xt722804z57j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt722804z57j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19500428  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 28, 1950 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 28, 1950 1950 2013 true xt722804z57j section xt722804z57j The Kentucky Kernel

Final
Musicale
Sunday

UNIVERSITY

Partly Cloudy,
And Cooler;

High

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY; FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1950

VOLUME XL

Jurists Are Speakers
At Legal Forum Friday
Current Problems

Band To Play
At Ceremonies
InBarbourville

Will Be Discussed
The third annual Legal Forum,
sponsored by Phi Delta Phi, international legal fraternity, and the

College of Law, will be held at 2
p.m. Friday in the Moot Courtroom
in Lafferty Hall, Dean Elvis J. Stahr
has announced.
Leading jurists and legal scholars
wiu aiscuss contemporary legal problems. The subject of the Forum will
be 'Modernization of the Administration of Justice."
Featured speakers will be the Hon.
Watson Clay, commissioner of the
Kentucky Court of Appeals; Donald
Q. Taylor, Louisville attorney; John
R. Bullock, Cincinnati attorney;
and A. C. Russell, dean of the University of Louisville College of Law.
Dean Stahr will act as moderator of
Uie Forum.
Commissioner Clay is a graduate
of the University of Michigan and
practiced law with the firm of

Barkley To Speak
At Park Opening
The UK band will play tomorrow
at ceremonies to be held at Dr.
Thomas Walker State Park honoring Dr. Walker, the first white man
to build a cabin west of the Appla-chia- n

Mountains.
At 10:38 they will play during a
ceremony for the laying of a cornerstone for a new building and
monument erected in honor of Dr.
Walker. Vice President Albcn Bark- ley will be the principal speaker
during the ceremonies.
A parade in downtown Barbour-vill- e
Tarrant, Galphin and Street,
will be staged by the band, in
Louisville, before becoming a mem- conjunction
other
with several
ber of the Court of Appeals.
bands, at 11 a.m. At 4.30 Saturday
will play for a
Taylor, a member of the firm of afternoon the band
Doolan, Helm, Stites & Wood, Louis- reception being given at the park
ville, is a graduate of the University for distinguished guests.
of Virginia. He is also a commissioner of the Kentucky State Bar Association.
Bullock is a graduate of the
of Kentucky and Yale Law
School. Past president of the Kentucky Alumni Association, Bullock
is a member of the firm of Taft,
Stettinius and Hollister.
Dean Russell is a graduate of Be-r- Re-activa- te
College and Yale Law School.
He was a member of the Bureau of
Eta chapter of Delta Slgmi Pi,
Investigation in the Department of international commerce professional
Justice before he began to teach. fraternity, will be
on
He is also the compiler of Russell's the campus at ceremonies to be conRevision to the Kentucky Code of ducted at the Phoenix Hotel tomorrraetice.
row. The group was first organized
The Forum is open to all Univer- on the campus in 1920, but became
sity students.
inactive in 1930.
Twenty-on- e
students will be Initiated into the organization. They
are Glenn Wills, Robert McCowan,
Harry B. Scott, Malcolm B. Saunter, Frank Purdy, Edwin V. Inman,
James Inman, Richard Pigman,
Jesse Bollinger. George Cannon, Arthur Lee Myles. Anthony Dallas,
Hall Griffen, junior journalism Robert S. Griffith, Jack Boyd, Robmajor, was named president of the ert Allen, Gentry McCauley, Ralph
Baptist Student Union council for Burgin, Samuel Swope,Carl Turner,
1950-5- 1
at the King's Hour program Hermann Kessler, and Bill Don
of the group last Friday night.
Grote.
First vice president elected to the
J. D. Thompson, assistant grand
was Robert Francis, second- secretary, and 15 members of the
council
ary education major. Rose Mary fraternity at the University of CinHaley, arts & sciences junior, was cinnati will participate In the cerenamed second vice president and monies.
Nancy Bowles, sophomore home ecoPrincipal speaker will be Leroy
nomics major, was elected third vice Miles, vice president of the First
president.
National Bank and Trust Company
Dr. Vernon Musselman, head of of Lexington. Others appearing on
lhe Department of Business Educa- the program Include Dean Cecil C.
tion, will continue as faculty ad- Carpenter of the College of Comvisor, and pastor advisor will be Dr. merce; Glenn Wills, headmaster of
OTtay Weeks, pastor of Porter Me- Eta chapter; William Wohlender,
morial Baptist Church.
headmaster of the University of
Members of the council leave this
chapter; and Mr.
afternoon to attend the State BSU Thompson.
Spring Retreat with other newly
Prof. R. D. Mclntyre of the Colelected campus councils at Camp lege of Commerce will preside as
Piomlngo, Fort Knox.
toastmaster.
Other student members elected to
the council include Eula Mae Carter,
secretary: Caroll Tichenor, treasurer; William Ghee, recreation
chairman; Fred Lawson, public relations; Doris Amis, publications;
Jerry Reese, King's Hour chairman;
Gene Reese, evangelism chairman;
Lora Adkins, missions; Weston BergStudents elected to membership in
man, music; Bill Vickers, building Phi Beta Kappa, national arts and
grounds; and Leola Burchficld, sciences scholastic society, were anand
nurses' representative.
nounced yesterday by Dr. Charles E.
Snow. Names and major fields include:
Ferrel Atkins, graduate in matheSeven Students, One Prof.
matics;
Emerson Beauchamp Jr.,
Are Elected To ODK
English; Julie Bradley. Romance
Languages; Elsie T. Church, gradSeven men and one faculty member have been elected to Omicron uate in mathematics.
commerce; Venita
Delta Kappa, senior men's national LuJoseph Dahlan,
Dawson, medical techniligy; Virleadership society, according to
ginia Lee Henrv. Dhvchologv: Stan- Weakly, president.
ley Hunt, Commerce; Norman Jerry
They are Robert Dcen, Glenn Klein, industrial chemistry; John
Wills, Fred Perkins, Robert Gregory, Kuiper, art.
Edgar McDavltt, Frank Maturo,
Stanley McElroy, commerce; Anne
John Kuiper, and Dr. A. E. Bigge, Park Mayes, English; Moss Patterhead of the Department of German. son, philosophy; Martha Lee Penne-bake- r,
Pledging services will be held In
philosophy; Joe Comer Ross,
room 127 of the SUB at noon today. pre mcd.
Paul Willis Scott, pre med; Paul
G. Sears, industrial chemistry; Wil- Og-de- n,

Commerce
Group Will

Uni-versi- ty

ea

Griffcn Named
To Lead BSU

Cincinnati

and traders.
"Dr. Wright is probably
student of cultural life in

Plantations."

Born In Greenwood County, South
Carolina in 1899. Dr. Wright is a
graduate of Wofford College and the
University of North Carolina. He
was a Johnston research scholar at
Johns Hopkins University in 1927
and 1928 and was a Guggenheim
research fellow In England and
Italy from 1928 to 1930.
The lecture is sponsored by the
University Libraries and the Department of English. The next
soeaker in this series will be Jesse
Stuart who will be on campus May
17

and

18.

'I Wanna Be Alone' Star
Featured In Anna Christie
"Anna Christie," based on a play
by Eugene O'Neal and starring
Greta Garbo, will be shown in Memorial Hall tonight at 7 p.m. and
9 p.m. Admission is 30 cents.

McCowan Will Head

Student Union Board
Bob McCowan, law student,, has
been elected president of the Student Union Board for next year.
Other officers elected were Jim
Inman, vice president; Martha Durham, secretary, and Betty Bryant,

treasurer.

Phi Beta Kappa Society
Names 20 New Members

Ry-bu- rn

j

Horse Show Entries
Must Be In May 10

Deadline for entrants to the an-uBlock and Bridle Horse Show,
to be held May 20 at the Lexington
Trotting Track, is May 10, according to Dick ' Crafton, president.
Entrants received after May 10
will not appear on the program although post entrants will be accepted.
al

Ham Swift, physics: Kenneth
Toomey. political science. and Nick
C. Wallen, political science.

By Holt Maslin
A consistently competent cast sus- tamed Gulgnol's production of the
rather thin play. "Two Blind Mice."
The play itself, which seemed to go
thc way of most comedies, had a

slow beginning, gained some impetus
in the second act, and strained for
effect in the final act as the char- actors made a frantic attempt to
solve their problems and allow for a
"happy ending."
The story concerns two elderly
ladies called Letitia and Crystal
who knowingly operate a liquidated
government bureau called the Of
fice of Seeds and Standards, or the
Office of Medicinal Herbs. News- paperman Tommy Thurston discov- ers their ruse, his
arrives
with her new fiance, and after all
is thoroughly confused
the Office of Seeds and Standards
fe

Tau Sigma, the modern dance society, will present their annual
spring concert May 3. 4. and 5 at 8
p.m. in the Guignol Theater. The
concert, composed of eight dances,
will be presented by over 40 men and
women students under the direction
of Miss Revell Estill Sha-- of the
Fhysical Education Department.
Miss Helen Lipscomb of Lexington
composed the score for "The Masque of the Red Death," a story by
Edgar Allen Poe. This dance, the
highlight of the entire program is
made up of eight different sections.
It opens with an ensemble dancing
the Introduction. This is followed
by the "Masquerade Walti" and the
"Royal Quadrille.'' both group
dances.
The fourth section is the dance of
the "White Princess,- - performed by
Beverly Brown. Joseph Marks dances
another solo in the Harlequin dance.
The "Green Hall" follows, performed by the entire group. The dance of
the "Violet Lament" and the dance
of the "Red Death" concludes Poe a
story.

Students To Enter
Private Collections

z,

An estimated 2500
school students are expected to attend the State High School Music
Festival to be held today and tomorrow on campus.
Prof. Louis Clifton, director of the
Department of University Extension, is manager of the festival. )
The program includes band and
orchestra competitions and solo and
small ensemble events. Highlights
will include a massed band concert
Saturday afternoon in Alumni
Gymnasium and a baton twirling
contest Saturday morning.
Judges for the Festival will be
Frank Simon, conductor of the
Armco Concert Band ; Manley Whit-com- b,
director of bands at Ohio
State University; David VanVacter,
University of Tennessee; Jack Bry-de- n
of Transylvania College, and
Frank J. Prindl, Kenneth Wright,
Edward Hornoski, and Gordon Kinney, all of the UK music faculty.
All sessions of the Festival will
be open to the public. Programs
may be obtained from the Information Desk In the Student Union today and Saturday.

Seniors Must Register
For Degrees By May 5
Seniors and graduate students
who will complete their requirements for graduation in June must
make application for degrees In
room 15 of the Administration
Building by Friday. May 5. Graduation fees must be paid by Monday, May 29.
Candidates for the bachelor's degree will be charged a graduation
fee of $9. This will cover the
rental of cap and gown, diploma
fee. The Kentuckian, and other
necessary expenses.
Candidates
for advanced degrees, other than
the doctorate, will be charged a
fee of $17.00, which will cover the
above with the exception of The
Kentuckian and in addition, the
cost of the hood to be presented
the candidate. The fee for candidates for the doctorate is $25.00.
No student will be considered
for graduation who has not filed
an application.

THE CAMERA CATCHES several modern danc rs as they practice their leaps for the Tan Sigma
spring concert to be held May 3. 4, and 5 in the Guignol theatre. The program is composed of eight dances
originally choreographed under the direction of Mis Ke veil Estill Shaw.

Queen, Attendants Are Chosen;
Selections To Be Announced May 13
Celebration Is Sponsored By Suky;
Will Include Parade, Stoll Field Program

i

w"

fff

ft Ml

f1!.
-r.

r;-'.-Pr-

h

y

JZF'iZZ:

a

ueen will be crowned,

son Hall; Nancy Camp, Delta Delta
Delta: Doris Walker,
Carolyn Critchlow, Kappa Alpha
Theta; Jane Barnett, Alpha Gamma Delta; Mary Jo Ridley, Alpha
Delta Pi; Janice Stille, Alpha Xi
Delta; and Doris Eith, Kappa Kappa Gamma.
The May Day program will include a parade, led by Suky, with
floats representing sororities, fraternities, and residence halls, a
piogram on Stoll Field where the

Suky May Day
Members of
Gene Stevens
committees
Rvburn Weakley, general program
chairmen; Glenn Wills, Evelyn
Baker, and Ruth Trefz. queen committee;. Zell Sharff. Richard Crafton. Anne Williams, and Nancy
West, Suky float committee.
Bruce Cotton, Ann O'Bannon. and
Betty White, publicity committee;
Ed Stroube. judges and trophy com

mittee;

John Sherman Cooper has been
chosen as commencement speaker
and will speak before approximately
1700 graduating seniors, largest class
history, durin the school's
ing exercises to be held in Memorial
Coliseum on June 2.
Cooper is a former U. S. senator
and is now special foreign policy
advisor to Secretary of State Dean
Acheson.
A baccalaureate program, set for
10 a.m.. May 30. will also serve as a
formal dedication service. The new
coliseum will be dedicated to the
memory of 9333 Kentuckians who
lost their lives in World War II.
Families of all the men have been
invited to attend the exercises.
Poling Is Speaker
Principal speaker at the com- bination dedicatory - baccalaureate

and Jean Sherman and

will he Dr Daniel A

Sie

Pnl-- 1

smervesentTfhrWorlPeals
Christian Endeavor Union and edi- tor of the Christian Herald.
Both the baccalaureate and com- niencement programs, the first of
any kind to be held in the 15.000

ar

i

,

n

g

performance.

is

We hope

Blind Mice."

El-h- ot

Joe Quinn To Speak

capacity auditorium, will be open to
the public and no admission tickets;
will be required.
Names Inscribed
Names of the entire 9333 Ken- -

"

"7

'.T.

"

ST":..
,

Z

m

kT"

panels along the Coliseum entry
ramDs Drior to the dedication serv- ices. The baccalaureate-dedicatio- n
(Continued

Y$rv

Xr;.

r

kr

.

l

iter-

on Page 2)

-

fri)

,

-

j

THE STYLE SHOW at Memorial Hall Monday night, sponsored by Loom ami Needle anil planned by the Economics of Clothing class,
provided some novel entertainment in addition to the successful modrling of summer rotton dresses. Shown above are one group of the girK
timothy lith, Tat Lauon. and M.iry Anna
who parlici:ilrd in I lie siiuw. 1 liey arc Uclt to rir.ltli lXty M.ulin, Jaie lluulcr, l.iMiy UoKti--

Parker.

t:

!

Tommy Raddsn. Parade committee.

of the seats
left vacant throughout the

not a lagging interest in
Guignol, but instead, just poor
lirity work in connection with "Two
this

Never Land of Nowhere" is
gay dance depicting various members of
world.
wU1 dance
lves- - hosU.
Dr. H. L. Donovan, president of 8rouP
hon
University, was made
Alpha Delta,
orary member of
,A"en-'Srhcere- legal
corder
monies Wednesday in the Court of
ADoeals chambers at Frankfort.
Arrangement Is Retarded
In addition to Dr. Donovan, 15 "Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata"
UK students were inducted into the will conclude the program. Tha
Henry Clay chapter of the frater- choral arrangement, directed by
nity.
Aimo Kiviniemi and arranged by
The students are Fred Coplin. Edward Hornowski. has been reGuy corded for this dance.
Joseph Currence. James Dixon.
Accompanists for the dance group
Duerson Jr.. John Duncan. William
Fish back, Goodloe McDowell. Ben are Mrs. Nancie Fields and Miss
Forman. Richard Getty, Robert Beulah Stillwell. Settings for the en- GuIlette Andrew Palm;r jr.. Sftel- - tire program have been planned by
ley Riherd, Joseph Schoepf , David Luis Eads, Fat Ennls. Jimmy Irvin,
and Dorothy Robinson.
Whites Jr.. and Donald Wood Jr.
Following the ceremony members
Other dancers performing are Ben
of the fraternity and their guests Ardery, Julia Ann Barnhart, Emily
attended a banquet at the Hotel Barron. David Be re, Nancy Broen.
Southern. Principal speaker was Al Bruno, Carol Jean Carter. Mary
Joe Leary. Frankfort attorney, and Cochran. Ginny Cardill. Ruth Cav- Charles K. O'ConneU. clerk of the ender. Betty Com p ton. Carolyn
Court of Appeals, served as toast- - Critchlow. and Bob Faulkner.
warren reatnerston.
Guests were Judges and
master.
of the Court of Ap - Gash. Norman Howe. Bob LeCompt.
and E. A. Taylor of Kansas Bill Leskovar. Judith Luigart. BUI
ivicviurc. r ranees Mairaon, urate
City.
Lee Moody. Ann O'Bannon, and
Peel.
Geneal Peterson. Sally Ramsev,
a
Beulah Reynolds, Ileana Rigau,
Sharif. Sam Shawhan. Harry
Sp1"1P
Tn Tmirnnli'Sm
Stille. Dorothy Walthall. Chariot :e
Watson, and Bobbie Yates.
Post
Tickets for the performance are
Joe Quinn of the Cincinnati
will speak on "The American News- - on sale at Shackleton's and the
Guild" Thursday at 4 p.m. in ' men's Gym. Prices .are 75 cents for
students and $1.23 for townspeople.
the Journalism Building.
j

j

John S. Cooper Will Address
Largest UK Graduating Class

11

Marks have chore- -'
dance. "Love
UDjeci.
wui oe
or
811 ensemble

i

g.

week-lon-

k

.

13.

A good percentage

were

I

w--

Wi
hf

Wilson.
Miss Shaw
ographed
oi

and
Legal GrOUJ)
the
in
rney
searcn
an
The queen and eight attendants were elected Friday for the
annual May Day celebration, spousored by Suky, to be held May ricks Donovan xdtnc.
"The
The queen and rank of the attendants will not be announced
a
AC
I
ai
until that day.
the fairy tale
The
Ilo 1IAC111UCJ.
fair,
,nd
and danc. the
an
that night.
Phi
KfT"Z?J? rJ.
the
fraternity, at
national
Independent;
tha
and
are

Zel-m-

Wo-pap- er

,

Youth Orchestra Gives
Season's Final Musicale
By Joe t'oyle

v.;

Choreographed By Student
"I've got the World on a String.'
a dance choreographed by Janice
Stille will open the evening's program. This is followed by a dance
choreographed by Joe Marks called
"Land of the Pastoral Plains."
The third dance of the evening is
called the "Precipice." This is per- formed by the entire group to one of
Roy Harris' symphonies. The "Preci- -i
pice" tells of man's struggle to keep
hope and faith against the ravages
of war and hate.
"The Four Marys." a token to the
four Marys of the Bible will be
danced by Betty Elliott, Janice
Stille. Mildred Vance, and Jeanne

250 Musicians
Expected Here
For Festival May
Kentucky high

60-Pie- ce

Good Guignol Comedy Jy
is finally investigated by the greatly
feared Senator Kruger. Only a timely mild blackmail by Thurston keeps
the more interesting characters from
serving a prison sentence.
Charles Drew is impressive as the
overly stimulated Tommy Thurston,
Jane Ratchford and Maxine Perrlne
fit well In their roles as the stern
Letitia Turnbull and the naive Crys- tal Hower. As Karen, the
Minna Bloomfield has the difficult
task of sustaining anger throughout
the entire play.
Laurels go to minors Kenneth
Scott for his role as the somewhat
obnoxious Journalist, Robert Tut-hi- ll
as the ranting Major Groh, and
to Claude Trapp in the role of meek
Mr. Threadwaite whose hobby is

Program Planned
For May 3, 4,5

Pence Is Director
Unit
Of

Two Blind Mice' Rated
Consistent Acting
Is Play's Feature

Top Student
Library Will
Be Selected

A student library competition is
now open to all graduate and undergraduate students of the University having their own personal book
collections. The contest was made
possible by a sum of money willed
to the University by the late Judge
Samuel M. Wilson.
Each entrant in the contest must
present three copies of a typewritten list giving author, title,
place, publisher, and date of publication of each volume. ' No books
may be included that are not the
students personal property or that
were received as gifts from another's library after April 20, 1950.
The lists will be Judged by Miss
Margaret I. King, Prof. George K.
Brady, and Prof. H. Alex Romano-wltchairman. They must be presented to the chairman of the committee not later than 5 p.m.. May 26.
The award will be announced on or
our best before June 1.
old Virhead of
said.

ginia." Dr. Herman Spivey,
the Department of English,
Stuart Will Speak
Dr. Wright also wrote "The First
Southern Gentleman of Virginia,"
"The Atlantic Frontier," "The Reading of Plays During the Puritan
Revolution," and "An Essay Upon
the Government of the English

NUMBER 25

Tau Sigma Spring Concert
To B e Presented Next Week

Director Of Folger Library
To Speak In English Series
s
By Katheryn Whitmcr
Louis Booker Wright, director of
the Folger Shakespeare Library in
Washington, D. C, will speak on
"Rare Book Libraries and the Advancement of Scholarship" at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the Laboratory Theater
in the Fine Arts Building.
Dr. Wright has been research professor at the Henry E. Huntington
Library, San Marino. California,
since 1932 and is visiting professor
at the University of California at
Los Angeles. He has been director
of the Folger Shakespeare Library
since 1948.
While Dr. Wright was professor
of English at the University of North
Carolina, his publications were primarily studies of the life of the aver
age man In the Shakespearan period.
He wrote "Middle Class Culture in
Elizabethan England."
Helped Edit TMarv
After going to California he became Interested in colonial American history. The Huntington Library is made up of rare books, especially those pertaining to early
American life.
He helped edit two volumes of
"The Secret Diary of William Byrd
of Westover." These were written
in an old form of shorthand and
now constitute one of the main
sources of information concerning
the daily life of the wealthy eighteenth century Virginia planters

54

KENTUCKY

OF

series of University
The 1949-5- 0
musicales will close Sunday with a
program by the Central Kentucky
Youth Music Society Orchestra at
4 p m. In Memorial Hall.
The progranf will be directed by
Howard Pence, a graduate of Union
College in Barbourville. and violinist for several years with the UK
Symphony Orchestra.
The orchestra Mr. Pence founded
in the summer of 1947 has now
grown into a full orchestra of 60
pieces. It was started as a means of
creating interest among the youth of
Central Kentucky in good music.
The group is composed primarily of
Fayette County boys and girls, but
Include several from surrounding
counties.
Members of the orchestra are as
follows:
Olin Spivey. Anna
First violins
Chalkas. Jerry Day, Tommy Shirley,
Robert Lancaster. Nancy Mefford,
Rillv McAfee nnri .Tim Pecrtr
Second violins
Ruth Trimble,
Betty Jo Brumfield. Pauline Allen,
Gypsy Barnett. Maxine House. Betty
Havs, Sally Ann Clelland, Susan
Darnell. Winona Wiliams, Jackie
Todd, and Alice Callahan.
Charles Ford. Wayne
Violas
ICi:ii. and Nancy Burklow.
Allen Wetzel, Dorothy
Cellos

Davidson. Dorothy Blackwell. Warren Ffefferle, and Bobby Shaw.
Raymond Farris and
Basses
Don Lair.
Flutes
Barbara Baldwin. Carolyn Carter. Gwen Cranfill. Jean
Zerkle. Patricia Barkley, and Virginia Jayne.
Sally Davis and Bobby
Oboes
Jones.
Bobby Davis. Richard
Clarinets
Betty
Lamb. Barbara Burchum.
HendrLx. Lewis Barnet. Stuart Carpenter, and Harry Carter.
Jimmy Kennedy.
Bassoons
Dwight Carpenter, and Ronny Gor- don.
Morvyth Kinney,
French horns
Nancy Bowman, and Craig Ritchie,
Billy Purdon, Vernon
Trumpets
Cooper, and Billy Young.
Bryson Curry. Bud- Trombones
dy Purdon, Frank McVey. and Don

Seath.

Shirley Shafer.
Tympani
The program will be in four parts.
Part I will be the "Symphony No. H4
i Second London'" by Joseph Haydn.
"Symphony in D Minor" by Cesar
Franck will feature Part II. The
i i rrl mrtinn will
rrtsicf nf a rtre- sentation of the second movement
t Romance)
of "Concerto No. II for
Violin" by Henri Wieniawski, with
Robert Lancaster as violin soloist.
"Finlandia" by Jean Sibelius will
close the program.
The concert is open to the public.
Special guests will be members of
the University Symphony Orchestra.

* Page 2

KENTUCKY

THE

The Kentucky Kernel
All ttpr.ed articles enri column
ere to be
rons.drred
opinio $ vl V:e

te

rnri

the opinion of The Kerr el.
PUBLISHED WEFKLY DURINO THE
SCHOOL YEAR fcXTPT HOLIDAYS
OK EXAMINATION PERIODS
ntered at th? Pnt Oifice at Iexinptnn,
Kentucky, as second c!.i&s matter under
the Act o March 3, 1UT9.
SUBSCRIPTION

&

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1SC

.....

Kentucky Interoollemate Prss Association
LexitiRton Board of Commerce,
Kentucky Pres Association
National Editorial Association
MPMNNTiB
HATiMt advm.tisim mv

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by Clare Barnes Jr., to be published by

Bolivian Loves His Country,
But Not Its Present State

(This is the last of three articles
by Manuel Mercado, about his na
tive land.)

The misery that aflicts the majority of the people of my country
moved me to gather ideas and write
about those points which are the
interest of my friends and turned
my eyes to those American' young
men and women whose desire is to
work for the world society more
than for the piece of land to which
we are legated.

With these ideas that will help to
make comprehensible the social and
geoeraphical conditions of my country I wish to awaken the interest of
those men and women whose desire
is not to make money but to find
happiness, and over all, to produce
happiness wherever happiness is
most necessary.
I wish to thank with sincere affection all those persons whose questions, sometimes childish and ingenuous, showed interest in our
pioblems. To them I dedicate my
tnougnts.
I felt deeDlv sorrv not to he nbl
A sure sign of spring in Kentucky is the annual state high to helo with more definite facts due
to my modest position at present.
school music festival, starting here today with the instrumental and over all, due to my lack of in- bandmemliers will again stroll fluence and political status which
sctions. The brightlv-lxxlecke- d
could have been of major efect.
baton-twirle-

The Music That's
Heard In The Spring

from campus to Main Street, and the
and dnim
majors lead their organizations into the festival climax a massed
rs

inters

Senior Is Contestant
In Oratorical Meet

Jeanne Harrell. senior In the Col- lege of Arts and Sciences, will rep
resent UK in the women's division
Ora
of the 76th annual Inter-Stal- e
torical contest being held yesterday
111.
and today at Evanston,
Miss Harrell has been active in
radio and speech work during her
four years of college. She will com
pete with students from colleges and
universities in a dozen midwestern
states.
UK faculty representative at the
contests is Dr. J. Reid Sterrett,
associate professor of speech.

Persons interested in taking the
examination
for engineers
in
training have been advised to
secure an application in Room
204 of the Engineering Building
immediately.
The deadline
is
May 24.
The forms are to be filled out,
signed by the student's advisor,
and returned as soon as possible
so that the necessary arrangements may be made for the test.
A fee of $3.00 will be charged for
every application.
Those taking
the test are advised to keep a record of the form number because
the student's name will not be
used on answer sheets.

"Please, Dean, just one more chance!"

.

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complexity and its tremendous proportions.
To see and to understand are
It will be necessary to distribute
duties imposed by sincerity and the huge problem to people who
in it- know and can carry on their jobs
truthfulness. Patriotism, love
self, will be our light not our blind- with faith, with patriotism, and
ness.
with love to Bolivia.
I see my country such as It is, but
I do not love the way she is. But
the fact of being the way she is, will
PERSONAL LOANS
not change my deep feelings of love
Deiiqned Especially
toward her. To love the way she is
for UK Faculty and
would be horrible; not to love her
Penennel
because the way she is would be
UP TO $300
horrid. I love her arbitrarily, as
mothers love their children and
PAYMASTER
LOANS
women love their men. A women
in love fights for her man against I ,17
an enemy with reason or without it;
but she is not blinded with his faluts
and defects, on the contrary, she is
intelligent to see them, to find them,
and to correct them.
Mystic in her belief and cynic in
her criticism, she wants what she
sees in him, but more, what is in
him potentially, and all the time she
tries to reform him with the eyes
of intelligent love that grow brighter the more possessive her heart
feels.
Having analyzed with facts and
reason the problems of my country
1 nave come to. realize the necessity
ot a vast reform, vast because of its

used in
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umbrella,
fnimes;
cigarette
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April Showers Applied
The colorful May Day program, to be held May 13, is another
. of the annual attractions arranged by students which draws wide- spread interest and which is thoroughly enjoyed by all who are
connected with it.
Doubtless this will lie much like every other year, with some
organizations waiting until the morning of the thirteenth to legin
work on an elalxirate float. Those are the groups the others are
j thankful for, but they usually don't make the parade any more
attractive.
'

'Letters To The Editor
the muddy ditches.

Ditches Everywhere!
Editor, The Kernel:
I appreciated reading the "quotes"
of the different students about the
conditions you are going through on
the University of Kentucky campus.
We sympathize with you. For the
last two years St. Francis College
campus has been in the same conAfter our Centennial two
dition.
years ago a student fell in one of

He got up. shook off some of the
mud and said, "x!!x!x Huh! A
century of progress!"
(Father) Charles V. Ginocchio
Class of 1924

Cut Troubles
Editor, The Kernel:
class attendance problem here
The
(Continued

on Page 6i

in only 7 HOURS!

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Every Garment Receives

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Capf. Pan 8asAey9 MtWe6iity993B
Air ntefigence, (.&. 4r Force

Individual Attention At

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HART'S LAUNDRY
549 South Limestone
across from the Little Commons

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NOTICE VETERAN'S!

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Summer Trip To Europe

G. D. BILL

He then joined a coated paper mill firm as
research and control man. Pearl Harbor
changed all that Paul went to Maxwell
Field to begin Aviation Cadet training.

An outstanding Cadet. 2nd Lt. Paul
Huskey was held over as an instructor
after graduation. Then he was assigned as
a pilot in the Air Transport Command.

Back home, after accepting a Regular Air
Force Commission, Captain Huskey went
to Air Tactical school, was there rated an
outstanding student, and won assignment
to Command and Staff school.

Today. Cnptain Buskey is an Air Intelligence Officer on MATS Headquarters
Staff at Andrews Air Forte Ba.-- near
Washington. I). CHe looks forward to a
rewarding future in the U. S. Air Foice.

Last Day To Charge On

With International Youtfi

An excellent student at Middlebury College, Vermont, Paul found time to win
the coveted All Sports Trophy in his
senior year. He graduated in June, 1938.

His big plane education was topped with
"Hump,"
23 missions over the
flying 4 transports. After J Day, he
stayed on in the Far East until March of
1948 specializing in Air Intelligence.

You Can Still Make That

IT'S NOT TOO LATE!!

PARIS BY AIR
$360 ROUND TRIP

j'rg rp
far-fam-

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DURING THIS SEMESTER
BY ORDER OF VETERANS

Write or Phone

International Youth Inc.
150 Broadway
New York 7, N. Y.
Cortland

62

To Assure Passage Write Immediately

look

1

ADMINISTRATION

Flights to LONDON and ROME

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If you or single, between th ages of 20 and 26'j,
with at least two years of college, consider the many
career opportunities as a pilot or navigator in the
U. S. Air Force. Procurement Teams are visiting many
colleges and universities to explain these career
opportunities. Watch for them. You may also get full
details at your nearest Air Force Base or U. S. Army
and U. S. Air Force Recruiting Station, or by writing to
the Chief of Staff, U. S. Air Force, Art: Aviation Cadet
Branch, Washington 25, D. C

U.S.

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Room
lighters.

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