xt722804z584 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt722804z584/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19570329  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1957 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1957 1957 2013 true xt722804z584 section xt722804z584 1

Crowning Of Queen To II ighlight Military Ball
The University of Kentucky's future officers take time
off frcm their drill field duties tomorrow night for a little
at the annual Military Ball.
The event Is sponsored Jointly bv the Army and Air
Force ROTC units. All students may attend. Attire is
l,
but those students enrolled in ROTC courses
arc expected to wear their uniforms. Time of the dance
Is from 8 p.m. until midnight.
Hithlipht of the Ball will be the crowning of the queen
at 10:20. p. rn. The queen will be selected from a bevy of
13 beauties chosen as finalists by the ItOTC units. These
finalists pre:
AFROTC:
Jan Thomas, Squadron "A", (KAT) ; Eli Runyon.
Squadrcn "B" (ADPi; Muff Van Ness, Squadron ' C"
foot-stcmpl-

n'

scmi-ftima-

't

'

(KKOV; Kathy Hancock Dickey. Squadron "D" (AOD;
Randi Richards. Squadron E' KAT ; and Jody Nichols.
Squadron F" (AXiDi.

KI).

Shown above are the candidates for queen of the Military Ball.
1. to r.) Charlene
Scheibel, Eleanor Kunyon,
Nichols, Gay Evans, and Margaret Combs. (Back row 1. to r.)
Lee Anderson, Muff Van Ness, Randi Richards, Carol Lee 'Axton,
Owen, Kathy Dickey, and Jan Thomas. Absent from picture is
garet FutrelL

are: (Front row

Vol. XLVIII

-

They
Jodie
Carol
Anna
Mar-

University of Kentucky, Lexington. Ky.. riid.iy. M.mh

Derby Policies
Cause Conflict

According to nooen makemen, uireetor ot me residence
halls, "some of the members of the dorm council and several
dorm monitors felt that the requirements for entering the Derby
had been misreprejted
The complaints arose w hen the

Should Peak win the Democratic
primary he would possibly oppose
Dan Fowler, the present Fayette
County Judge, in the general election in November.
In 1952, Peak received a leave of
absence from the University and
represented Fayette County's 49th
District in the State House of
Representatives. Peak lost a congressional primary race to John
Watts in 1952, and lost the primary

ss

JY

-77-

Polio Shols
"Get your polio vaccine shots
now," Mrs. Marion Brown, In-

Cammack Hall. Julie Hawkins. Virginia Johnson,
Shirley Ann Lewis. Sara J. Riley, Barbara J. Roberts. Donalene, Sapp, Carol Scott. Helen Stephens,
Evaimeline Talor. and Janice Turner.
College of Agriculture and Home Economics
Carol Ca'.derwood. Sondra Cowgill. Carol Riddell.
and Ernestine Williams.
Anne Armstrong. Helen
Collide of Commerce
I annul, and M utfi i .lean l ocunnrt.
'

V Cfnni riori -- E;?,'rt:rilcy.
Brti.v Comb--- ,
Ebli :i. E. Nadilie Ilcreioid, Alu e J.trk-me, Al.ro M.iruii,
Kailuyn John.n. Sudani
Jeanmne Mas.-e-y and Shirley Vaid rpool.
Delta Delta Delta Scholarship awards were presented to Anna Sue Chandler and Ernestine Williams.
Joan Stadelman was named outstanding sophomore woman by Cwens.
Kappa Delta's outstanding senior woman was

Foundation,

Paralysis

fantile

advises.

The National ' Foundation Is
conducting an all-ocampaign
to promote the use of thr Salk
vaccine to fight polio she said.
Salk vaccine may be obtained
at the L'K infirmary.

Stars In The Night Program
Honors Outstanding Coeds
...

Sunday Library
r-ir-

'

day evening hours cannot b
continued if they prove to b
needed unlet
budgetary adjustments are made.
Lawrence S. Thompson

Hart Peak, YMCA secretary, will resign April 1 to enter the
race for Fayette County Judge.
Due to a University ruling, which says no employee may
run for public office, Teak must resign his position to enter the
race. lie cannot file for the Democratic primary which will bo
held May 2S until he has resigned from the University.

A1--m-

The propram opened with askit written by Jo
Ann Buibiclce, Nancy McKinley. MTrcia Wilder. Jo
Ann Fi1ht. Frances Ldney, Sue Davenport and
Jah'o Fi'ch.
'I lie c;i't included: Betty Jo Fritz. Tracy UaUten,
Frances House, I.ind.i lljinilton, N'.incy 4)uinn. "Tail
Si?!iia members, and the SAL quartet. 'I he master
of ceremonies was Belly Jo I iitz.
About 70 coeds received award at 4 he program.
The awards, recipients and sponsors iollow:
YWCA was named the outstanding woman's organization on campus by ADPi; Panhellenic recognized the Chi Omega sorority for having the
highest pledge class standing. Kappa Kappa Gamma for the highest sorority house standing, and
Hamilton House for having the highest small residence house standing. The Panhellenic foreign student scholarship was presented to Ayhan Aydogdu
of Bursa, Turkey.
The Fayette AAUW Scholarship was presented to
Margaret Marie Sweeney. The McVey Scholarships;
were presented to Carole Ann McBaniel and Carolyn Conrath Williams.
The program recognized 32 women for having
4.0 standings. They are:
College cf Arts and Sciences Patricia Edwards.
Ellen Flippo, Faye Gibson, Maxine Gottesman. Lois

Numlx-rll- l

Peak Will Resign
To Run For Judge

d."

About 287 UK women were recognized at the annual "Stars in the Ni'ht" program Wednesday. Seven organizations were recognized at the ceremonies
in Memorial Hall.

1)"7

TT

In order to ascertain the nerd
r.
for Sunday evening library
the Kin Library will tx
open from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00
p.m. on 7, 14. 28 April and S
and 12 May. The periodical. Reserve, and Reference Koonn will
By JOE GOODMAN
be open, but there will be no
Loan Desk.
Complaints regarding policies governing the forthcoming service I at the Ktatt I.
Til
Ikr.r.
MJ.i.l.
Little Kentucky Derby were expressed Tuesday by several per-- , In this experiment over and
li ngulr dutle. and It
sons connected with the men's residence halls.
f50?been emphasized
has
.
,.
that Sun- .
r
..
i
i ...

dorms received tnlF-0)- f ficial applications for the Derby. Contained in these applications was a
correspondent clause stipulating a $10 entry fee,
Harrison Salisbury, Fulitzer Prize-winnin- g
which
for the New York Times, will speak in the Central Kentucky and another would bespecified that
held responparticipants
Concert and Lecture Series at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 in4 sible for the bicycles they used.
These stipulations, the dorm
Memorial Coliseum.
representatives said, had not been
Salisbury won the Pulitzer Prize Press and the income tax evasion mentioned when they were first
in 1954 for his "excellence in for- trial of AI Capone. He later be- approached by a member of the
eign reporting." The prize was came Washington editor for the Student Alumni Foundation, with
awarded for a series of articles LP.
During World War II he was the Little Derby proposal.
called "Russia
The Little Derby is sponsored by
The articles were written follow- London manager of the United the Student Alumni Foundation, in
ing an extensive trip to Soviet Press and director of European
with the UK Alumni
(Continued on Page 6)
Asia in 1953. He visited Kargan-ad- a,
Association.
a,
the home of prison labor
Willis Haws, president of the
Ata, capital of Kazakstan;
men's - residence halls governing
Frunze, capital of Kirghizia; Tashcouncil, said that Pete Perlman,
kent, capital of Uzbekistan; Sama member of the Foundation,
Bokhara, Fergana and
arkand,
"came to me around the first of
Stalinabadr capital of Tadjikstan.
February and asked to speak to
This was the first trip iver made
the council."
by any American correspondent to
Haws said that "Perlman urged
all of these cities and the most
all council members to try to get
extensive ever made in modern
up teams from their respective
times by any foreigner to this area.
floors to participate in the Derby;
Salisbury gave an
and that the entries would be due
report of the tremendous indus- I
in the next three days."
trial area which the Communists
are building in "forbidden" Cen"At that time, Perlman said
.-TZ
tral Asia.
there would be no financial obligaSalisbury was editor of the Unition on our part and that the biversity of Minnesota daily during
cycles would be furnished," Haws
his undergraduate days, until he
said.
was fired "for smoking a cigarette
Bob Seay, a dorm monitor, said
in the University library."
"Perlman said I could get up a
He covered the tail-en- d
of the
Chicago gang wars for the United
(Continued on Page 3)
HARRISON SALISBURY

O

I

IRN1B

Pulitzer Winner
WitlSpeakMere

.

.

The 13th queen candidate is Margaret Combs tKD,
representing Scabbard and Blade.
The queen will be presented by Pan Wooilward. Arnold Air Society Captain. Two attendants will be named;
one will be pi evented by Ric hard Cralt. Captain of Pershing Rifles, and the other by James Deacon. Captain of

Queen Candidates

eye-witne-

Iz-sl-

C

C nlf. a

;-

1

Army ROTC:
Carol Lee Axton. Companv "A" (KATi; Clave Evans.
Company "B" (DDD: Margaret Futrell. Company
(DDD: Anna Owen. Company "F.": Carol I,rc Anderson.
Company "a" tXOt; Charlene Scheibel. Company F"

m W' fit-

I

Scabbard and Blade.
The reception line will consist of the three enlor cadr
officers in the Army and the Air Force all are ROTC instructors at UK and thrir ladies; I Van of Men i
I..
Martin and Mrs Martin; Ivan M M White of the College of Aits and Sciences mul Mrs. White, and Dean of
Women Sarah B Holmes
The officers will Include Col Rotwrt S Irnn. I t Col.
Albert H. Hutdunson. Jr ami MaJ Milton Rorlofs of th
Air Ft. ice; and Colonel W.lham E Orubhs. Major Ol if V.
Christupherson. and Ma.) KKIen F. Fvans of the Anrv
Tukets will be available today an. tomoirow at Bar
ker Hall and also ttom all members of Arnold Air Svie?v.
Scabbard and Blade, and Pershing Riflcr Tickets will
ii1m be mailable at the door. Admission is $J (o a oupN

ut

race for county Judge to W. E.
Nichols In 1953.

Peak graduated from the University of Kentucky College of Lav
in 1931 and has been YMCA secre-

tary for

v

years.

1

L

1

C

.V-

i

37

Kenneth Harper, currently working on his Ph.D. in the College of
Education, will become acting
YMCA secretary. Harper Is also
working under Dean of Men L. L.
Martin.
Peak is a member of many civic
organizations. He is a member of
the Kentucky Society for Crippled
Children and was appointed by
Governor Chandler last year as a
member of the Kentucky Crippled
Children Commission.
He has been past president of
the Traveler's Aid Society. West
End Foundation and the Lexington Rotary Club.
Peak teaches a Bible class in
the First Methodist Church and U
a member of the Board of Stewarts
and the Board of Trustees of the
church.

)

ly

!'uf...
i

J

i
1

Cor.V::e of

Margait

t

m,

t1-j-

ln

Sonia Shine.
Mattie Levon Cooksey was named by the Home
Economics Club as the 'Girl of the Year."
Barbara Jean Roberts was presented with the
Alpha Lambda Delta award tQ the senior girl who
attained the highest Alpha Lambda Delta standing
for four years.
The following were recognized for maintaining
the Alpha Lambda Delta standing for four years:
Lois Mae Allen. Betty Jo Fritz. Barbara Jean Roberts, Theda Frances McKinney, Elynor Fortune
(Continued on Page 8)

V

v

itr

i

"i

A
A

ill

I'll'-

-"

Kernel Kit tie
This dazzling young damsel is this week's Kernel Kutle. She is Barbara Alstott of Ironton, III. Barbara Is a tophomore in the CoIle(9
of Agriculture and Home Economics and lirrs in Kreueland Hall.

* 2--

s-c.

1-

KENTUCKY KTRNFI.. TtMav. M;r. 20. 10"7

-TIir

Home Economics Club Career Week Activities
'i

f-

V

r

fJ

f n rvv
1

?s

in

Design Class

Registration

-

Election Of Officers
To Be Held By YMCA

Blue Marlins'
Water Show
Ends Tonight

'Career Week'
Will End Today

CooiiinjrCltfs-

Time

iUfv

school year
Tlic YMCA will elect offio rs for tlic 1937-3Fifty bathing beauties will preApproximately 07.) girls were expected at "Career Week," sent their last Blue Marlin water March 27 throiiu;li April 2.
Each YMCA member has been Willie Ray Haws, Education fresh-- i
show tonight at the Memorial
which closes today.
mailed a ballot arid they must be man; David Page, Arts and SciColiseum pool.
to the YMCA office by ences freshman; Claude Pierce,
On Monday, HS girls attended; 1.1 came on Tuesday. In
The Blue Marlm show. Fra- returned Anril 2.
Engineering freshman; and David,
past years, Can er Day was held on Saturday with very few at- grances of the Deep, which started Tuesdav.
Racel, Commerce freshman.
The candidates for president are:
last night and ends tonight, will
tending, Lois Summers, Home Kconomics Club president. Last consist of synchronized swimming Elliott Netherton. Commerce senand acrobatic diving. The show ior; Pete Perlman, Alts and Scixear. it was held on Friday and 500 girls came, she said.
ences sophomore; and Frank
"The Jlome Economics Club feels display was exhibited during the will begin at 8 p.m.
Sprat; ens. Arts and Sciences jun-- ,
S

'

it leached more high school girls
by extending Career Day to Career
Week. It gave them an opportunity
to attend the day best suited for
them," Miss Summers said.
Appointed guides stayed with a
group of about 15 girls all day.
They visited classrooms, had lunch,
and toured the campus and dorms.
Some of the classes in session
were costume design, nutrition
classes, foods, consumer problems,
special problems in clothing, and
interior decorating projects.
Each afternoon at 2 p.m. a
sneaker cave a shorttalknn one- of the various fields in Home Eco- -

Tickets for tonight's show are
Material used was borrowed
from the Eienhank Designer Com on sale in the Student Union
pany in Chicago to be used in Building from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
dn orating c lasses and "Career Tickets may also be purchased at
the pool tonight. Mis Jane Bell
Week."
rl
show.
The program was conducted on directs the
Monday. Tuesday, Thursday and
today. It was sponsored by the
Governmental securities of
Home Economics Club.
and Russia are known as
wet k.

-

all-gi-

ior. The person with the second
highest number of votes for president will automatically become
The State Speech Festival will
vice president.
The candidates for secretary be held on the campus April
are: John Bikhvcll, Engineering
Judges for this year's Festival
sophomore; and Fred Strache. are
all qualified speech teachers-hold- ing
Agriculture and Home .Economics
at least one degree in the
sophomore."'
field.
The candidates for treasurer are:
0.

Men's Ping Ponjjr
Svi For April u

Thp Mens DoutJlef. ping ponp
Tournament will begin Monday.
April 8 in the Student Union
Game Room.
interested students must sign-u- p
in the Game Room before Friday,
j April 5.
stated.
'
Questionnaires will be sent out
Trophies win oe awarded and
to teachers to see how they re- - there is an entrance fee of 25 cents-acteto Career Week, she said." ; The tournament is onen to all
Today Dr. George P. Summers; students except those on proba-Mr- s.
Betty D. Eastin, interior tion.
decorator; and Mrs. Elizabeth Ty- students may contact the Pro-socommercial demonstrator will gram Director's office. Room 122
P?ak.
'in the Student Union Building for
d
A
drapery fabric ' additional information.
nomics"A few of the schools left as
early as one o'clock in the morning
to get here. The scheduled time
for arrival was 9:30 a.m.," she

Speech Festival
ToIieAnrilJMO

-

;

l,J,
WW

OPEN EVERY'MONDAY

TIL 9 P.M.

If lVVl

YOUR

--

n,

0$2

hand-screene-

..To

HEADQUARTERS
about them, glad about them.
Sprightly springtime blooming at your
feet!
Be mad

ON
FAMOUS

FOB FAMOUS

BHANOS

7

w7-

PARTY RECORDS

2.
3.
4.
5.

"Bawdy Songs and Back Room Ballads" Oscar Brand, Folk Singer (Volumes I, II, and III)
"Howls, Boners, and Shockers from Art
Linkletter's House Party Kid - Interviews"
"House Party" Ruth Wallis
"Stan Freeman At The Blue Angel" ,
"Censored"
Martha Wright sings
original lyrics of Cole Porter, Irving
Berlin and Rodgers and Hart
g
"Over Sextecn"
Based on
book of same title
"French Postcards Set To Music"
Ruth Wallis
"For Sophisticates Only" Ruth Wallis
"Noel Coward At Las Vegas"
''Songs by Tom Lchrer"
"Songs His Mother Never Taught Him",
Dwight Fiske
"Pardon My Blooper" 5 Volumes
.

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

best-sellin-

.,.zzx

n
;:i
':

GENE HIGHLAND,

Manager
,f.'

Student Models of
RECORD PLAYERS

r A'nins

Are You Mad

MOST STYLES

W9vftTy

z

FOR FAMOUS

(9

(

S. BROADWAY

795 to 1495

(a) Nugget Kid with Flax Bars
(later in white).
(b) Navy Calf or Black Patent.

Crass Topper Heel

BRAN OS

V
PHONE

'

HAYMIAM'S

JUST TWO BLOCKS WEST OF CAMPUS

669

51

Enough for

CAPEZIOS

PORTABLE TV

FAMOUS

1

2-68-

...

Slmrs of Distinction

...

m.irW K . AlaiiTSl.

i:

* THE KENTITKY KERNEL, rriclav. Mjr.

(Continued from Tage 1)
team of monitors."
"In addition to savins there
would bo no entry co.st to us, and
would

be

t

Derby."
(The taims couhl not lime entered
eftiei'ilhi tit the time, siiue nitnt
blanks for the Derby u ere nut ,sent
until the latter nnt of last week,
and this u k.)

I

'Ideational Pattern of the New that work.
Centers of the Indian Iron and

sometimes leads to unforeseen events as when a girl'

irate fattier killed her suitor Monday in the SUB, in a demonstration
murder staged by Law students for a trial during: the April 5 Law Day
Trogram. The trial, open to all UK students, will be held at 2 p.m.

next Friday in Lafferty Hall.

,
t

When contacted. Perlman said
"What I said at the time I meant;
but at a later meeting of the
Foundation I heard about the $10
entry fee. I then went on record
as believing that the dorm teams
couldn't raise the fee and would
probably drop out."
Carolyn Collier, chairman of the
Student Alumni Foundation, said,
referring to Perlman's talk to the
dorm governing council. "The1
steering committee told Pete Perl- man to canvass the men's dorms to
see how many teams eould be
formed."
"It's just a general misunderstanding," Miss Collier, who also
serves as chairman of the Little
Derby Committee, said.
Haws said he was sure "No team
from the men's dorms would enter
the Derby if they had to pay a
$10 entry fee."
'

.

Marine Corps League Post
To Be Established Here
Break out those combat boots
and dust off those old dress blues
the Marine Corps League is
coming to Lexington!
Bill Downey,
and
now a student at UK, has received
authorization from the national
headquarters of the Marine Corps
League to establish a league post
in Lexington.
Persons eligible to join the
league and, in the process become charter members of the Lexington Post include all Marines
now" on active duty; all
vno receivea an nonoraoie discharge from the service; and all
persons who are serving or have
served not less than 9D consecutive days of active duty in the
Marine Corps Reserve, including
the Marine Corps Women's Reserve. Also eligible are naval
who served with Marine
Corps units and wnose names appeared on Marine Corps muster
rolls (such as corpsment.
Downey said that tentative plans
call for the Lexington Post to receive a national charter sometime
within the next two weeks. An
organizational meeting will be held
at this time, he added.
In the meantime, Downey asked

that all persons interested in

Willi

n.

,

be-

Dr. Stanley Wall, associate dean
of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics, will attend the
annual spring meeting of Southern Deans of Instruction at
Ark, April
Dean Wall said that- problem
related to curriculum and .student
'relationships will be discussed.
Fay-ettevil-

4-- 6.

-

AUTO ft HOME

REPAIRS

7"

White You Walt

Service

buy

We

sell or trade

CompUft

Drivt-l-

Uni Utt I ought,

DENNIS

n

FocilitWt

i

Sold

Neird 3rd

t.

417

PUm

Mill

ex-Mari-

&v

a

'

t

Wanted At

COWS

LEFT-FOOTE- D

TO BE DELIVERED TO THE 6TH FLOOR
OF

nn

Inn s

1

Mortar Board
To Hold Display
Mortar Board, senior women's
honorary, will sponsor it5 annual
silver, china, crystal display in
Jewell Hall.
The display, which will be sub
mitted by campus women's organ-- 1
izations. will bf hplri from 3 tn
2 p.m. Thursday, April 4.

nee!

THE LEFT SIDE OF 400

y

x

n
I

nI

11

Before
x

Klesit

Fd--o.

Apr.

ML

r

Another "Meet The Huddle Crowd Special" . . Next Friday Tom Simpson
For 29c!" This is an early announcement so you can be
says "Eat-U- p
ready
Save space . . . (Limit per student: 25 V2 steak burgers, 25.5
milk shakes).

...

SYEAKB

A

iiiiiMifiii:
Jewel-like-

,

garden!

enameled flowers in colorful rock
$23.95

5 piece plate setting

CI

.

ON DISPLAY AT THE

Table Setting
Contest
THURS., APR. 4, 3 to 7 P.M.

AT JEWELL HALL
WE INVITE
CHARGE ACCOUNTS!

Villeminot

105 W. MAIN ST.

Jewelers

.
d

(teak

qround

from th lett (id
cowl only .

of
.

.

on a bun freth at
a.m.
with lettuce, pickle( and
1

A special Huddle student service.
For the midnight headaches . . .
for the group picnics or beach par. just bring,
ties. Ice is frpe ,
your oyn pails and we'll fill 'em up.

BOTH FOR
Big and

made

thick shakes .
'

with

Kentucky

.

.

Ice

d
Cream and fresh
cow's milk. Made to match
left-foote-

THIS LOVELY PATTERN

P. Edw.

.

left-foote-

See

I

quality

Top

Silversmiths

OPEN 24 HR. DAILY

our teakburers.

CCY.

MOLECSHAKI

UW PPL

CORNER ROSE AND EUCLID

Any cows responsible for campus

grow-gras-

s

TroM

DAVIS
SERVICE CENTER

BOOK STORE
257 N. Lfmt

'i

PARTS ANO SERVICE FOR
ANY MAKE RADIO AND TV

BOOKSTORE

SED

TO

RADIO

Central Kentucky's Largest

4-JU-

Vi) .A It 111(1

Deans Mealing

'

coming members of the Lexington
Post contact him at the Faculty
Club, ex 2316; Bob Dougherty.
420 Hilltop, ex. 2417; or Marney
Beard, Kentucky Kernel, ex. 2275.
League dues are $1.50 annually,
plus 50 cents for the Marine Mag
azine; initiation fee Is $1.00.

ex-Mari-

The professors making the trip
iroi. josepn it. tcnwrnde-mahead of the department.
Prof. Thomas P. Field. Prof. Wil- ham Withington. Prof. Forrest
McElhoe. Jr.. and Prof. Karan.
The meeting Is held once a year
to present professional and technical papers. All geographers from
all over the country and Canada
will meet for 4 days to present
papers from various geographical
studies.
During the course of the 4 days
many international and physical
problems will be discussed. These
will range from the effect ice
melting off Iceland will have on
the ocoan 'level to the Antarctica
expedition in this geophysical year.
Currently Prof. James Shear of
the Geography Department is In
lnciucie

r

Murder
Voting1 love

-S

Fiw professors from the Ccorrapliy Drp.utmrnt will c.c
M.mh 31 to attotnl llio National M rtin of tlio Association of
American Ceorapliers at C'ita innati.
to speak Monday morning on Antarctica hcadinj a phae of

fur-

nished; he tlYrlmuni said that a
downtown merchant was to contribute $100 for building a float
with a woman's group on campus
that had not yet been picked,"
Seay added.
Hans said that some "8 to 10
teams from the men's dorms had
been formed, following Perlman's
talk, with the idea of entering the

1-

Five Professors To Attend
Meeting Of Geographers

Conflict
that errythinii

2. m7Sr.

program not acceptable

le.

* 1-

Srr.

KENTUCKY

-TIir

K VMS

IX. riMnv. Mar. 20. IT, 7

University Is A
Public Concern

8
TRUSTEES

QF

BOARD

I'--

c)

7

r -o

-

r

r mm

.

All open ldtcr to tin University of Kentucky
ioard of Trustees, the Hon. A. H. Chandler, chair-

man.

Centlemen:
For some time now we have harbored an idea'
which we would like to see you transform into a
reality an idea which we believe will benefit you,
will benefit us, and most important, will benefit the
University of Kentucky.
Now, only four days away from your last full
board meeting this semester, is, we believe, the
jnost appropriate time to approach you with our

idea.
briefly, gentlemen, we would like to see you
open your meetings to the press.
Admittedly, our idea is no new one. It has been
a controversial issue for quite a few years, not only
at tlx1 University of Kentucky, but at colleges and
universities throughout the land, but this does not
detract from the worthiness of the proposal if anything, it emphasizes it.
Wo would, first of all, assure you that you would
in no way be breaking a nation-widtaboo were
you to change your present policy of closed meetings. You would be in good company approxiof the nation's land-gramately one-hauniversities now have open meetings.
"This, in itself, of course proves nothing, but
there are other, more valid, reasons why we feel
the meetings should be open.
First, we are sure that you must realize that, in
these days, when suspicion seems to be the byword of the times many people, when told of closed
meetings, are certain that nothing short of a liaison
witlr the Devil "must be transpiring inside.
Those of us who are close to the University feel
sure that, in your case this is a false conception
but the fact remains that, in the minds of many,

M

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Vs. sZislJ-zsz
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Lct There lie Light

nt

it docs exist.
But perhaps the greatest good that would result
from open meetings. is.. that understanding would be
gained. Many newsmen, members of the Kernel included, have a vague picture of the board of Trustees as a somewhat untouchable, austere group of
individuals who meet in smoke-fillerooms and debate
policy matters. Inevitably, the
l
readers must receive the same picture and, in so
doing, associate this picture with the University of
d

high-leve-

Kentucky.
Were the press to be allow ed into your meetings,
we would get to know you you, in turn, would get
to know us. Understanding would surely follow
an understanding which would aid us all in achieving our mutual goal of a better University.
A trustee, is, by definition, "a person ... to w hom
something is entrusted; one trusted to keep or administer something."
The "something" which you are administering is
a public institution of the state of Kentucky. The
people who support the institution who are affected by the institution (and this category should
include all Kentuckians) have the right to know
what transpires in the meetings of the persons in
vhonnhe)rhave invested their trust.
Admittedly, we receive copies of your agenda
before you meet; we are given the opportunity to
consult with UK President Frank-DicketmlisTuSS
events of the meeting after the meeting; we are
given copies of the minutes of the meeting some
two weeks after the meeting.
but, too often, a practice such as this results in
only one side of the story being told. Whether this
happens in your case, we have no way of know ing
we have never been to one .of your meetings. Hut
were we allowed to attend your meetings, the question would be removed and all concerned would
y

Letters From The Readers
lut

Who Is Gym For?
To

tor
believe that something should he done ahout the
Alumni Gym situation. I am under the impression,
which could he wrong, that the gvm is for the use of
University of Kentucky students only.
Lately every afternoon from 3 to 5 o'clock (after all
classes have finished in the gym) there have been "0 to
80 ho)s there
laing "and waiting to play basketball.
There., are only three goals that tan be used, since one
ha been removed to allow the Troupers to jump around
r
of the gym's area.
on
To make the situation worse, outsiders from Trans)
other schools. anctrvcrrno schools are there playing, thus depriving use of the floor to IT. oT Ky. students,
many of whom have paid $2.50 for lockers in Alumni
G)in, just so they could play basketball there.
Ernie Cojlc
the-I'- d

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one-quarte-

Tribute To Stahr
To the Editor:
I love to see Kentuckians do welt. Rut it is always a
keen disatmointment to me to see a vounp man like
1
o
i
Elvis Stahr leave the state of Kentucky. Many of us
feared that when he failed to realize his ambition to
be president of his own university that the job that he
had would not hold him.
He has a grand opportunity in this new position where
the physical plant has been greatly enlarged for a career
that will satisfy his great ambition.
He may not have talents of a first order at this time
but if he continues to work hard he will develop such
capacities. This is perhaps the stepping stone to a university presidency or maybe something much larger.
We shall pray for this brilliant Kentuekian anel hope
that he can do much for his new home anel citv.
Sinecrelv,
James W Jewell
1

'Hostess ' Is Not
To the Editor:
have put oil writing this letter for several months,
but I can remain silent no longer.
1
don't mind too much risking my life to get acrovr
Limestone Street, dodging cars going ."() miles an hour.
It doesn't peeve me &ieatlv when I have to wait 13 m'in-iitia geua coke in the Crilh- Even the laci'that I 'can't
us
park ny. car within tvm blin ks of
doesn't
upset me too much. Pel haps these things aie unavoidable. At am rate, we can't have eveivthing. lint the
Student Union Caleleri.t situation is something that 1
find hard to reconcile mvselt to.
The looel is usuallv lit to eat. Xo complaint there.
I

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when I pay more lor .supper in the cafeteria than I
do downtown, and when I have to wait the be st part ol
an hour to get it. and when the) practically count out
.serve litem
rrliaiV
too niiK h!
The University of Kentucky is not a proft making
organiation! It is supported In the people el Kentucky,
and its primary purpose is to serve those people. Hut
whv is food more expensive there than in some ol Lexington's public restaurants? Should
to pay more
less?
for
At night the cafeteria is invaded by litcrallv hundreds,
of townspeople who don't want to cook at home. To
these people, service is excellent. They get plenty of
food, the women in the serving line are pleasant, and
the cafeteria "hostess" sees that thev are well taken care
of. Hut such treatment is not extended to the lowly students. The servers grudgingly take orders, as it they
themselves were pa)ing lor the food, and the
around with a sour look on her
face, apparently trying to find something to gripe about.
Is it necessary for us to wait longer, get less, and pay
more? Should we have to put up with the discourtesies
of the serving line, or the bickering of the Hostess With
The Lcastcst? I think not. These complaints are all in
tIie better interests of the students. How about a break
in our favor?
John Egcrton
we-hav- e

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Too Many Alarms
To the Editor:
Has the folly of false alarms had any real effect on
the safety of students? Apparently, )es.
The fire alarm turned in at Donovan Hall last week
was real, vet only a haneltid of the several hundred residents came outside. Many of the students inside didn't'
even gel out of bed. Most ol those in the vard only came
out to see the fire trucks and watch" .the fun.
Very few people even thought to cheek if it was a
leal alarm. Most of them just took it for granted that
it was only another practical joke. Even a Kernel reporter" reported it as a lalse alarm.
The alarm signal was set oil automatically by an overheated boiler in the basement. Had the clanger been
more serious, the loss ol a minute through the students'
iudiileience or the firemen's natural skepticism may have
had deadly consequences.
The director of the dorms has warned students to
leave the. building whenever the firc.alarjn is sotuujecl.
liob Harmon

the-omrp-

The Kentucky Kernel

benefit.
University of Kentucky
Your answer to this proposal if any will, we Ml
at the P st Office lit I. xinutnn, Kentucky, as tfconj tlail
sure, be that occasionally matters are discussed
in.ittrr under the Act
March 3, 1879.
Pulilisht'il weekly ilurinu school except holidays and exams.
which the public .should not have access to (such j They should be covered by reporters.
SI HSOKIFTIO.V RATES - $1.00 per semester
as the discussion of candidates for appointments to
For. alter all, gentlemen, you must realie that
Murney Heard
Editor
oil ices). None of us, I feel sure, would dispute members of the press are also trustees-trust- ee
s of
Dave Stewart
Managing Editor
our right to confer in private about such matters.
News Editor
the people, and trustees ot the principle of responsi-- ) Paul Daniel
Bob White
Sports Editor
bility, upon which the pillar, of Freedom of the Moira Quinn
but we teel very strongly that all matters conSociety Editor
Ann Monarch
Feature Editor
cerning public finances, and public business w hich, HlYcss rests.
Perrv Ashley
Business Manager
we reiterate, a licet each person in the state of Kentuc- H We have always res pected your trust. You shouhl Tex Thomas
Adv