xt722804z61k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt722804z61k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19520627  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June 27, 1952 text The Kentucky Kernel, June 27, 1952 1952 2013 true xt722804z61k section xt722804z61k The Kentucky
VOLUME XLIII

ECe IRNEL

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JUNE 27, 1952

$1 0 12, 000 Loss Causes Hike Seniors
In SUB's Cafeteria Prices;

NUMBER 31

To File Next Week

--

University Employees
No Longer Covered
By Social Security

All seniors who expect to complete the requirements for graduation by the close of the summer term and who have not previously
filed their applications for degrees are requested to do so on either next
Friday or Saturday, University Registrar R. H. Tuthill announced this
week.
Dr. Tuthill said the commencement lists are made up from the
application cards. He said candidates for the A.B. degree would be
charged S9. This amount covers the cost of renting a cap and gown
and pays for the diploma and a copy of the Kentuckian.
Candidates for advanced degrees, other than doctorates, must pay
a fee of $20 and candidates for the doctorate will be charged $25'.
Graduation fees. Dr. Tuthill added, must be paid not later than
August 4, four days before commencement.

Wholesale Increase Blamed

loss for tin fiscal
just completed has neces- sitated the latest hike in Uni- versity cafeteria prices, Frank D.
Peterson, UK Comptroller, has
,
announced.
TIr' recent increase in cafe- teria food is not an attemnt to
regain the inonev alreadv lost,
says Peterson, but is to prevent
a recurrence of such a loss in the
luture.
A

Peterson. At the same time, he said,
the University cannot be expected
to continue operating the cafeteria
recent raking of
at a loss
prices is not an effort to make up
tne thousands of dollars lost this
year, but represents an attempt to
erase further debts only, he em- phasized.
Miss Zoe Harris, director of the
cafeteria, outlined the plan that the
Union cafeteria followed since the
loss was being accumu- lated. She believes it Is the most
economical arrangement that could
be employed
under the circum- -

that this practice is more economical
than weekly or monthly buying be- -

cause of the saving afforded by pur- chasing in quantity.
Critics Don't Know Facts
Miss Harris pointed out that many
f
University employees are no longer covered by the
critics of the Union food operation
the Federal Social Security Act, it was announced this week by
were evidently not aware that the
University officials.
school cafeteria had to pay the same
operating costs, basically, that any
President Herman I,. Donovan said he received an olfici.d rul1
other restaurant in town must pay.
ing on the school's status on June IS from Commissioner A. J.
She said that actually there was lit- Altmeyer of the Federal Security Agency, a branch of the Social
tie difference between the operation
of the school cafeteria and other
Security Administration, Washington. D. C.
eating establishments in Lexington.! The University has scheduled its
The ruline came iust 13 davs be- - only summer Blazer lecture in his- Asked to comment on any criticUnder UK's system, older mem-th- e
:
A television set will be installed in fore the University would have been
j !A;"U i
t.. 4A .
iur mic
isms which rnav have arisen as a luI
rs of the staff and faculty are
Student Union building some- - eligible to collect Social Security
Prices in the SUB cafeteria had stances, j The sDeaker will he Dr filvndon G.
-j
ipkiiil oi me latest, advance in iooa
-r
m
i n-i- iduring August and will be benefits. Dr. Donovan said. UK first s'Sne lighter work loads as a
for student use by the begin- - started paying Social Security tax auction in salary, but they are not
The cafeteria, she said, buys fresh Price. Comptroller Peterson replied
until last September when wholesale
otR-food
'
ning of the fall semester, said a year ago this past April. At that actually retired. The continue to
prices increased so rapidly that food and vegetables every day. Bids tha he was unaware of any paremployees of the University,
Howard M. West. University pur- - time the school paid back taxes
it was "impossible to continue opera- - are accepted on meat once a week Uc
.
of ceremonies
The lecture is r
reouie realize. luhl Liie iikju is rnmmrmnratinir a nartinnth nnnlver- In the case of "an accident that
'retroactive to Jan. 1. 1951.
chasing agent, this week.
UOn on me jormer price level,
irura winu iaiBc lumuica. iiic
thr
cneapiy
At first UK officials were reluctant ml"ht Impair the earning capacity
Peterson said. Despite the general cafeteria accepts the lowest bid and P
sary of the d;ath of Henry clay
th
gir
HC lded
University emp.oyee. Dr. Dono- ac- - that particular company furnishes sa
.
to enter the nrosram because of the
price hike the huge loss was still
which wU1 be held at UK on that
irom umicruii Ltua ivapua, iiauuimi TTnilioriltll'r "f.h
reterson aaaea mat me quality oi
.f wurn. plan. van said, the University Board of
the meat for the week. ...
cumulated, he added.
u,",c
"lanc ui nnvb" nlnn Trustees usually grants sone type
ervi,.e .nH srhnlast.tr fraternitv
.
.
..
tViA frmA 1c oc DnnH Di in qui' raf- - Uatc.
"Dr. Donovan said. They felt that
for cannea gooas, miss Harris
with UK in staging
Loss Started In September
The model will have a wide 21" this program was the equivalent of of partial compensation. He exsaid tne cafeteria , is supplied by teria even though the eye appeal the centennial observance will be
....,
.,
,
.j
i
oi
plained that employees who ure unscreen, and will be of a table type a retirement nlan
ru i ouier wiae
jutt
.uiesie, s. o..c ntcu of tho food has been sacrificed to a the Filson Club, a private historical
i.ie
to reduce
able to work must report periodically
design. It will be installed in Room
at a rate of $.0233 on every dollar that large quantities could not be
Assu
society devoted to Kentucky and
superiors and thoe report;
106. Tentative plans caU for the model
received irom septemoer mrougn purcnasea Decause oi me lac
oi
We, to their
Autnorities from tne state
stry. ana me nenry
The cafeteria is ODerated as a umo va"ey
are then turned over to the Trustees.
to be inset about six feet up in fare Agency however convinced
June. With these figures confront- - necessary storage space.
clay Memorial Foundation.
Benefits Of Social Security
one wall, so that its large picture re- - officlals tnat
intr the ComDtroller's office it was
Manv other schools and institu Class A establishment, he said. The
am was ac
the
Dr. VanDeusen, an authority on
Under the Social Security system,
ceiver can be viewed clearly through- - tuaUy not a retirement plan
serve a large volume of lood te Properly inspected and pur- evident, according to Teterson, that tions that
the life of Henry Clay, is the author
President explained,
out the room.
another rise in prices beginning in meals buy their canned staples in chased as cheaply as is feasible,
lnstead of retiring men the Univer- - the wives of University protection
of "Biography of Henry Clay,"
employees
Peterson added, "Even with the recognized as
the summer session was mandatory, huge lots, sometimes for six month
gave them new assignments for
Probably the most outstanding sity
the most complete
and their families is taken care of
The SUB cafeteria is operated for periods, according to an authority current increase, the University cafe- - work on Clay's life. He spent the
features of this latest TV model is its with lighter work loads,
case of premature death.
the benefit of UK's student body on restaurant and institutional food teria is still the cheapest place in summer of 1934 in Lexington preof Ken- - in As an example
"The Attorney-Generelaborate antenna, a "yagi" design,
he cited a mythito eat."
operation, adds operations. The same source added town for students
and is a
same antenna system tucky assured us that this was so.". cal case of a University employee
This is the
paring material for this book. He DR. GLYNDON G. VANDEUSEN
said President Donovan, "and we with three children all
currently used at the Va hospital.
examined many private papers which
under the
The "yagi" is a stationary an- - had a verbal ruling from the Federal age of 18. In case of the father's
are reportedly no longer available.
partment of History, wishes to emagency that supported his opinion."
tenna. and will be double-stacke- d
A graduate of Amhurst College,
death, the man's widow would rephasize that the lecture is "primarily to a height of 70 feet from the roof
President Donovan said the mon-o- f
Dr. VanDeusen holds a Ph.D. defor students."
ey UK employees have already paid ceive a monthly amount and each
gree in American history from Co
the SUB. The best cable available
of her children would also receive
The observance will serve as a will be used to secure the huge an- - into the Federal program will be
lumbia University. He recently conv
allowances until they reached the
Me-tteaching term at Joint meeting of the Henry Clay
pleted a
It will set the video turned, but commented that it may age of 18.
Dr. J. B. Shannon of the Political welfare, which works toward raising
University of New Zealand morial Foundation and the Filson receiver on two channels, nine take the government some time to
In addition to thus provision, as
Science department has been elected UK salaries to the standard of com- - where he conducted a seminar in Club. It marks only the third time (Louisville. CBS and four (Cincin do so.
Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain. UK vice
As- - parable institutions. The group also American studies. He has
th club has met away from nati nbc.
president of the local American
The governmental ruling on UK's
Just re- - that
might be
status came despite efforts of Gov. president pointed out. it
sociation oi university proiessors. maintains committees in social se- - turned from a triD around the world. "Juisvuie. xnany memoers oi tne
The antenna is fixed in position Lawrence W. Weatherby. Sen. Tho- - more attractive for a University emDr. snannon nas been a memDer curity ana retirement; leaves oi ao- Clav of Kentucky will be ciud wno nave naa no opportunity
"Henrv
Dr Enno E. Kraehe, associate
ployee to take advantage of the
and cannot be rotated to pick up
professor of history, has been of the Executive Committee for sence and sabbaticals; athletics, and the topic of Dr. VanDeusen's Blazer t0 attend regular meetings are ex- - other channels. The "yagi" is al- mas R. Underwood. Sen. Earle C. Social Security benefits when he
pecteo. to taice pari in mis event,
years, and served as vice University government,
Clements, and Dr. Elvis J. Stahr.
lecture address to be presented Mon- awarded a grant under the Ful-- ! three
Preceding the Blazer lecture will leged to be an improvement over dean of the Law College, to convince reached the age of 65 instead of
.j
bright Act to engage in research in president of the Association during
recentiy sponsored day. just 100 years and one day after
latter
tenna-rotwaiting to go on the school's "change
models, however, be- 1939-4legislation that removed UK per- - the "Sage of Ashland" succumbed in be an informal dinner at 6 p.m. cause it simplifies operation and Washington officials of the differ- - of work" status when he became 70.
German history in Austria.
ence between UK's "change of
age of 75. CDT) in the Student Union build- - greatly improves reception
15
a na"
local AAUP
nnel from the control of the State Washington, D.C., at the
Dr. Chamberlain said that beneIf the
Announcement of the award,
rrrtrm rr artrl r Am ilor rat i a
-8- U,
h.- hich has a Finance Department. The asocia- - The lecture will begin at 8 p.m. ir8- The dinner will be open to the occasion demands, TV mechanics! nrrt-l- r
or8anIzation
fits from the Social Security promust be
mem programs.
of the Public, but reservations
ob" (CDT), in the Guignol
"on u
I?;000-771gram would probably be most ad? em- - University's Fine Arts theater
"lade either with Jacqueline Bull at can set the antenna on other popu
building.
secun
lh
taming a higher
'Change Of Work I'nique
vantageous to employees of the Um- lar channels.
Fulbright program for the
in the
possible the UK library or at the Department
The Blazer lectures, made
academic freedom It seeks to ployment for persons employed In
pay
Dr.
1952-5- 3
academic year, was made by
of History by noon today.
members, who are assuming knew Donovan said that as far as he versity who were in the lower
ODK
by Georgia and Paul G. Blazer of
UK's system for assigning brackets,
"""
Dr. M. M. White, dean of the College
A reception for Dr. VanDeusen the entire cost of the television set. lighter work loads was almost unique
Ashland who have established a
Chance For Revision
of Arts and Sciences.
,
views.
..
J P" " -' fund to bring distinguished speakers and other visitors will be held in the will formerly present the model to among American universities. He
Dr. Donovan said there is a slight
plans to study at the
.
are open t0 tne public. Dr. lounge of the Fine Arts building fol- - Dr. H. L. Donovan, representing the said he knew of only one or two chance that UK employees may be
Dr. Kraehe
t0 UK
Th nati,., nffirA in wchinrtn ""uc.
University, in the near future.
University of Vienna during his stay receives complaints from members
vZh to as essential to that Thomas D' Clark" head of the De lowing the address.
other schools that had a similar reintegrated into the Social Security
in Europe. Selection of the Uni- - and .DDOints an outside committee
program.
f
program. The letter from Commis- frA "nf
versity professor was made by the
investigate. If the committee
fsioner Altmeyer noted that a bill
Mewspaper people
Board Of Foreign Scholarships, finds that hr rnmnlaint ts irrniifnr
which has recently been pa&sed by
He added that the association
members of which are appointed by and lf the institution fails to cor- the House of Representatives would
the President of the United States irect it. the violating University Is seeKS onl? 10 protect noerues aipossibly enable UK to resume the
aantee,. in tne Constitu- When this action is ready
program. This bill, an amendment
Born in St. Louis. Mo. Dr. Kraehe black-listetion of the United States and in the
to the Social Security Act. still has
holds a PhD from the University taicen. a university olten rinds even constitution of the Commonwealth.
jobs dificult to fill.
to pass the Senate and receive
of Minnesota and AB and MA de- "Without these freedoms," Dr. Shangrees from the University of Mis- President Truman's signature before
The association also seeks juris-sour- i. non continued, "neither education
of
Koreans before he left. Refering to politics, one
The Kernel Is presenting this sketch of Dr. George
it becomes law.
Before coming to UK he was diction over the field of professional nor democracy can survive."
1
them said. "In six months we may not be alive." The
well- K. Brady as the first in a aeries of articles on
If enacted, it permits extension of
an instructor in history at the Uni- - ethics, and will move increasingly
Korean Was pointing out the danger of being on the
e
and survivors insurance
Local control of education is the the
it In addition to Dr. Shannon, of known L'K professors. Readers' suggestions for the
versity of Delaware, assistant pro- - toward mat goal in tne iuture. be- - ficers of the local AAUP include Pro- - subjects of future sketches will be welcomed.
hopes to draft a code of ethics
thing we want to surrender in system to employees already covered
living in Japan
An aspect of the Koreans now
lessor of history at the University lwecn professor and employer that fessor James W. Martin, vice presi-o- f
America." Dr. L. D. Haskew. educa- - by a "retiremen system if two- By RONNIE BUTLER
proved ofspecial interest.
dent; Ruth McQuown, secretary- Missouri, and instructor in his- - will soon become formulized.
of the employees effected vote
"Koreans." Dr. Brady stated, "were given their "on dean at the University of Texas, thirds
Dr. George K. Brady, born in Fort Leavenworth,
sum ... cr.u,iUiV
tory at the University of Minnesota,
The University AAUP, headed by treasurer; Dr. Daniel Hegeman, Dr. Kansas on October 16, 1893, received his A3, at the
r ctoinB in .lanon nr nf rrtnrnins to Korea, acciarea last juonoay as tne second
H- - Carter- - Professor John Red- The bill would exclude firemen.
Dr. Shannon, is also responsible for
i
f ihom .h
to ctv ThPi ir tronhlp week of the Conference for Class- of Illinois, a PhX. at the University of
policemen, and secondar school
additional local affairs. It has ap- - man. and Dr. Carl Cone, members University a
makers, even the ones from South Korea, and make room Teachers and School Adminis- Toledo and
at UK in 1925.
teachers from participation in the
trators opened at UK.
pointed a committee in economic of the executive committee.
To See
During the First World War, Dr. Brady served as up a core of rabble rousers."
"With loss of control goes loss of program.
'Koreans Hate Japanese
a member of the 1st US Army Ambulance Service
Altmeyer Willing
Soon
He added that many Koreans hate the Japanese, interest in education." the speaker
with the French Army from 1916 until the end of the
Dr. Donovan, who met and dis
more than 200 teachers, super
due to war time experiences, and, even though they told
war. When he returned from the war, he married.
cussed the ruling with a group of
The Maintenance and Operahave been allowed to stay there and carry on business. visors, principals, and superintenIn 1925 he came to UK, and has been here since.
UK faculty members Tuesday, ex- -;
tions Department of UK is removdents attending the meeting.
they constantly make trouble.
In 1948 Dr. Brady went to Japan as a member of
pressed the hope that possibly there
Brady came back from Japan he was
When Dr.
ing approximately 2.142 red bricks
.
v.
v.
TiT Hilskpv ripfinpri thp "minimum
1
the Cultural Science Mission to Tokyo, Japan. The
"
very much interested in foreign students, especially foundation.. approacn in
economic collapse of Japan following her defeat in
from the northeast side of the Ened- Dr. Donald P.
those from Japan. His house has become a regular by setting up an actual foundation
gineering Building to provide ucator, will make Cottrell. Ohio ad- - year's topic is "Moral and Spiritual the war brought about conditions that called for imAltmeyer
he would
the principal
attraction for Japanese students, who find hospitality case in a community which he called missioner meet withsaid
Values in Education."
mediate American aid.
Kentucky of- be glad to
space for new windows.
any time they have a chance to go.
dress Monday at a public conference
there
Dr CottreU is Dean of the College
Modernville." Basic premises were
further,
Spending All Funds
Work began on the windows in connection with UK's fourth sum- - of Education at Ohio State Uni- Last spring Dr. Brady was in charge of the orienta- cited by the Texas dean, and he ex- - flcials to discuss the matter
The Japanese Ministry of Education was spending
Nowhere in his letter did Commer workshop for teachers.
tion program for 43 foreign students, and he seemed plained an objective formula used to
early this week.
versity. He has long been interested all of the funds that should have gone to education
missioner Altmeyer give exact
to have made an extremely favorable impression on
The workshop, begun June 16, will m general teacher education, and on practical sciences, in order to enable Japan to rethe minimum level of edu- - sons for the government's decision
them, for some of them, who went to spend the rest cation values in "Modernville."
continue through July 11. This especially in improving the educa- - gain her industrial standing. The cultural aspects of
to consider the UK "change of
of their time in the United States in other cities came
'tion of college and university teach- - Japanese life were being neglected.
to Dr. Haskew. a "set status a retirement plan. He ac-back to visit.
ers and academic administrative of-- I
Japanese educators realized. Dr. Brady said, the
basic convictions" is necessary in knowledged the decision given by the
Student Conies Back
Attorney-Genera- l,
ficers.
error in the policy of neglecting culture, and asked
and
Speaking of one student, who came all the way from every state where the minimum Kentucky
- commented that he "had the
Dr. Cottrell's address on "Develop- - for an American mission to help study the situation.
New York to Lexington by bus. to revisit UK. Dr. Brady foundation approach is used. "Detering Moral and Spiritual Values in In September, 1948 Dr. Brady flew the Pacific as a
that financial investments est regard" for that opinion. But he
said, "If you've ever taken a long bus ride, you can
against it.
Education," will inaugurate a full member of that mission.
appreciate the fact that she (the student) really made should be fairly distributed still ruled
Commissioner, Altmeyer did quote
among various districts of the state"
When asked if the flight across the Pacific made wanted to come back."
day of activities. The lecture is
references both from the
scheduled for 10 a.m. (CST) at Me-- ; him nervous. Dr. Brady proudly stated, "Not in the
Dr. Brady's hobbies, not including his interest in was listed by Dr. Haskew as one of several Security
Act itself and from
Social
mortal Hall. A luncheon will follow least!" He then recalled that, from the air, the density
foreign students, include stamp collecting, flower gar- these convictions.
Dr. Herman L. Donovan, explain- at 12:15 p.m. in the football room of the population (American) becomes immediately dening, and translation of Japanese folklore, with the
The conference will continue the Senate debate while the Act was
ing and apologizing for the conevident, with "city following city" and "one long, conof the Student Union building.
through July 3, with all sessions on the floor which specify that no
aid of Professor Takatsuka at Shiga College. Japan,
fusion caused by the differences beold-- e
ant- - survivor benefits shonlrl
The conference program will con- -, tinuous string of lights."
Professor Takatsuka, who has an excellent com- scheduled at the Jefferson Davis
tween University time and town
given to any roup of state and
'Japan Is Beautiful'
tinue at 2 p.m. with a discussion of
mand of the English language, translates the stories, school. Most of this week's sessions local employees
time, has Issued the following statealready covered by
Japan, stated Dr. Brady, is a beautiful country, al"The Development of Moral and
from an anthology by Professor Yamagida. "Mountain were devoted to the discussion of a
ment:
retirement plan.
Spiritual Values in Cooperation with though the density of the population is much thicker
Vollage Life and Fishing." and mails them to Dr. the proposed state constitutional
"Central Standard Time is the
Community Agencies." A summary than it is in this country. "There is no place in
amendment pertaining to distribuBrady, who clarifies the sometimes
official time on which the University
he added, "where you can't see signs of human
session will follow at 3:30 in Me-- ;
tion of state school funds.
sentences and does a little polishing-uwill operate in the future, or until
mcrial Hall. Dr. Cottrell will alsc habitation."
While on the subject of translating tne folklore.
the General Assembly changes the
Most of Dr. Brady's time in Japan was spent in
make concluding comments.
Dr. Brady related an incident that occurred when he
To
School
law relative to this time rone.
studying the libraries at Japanese schools. The Japwas asked to sponsor a speech contest in one of the Two
Representatives of Kentucky Par- -' anese were
regret that there has been some
I
By Courier-Journ- al
in sore need of universities, said Dr. Brady,
schools. It seems that Dr. Brady bought a loving cup On
groups
ent Teacher Association
confusion regarding the time on
but they simply did not have the money to install
and sent it to one of his friends with the suggestion
boards of education, religious educaBarry Bmtham. editor of the
which the University would operate
ibraries, and a university has to have a good library. that it be engraved (in Japan) according to the friend's
Removed
tional groups, and community or-- 1
('
rIf
and Louisville
this summer. Had the law not been
He went on to say that American occupation forces
desire.
at-- j
ganizations have been invited to
The pair of quonset huts formerly Times, has donated three stainless
changed by the last General
et up one university in every district of Japan. 100,
Sends Two Anthologies
tend the one day conference.
at the south end of the intramural steel,
we would have gone on as
sinks with drain-fiel- d
is opposed to seven before and during the war.
Then Dr. Brady sent two anthologies of English
have recently been removed.
boards, and four stainless steel, four- usual but the law made it imperaThe workshop is conducted daily
A Matter Of Prestige
literature for the winners. It seems that the contestThe two temporary structures were foot sinks to the School of Journal-erecte- d
tive that we operate on Central
from 2 a.m. in Room 101 of the
"Now it is a matter of prestige." Dr. Brady confided.
ants were children in the eighth and ninth grades, he
immediately after the second Ism's photography laboratory.
even though our
Standard Time,
Engineering annex. Dr. Ellis F Although there is a university in every district, there
laughed, and the anthologies on English literature were World War to furnish additional
Also included in the gifts were
local community by resolution adoptHartford, professor of education, it will be a certain amount of jealousy between the older hardly the right present.
housing facilities for veterans study- - four round developing pans and one
ed Daylight Saving Time.
director of thfi seminar.
universities and the newer ones."
To top it off. said Dr. Brady, t:ie cup was in- ing under the GI Bill of Rights. Speed Graphic camera.
This
DR. HERMAN L. DONOVAN
The conversation, drifting from the subject of uniAfter consultation with the deans
scribed. "The George K. Brady Cup." He remarked, Now that their original purpose has the department a total of sue?
Workshop consultants are Dr. Wilthree
and a number of faculty members,
liam C. Bower, professor emeritus of versities and libraries, settled 011 politics. Dr. Brady "It looks like I have achieved immortality in the pre- been eliminated the use of these Speed Graphic cameras. With the
emphasized the tremendous differences between Asiatic
it has been decided that beginning
The schedule of classes will not be religious education at the University
fect of Shiga."
huts has been discontinued.
equipment sent, one developing
July 1, offices will open at 8 a.m. changed but '.hey will continue to of Chicago and UK; Dr. Clarence M oolitics and American politics. "In Asia," he said,
Not to be overlooked are Dr. Brady's editorial talThe structures are being loaned loom can be completely furnished
"politics is a matter of life and death."
CST and close at 3:30 p.m. CST operate as at present,
Linton, chairman of the Religious
ents, stemming from his hobby of collecting pre- to the Favette County School Board and sinks can be put in the majority
He explained that in Asia the choosing of the right
In the event any dean, head of a Education Committee of the Amer- until September 10. On Saturdays
cancer of Kentucky, i.e., stamps that have had the to take care of an overflow at a of the photography rooms,
the offices will close at 12 noon department, or other staff member ican Council of Education, and Dear party and the party that lost out to its opposition is names of the towns they are mailed from printed on county school. UK officials were
John Ed Pierce, editorial writer
- Cottrell. Dr. Bower is the author o) not just a matter of debate and argument, as it is
CST until September 10. After finds it necessary to extend his ofthem by the post office. "I have one of the best col- quoted as saying that they "will be for the Courier-Journand former
here. The loosing members are more than likely put
that date offices will open at 8:30 fice hours in order to accomplish his "Moral and Spiritual Values in Ed- glad when all temporary buildings UK columnist came down to the
lections of Kentucky
he added.
ajn. and close at 5 p.m. CST. and work, he has the authority to do so ucation," recently published by tht out of circulation.
Therefore it was almost natural that Dr. Brady be are removed." They added that School of Journalism a few weeks
Hose nt 12:30 p in. CST on S;itur- - :nid to request inriiilx is tit las stuff lK press. The book is the official
Itecalls Korean Talk
the ideal editor of a catalogue of Kentucky
these buildings will be "individually ago to see what equipment was
days.
to remain on duty."
textbook of the workshop.
Dr. Brady recalled a conversation he had with some
which he is.
moved whenever it k possible."
, needed mobt.
j

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* KENTUCKY

THE

Modem Advice To Students
Is 'Stay Home, Young Man '
We think this particularly good advice for
Kentucky is literally a state of
sm ill towns. Far too many of our young adults have
left the state to go to large cities with their mythical
lure of riches and fame. This exodus has been
marked among our college-trainepeople, those
who supposedly are to lx the leaders of tomorrow.
The small town presents a challenge to the ins
telligent,
young person who will
accept it. Those wlio say that America no longer
has a frontier ignore the great opportunities for
clnnge and progress offered in the country's small
communities.
Although it's true that the typical "home town"

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Now Studious Sal
Was Quite A Gal
But Just For A Pal
Now. Studious Sal from Southern Calif must be admitted, was quite a gal;
She knew her math and physics, too,
And with each year her knowledge grew.
With angles obtuse and circles round,
Sal could cover academic ground.
Latin. Spanish, even Greek,
She did a semester in less than a week.
ler marks were known throughout the school,
And Sal would never break a rule.
Though promise of work was right nearby,
Down in the mud was her chance for a guy.
In social circles Sal wasn't advised,'
So she went to a doc to be analyzed.
She wanted to know, and slie wasn't coy,
"Why the heck can't I get a boy?"
"You're terribly smart, your chem is great,"
The doc replied, "but before it's too late,
Forget the stuff that comes in books,
And use your brains to improve your looks.
"When you are with Einstein out in space,
It's clear you overlook your face.
Instead of reading Roman tales,
Why not polish and trim your nails?
"Instead of looking for calculus tips,
Why not paint and shape your lips?
C-out of doors, acquire-a-taFor after the sun will come a man."
So Sal did what the doctor said;
Now she wishes she were dead.
Although dates each night have become her rule,
Her marks dropped so low, she flunked out of
school.
Reprinted from the Northeastern News,
Northeastern College, Mass.

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Finally the eyesores are going!
It may take a little time for all of tliem to be torn
clown, but the temporary buildings on campus are
dismantled. We welcome this as astep toward making the UK campus one of the most beautiful in the country.
In their clay the temporary buildings, many of
them donated by the Army, served a needed purpose as classrooms for the students that flooded the
campus after the war. Now that influx is over, however, and the school's enrollment has dropped to
what mig