xt71vh5cfh4f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt71vh5cfh4f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19641119  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 19, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 19, 1964 1964 2015 true xt71vh5cfh4f section xt71vh5cfh4f Chapters

Totiijllits Wrallirr:
Cloudy, Cool Willi liain

2-- 4

In 'CliroicIicM Of Han'
Sec

Page Four
f ii i v v

Vol. LVI, No.

rsity of K vn
KY..

LEXINGTON,

15

c Ii y
1
THURSDAY, NOV. l!,

Before the film Cov. Breathitt
will comment on the life and work
of the late president.

The Pershing Rifles will serve
as color guard for the ceremony.
The Very Rev. Robert VV. Estill, who will give the invocation,
is presently chairman of the human rights committee for the
state as well as dean of the Louisville Episcopal Cathedral.
Giving the benediction will be
Father Francis E. Nugent of Lexington's St. Paul Catholic Church.
Special music will be provided
by the Central Kentucky Youth
Orchestra and the UK Choristers.
The Youth Orchestra, which is
a group of 95 high school and junior high students directed by Joseph Pival, will play "Elegy for
Strings" by Tschaikovsky and a
"Hymn and Fuging Time" by
Henry Cowell.
In April, 1963 this group
on the White House lawn
at the request of Mrs. John F.
Kennedy.
The Choristers will sing "Ave

Maria."

University President John W.
Oswald will preside over the
service.

Eight Paiges

UK Greeks Discuss

Common Problems
First Mass Greek Unity Convention

University students, faculty,
and staff will join with persons
throughout the country in commemorating the anniversary of
the death of President John F.

The film, which deals with
Kennedy's time as president, was
shown at the Democratic Convention as a tribute to him.

llijrl, 17

it

JFK Film
To Highlight
UK Service
Kennedy Sunday.
A film "First Thousand Days"
and comments by Gov. Edward
T. Breathitt will review the life
of John F. Kennedy during a
memorial service at 4 p.m. Sunday in Memorial Coliseum.

II;

Low

Convenes In Memorial Coliseum
By KENNETH

i:

k.,

'V

m

.

m

.i

Distinguished Cadets

Distinguished Air Force ROTC cadets are (from the left) Aubbin
Higgins, Jerry Raybeck, Benton Diehman, Ernest T. Wightman, and
Joe Jones.

s,

Next Semester

Students To Register
By Academic Standing

Registration for the spring will be according to this semester's
grade point standing, Dean Charles F. Elton of the Registrar said
today.
group will be heard by the faculty
This procedure was recom- committee next week.
Honaker said that the plans
mended by the student registration improvement committee ap- to be presented to the faculty are
"a streamlining of the old syspointed by President John VV.
Oswald and has been approved by tem."
"We didn't attempt to comthe faculty registration commitpletely alter the system. We feel
tee.
that the nlans nlus the fart that
According to Charles Honaker,,. registration is. spread over, three
a member of the student com- - days instead of two will facilitate
mittee, the complete plans of his registration," Honaker said.

Patterson Calls '65
'UK's Best Year9

University Centennial Coordinator Dr. J. W. Patterson told
Blue Grass Kiwanis Club members today "1965 will be the Uni
be a time "when we honor the
versity's greatest year."
traditions of the past and, at the
Patterson said observance of same
time, plan for the next
the UK's 100th anniversary will
100

years."

UK Religious Staffs

Sponsor Seminar

University and Lexington ollicials and civic leaders will
be guests of the University religious advisers stall for dinner
today in the UK Student Center. The event will be the open'"
ing session of a seminar, The University and Religious Life."
Dr. Milton McLean, coord in- - develop a unified approach by
ator of religious affairs, Ohio which they can assist students
as they develop morally and
State University, and president
of the National Association for spiritually.
the Coordination of University
Religious Affairs, will Ik1 the
guest speaker and resource leader.
advisors staff
The
is sponsoring the seminar.
Other seminar events are a
breakfast at S a.m. tomorrow
By ANN HAMMONDS
for the religious advisors lunchKernel Staff Writer
eon at 11:30 a.m. for Lexington
The first phase of the Cencivic counselors and social servtennial Committee on Evaluation
ice workers; a coffee at 4 p.m.
of Student Life began this week
and faculty members who parwith the evaluation of the extra
ticipate in the work of the religious foundations, and an S curricular life of the student his
activities and organizations.
pin. meeting for members of
the
Council of
Kathy Kelly, eoehairman of
( !hurc lies.
the Committee, said that this is
the first part of an evaluation
A student forum at 10 a.m.
on Saturday will be held for that will include study of the
student's academic life and
members of (lie UK Interfaith
Council and selected student dormitory and housing facilities.
leaders.
The evaluation of the organThe religious advisois will exizations, will consist of three
plain to the various invited
parts. The first step is to go to
groups how they are seeking to the organization and present

The coordinator added that
throughout the year some of the
world's outstanding scholars w ill
be either teaching or lecturing
at both the main campus and the
community colleges.
The Centennial Year will be
kicked off by a Founder's Day
observance here Feb. 22. More
than 3,000 delegates from the
nation's colleges and universities,
various learned and professional
societies, governmental agencies
and friends of the University are
expected at the occasion.

GREEN
Kernel News Editor
Four main problems facing the Greek system at the University
were mentioned last night in the Greek Unity Convention in Memorial Coliseum.
These problems listed by Beth Roper, Mike Jones, JackCriff,
and Pat Fowler were communication, competition, conformity, and
courage.
The problem of communication, Miss Roper said, includes
"the breakdown in communication from the sorority and fraternity
representatives (in the Panhellenic Council and the Interfraternity
Council) back to their chapters, the lack of communication with
the faculty,
and the community."
Communication is "a most serious problem because, ifwe are
not understood by others or cannot understand ourselves, how can
we work together to strengthen our system?"
Communication outside the Greek community is important,
she said, so
"will know, what we stand for, that we do
have high ideals and goals, and that we do strive to attain them."
In discussing the problem of competition, Mike Jones said,
"When competition gets to be no longer proving ourselves, but running down our fellow Greeks.thenit is bad.
"When during rush one group must resort to smearing another
in order to obtain pledges, then they are giving one impression, but
it is the wrong impression.
"When Greeks become so wrapped up in intramural competition that they must literally fight, then they are giving themselves
and the entire Creek system a bad name."
He suggested that when the individual Greek organizations
compete, "prove that you are the best, rather than proving that
others are not as good."
Jack Criff defined the problem of conformity as one which
tends to hide the individual member of a Greek organization.
"It is felt," he said, "that in order to strengthen the Greek
.system, greater independence is needed within each group, showing
each member as an individual.
"If we could learn to follow the high standards and responsibilities of which we are capable, the system would be drawn together in a single body, in which all members would have the same
objectives.
Continued On Page 7
non-Gree-

.

Newspaper Initiated
By Campus Greeks
The first edition of the Oracle, the newspaper published by the
The Hurst Printing Company of
will
Lexington has contracted to do the printing. The initial run-obe 6,000 copies and will be available in about a week and a half.
a rough outlineof
Earl Bryant, editor of the Ora- the Bryant gave
format of the paper by saying,
cle, stated, "The newspaper fol"It will contain primarily fealows along with the convention
tures and articles questioning the
which was held last night." He
problems facing the Greek system.
went on, "Even though it will be We
hope to get these problems
put out by the Greeks, it will not out in the
open."
be just to play up our system.
He went on to compare the
"The purpose of the paper conv ention and the newspaper by
saying, "This is a unified effort
will be to disc uss the Greek community on campus, its problems by the UK Greeks to improve
socially and imand its goals. We feel that we will scholastic-allyhave articles in the paper that the prove the campus. If we can imwhole campus will be interested prove ourselves then we will improve the campus."
in."
UK Greeks, went to press today.

ff

,

Centennial Committee Initiates
Evaluation Of Student Activities

Lexington

and questions for discussion. Participation by campus
groups is voluntary.
The second step will be an
opportunity in February for all
faculty, administration, and students to make recommendations
to representatives from each
organization.
The evaluation of the organizations, will consist of three
parts. The first step is to go to
the organization and present
topics and questions for discussion. Participation by campus
topics

groups is voluntary.
The second step will be an
opportunity in February for all

faculty, administration, and students to make recommendations
to representatives from each
organization.
Finally, each organization
will send delegates to a con-

ference to discuss such topics as
master plan for all organizations w ill be responsible.
Miss Kelly said, "The intent
of the evaluation was to motivate the organization to lead
their own discussions and evaluate their goals."

a

Organizations that have been
evaluated so far are Links, Mortar Board, Student Union, and
Phi

Upsilou

Oinieron,

Home

Economics Honorary.
In the spring all organizations
will be asked to discuss their
organization in the future and
how to align their goals with
the goals of the University.
All the information will be
compiled into one report and
presented to President Oswald
for further evaluation.
The members of the Evaluation of Student Life Committee are eoehairman
Miss Kelly
and Mike Stanley, secretary Sandy Smith, and Betsy Claik,
Kathy lllston, and Ray Davis.
Members of Links, junior women's honorary, aie assisting in
the evaluation sessions.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov.

2 --

19, 1961

New Sociology Course 'Hanging Of Greens
Offered Next Semester Committee Selected

"Sociology of Mass Communications" will be offered for the
first time at the University during the spring semester, according to
Dr. Melvin L. De Fleur, professor of sociology.
Dr. De Fleur, who will teach
the course, said it would be devot
ed to three facets of mass communication:
1. The historical and
Michael Sells, a University
study of mass communisenior music major, will present
and how it has developed
cation
his senior recital at 8 p.m. Friin particular social and cultural
day in the Laloratory Theater
settings.
of the Fine Arts Building.
2. The exploration of the theSells, a tenor, will sing arias
ories of communication and how and
songs by Fux, Schubert,
they apply to mass communicaBrahms, Havel, Vaughan Wiltion.
liams and Stravinsky. He will be
3. The affect of the mass meAnna Laura
dia on the members of society. accompanied by
Hood.
Dr. De Fleur added that a
He has
as soloist
substantial amount of interest with variousappeared
UK choral organihad been shown in the three-hou- r
zations as well as performing
course. He said that it would
roles with the University
of readings and leading
consist of a list
Opera Theater. He also serves
two paperbacks.
as student conductor of the UniDr. De Fleur taught in this
versity Choristers.
field for 10 years at Indiana University.
Best
The sociology professor, who
joined the University faculty in
1963, received his B.S. from St.
Louis University, and his M.S.
and Ph.D. from the University of
Washington.
He is the coauthor of a book,
"The Flow of Information," and
not too early
has written more than 20 articles
to have
for various trade publications.
Dr. De Fleur was also a
professor of sociology in
Argentina during 1961-6cross-cultur- al

9

Newman Club

The steeling committee lor the "Hanging of the (iieens"
ceremony has been chosen. This is an annual function thai is
presented to open the Christmas season at UK.
The ceremony is sponsored
programs. Advisers to the comare
mittee
by Student Congress, Student
Jane
Batchelor,
Center Board, YWCA, and Chrystal Kellogg and Don Leak.
YMCA. The program will be
Participants in the various
preesnted on Decemler 8 at 4
other parts of the ceremony will
and 7 p.m. in the Grand Ballbe chosen from mcmlcrs of the
room in the Student Center.
two

Sells To Sing
At Senior Recital

Part of the ceremony will consist of music by the Men's Choir
under the direction of Max
Jackson and the Women's Choir
led by Sara Holroy. A Nativity
tableau will also be presented.
Members of the steering committee are: Arch's Hoven, chairwoman; Billie Jo Hedgis, costuming; Kathy Ware and Eddie
Wickfield, personnel; Jack Lyons
and Jack Milne, decorations;
Bill Moore, programming;
Sam
Alel, publicity; Kathy Kelly,

Dr. John Ford, head of the
Psychology Department at Bellar-min- c
College, will speak on
"Conservative Calholocistn versus Liberal Catholocism" at 7
p.m. Sunday at the Newman Club.

sponsoring organizations.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov.

19, 1964- -3

Announcements

The Merry

Go-R.ou- nd

by Gay Gish

...
"While the Cats are away, the
'mice' will play" is indeed an
apt description of the University's social life this weekend.
While the football team, along
with much of the campus, makes
the trip to Knoxville for the
traditional rivalry between the
two schools, the remaining students have planned a "luscious
feast" of parties and dances-enou- gh
to keep them well satisfied through Thanksgiving and
into the long siege during finals
when there will be little "play
time."
for the
The "kick-oil- "
is a duo
of jam sessions, one with the
Lambda Chi's and the other
with the Alpha Cam's. Both
dances are from 2 until 5, with
the Torques entertaining at the
Alpha Gam house and the
Temptashuns stirring the movement on Huguelct Drive.
For the ATO's, KA's, and
TKE's, the evening will continue
rush parties.
informal
with
Rushees will be treated to lots
of music the KA's are engaging
the Parliaments to play dancing and all the "fun" things
which accompany rush.
Friday night is a big night
for the Kappa's and Pi Thi's,
who are celebrating their mutual founding at Monmouth College in Illinois. The Monmouth
Duo Ball, intended as the beginning of a University tradition,
will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Student Center. The
dress is black ties for men, and
the formal is limited exclusively
to members of the sororities and
their escorts.
Another formal is being held
this weekend by Wendon House
and Hamilton House. This dance
is being held in the Phoenix
Hotel Ballroom, and, again, invitations must be presented at
the door.
Here come the bunnies! For
the fifth consecutive year, the
Sigma Chi's will open their Club
Playboy. The chapter house will
be tarnsformed by a night club
setting reminiscent of one of
Hugh Hefner's best. And this
might very well be the real
thing, for admission is by special
key only, and the Temptashuns
will play in their best "bunny
style."
Saturday afternoon all ears
will be tuned to the radio to
silently or maybe not so silently
-- cheer for the Wildcats as they
stay-at-ho-

"gad-about-

meet UT. But by evening the
campus social life will have
swung into high gear.
This is the weekend for the
annual Phi Dclt Pajama Jarty.
The Mystics will provide the
music as brothers in dainty
in
nighties and their dates
voluminus pajamas
cavort in
playful mockery of the sandman.
Saturday night rush parties
abound. The Phi Sig's and Triangle's will be "putting their
best foot forward" as they entertain their favorite rushees.
A Sweat Shirt Party has been
planned by the AGR's, and you
can bet that's going to be a
comfortable party!
The Phi Tan's fall
is being held at Spring Valley
Country Club Saturday night.
And this is a pretty good way
to begin holiday spirit.
Other fraternities will be playing the "rush game" Saturday
evening. The ATO's, Lambda
Chi's, and TKE's will be partying at their respective houses.
semi-form-

The Monarchs will be playing
for the Pike's, who also plan

to "play" some.
Do you like to roller skate?
The ZBT's do and that's exactly what they intend to do. The
brothers will be rolling along
at their "first annual" Roller
Skating party. Could be fun.
Just watch out for "flying" dates.
Many fraternities have parties for which they may always
be remembered. For the Delts,
it's their Neon Party. When the
lights go out Saturday night
and the black light comes on, of
course there may be some very
crazy looking sweatshirts . . .
and people.
After this weekend's fun is
over, you can look forward to
shades of turkey and dressing
for next week. Perhaps you're
eve lucky enough to have a professor who says he won't take
role next Friday. But whether
celebration
your Thanksgiving
lasts for one day or the entire
weekend, the holiday season is
upon us. Let's make the most
of it.

The Reeistration
Improve- ment Committee will meet Sun
day at 3 p.m. in Room 113 of
the Student Center.
The meeting for Thursday
night has been canceled.

The UK Woman's Club New
B ridge
comers'
Beginners'
group will meet Monday, Nov.
23, at 8 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. Bruce Gaskin, 2237 Jasmine Drive.

The November meeting of the
UK Woman's Club will be held
Tuesday, Nov. 24, at 2 p.m. at
the King Alumni House. Mrs.
William Lloyd Mahan will serve
as program chairman.
Dr. John Oswald and Dr. Ellis
Hartford will speak on "The
Importance of Community Colleges."
The Executive Board will
meet at 1 p.m. in the Student
Center.

The UK Woman's Club Newcomers' Night Sewing group
will meet Monday, Nov. 23, at
8 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Mark Luckens, 664 Sheridan
Drive.
There will be a meeting of all
persons interested in forming a
University "Railfans" Club on
Tuesday, Nov. 24, at 7 p.m. in
Miller Hall. This is to be a club
for railroad enthusiasts.

3zfiM3iMI)y
it's no idle boast. A Little Pigs
barbecue is in a class all its own.
'Cause fresh, tender meat is barbecued, swabbed and browned for long
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Phone

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Young Sophisticates

Villager

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Now 12.90

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great-fittin- g

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Now 17.90
were 30.00
Shirts and Blouses, sizes 5 to 15,
Ladybug
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LowenHid's

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Who do you
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Yes
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If she is important, let
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Acrost from Holmes Hall

I

* "And Those Guys Kept Talking Up Moderation"

Bari The Goldwaterite
Selected Chronicles

Chapter II
Yea, the Prophet cried out
against sin and Evil doing. Am I
1.

not the Lion of the Desert and
Justificr of the laws of God? Thine
enemies are multifold and thirst
for Thy grain and Thy coin and Thy
young men and young Women. Is
it not written by
the
that all Thy leaders and Procurators and the bearded elders of
the tribe are Spies and Traitors.
Have not even the children of Tender years not sold thee out to the
false gods and idols of the tribe of
the Kruz-chof the barbarian tribe of the North which is
called Kom-niby the alien and
called a
by Those of the true
faith? Does one among ye doubt
these Revealed Truths? Selah.
2. Aarg cried the Noblest
Prophet of them all. Are not the
secret archives of Thy chieftains
and Thy congresses and Thy hated
e
judges and tax collectors and
of Treasonous
hiding place
pacts by those who Thy Fathers
and pinkites?
called
will mine clever
Lo,
and mine brave palace guards of
and Thurm-unthe Tribes of Nix-othe Strummite ferret out these
Traitors and discover their Wicked
compacts and dismantle their blasphemous Undertakings. Yea, will
I undo the idolatrous
sect and drive them from
their pagan building which arrogantly overlooks the
river which is called East and which
spies upon the secret Fortifications
of the Island of s in the village
of Noo
Yea and again
Yea shall I give it and them over to
the mercies and uses of the
Followers of the true Faith. Yea
and twice Yea shall the pure of
blood Reign and the Tribes of the
Klan-zer- s
and
increase. Will it not
be so screamed the Prophet of
God. Kion of the Painted Desert,
Destroyer of Idols, Vindicator of
the blood-cuof the True Faith,
than Wrongs, Bari the GoldRighter
waterite. Selah.
3. Ant the People heard and
were soRe afraid.
Lif-Lyn-

Xik-ita- h

all-seei-

e

ef

st

A-d-

stayt-deptth-

Potz-Damme- rs

Mak-karthi-

is

n

d

Yu-nite-

Na-Shu-

d

sweet-flowin- g

El-li-

Ams-terd-a-

Bir-chite- s,

Aunty-Komm-nis-

ts

lt

Chapter III
1.
And it came to pass that
certain merchants and physicians
and young leaders who are called
and who live on the
outskirts of the Wicked Cities and
all the Agitated of spirit took up
the Cry of the Prophet from the
wilderness of
and it was
Ari-zon-

echoed throughout the Land. Missionaries of the True Faith journeyed into the Low lands which lie
near to the Great Waters and are
called by the names of their Might
Kings and Warriors and Noble Defenders of the paces of instruction;
these rich and bountiful lands
which are called the
Yet did the missionaries trabel to
the high lands of theKolo-radoanthe seacoast cities of Holi-wuand
the high plateaus of the land that
is called
and
Sin from whence sprang the Holy
Kone and
Trinity of
of
Schine who was the
the owner of many sacred Temples
of Worship. And a mighty outcry
sprang up from every corner of this
Wicked Land and a multitude gathered in Support of the Lion of
Phoenix, Wolf of the Desert, Thirst-e- r
for the blood of
the
of God. And thus was Bari
Prophet
the Goldwaterite chosen by the
People too.
2. With a glad cry did the
Lion of the Desert call upon his
faithful jackals and with gladsome
heart did those of glittery Eye and
sleek chariots and flowing white
robes take up the Cry of the blood-paAnd in one Voice did they
range through the Peaceful land crying out for the blood of Traitors
and the
and those called sosha-list- s
wasters of wealth and the sick and
afflicted and those the Prophet cursed and condemned with his stern
logic.
3.
Thus saith the Prophet:
Are not mine thoughts inspired of
God? Will I not destroy with mine
slings and arrows and missiles all
who oppose me? Mine running pack
will seek out and destroy Thy corruption and thievery and all who
dare oppose mine edicts will have
their fields defoliated and their
flocks diseased and their highways
and bridges crushed beneath the
From mine
Fist of
which will be called
apartment
will I hurl forth
Ultimatums and decrees and Sacred
rules which all the World must
obey. Yea, will I pacify the iron
and command
waves
the Sun to shine and cease shining
and the Moon to become mine
Con-fedra-ci- e.

d

d

Dirk-sinlan-

Wis-co- n

d

Mak-karthi-

e,

man-chil- d

Kom-nist-

s,

k.

o.

Berch-tes-gade-

n

resting-

-place.

And the people heard
sore afraid.

4.

and-wer-

e

Chapter IV
Roaring forth from his
triumph before the Faithful in the
the
city of
1.

Baghdad-by-the-Ba-

y

The Kentucky Kernel
The South'

Outstanding College Daily

1894

THURSDAY. NOV.

19. 1961

f
Win j am Chant,
hxeiutiw Editor
Cahy Hawksmohi h, Siatui&nti Editor
kiNMitt Ciu.n, Sens Editor
Waitth Chant, Auiufunf to the Exeeutive Editor
Hlnhy IWmhal, Sjx.rfj Editor
Sam Ann.!., Jons Zm, Jons Feaiusc, l'hotonruihers
Cay Cisii, Stn iJ Editor
Sai i.y Aiiilahn, Women's E future Editor
Editor-in-Chie-

David II

I'ACt Wat ki.it. Advertising Stunautr

Business Staff

Jons
Editorial

TnoMA

I'ue

T. Dalc.iiauay, Cireulutum Manager

Staff

llmsor, Ahuhh Htndthson, Ci.aiiia Jumty,
Sii W'thb, CurtiHinLt

I.ima

Miu.

Editor

IUHt h r Staih,

ef

sosh-list-

com-nist-

Ro-ma-

UNIVERSITY OF KfnIDCKY

ESTABLISHED

Prince of Precipies did venture
throughout the Corrupt land accompanied by his band of fierce young
lions. And from the rear of his noble
Caravan did he prophesy throughout the plains and valleys and the
villages and Small cities. Lo, dost
thou not find thyselves confronted
by the implacable hordes of Niki-ta- h
which are called
the Kruz-chs
s
and
and
and traitors by all of pure
thoughts? Will I not scatter them to
the four winds by rattling mine
missiles and whooping into the air
and issuing ultimatums and treats?
Yea will mine whooping cranes invade their swamps and mine musk-rat- s
undermine their flooded fields
where the alien grain conceals their
Iniquities. Their walls will I breach
with mine elephants and across
their narrow places shall mine
snakes glide up onto ther
snakes glide up onto their Mainlands where their oppressed subjects Whall rise up with a glad cry
and fall upon their masters. From
the sanctity of the house that is
called White rise up with a glad
cry and fall upon their masters,
called White will mine long whip
discipline the wavering minions of
the land that is called Eng where
the hated laborites leech off the
people. Yea shall mine lash lick the
recalcitrant Franks and the lustful
and I will consign to
limbo all who shirk mine commands
limbo all who shirk mine commands. Selah and again Selah.
2.
From the mountain tops
thundered the Prophet: Once and
Twice shall mine demands issue
forth to the Wicked world. Once and
Twice will I strip for battle. Once
and Twic e but not thric e whall mine
shaggy Lions gird their loins for
war. Once and Twice but not thrice
shall I gather mine jackals and
hyenas and dogs of war for they
thirst for the blood of the uncir- -

Jamis Svaha

Thursday Seus Staff
Sandy limx I, Assistant

es

cumcized and will not be denied
their carrion. Y'ea, the Prophet shall
speak but twice and then loose the
missiles of Destruction and the dogs
of holy war against the hated
s
and pinkites and all who
would oppose mine divine pronouncements. Selah and again
Selah.
To the Editor of the Kernel:
The daily tirades against Coach
Bradshaw have become extremely
boring. Primarily because they
ceased to be constructive long ago.
The only fault with Mr. Bradshaw
is that he hasn't been a big winner, yet.
You complain of closed sessions
and injured players at the Sports
Center; but there were no attacks
on the coaching staff at the Coliseum when a starting player nearly
had an eye gouged out during a
closed session. In fact, Mr. Rupp
has closed sessions every day and
often the press is barred. Why are
there no complaints against "total
basketball" at UK, w hich has been
practiced successfully here for thirty
five years? Apparently the difference is that Mr. Rupp has been
successful. If this is the case, then
criticize Mr. Bradshaw for using a
double-winwhen the situation
called for a split-T- .
Your attacks are personal, despite your claims otherwise, and
they only occur because the football team hasn't been the success
we'd hoped for. It's easy to be
critical when your opponent isn't
on top of the Conference.
Next time that you get worked
about "total football" remember
up
that every football player at UK
has the option to quit when he
wishes; and with a full scholarship
until he graduates. The fact that
they remain indicates that Mr.
Bradshaw has something to offer
those who want to play football.
RICHARD HODGETTS
com-nist-

g

* THE KF.NTI'CKV kl KM

I.

TliuiMl.it. Nut. Id. I'Mil

-

.1

RALPH McGILL

LITTLE

Two Centuries Of Service
American journalism took
great pride recently in the 200th
anniversary celebration of the
Hartford Courant. For two centuries the Courant has been publishing the news, always under
the same name, always with the
same dedication to public serv ice.
Indeed, this latter quality may be
the secret of enduringpublication.
A paper should serve the public
interest, should speak out on issues, should have a voice.
As one looks at the graveyard
of journalism one sees there papers that were founded on hate,
revenge or vindictiveness as well
as those founded to serve some
selfish interest. By and large the
papers that endure and grow are
those that are devoted to, and are
participants in, community affairs and interests. This has been
the history of the Courant. At the
time of its 200th anniversary there
were on the front pages some
photographs, obtained with longdistance lenses, of men al