xt71vh5ccr3p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71vh5ccr3p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19400126  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 26, 1940 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 26, 1940 1940 2013 true xt71vh5ccr3p section xt71vh5ccr3p Fhe .Kentucky Kernel

The World
Whirls On

UNIVERSITY

By JIM YYOOLDEIDGE

treaty
Today, the commercial
between the United States and
Japan, which has been in force
lor a quarter of a century, expired. No effort was made to renew it. President Roosevelt made
an announcement to this effect
last summer. But to the Japanese,
the treaty is the subject of intense
national interest. The Japs know
that in 1936 they obtained 587c of
their imports from the United
States, that since World War II
started they have gotten practically all of their imported goods
from us. They know that we could
stop their invasion of China instantly by simply placing an embargo on our war materials.
Embarca I'p For Debate
Such an embargo is at present
embodied in a bill presented to
Congress by Senator Key Pittman.
The bill should appear on the floor
for debate very soon. Congress will
have the alternative of placing this
embargo on our exports or of making another trade treaty. Right now,
however. It doesn't look like we
are going to make another treaty.
The Gallup public opinion poll
of the American
shows that 82
people are against such a treaty.
What the people want is an em-- "
bargo.
Grew Told Them

V

OLUME XXX

CALENDAR LISTS

HOPS, FORMALS
FOR

Conference To Open
On Campus
Schedule Is Released
Tuesday
By Student

Committee

Social calendar for University
dances during the coming semester, just revealed by Susan Jackson, chairman of the student government social committee, lists
hops, formals, and tea dances. Only
cne fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsil-ois scheduled for a formal.
Jack Herndon, member of the
SAE dance committee, said yesterday that his fraternity was "trying
to get" Jimmie James and his orchestra for its dance, but that final
arrangements had not yet been
made.
The state department wants the
Three sororities reported that the
embargo, too. The inner circle dip- "Blue and White" would furnish
lomatic figures say that there is no music for their
the
use making a treaty with the Japs. others had made no definite plans.
governThey say the Nipponese
The complete calendar:
ment cannot be trusted. They reUnion
Wednesday, February 7
member only too well the action dance.
of Japanese after they had signed
Saturday, February 10 Interfra- the Nine Power treaty. Emperor ternity ball.
lt
Hirohito of Japan agreed "to reSaturday, February 17
spect the sovereignity, the indee.
pendence, and the territorial and
Saturday, February 17 (evening)
administrative integrity of China."
Scabbard and Blade Military ball.
Alpha
But look what he is uoing now!
Saturday, February 24
e.
The department isn't trying to hide Gam
feelings. It sent Ambassador
its
Saturday, February 24 (evening)
Joseph Clark Grew to Japan beUnion dance.
knew that Grew had the
cause it
Saturday, March 2 Kappa Kappa
courage to tell the Nippons Just Gamma formaL
Grew did!
where they stood. And
Saturday, March 9 AE formal
His torse's mouth" speech is one
Saturday, March 16 Tau Beta Pi
addresses formal.
of the most threatening
department.
ever sanctioned by the
Saturday, March 23 Delta Zeta
e.
Secretary Hull adds that it would
be difficult to make a treaty which
Saturday, March 23 (evening)
Japwould be satisfactory to the
Union dance.
anese. The Japs, he says, would
Saturday, March 30 Junior prom.
want us to recognize their conquest
Saturday April 6 Union dance.
of certain parts of China. But who
Saturday, April 13 Kappa Delta
are we to be giving up China? formal.
Saturday, April 27 Union dance.
After all. Hull says, the Chinese
should have something to say about
Friday, May 3 SuKy May day
It. Hull remembers that in the dance.
peace conference following World
Saturday, May 4 Zeta Tau Alpha
e.
War I, Woodrow Wilson agreed to
Friday, May 10 Pershing rifles
let the Japs have the Chinese
port of Shantung in order to get dance.
Saturday, May 18 Union dance.
the Japs In his League of Nations.
Wednesday, June 5 Senior ball.
It was from this same city of Shantung that Japan started her cam
Hull
paign in China. Secretary
doesn't want to make the same
n,

tea-danc-

Tri-De-

tea-danc-

mistake.

Meanwhile, the Japs are doing
everything in their power to persuade us not to enforce our proposed embargo. They have thrown
out their old cabinet under Abe
and have formed a liberal group
headed by Admiral Yonal. They
have agreed to give us full use of
the Yangtse river. One hundred employees of their foreign office went
on strike because their chiefs refused to adopt a concilatory policy
toward American interests in Asia.
They realize that their war with
China rests in the balance.
LAST MINUTE FLASHES
COLUMBUS, Ohio John L. Lew
is, chairman of the CIO, stated in
an address to the United Mine
Worker's convention that the Dem
ocratae party had broken faith with
organized labor and predicted that
President Roosevelt would encounter "ignominious defeat" if he
sought a third term. Some observers believe that Lewis is making it
clear that his organization will not
support a new deal candidate in
the forthcoming Democratic nom- -.
inating convention, but will favor
the nomination of Senator Burton
K. Wheeler of Montana,
The state How
FRANKFORT
of Representatives passed and sent
to the Senate a bill raising the
present maximum old age pension
payment from I 15 to $30 per month.-Thmeasure was passed by a
unanimous vote.
HELSINKI A Russian attempt
to rescue two trapped Red army
divisions northeast of Lake Ladoga
was repulsed with heavy losses to
the Soviets, a Finnish dispatch

WILDCAT ISSUE

DUE FEBRUARY 6
Registration Number
Praised By Pearce

By JIM CALDWELL
The editor of the Wildcat, who
claims the threat of exams has
made him feel as low as an Ingrown carpet tack, slid under the
door of The Kernel office last night
and gently whispered in his train
announcer's voice that the next
issue of the campus humor publication would make its appearance
on registration day. February 6.
strangely enough, he pointed out,
the edition will be entitled th
"Registration Issue."
Pearce noted that this number
"will not be as riotously hilarious
as previous editions, but it will
contain features that are of special
interest to local collegians, and
which are significant of the most
recent campus trends."
Besides the traditional scandal
column, jokes and limericks, the
magazine will carry an article cm
the humorous aspects of WPA
findings and details of an "Ugliest
Man Contest." Also featured will
be an article entitled "Bankroll
Brotherhood," being a survey of the
social fraternities.
also wishes it noted
Pearce
that he is sending up a signal
rocket asking for volunteers to work
on his staff. "There are a number
of vacancies for advertising workstates. The dispatch adds that ers," he said, "and room for an
several Russian air raids on the additional number of humor writ
coast of Finland were uhsuccessfuL ers. If you think you're funny," he
blurted, "come over to the Wildcat's lair and give vent to a little
We're keeping Pen-ic- k
chained, so there's nothing to
hurt you."
By BOB AMMON'S
His interview
completed,
the
Pearcian body and brain dashed
through the ventilator slits on the
QUESTION
"Does cramming for exams do wall, whisked around the corner
any good?"
and disappeared under the door
into the damp darkness of his den.
Jean Williams, A & S freshman According to our private ledger,
"It does if you start cramming Pearce will make his next appearance on Groundhog day.
in September."
Crit Lowry, A & S senior "Sometimes you learn more for an exam
than for all the rest of the course

What They Think

put together."

Advisers Will Meet
To Plan Conference

Alice Smith, Ag sophomore "It
might help you pass the exam, but
The advisory committee of the
you forget it the day after.
study group of the Southern As
John Cassidy, Engineering fresh sociation of Colleges
Secondary
man "You remember it long Schools will meet at and
9 o'clock, Sat
enough to pass that's what counts." urday morning, in the library of
Mary Anne Blevins, Ag sophomore the Education building. The com
"I believe in cramming but I be- mittee will study the possibility of
lieve in getting some sleep too."
a conference on the University
Berlyn Brown, Ag senior "I've campus this summer. The purpose
always found it helps because you of the conference would be to ex
can get a picture of the entire tend the influence of th exneri- picvc uBicau vi ui menial program in secondary edu
wuic in
disconnected assignments."
cation.

J Bfcsi'

Uix

The complete schedule

CI i Ci

.QONE.9

'.

Jill

SI

X

1

POOKE

7T

CjENi)MS'

TOCHZifil.E

1

v

y

1

Toms
All-Stud-

P.

Drive For Charity
Try To Pass $500 Goal

ent

Raising their goal $150 over last.
year, the second annual drive for
Community Chest funds under the
of ODK, men's senior honorary and Mortar Board,
women's senior honorary, will open

Jury Fails To Indict
Stamper And Mother
Davies Jury Votes True Bill

rs'

Kernel Survey Reveals Student Approval
Of Dance 'Sets' And Compulsory ROTC
By JIM CALDWELL
59.3 percent said yes; 40.7 percent,
Tliat Kentucky students would no.
support sets of formal dances, that
2) Do you approve the subsidizathey think undergraduate newspa- tion of college football players?
pers should comment upon affairs
75 percent approved; 25 percent
of the world outside as well as upon disapproved.
mere campus activities, and that
3) Do you favor compulsory RO
they endorse compulsory military TC?
training and subsidization of col51 percent said yes; 49 percent, no.
lege football players, is indicated by
4) Do you think the collegiate
a survey recently conducted by The press should confine its editorial
Kernel among UK students.
opinions solely to campus matters,
or should it discuss national and
1. Adoption of formal dance "sets"?
international affairs as well?
No 40.7.
Yes59.3;
62.7 percent believed it should
2. Subsidization of footballers?
discuss outside affairs; 37.7 percent
No
Yes
thought it should stay on the cam3. Compulsory ROTC?
pus.
Yes
No
that the closest
It is
4.
affairs in collegiate conflict of opinion was that of the
press?
question of compulsory military
Yes 62.7; No 37.3.
training, the variation being only
2 percent. Interesting to note o the
The poll, which Is modeled after fact that a larger ratio of the wothose used by the Gallup Institute, men interviewed approved of encomprises a
of beliefs forced' ROTC than did the men.
rather than the usual "lump sum" The percentage of affirmative anof thought, and so may be regarded swers was considerably larger among
as a rather accurate account of freshmen
and sophomores than
student opinion. According to the among the upperclassmen.
system, 150 undergraduates are inMost of those who favored the
terviewed, with their distribution formal set system expressed a belief
being proportional
to that it would enable the student
according
college, sex, and classification.
body to bring the nation's leading
The queries, with the statistical "name" bands to the University for
findings, are:
dances. Chief criticism of the pro1) Do you favor the adoption of posed plan was
that sets "take up
sets of formal dances, as are now too much time
and too much
held at several of the nation's
money."
Those who advocated subsidiza
Non-camp-

25.
49.

cross-secti-

Final program for

s:

Editors Throughout The State

nt

tion of college football players felt
that the scholarships and payments
help deserving students through
school who otherwise would not be
able to attend. Several said they
did not sanction the principle of
subsidization, but since "the rest of
the schools do it, we might as well
too." The dissenters claimed that
the practice introduces "an aspect
of professionalism into college athletics."
Champions of compulsory ROTC
expressed the belief that the "current need for increased armaments
justifies the enforced training of
college underclassmen."
The bulk
of the opposing vote maintained
that requiring one to have a course
in military tactics before he may
be granted a diploma is
and tends to breed a militaristic point of view."
The opinion that the collegiate
press should discuss national and
international events as well as purely local activities apparently was
based on the belief that the practice stimulated members of the student body to take notice of current
events. The general view was that
college papers should "mix editorials on campus affairs with comments on outside events, but with
the emphasis on the local matters."
Dissenters claimed, "for the most
part, that "college Journalists don't
know enough about international
affairs to be authorities on them,
and so should ignore them entirely."

Y Presidents Name
Club Committeemen
Sophomore and Freshman Y club
committees for next semester have
recently been selected, as announced
today by the presidents Joe Logan
Massie, and Henry Hammock, respectively.
The Sophomore committees follow: program, John Long, Vernon
Garrison, Dorothy Vaughn. Sarah
Armbruster and Mead. Ferris; social
service, Jessie Francis, Dorothy
Paul and Haskell Ross; membership, Lida Belle Howe, Jean Ewers,
Karl Micheler and Ed Short; worship, Mary Olive Davis; social, Doris
Reichenbach and Billy Crouch.
Freshman Y committees are membership, Katy Lee Snyder, chairman, Owen Cox, Miriam Man gum
and Jean Williams; program, Glen-n- a
social, Elizabeth

Jag-ger-

s,
y;

Chapman,

chairman, and Ed Hank; worship,
Martha Adams, chairman, Wilfred
Kelley and Joseph Hendricks; publicity, Bob Ammons.

Request From Manila

Comes To Horlacher
Proof that the influence of the
College of Agriculture reaches to
iar corners oi me giooe came last
week with a letter from the
to Prof. L. J. Horlacher, requesting a text book.
Julian Lou wrote Professor Horlacher from Manila asking for a
copy of "Sheep" a text by Professor Horlacher, assistant dean of the
agriculture college and Dr. Carsie
Hammonds, head of the department of agricultural education.
Lou wrote, "It Is difficult for me
to learn the whole course without
the help of a good textbook such
as ine one mentioned. But as I
am a lad who belongs to a poor!
lamuy. it is out of my dream to
have the valuable textbook by purchasing. So in order to have my
dream realized. I am requesting,
your generosity to send me a freej
copy, because you are the only man
in this world who can actually give
me some help."
Phil-lipin-

ar

com-

j

KNITZER

TO PLAYSUNDAY

Delta Sigma Chi, men's professional journalism fraternity lart
week published volume 1, number 1
of the Kentucky News Service.
Designed to offer weekly papers
In Kentucky a resume of the week's
news, the KNS is expected to take
much the same place among the
smaller papers in the state that the
Associated Press, United Press and
other syndicates have on daily publications. Letters mailed to the editors of approximately 170 papers
asking them how they would receive such a service brought better
than a two to one favorable response, several editors even offering
to subscribe "sight unseen."
The first Issue was mailed to every
weekly paper in Kentucky, giving
them an opportunity to Judge its
merits for themselves. Those who
feel that they can make use of such
a weekly news review will be placed
on a regular mailing list.
Written by members of the fraternity and edited by Ben Williams,
the news service is being printed by
the University stenographic bureau
until a mimeograph machine can be
obtained.

Ballard, chairman, Frances
Eileen Shutte, and Glen

mid-ye-

mencement exercises, to be held at
3 p m Monday, February S in Memorial hall, has been released an a
lacks only the certified list of candidates who will receive degrees to be
complete.
Following the invocation by the
Rev. Hayes Farish, pastor of Woodland Christian church, Lexington, Dr.
Alfred H. Upham. president of Miami university, Oxford. Ohio. wiU
address the graduating class. President Frank L. McVey will confrr
the degree and administer the
pledge to the class after which
"Alma Mater" will be sung by the
glee clubs and audience. Doc. or
Farish will give the benediction.
gum ,t
"The Lord's Prayer." by Hansen
will be sung by Mrs. W. H. Hansen
"He belongs with Virovai
with the organ prelude and pest luce
and Menuhin."
be'ng played by Mrs. Lela Culhs.
"Fear of embarrassing those who
are not on the final list of graduates" was the reason given by Registrar Leo M. Chamberlain for not
releasing to The Kernel a list of
students who have made application for degrees.
Doctor Chamberlain said, a it
has always been his policy to withhold such lists, he feared publication in the University paper wouM
embarrass him. the student3 who
did not graduate, and the UniverJoseph Knitzer, young American sity. He added such a story woulj
violinist, will be the featured artist violate the agreement he now has
on the Sunday afternoon musicale with the downtown newspapers.
at 4 p.m, January 28. in Memorial
hall, with Miss Mary Strickler as
sisting at the p:ano.
According to Prof. R. D. Mclntyre,
chairman of the committee in
charge of the Sunday musicales.
Mr. Knitzer is one of the most outstanding artists ever to be presented
at the University. At fourteen, he
made his debut with, the New York
Symphony under Walter Damrosch,
17
the youngest soloist who had ever
played with the orchestra. In 1934
ho won the Naumberg award and
Thlrly - two juniors, advanced
the following year the prize of the military students, picked as men
National Federation of Music clubs "having the qualities requisite to
as well as the Schubert Memorial an officer and a gentleman" have
award.
been elected as pledges to ScabThat year, he was engaged as solo- bard and Blade, honorary military
ist with the Philadelphia Orchestra fraternity.
and had the double distinction of Those pledged are Chester C.
being the only violinist outside of Brown. Lexington; W. G. Bryson.
Fritz Kreisler to appear under Leo- Ashland; Paul Cavise. Glen Cove.
pold Stokowski's direction that sea- L. L; Gilbert Cheniae. Fulton:
son, and the youngest soloist ever Robert Cloud. Louisville: W. S.
to appear in a New York concert Coblin, Frankfort; Carl Combs. Hawith the Philadelphia Orchestra zard; Jack Cook, Salem: Dave
conducted by Mr. Stokowski.
Coon, Winchester; John Courtney.
Since that time Mr. Knitzer has Lexington; Howard Curtis. Mays-vill- e;
great orbeen soloist with several
Robert Drake. Cynthiana;
chestras including the Detroit and Mel French, Melrose Park. El.;
New York Philharmonic. He made Robert Gaines. Hopkinsvule: Ray
his debut with the New York Or- Graviss, Louisville; B. B.
chestra last season under the baton
Maysville; Emory Horn.
of John Barbirolli. After his per- Lexington; Sam Johnson. Lexingformance the World Telegram wrote ton.
that "he belongs with Virovai and
W. C. Kittinger. Owensboro;
Menuhin."
James Lewers. Louisville: John LyMr. Knitzer has chosen the fol- ons. Flemingsburg: Jack Marshall.
lowing program for his Lexington Louisville; Roy Mullis, De'.mar, Cal.:
recital.
Walter Reid. Leavenworth, Ind :
i
s,
Royce Reiss, Louisville: W. L.
Chacoiuit
Vital!
Lexington; C. E. Robinson.
U
Wteniftwskl
Concerto in D Minor
Lexington; Oscar Sellars. Paducah;
Allegro
moderato Romanic: AnH. E. Sellars. Versailles: W.
.
dante non troppo
Finale: Alia
Stephenson, Lexington; J. W. We'ob.
singara
III
Louisville; Rollins Wood, Bloom-fiel.
Aw Maria
and Tom Jackson, Lebanon.
Ouitarre
atoaxaowakl
Maid with the Flaxen
The
The Scabbard and Blade's annual
Hair
Ritual Fire Dance
DeFaUa Military Ball will be held on February 17, and will feature the
IN CONFERENCE
music of Deke Moffit and his orJames H. Pearson, regional agent chestra.
Moffit is now playing at th?
in agricultural education from the
office of education in Washington, is Netherland Plaza hotel in Cincinvisiting the University and has been nati. Previous to his present enconferring with President McVey, gagement, he played at the Beverl
Dean W. S. Taylor, Dr. R H. Woods, Hills Country club in Covington,
and last week performed on the
and Dr. Carsie Hammonds.
same program .with Kay Kyser's
band.
i Continued on Page Four)
-

Saturday, February 3, seventh and eighth hour classes.

May Receive Service
Of Honorary

ay

75;
61;

Withheld

News Bulletin Begun
By Delta Sigma Chi JOSEPH

Against Harold Tracey
February 13 and continue through
February 15.
In Jewelry Theft
C. P. Johnson, commerce senior,
WedThe Davies county grand jury adJones, government economist. was elected student chairman
returning indictsessions nesday at a combined meeting of journed without
A feature of the women's
freshmeeting Friday, Mortar Board and ODK. The drive ments against Allan Stamper,
will be the annual
this year will be conducted entirely man arts and sciences student, or
February 2 of the Kentucky
N. B. Stamper.
Sarah
Federation, representing by students. Last year Dean Beau- his mother, Mrs.
The pair was held to face grand
Mrs. H. L. G. Blanding and Dr. Henry
12,000 farm women.
of the Jury action on charges of houseCrafton, Henderson, president of mont were
breaking in connection with the
drive.
the group, will be In charge.
The goal this year was set at $5,000 robbery last June 4 of Grant's
Speakers will include Mrs. T. M.
jewelry store in Owensboro, it was
Johnson, former president, who will $500. Chairman Johnson stated
report on the meeting in England that students will be asked to con- learned yesterday. still at large after
Harold Tracey,
of the Associated Country Women tribute this year to the drive. Last
of several weeks, was inof the World, and Dr. Allen Stock-dal- e, year only the campus organiza- a search
on a burglary charge in
N. Y. The meeting will be tions were asked to donate to the dicted
connection with the Grant theft.
followed by the annual homemakers drive.
ODK will solicit funds from all
luncheon. Monday, January 29, en
SEAY WILL ATTEND
all-dmeeting of the homemakers' fraternities and men's organizations, while Mortar Board will seek
board will be held in Lexington.
Professor Maurice F. Seay, direcOther nationally known authori- funds from sororities.
tor of the University school and
A feather sale will be held durties to speak at the convention include Dr. Sleeter Bull and Dr. A. S. ing the drive and all students that head of the Bureau of School SerColby of the University of Illinois; contribute will be given a feather vice, will attend the joint meeting
of the board of directors and the
Minnesota Instead of a tag.
Dr. W. E. Petersen,
drive has planning board of the Kentucky
dairyman; Dr. J. G. Hardenburgh,
After the three-da- y
New Jersey dairyman; Dr. W. E. been concluded, the money will be Education association, Friday, JanDunham, Ohio bee expert; C. J. presented to the Community Chest uary 26, at Frankfort. Mr. Seay is
Fawcett, Boston, and P. O. Wilson of Lexington and Fayette county the University representative on
planning board.
(Continued on Page Four)
by Chairman Johnson.
Home-make-

fol-ow-

Plans Are Completed;
List Of Graduates

Violinist Knitzer

hour classes.

Organisations to meet during the
week include the Kentucky Horti.
cultural Society, the Kentucky Bee
keepers' Association, the Kentucky
Holstein Cattle club, the Kentucky
Federation of Homemakers, the
Kentucky Seed Improvement Association, and the Rural Church

ture.
The 'women's meetings' during
the week will have as speakers Dr.
Louise Stanley, head of the Bureau of Home Economics of the
United States Department of Agriculture; Mrs. Grace Sloan Overton,
Washington, nationally known lecturer; Mrs. Ella Gardner, recreational specialist, and Dr. A Drum-mon- d

3.

Saturday, January 21. first
hour classes.
Monday, January 29, second
hour classes.
Tuesday, January 30, third
hour classes.
Wednesday,
January 3 1 ,
fourth hour classes.
Thursday, February 1, fifth
hour classes.
Friday, February 2, sixth

n,

council.
Women will hoid sessions on
homemaking problems throughout
the four days. On the first and
last days there will be general
meetings for farmers, with Wednes
day and Thursday given over to
group sessions. These special sessions will include dairying, poultry
raising, livestock raising, beekeeping,
agricultural conservation, the rural
community and church, livestock
diseases, farm engineering, crops
and soils, marketing, and horticul-

colleges except law will begin
at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow. Registrar Leo Chamberlain announced and will continue

Thursday and Saturday
classes taking their tests in
the afternoon. Morning exams
will be given from 8:30 until
11:30 and afternoon examinations from 2 until 5, allowing no student more than
three hours to complete a quiz.

g.

Highlight of the convention will
be a "Get Together" banquet at
6:30 p. m. Thursday, February 1
in the Union at which President
McVey will speak on "The UniverDoctor McVey
sity Community."
will also speak at the general session at 10 a. m. Friday, February 2
in the pavilion arena, judging pavilion.
Speakers at the first day's general session include O. M. Farrlng-tostate executive director of the
Agricultural Adjustment Administration; Mrs. James Spilman,
and Dr. H. B. Price, Dr.
W. D. Nicholls, R. C. Miller, and
D. G. Card of the College of Agriculture.
At the general session the first
day. Dean Thomas P. Cooper, agriculture college head, and W. C.
Lassetter, editor of "The Progres.
sive Farmer," will recognize six
Kentucky Master Farmers.

Exercises
Set For February 5

Final examinations in all

Classes whigh meet on Monday, Wednesday-- and Friday
will take examinations in the
morning, with Tuesday,

:1

31

Mid -- Year

Exam Schedule

until Saturday, Ftbruary

Taking Part In Convention

Opening for a four-da- y
session on
the campus Tuesday, January 30
will be the 28th annual Farm and
Home convention featuring nationally known speakers and authorities in agriculture and homemak-in-

NEW SERIES NO

26, 1940

National Authorities Will Be Featured
At Four-Da- y
Farm, Home Convention

SEMESTER

KERNEL

Y

OF KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JANUARY

Z246

FRIDAY ISSUE
SEMI-WEEKL-

es

DIPRE ON AIR
history, participated in the radio
program "Town Hall Meeting of the
Air" Monday night at Columbus.
The question discussed was
"Should the Declaration of War'
be Brought about by a Vote of the
People, Instead of by Congressional
Legislation?"

Young Violinist Called
Best Ever Presented

HONORARY PICKS

32

FOR PLEDGING

Military Ball Set For

February

Hen-dricks-

--

Rcb-ard-

d;

Schubert-Wtlhel-

Debuasy-Hartro-

Registration

Schedule
To make sure that all students see and understand the
schedule for registration The
Kernel is reprinting the list
published in Tuesday's paper.
New students will be given
classification tests and physiMonday,
cal examinations
February 5. while registration
will be Tuesday and Wednesday, February
and 7.

Students must registrar
with their alphabetical groups
at the following times:
Tuesday morning

8:00 to 8:50 T through Z.
9: CO to 10:30 P through R.
11:C0 to 11:50 M through
O.

Tuesday afternoor,
1:30 to 2:20 K through L.
2:30 to 3:20 H through J.
3:30 to 4:20 Miscellaneous

J through

Z.

Wednesday morning
8:00 to 8:50 E through G.
9 00 to 9:50 C through D.
10:00 to 10:50 A through B.
11:00 to 11:50 Miscellaneous A through Z.

Wednesday afternoon
1:30 to 4:30 Miscellaneous
A

through

Z.

Kampus
Kernels
UNION NOTES

Todar
All members of Freshman ciuo.
11:50 a. m. Kentuckian pictures.
Federation of homemakers. 12:3:)

p. m., ballroom.

Saturday
University extension department
conference, 8:30 a. m. 8 p. m., 204
Taesday
Home economics faculty tea, 3.30-5:p. m, music room.
Wednesday
Extension division of agriculture.
7:30-1- 0
p. m.. ballroom.
Alpha Sigma Phi. 7:15 p. m., 204.

30

Thursday

Agriculture college banquet,
p. m.. ballroom.
OTHER NOTES

5.30-10:-

30

Friday
Dutch Lunch club, noon. Maxwell
Street Presbyterian church. Speaker, Rev. Warren HalL
Monday

International Affairs club. 7:30 p

m., Lafferty hall.
Speaker. Dr.
Huntley Dupre, "Britab War Aims."

* ucoi vvpy nvaiiauic
Page

Twi

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
fH3 families and 5,36 homeless or
transient human beings were given aid and
courage hv central Kenturkians acting through
lie Community Chest group. Even so, officials
and indeed a
Kini oui. there is much room
demand for improvement. They note that the
coumv jxipulation has risen 48 per cent in the
last lit vears. while the amount given has decreased 22 per cent. Their solution to this not-slaudable ci ic situation is that more subscrib-

reports.

TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OtTIfTIAl.

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Iritrcollfrisi
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of Commerce

Smkf, Inc.

National Advortising
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..oris T. IcT.FHART
Patricia Hamilton

Ter

Editor-in-Chie- f

Managing Editor
Seres Editor
Business Manager

CroRcr. Lamason

John H. Morgan

Sport? Editor
Circulation Manager
Cartoons

JOE CREASON .
WYNNE McKINNEY
JIMMY HALE
JACK TREADWAY
VIRGINIA HAYDEN
CHARLES A. SMITH
MARY LOCISE NAIVE

Staff Photographer
Society Editor

Advertising Manager
Secretary-Advis-

er

Associate Editors
BEN WTLLIAM8

LOrrSE CALBERT

Al'HA I EE I TONS
MABEL LOVENS
HN SAMARA
B1LI Y HUDSON
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Campuscene

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TJf;

In Which The Columnist

A

Inaugurates

Rich, Ileautiful Prose Department.

We were floundering through the snowdrifts Tuesday
ci..- -, tnin
afternoon in an apparently fruitless attempt to get to class, Mid(,e WhPel(.r 0f his date wit.i
when suddenly a frigid, drooley snowball wanned us up beside vIarv james on one Thursday
. Mae Cristian Deadman s
the ear. Under the impression that we had wandered erringly night?
onto Finnish territory, we involuntarily threw up our hands rock on that certain finger from
g.eat
caused
and cried "Tovaritsch ;" but we soon discovered our pardon- - Harold Bushone niyhta in the deal of
dorms.
excitement
able mistake, and, turning around, saw an irate universityke It's a beauty and. boy. is she proud
bearing down on us like the Burlington Zephyr.
Jane Bayham of "Shoes
of it
"Hey, you," the man said, "what in the . . . did you mean with
has done a fine jot)
by committing that sacrilege against Glenn Miller?"
of holding both Phi Delt Bob HanPretty much taken aback, we asked for an explanation, sen and last year's football t.t.
and were instantly and somewhat emphatically informed that Sherman Hinkebein.
.

.

.

wc knew absolutely

nothing- about
the fine art of swing music, and across bits
that we cannot forget
that furthermore, Shaw stinks.
and peculiarly enough, we find them
We might have passed this off more often in contemporary wrlt- as the mere machinations of a
"clas- than in the
crank, but approximately a dozen sics." The above exerpt from "Back- others have stopped us since and ground for War" is a typical exbrutally insinuated the same thing. ample.
One lone loyal soul told us we were
Another passage of present-da- y
right, but that only makes two of poetic prose which we never have
us against an army, and so we be?n quite able to forget is this
bow to public opinion. After this, bit from
Pierre Van Paassen's
we will refrain unconditionally from "Days of Our Years". It is a desmaking any remarks whatsoever cription of the coming of fall to
about popular music or its . pur his home town in Holland:
veyors. As far as we're concerned,
"It was the hour when the wat- they don't even exist.
ers are asleep. A strip of yellow
Several people have also wanted gold on
the edge of the world
we ever
to know where in the
marked the spot where the sun had
got the misfortune to use a lead
fallen off. The flowers had lost
like that of Tuesday's column. This their courage with the coming of
was. we confess, due to pure weakmeadows now lay
ness, nothing more. The model was autumn and the
green in tne laamg
an exerpt from the excellent "Back- a tarnished
light of day. .The smell of oak and
ground for War." and for some
hung In
reason, as yet undetermined, hap- of fallen leaves pungent the air.
odor of
pens to be one of our favorite pas- mingled with the
peat. In tufts of whitish
sages of prose. This will probably burning
wool it clung to the naked branches
bore you, but we're printing it anywillow trees."
way. It comprises the first para- of the
good reason at
For no
graph of a division entitled "Lo-