin, president of Sigma it Is necessary to build a larger
Nu. said the final agreements dorm In the same location. Dr.
concerning the purchase of the Peterson said when this becomes
property would be made Saturday. necessary, the Wildcat Bowling
Dr. Petersen said the contract Lanes will probably be torn down
agreed upon betmeen UK and to provide more room.
Dr. Peterson
Sigma Nu would probably be simones signed with the a year or more
ilar to the
move into the
houses cn Fraternity Row.
Continued
He added that Sigma Nu would

medical reUniversity
searchers have been awarded
grants totaling $123,570 for studies
involving enzymes and antibodies.
$62,000 grant from
A three-yea- r,
the Naticnal Institute of Health
went to Dr. Kmgsley Stevens, an
assistant professor of medicine, for
a study U the production of antibodies.
Dr. Alfred D. Winer, an Instructor in biochemistry, was the reSencipient cf a $61,570 five-yeior Research Fellowship from the
United States Public Health Service for an enzyme study.
Dr. Stevens, joined the UK Medical Center ttaff Jan. 1 after six
month as the chief medical resident at St. Joseph's Hospital here
and four ears with Merck Institute, West Point, Pa. He will also
attempt to discover why cancer
cells c!o not produce antibodies.
He wiU use tissue culture and
tissue transplants in the research
started while he served as a research associate at Merck Institute.
Dr. Winer, currently studying on
fellowship
at
postdoctoral
a
Maud.sley Hospital at the University of London, will study the reaction cl the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase to various biochemical
substances.
Dr. Winer studied at the Medical
Nobel Institute at Stockholm in
1958-5- 0
in the Biochemistry Department under professor Huo
Theorcll. a Nobel laureate in physiology and medicine in 1937.
Senior Research Fellowships are
awarded on the basis of demonstrated promise for a career in
research and tci( li'iiR.
Candidates are expected to luve a
docIirimuiuui of 10 years of
ar

toral

re-

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h.

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aie

do:

it
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UK Will Not Replace

Stolen Telephones

The telephones taken from Donovan Hall during the Christmas
holidays will not be replaced until
the telephone company and the
University can develop a device
to protect them from vandals and
thieves.
Dean of Men Leslie Martin said
the University will not have to
pay for the stolen phones unless
It is proven that the theft was the
said It would be work of UK students.
before girls could
The recent outbreak of teleSigma Nu House. phone thefts reported by the GenOn Page 2
eral Telephone Company of Kentucky leads Dean Martin to believe "this was the work of a
gang an organized gang."

Two Researchers
Get Federal Grants
Two

Dlssatisfaction with current students representing various Uni- management of student affairs has versity departments and is comgiven birth to a new political pletely bipartisan.
movement on campus.
Odear, explaining the moveBob Odear, graduate student in ment's purpose in detail, said:
"We expect to gain for the stuthe School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, said that dent body a voice in the policy of
a group of students, seniors and the University; complete authority
graduates primarily, have been to establish rules of conduct for
working on plans to reorganize the students, and compulsory
student government.
Jurisdiction over major student
The present status of Student violations."
Congress and the overmanagement
These ends will be achieved,
f student affairs by the admin- Odear stated, by the acceptance
f a constitution for a more
istration are the points In question, he explained.
authoritative constitution of stuOdear said the movement has dent government which will be
the support of a few hundred submitted for approval to the

Correction

story in yesterday's Kernel
incorrectly stated that Dr. Otto
T. Koppius, physics professor,
will prepare a listing of "all
students who have graduated
from the University."
Dr. Koppius will prepare a
roster of all former majors and
graduate students in physics,
and a summary of their accomplishments.
The work will be done when
Dr. Koppius goes on a change of
work status at the end of the
semester.
A

pally for the partial support of
promising young scientists in the
period between the completion of
their postdoctoral research training and their eligibility for permanent academic appointments,
according to a Public Health Service announcement.
Winer's fellowsnip was among 21
awarded scientists in 18 universities and schools of medicine in 13
states.
Dr. Winer will join the UK Medical Center staff in September.

A General Telephone Company
spokesman reported that pay telephones cost $150 each.
The University had installed a
cage-typ- e
apparatus in one of the
Donovan pay stations hoping to
discourage the taking of the
phones. The telephone was stolen
anyway.
Clyde Lilly, Maintenance and
Operations, said that anything the
telephone company or the University could construct would only
serve as a padlock. He summarized
the problem saying, "Anything we
put up would only force a thief
to use a tool" to remove the phone
from the wall.
A telephone company spokesman reported "We must work out
something so that we can have
more security. We welcome suggestions. There is an outbreak of this
not only
thing (telephone-stealingat the University, believe me."
The telephone company checks
the telephones about once a month.
Donovan's phones were last
checked, one on Dec. 11, and the
other Nov. 25. collecting $70 and
$25, respectively.
Since there is no meter on the
phones the company couldn't estimate the amount of money in
the cash boxes when the phones
were stolen.
),

imt

.

students, faculty, and the Board
of Trustees.
The constitution is now being
written by a committee composed
of members of the movement.
Dean of Men Leslie L. Martin,
adviser to SC. said yesterday the
organization would have to work
through the "proper channels" in
order to gain power on campus.
This would entail, he said, approval by the University Faculty's
Committee n Student Organisations, and then election to SC
as a regular political party.
Dean Martin said he had not
heard of the group until contacted
yesterday by the Kernel.
"Student Congress is the valid
student government on campus,"
the dean pointed out.
Campaign for the acceptance
of the new constitution will begin
Immediately after the beginning
of the second semester. Philip Cox,
senior history major, has been appointed to handle much of the
educating of the student body to
the need of a new type of student government.
The group will first point out
what is wrong with the current
situation and then show why the
new constitution is an answer,
according to Odear.
The matter had been discussed
with certain members of the administration and that response
had been favorable, Odear said.
He also said that in a limited
poll of the faculty the reaction
was overwhelmingly In favor of
the new movement. He further
commented:
"I wish to emphasize that none
Continued On Page 8

Building Talks
Are Pleasing
To Dr. Dickey
UK President Frank G. Dickey
yesterday said he was "pleased"
with conferences held with Gov.
Bert Combs concerning the University building plan.
Dr. Dickey also said he was "not
at all worried" about Gov. Combs
special message to the legislature
Tuesday in which the governor
cited the need for "an adequate
agricultural research center" at
UK while making no reference to
other needed buildings.
In his address the governor did
not cite such needs as the science
and commerce buildings mentioned
In the University budget request
..
Dr. Dickey noted that
for
Gov. Combs did not make specific
mention of the building needs of
any other state colleges.
The president said he has conferred with the governor and several members of his staff and
found them to be in agreement
with him on "all major points" of
the budget request.
The $30,329,000 budget request
made by the UK Board of Trustees in September included an
additional $20,750,000 building program. The trustees also recommended that the legislature approve a 15 million dollar bond
1960-61-

issue.

Funds raised by the bond issue
would be used for construction of
a commerce building, an agricul-

Agriculture Center

This is an artist's idcA of how the new agriculture science renter may look when it Is completed. No
arttitect has leen contracted to design the proposed structure because funds are not yet available.
See story on pace five.

ture building, domitortes, and additions and renovation for several buildings Including the
Building, Student Union,
and the Margaret I. King Library.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

mVS ISCDMVy ACOUUGS

Inert

-

1000

President Eisenhower To Visit

by Dick Biblcr

MAN ON CAMPUS

LITTLE

'

Thursd.y, Jan. 7,

NOW-I'- D

THINK

STUPtW

4 South American Countries

Kfc )

rv

J

John Hopkins University, repre- - Include Rio De Janeiro, the precapital, and Brasilia, the new
sented the President In 1953 on a ent
South American mission. Milton capital Other title, almct ..re to
will go this time in his capacity as be vUlled Include Burno, Aire,.

WASHINGTON (AP) President
,
f,rtm

TZl
FlTl

Www

otS

ZnrlTlm

n?v visits

SteAS;SleS

Inter-Americ-

Uruguay

The President., accompanied by
Mrs. Eisenhower and his brother
Miltonk among others, will spend
10 days on the flying Journey.
"The President.- - an official an- Hopes
nouncement said today.
his visit will serve two pur- that

.

y

MvtAK'fgOrUMAN-Arf- ''

i

poses.
' Publicly reflect his deep

Committee on
Affairs. This committee, headed by
He.ter. was set up by the Presl- dent Iast November to seek lm- proVed relations with other coun- trles of the wetsern Hemisphere.
yg
wUh BraJjl suff.
ed jast year over the matter of
u.S. credit. However. Brizilian
president Juscellno Kubitschek
said in a New Year's address there
has been an improvement,
The Brazilian ambassador here,
Walter Morelra Salle, said after

.

an

interest
in all the countries of the new
world, and "encourage further de- velopment of the
(day's announcement that "the dl- system, not only as a means of ntt exchange
f visits between
meeting the aspirations of the peo- - cnje fs
s a form r diplo- 8tae
pies of the Americas, but also as
tnat fn, Wfn into the fast
a further example of the way an pace 0f WOrld development today
peoples uiajr iic hi jaoviiui
James C. Hagerty. White House
operation."
press secretary, supplied this bare-bonIt was apparent during Eisenschedule: Brazil Ftb.

annual

Inter-Americ-

Montevideo. Urueua,.
Two of the four C0Untries. Argen- Una Bnd Uruguay, were visited by
Vice prudent Richard M. Nixon
ln 1958 NJxon was cheered and
1. ln Uruguay and in Argen- a cordial welcome
tlna he got
one outburst of hooting.
and
It was In Peru and Venezuel- atwo countries not on Eisenhower's
list that Nixon was the subject to
bitter, dangerous
demonstrations.
anti-Americ-

an

23-2- 6;

11 r.a- -

hower's December tour of
tions in Europe, Asia, and Alnca:
..
when the receptions given nu.i
unprecedented that
the
were
...... ...
with the potentialities of personal
diplomacy.
Even before he returned there
was talk or a trip lo l.aiin
and in recent days there had come
rrDoits from Brazil and Argentina
arranged. To- Things finally reached the point that visits had been
where the man was fired from his
injob. and he turned to Bockner for these and supplied additional itinot a detailed
formation, but
help.
nerary.
Bockner prescribed a tranqui- Secretary of State Christian A.
llzing drufe The barking became
Herter will be the top official other
pr0gressively less frequent.
than Eisenhower on the
Ana now, auer jx wkm vw wc ourney
drug, he is almost cured," Bockner
Milton Eisenhower, president of
wrote

ENDS

TONITI!
CljrW

ch

26-2- 9;

TrNnoN

singular

The
case of a man who barked at peo- pie was placed in the annals of
human behavior today by a British

psychiatrist.
The man. now

barked like a
dog every 10 minutes ior a year
65,

all-st-

and a half

His bark was so loud it could be
heard at a range of several hundred yards. It frightened his more
timid fellow commuters when he
was waiting for a bus.
It was especially raucous when
he was in the hands of his dentist.
Dr. Sidney
The psychiatrist,
Bockner. reported the case in the
Journal of Mental Science.
"

Dr. Cierley To Attend
Talk On Airborne TV
ceiving telecast

Dr. Morris B. Cierley. chairman
r the VK D,vlslon t Ed
will
attend a
ailment to a teacher who forced Administration,
Midwest Council
d
when meeting of the
him to write
he was a schoolboy.
on Airborne Television Instruc- was 63. he barked only tion Thursday and Friday in
Until he
occasionally. But then the urge be- - chicaeo.
came uncontrollable and he took
Purdue
TTT(he coun"
an
to barking six times ..... hour.
plans to sponsor a
..
r; ested thatxtracung a tooth ries of educational television
m tnnn broadcasts which will be relayed
uric vfA unnorvina
by an airplane to participating
for the patient, in view of the
stations and institutions.
loud accompaniment."
At the meeting, member Institutions, including UK, will be
asked If they are Interested In re

h.d.Ta,ulc;''S,r,a6e

freshmen-sophomor-

expect warm
thir in Branl. cooler autumn- like wtathrr in Argentina and
Uruguay and quite cool niphts in
mountainous Chile
Stops in Brazil are expected to
.

...

University Buys
Sigma Nu House

Continued From Page 1
Itonny McCabe, treasurer of
Sigma Nu, said no definite plans
had been made by the fraternity
concerning a new building. He said
it might be several years before
the move took place, but added
that it could be as soon as next
fall.
The property was appraised by
realtors for $37,800. The fraterlease on the
nity had a long-terproperty located at the corner of
Euclid and Harrison Ave.

cutmscjf!
KINCHIN -

Visits State Assembly
Political Science Class
about thirty students attended the
opening day of the Kentucky Leg- -'
islature in Frankfort Monday.
pov. Bei t Combs, a UK grad- uate, gave his State of the Com- monwealth message.
Prof. Keeves said other trips
were planned during the year In
order for students to see government in action.
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1

Dunn Drugs

field of general education.
Dr. Lyman V. Ginger, dean of i
the College of Education, is a
member of the council. It was
formed by educators in the Mid- west who want to provide
cient educational opportunities for
population.
the area's
The council is financed by a
Ax2 million dollar Ford Founda- tion appropriation and by other
contributions from industry. The
estimated cost of the first two
years of operation is 7 million
dollar.,.

right-hande-

"PORK

Service

e

ME"

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The party may

Tranquilizers Almost Cure
Man Who Barks At People

Gibl

NOT

Grtgory Peck

2

!

2--

"BUT

Chile Feb.
Feb.
and Uruguay March

Argentina

INDOOR
AUDITORIUM

HIATUS

R

es

( AP)

an

-

"

'
n

.

-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan.

California Man Roams World,
Buys Thousands Of Old Guns
PASADENA, Calif. (AP)
Seymour Ziebert roams the globe on
a continuing quest for guns
He finds them by the hundreds
of thousands. But still he keeps on.
And because he does, thousands
of Americans have been able to
set themselves up for hunting at
rofkbotlom cost. They have done
this by buying Id military rifles
at prices far below their original
cost.

"I'm Just an Incurable

."

roman-tlcfct-

kays big, genial Zlebert. "I
we lots of romance In firearms."
His travels more In a year tharr
most folks log all their lives have

helped build a small gun shop Into
cne of the world's largest Importers and exporters of surplus military weapons.

During World War II while In of guns, enough there and In nearthe Navy, Ziebert started wonder- by warehouses to equip an army of
Robert Hicks, assistant profesing: "What happened to the weap- 40,000.
sor in animal husbandry at UK,
ons left behind by the retreating
There are byproducts, too suits has resigned
his position, effective
Nazi troops?"
of armor, antique blunderbusses, Jan. 31.
That question led to a
cutlasses, and lances.
three-million-dol-

lar

a year business.
Now he and other agents of the
Pasadena Firearms Co. range the
world seeking firearms in neglected cellars and musty supply depots.
As armies switch to new weapons
their old ones become outdated for
military use. Many become obsolete through the current switch to
automatic weapons. Borne were
never uncrated by their former
owners.
In the company's retail shop are
firearms of every type. Row on row

Last year about 100,000 military
rifles were sold. Many of them will
be "sporterized," that Is, adapted
to sporting use.
They sell from about $15 up. The
sportsman can gradually improve
them for hunting by cutting down
on replacing the stock and putting
on new sights. Some of the work
he can do himself.
gun Is much
The remodeled
cheaper than a new $80 to $180
rifle.
The firm can sell weapons overseas, but only with State Department permission for each deal.
"We were approacned
many
times by those wanting arms for
Fidel Castro in Cuba," General
Manager Walter E. Anderson says.
"Each time we said we'd be happy
to ship the guns if they'd get an
export license from the United
States government. That stopped
them each time."
Ziebert traveled 230,000 miles last
year, including three trips around
the world.
He sometimes hears criticism of
the United States among his overseas firearms contracts.
"Our Constitution says it is the
right of every free man to bear
arms." he tells them. "I tell them
that only in a true democracy can
the citizens be trusted with firearms.
"This point makes a very strong
impression, particularly in the
many countries where the right to
bear arms is denied."

Farm And Home Week
To Have Dairy Session
Kentucky's dairy Industry will
be discussed at a dairy cattle
during the 48th annual Farm
find Home Week conference here
from Jan. 26 to 29.
E. C. Scheidenhelm. UK Agricultural Extension Service dairy
will preside at the mett-in- t:
at 1 p.m.. Jan. 27. in the
Dairy Center Building.
The dairy cattle session will
with a movie on efficiency in
dairy production.
Itohrrt Walton, of the I K Dairy
Department, will speak on "Why
Dairymen Should Re Interested In
A panel discussion on dairy production problems

special session on how to buy
and rare for garments "for greatest satisfaction from the purchases
and maximum benefit from modern research" will be held Thursday morning, Jan. 28.
Miss Ruth Guenthcr. UK home
economics clothing and textiles
professor, will moderate a symposium which will close the session.
The panel win discuss fabrics
of today as viewed by the consumer, the commercial laundry
and dry cleaner, the home laundry, the research laboratory, and
the merchandiser.

will follow.

Historical Grou p
Elects Dr. Eaton

ses-M-

.tpu-ialist-

on

,

be-fi- m

Solids-Not-Fat- ."

Robert Hicks
Will Leave
UK Position

A

Members of the panel include
Dr. J. T. Bryans, UK Experiment
Station Pathology Department virologist, and Dr. Durward Olds,
professor of dairy husbandry.
Dr. William Clement Eaton, pro- .Moderator will be Dr. S. M. Seath. lessor of history at UK, was
head of UK's dairy section.
elected to the Council of
Two talks, one by E. C. Trout-ma- American Historical Association,
He was elected during a meeting
UK Extension Service dairy
fpecialist, will conclude the
of the council held in Chicago

Hicks Is in charge of purebred
beef cattle at the University and
has been on the staff for three
years.
He is leaving UK to enter private business with his brother,
Dr. Newell Hicks, a veterinarian
and Dick Starks, Woodford County farmer. They will run a farm
service company at Midway.
Dr. W. P. Garrigus, head of the
UK Animal Husbandry Department, said Hicks Is one of the outstanding workers In the livestock
field. He said he regrets Hicks'
leaving.
No successor has been selected
yet.

-- V.

Legislature Hears
UK Fiseal Report
UK

spent

$10,416,077.37 in
funds in the fiscal year
state-controll- ed

ended last June 30.
The figured were included in
former State Auditor Mary Louise
Foust's report to the I960 legislature.
The University spent $633.686.?, 4
on capital construction for the
same period, Miss Foust reported.
She said the capital outlay included the state's share of expenditures on the Medical School
and dormitory construction.
The report gave no detailed
breakdown on the figures.
A hustling swimmer is Israel can
swim in four different seas in one

day the Mediterranean, the Dead
Sea, the Sea of Galilee, and the
Red Sea Associated Press.
In the United States a hustline
swimmer may not make as many
seas but he has a hell of a lot
more fun.

AFROTC Cadets
To Visit AF Bases
UK AFROTC students will visit
two Air Force bases in the next
month as a part of their training in Air Science.
30 cadets will fly
Jan.
of the Tactical Air Comin a
mand to Lockbourne Air Force
Base near Columbus. Ohio, and
Feb. 19 a trip will be made to the
Arnold Engineering Development
Center in Talahoma, Tenn.
The center .'n Tennessee specializes in Air Research and Development of future Air Force
weapon systems and does some
work for Army, Navy, and civilian
programs of the same nature.

4

U

mm

28-2- 9,

C-1- 19

119 South Limestone

re-cen- tly

n.

ses-.iio- n.

Dec.

25-3- 0.

Dr. Thomas D. Clark, head of
The Farm and Home Week
proper opens on Tuesday, the t'K History Department, said
session on the association was one of the
Jan. 2fi. with a one-da- y
mrai leadership development and greater historical organizations in
con-Itren-

ce

training.

the world.

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ON THE CAMPUS . . .

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* The Kentucky Kernel

Truth For Sale

In Kentucky, where low caliber
teaching presupposes low salaries and
athletic facilities excel educational
facilities, there is a clear need for
more people with college educations.
And to effectuate the ideal situation,
there is an extensive need for more informed people with an incentive toward getting an education.

as well as social aspects of college.
Scholarships arc often available to
eligible people who are unaware of
them and therefore do not receive
them. An increasing number of loans
are available to people who wtit
heretofore disinterested localise of
economic factors.
The committee can work toward

Too many people arc unaware of
the need and purpose of educational
reward. Only 2 percent of the people
in Kentucky have a college degree,
half as high as the national average.
In many areas there is a virtual void
of information about college and consequently, there is little incentive.

alleviating the ignorance and misconceptions of college prevalent in
various areas of the state. Some people
are unaware of exactly what college
invo'ves, and many are lesct with
ideas about "book
learnin'." They have a vague notion
that college is intended for people
in a category far beyond their vision
and experience. They cannot aspire to
something of which they have a misconception or know nothing. Some
aren't adverse to information; they
just don't know it exists.
But when they learn what they can
do with an education, they can be
encouraged to get one. By approaching their positions with enthusiasm
and the intention of effective communication, the members of the Committee of 240 can bring about a
greater understanding of the purpose
of education and the various means
of getting it. Although set up not as
a recruiting committee, but as a committee to inform, it can undoubtedly
awaken some people to the value of
higher education.
Truth, in effect, is the strongest
propaganda.

With the realization of our educational needs, students themselves have
an opportunity to help inform Kentucky about education. Students who
were disgusted with the cultural
apathy of their hometowns can do
something about expanding the educational visions of those towns.
The Committee of 240 is a group
of students serving 'as a link between
the University andfstate communities
to advise and iilform Kentuckians
candidly about college life and policies. Ideally, the committee is composed of two UK students from each
of the state's 120 counties.
Utilizing its full capacity, the committee can enlighten groups of citizens in most areas of the state, informing them of policies, budget, enrollment, admission, and scholarships,

are

...

Too often

...

"Property is sacred" means the
ownership of property is not to be
interfered with as long as the property 1. belongs to me or 2. is useless to society . . .
Too often . . .
"Freedom of speech" means man

nt

Tiwt

riit)hsli

(l

cl.i
m
Office nl I.rtttfln.
lour times week iliirinn the rewilnr v hool
SIX IMH.I.AHS A SCHOOL
Krtitm

Vy

ni.itNi envlrr

vi-nto- l

M

t

mrpl

nr

UH

tin- - Ai l

linlul.i

o'

mid

rt h 3, 1870,

rvinn.

Bill Nmmhk, Editor
Stlvvaht llnx;Kn, S;vrM Editor
I'ob Avplhson. Managing Editor
Yah, Zimmmiman and Caiwh.e Mahtiw Assistant Managing Edit r?
Dk k Wahe ami John Mire hell, FhotogravhitS
Ai k e Akin, Sot irty Editor
Sri'AiiT CIoijiEAiui and Pail Dykes, Advertising Managers
IUvhu.y Cahdweu., Circulation
Tehhy Asiilfy, Kusitwsit Manager
Bob HntNnoN, Hank Chapman, nnd Skit Tayi.oh. Cartoonists
Staff Writer: Jrrrv Ringo. Jim Phillip. Bohble Mawn. Mndj Hockensmlth. Robert Wenninger,
.

George Smith. Robert Perkins. Edward Van Hook, Hod Tabb. Iwrence I.nch, June neri, Ann
M.iry
hn.-r- i,
Beverly Cardwell, Diane Capehart. AI HoyMer, Jan llerryman. Bob J.1m
Miller, Herb Steely, Norrls Johnson, nob Fraser, F.mnjo Cocnnouiher. Mlrhele Foirlnfl. P.it Iftilkrr,
Flnley, Alien Travi,
Ci.rtiss Smith, John Fltzwater. Garnett Brown, Hlrhard Hrdlund. ChriMa
Svie McCauley, Phil Cox, Hobert Hadford, IVeverly VcQiko. and Maxme Catev

THURSDAY'S

NKWS STAFF

Scy

Bill Blakkman, Wtt Editor

H'n,

Ats(Hi,ta

old-fashion-

A Little Too Often
Too often . . .
"All men are created equal" means
all men except the inherently inferior Negroes, Jews, Catholics, etc.
are for all practical purposes equal
to us until we can figure out a justification for being better than they

OF KllMlCKY

UNIVERSITY
F.n-i--

has the inherent right to speech as
long as he does not shock people. In
other words, those men who have
nothing significant to say have legal
protection to say it . . .
Too often . . .
"Necessity of competition" means
all except unfair competition is to be

fostered. Unfair competition is that
form which puts my particular business under stress
Too often . . .
"Freedom from want" means all except second class citizens have the
right of freedom from want, a second
class citizen being defined as a needy
individual.

...

The Sideways Elevator
By ARTHUR EDSON
AP Nrwsfeatures Writer

WASHINGTON'

(AP)-Bcf-

Sv mington-h- is

me a

Con-

ore

mouth tight "my
dentist gae
god woiking over."
Leaving the
unavowed
candidate, busily unavowing, let's seurry
down to the basement for the inauguration of the new Senate subway train,
designed to whisk senatois fiom their
new office building a thousand feet to
the capitol in exactly 3 seconds.
This project has lecn ciitici.ed, mostly
by some of the senatois themselves, as
a horrendous, expensive Ixxvuloggle. But
the two senators on the program and
who were on the building commission-we- re
not among the critics.
)
and
Sens. Dennis Chavez
were prosub-Styles Bridges
said

tight-lippe-

gress had officially opened for business
yesterday, the tow n was really jumping.

President Eisenhower had scurried
back from his Augusta, Ca., golf course.
. . . Senators were popping up everywhere with well honed adjectives.
Anyone who moved fast enough, and
who didn't mind if his ears took a leat-incould listen to nine senators speak
at one spot or another, including four
full fledged news conferences.
So let's get into the
warmups by dropping in on one of the
news conferences, held by Sen. Stuart

g,

pre-openi-

).
Symington
Because Symington is often mentioned
as a possible presidential candidate, he
drew a full house. He has just returned
from Africa, but nobody cared much
alout this. Most reporters seemed interested only in his presidential hopes, if
any, and the air was filled with such
pithy exchanges as these:
"If you should become president . . .
"Well, the question is a little hypoI am not an avowed canthetical.
(D.-Mo-

...

didate."
"If you are not an avowed candidate,
what kind of a candidate are you?"
Symington said he'd have to say he
isn't a candidate at all. But you had the
feeling if you twisted his arm long
enough, he might shyly step forward.
Symington often talks alxiut how we
lag between Russia in missiles, and
some of the talk today was of the missile
thinks it's growing
gap. Symington
larger. As he talked, he pursed his lips,
like a man who not only weighs his
words but also savors them. This, it
turned out, was a delusion.
"If I seem a little tight in the mouth,"

d,

(l)-NM-

(B-N-

w

ay.
It is to Bridges that we aie indebted
for most of the statistics. . . . That
each of tin- two plush cars cost
. . . That when he first came here his
son, Johnny, was so impressed with the
old subway train that he rode it o2
times in one day. . . . This may le the
subway-tidinrecord. . . . That the
subway trains are capable of hatting
along at 20 miles an hour, but that it
seems faster since you're sitting in the
open air.
That nothing anywheie is like these
subway cars.
"They are really built like elevators,"
Bridges said, "so what we have lteiC
is an elevator going sideways."
The speeches finally ended, a few
senators climlnd on lnurd in front, a
few of es lucky reporteis got in the
rear, and we were off to applause.
A fine inaugural trip was had by all,
and it seems fair to venture tliis conclusion:
We may lag in missiles, but we're ce
closing the sid