xt7228050z3w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7228050z3w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690407  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  7, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7228050z3w section xt7228050z3w rs

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AMTHJCECY

Monday Evening, April 7, 19G9

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Vol. LX, No. 125

SG Representative

Candidates Give
Policy Statements

By KERNEL STAFF WRITERS
EDITOR'S NOTE: These are the campaign statements released by
all the candidates for Student Government representative who
could be reached by the Kernel. Those who have not been contacted should call the Kernel office this evening in order for their
statements to be printed in Tuesday's edition.
There are 41 candidates running for the 16 representative seats
in Wednesday's Student Government elections. To help the voter
make a meaningful choice in the election, a brief sketch of the
representative candidates follows.
Each candidate contacted was and the know-hoto get around
asked why he or she was running its difficulties."
for representative and what they
His goals include an improvehoped to accomplish if elected. ment in student services, such
as an increase in recreational
facilities and an increase in communications between students
Bob Bailey (SAR) said, "A lot and the administration, and a
of things need to be accomplished "concise" sheet of administrative
offices and duties.
and I think I can do something."
Bailey was vice president of the
He is opposed to forced housSG at Elizabethtown Community
ing above the freshman level
College.
"unless it is absolutely
Bailey said he is running on
the SAR platform and its planks
are his goals. He specifically
mentioned student services as
the focus of interest.
Bill Dawson said Student
Government "needs a turn to- ward more responsible action; no
David Bohannon feels he can more circus action like what went
on during the Dixie bill."
be an effective representative
He wants to achieve the desince he feels he "can see both
velopment of a new type of camsides of the issues." He mentioned changing the advising sys- pus communications system
tem and establishing a closer which he described as a cross
PA system and an
faculty-studerelationship as between a
AM radio station. This system
his chief goals.
would broadcast announcements,
upcoming events and Student
Government meetings.
He also said he would supKeith James Brubaker (SAR)
said he wants "an SG that does port all "pertinent and imporsomething. As it stands now, we tant legislation."
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Bailey

Participants in the Peace Vigil at the Southland Selective Service Office
on Southland Drive listen as Bob Walker, a sturlrnt at tho I

PcdCC VxQxl
o

Theological Seminary, speaks. Walker, holding the cross at right, was
once a student at UK. (See related story on Lexington Peace Council
on

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

page 6.)

Dawson

Community Colleges Preparing
Their Own Student Rights Bill
The .UK .Community College
System currently is formulating
a new bill of student rights and
r
a student charter for its
campuses.
The student charter is being
patterned after the main campus
Student Code, also currently
under revision. Final approval of
the community college code by
the Board of Trustees is expected
at its May meeting, said Dan
Tudor, coordinator of student affairs for the community colleges.
"

two-yea-

The community college" bill of
student rights was adopted recently at a joint meeting of the
system-wid-

Standing Commit-

e

tee on Student Affairs and the
executive board of the
College Student Council.
Essentially, the bill of student
rights is similar to the student
code on the Lexington campus.
Tudor said the local staff will
discuss the bill and delete from
it those portions (such as ho using
regulations) which do not apply
Inter-Communi- ty

Bohannon

to community college students.
The bill will then be sent to
the various community college
student councils for their approval.
A meeting of the faculty
council, community college equivalent of the University Senate,
will be held April 18 and 19
here to further discuss the new
bill. Establishment of guidelines
forinier college activity will also
be discussed, Tudor noted.

nt

Brubaker

.ally don't."

Brubaker seeks student involvement through "legitimate
channels." He would like to have
"bills passed with provisions to
allow a student showing of approval such as petitions or
refer-endums-

0

."

His specific goals include ending mandatory housing above the
freshman level, "beautifying the
campus," improvements in student services, more study areas
on the south side of campus,
and providing a place for Creeks
to cash checks on the south side
of campus since they cannot use
the Complex facilities.

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Clark

i

Dexter
Dexter was an SG representative this year but said
he felt "like a freshman senator." Next year he "hopes to
be more active and to be a
voice of students."
He would like to improve
"thephysical environment of the
University." "Hilltop Avenue
needs to be improved and there
needs to be more parking," he
said.
Bill

Fergus
Debbie Fergus said, "I want
to represent the students. I want
to get in there and speak on the
issues."

Clark (SAR) thinks
Government can be
more effective." She points to the
Jv
V'.;.
She claims, "We are not too
research and bills effected by
Thorn Pat Juul, Bob Duncan close to the administration; I
hope fo work with that. I want
and Joe Maguire (all SAR members) as an example of what can to make SG stronger, lots of
be done when representatives are people do not know it exists.
I want to make the things SG
"interested enough to work."
Her goals are basically those does better known to the stuof the SAR platform, but she dents."
listed the housing policy, easing
general requirement restrictions
and obtaining a legal staff to
counsel students brought before
Linda Hittepole says she is
the
as the important
interested in "the general area
issues facing SC next year.
of SC. I have lived in a dorm,
Krni Photo by Dtck War
and I hope to represent the stuMembers of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority killed up a stonn last week as part
dent's view. I would like to see
of a ransom for their housemother, h ho was "kidnapped" by members of Lambda
SC work toward better condiChi Alpha fraternity. The fraternity men, right, "invited" the housemothers to stay
Since Joe Dawahare is a retions for students. I am for libI .1
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.
wiiii iijcxii umii ransomeu ay ine soroniy monocTS, ana men luniru uvct iiic uav presentative this year, he feels
eralizing women's hours."
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collected as ransom to the Lexington Salvation Ann. Tlie house- he has the "experience and the
IvlCliCrS
mothers, meanwhile, enjoyed games of bridge with their captors.
Continued oil Pate 5, Col. 1
knowledge of how SG functions
Molly

"Student

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Hittepole

Datvahare

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* S-- TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 7, 190!)

Correcting Student Incompetence;
Can Curriculum End Protests?
By TERRY DUNHAM

Assistant Managing Editor
COLLEGE CURRICULUM AND STUDENT
PROTEST, by Joseph J. Schwab, University of
Chicago Press, $4.93.
According to Joseph Schwab, college protests
are the results of "incompetencies" in the thought
processes of students and could be eliminated
by educational changes administered to the faulty
curriculum.
Throughout College Curriculum and Student
Protest, he builds a fascinatingly complete outline for the curriculum he recommends to replace
the present one. It is a program of training HOW
to think, rather than WHAT to think, and though
it is not new in educational philosophy, it is
competently developed and excellently presented
through exciting examples of classroom methods.
His case is compelling.
The unfortunate fact remains that Schwab does
not satisfactorily explain how the greater competency in reasoning will eliminate the current
dissension, or for that matter, dissension at any
time, in any place, and in any society. The flaw
in "Curriculum and Protest" is that if the logical
processes proscribed by Schwab are employed
in analysis of the book, the only conclusion possible is that he has in no way justified his original assertion that it will provide the cure.
It remains to Schwab's credit that such a
great shortcoming is only slightly disconcerting
in its context, the fascinating program itself being
so well presented that the reader sees its usefulness
even if not precisely the usefulness Schwab
envisions and is only slightly bothered by the
author's illusion.
His program would, in fact, reduce conflict
between generations in several ways, though they
are not ways he recognizes. First, the emphasis
on logic and support for any reasoning position
would be beneficial training for student dissidents,
as it would be for every individual, and would
enable youthful protesters to more articulately
present organized complaints demands, requests,
what have you in a fashion much more difficult
to resist or ignore.
And once the first generation of students trained
under the new curriculum was of an age that it

e7"

was in charge

of the institutions of higher

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JOGLmJ

learn-

ing, the dialogue between students and administrators would be an exciting and productive affair.
In his confidence in the administrator's point
of view and in the rightness of. their positions,
Schwab is forced to a few awkward stances.
One occurs when he describes how seniors in the
roles, in
new curriculum would assume intcm-lik- e
which they would quietly observe school administrators carrying out their functions and discuss
with them the reasons for various procedures
and conclusions.
relaThe students would, in these
tionships, have to swear to keep all they observed
within their confidence, he says. The obvious
result is that seniors would either be silenced
for one frustrating year, or successfully administration-trained,
in either case to that latter Roup's
great satisfaction, or else would find themselves
conscience-bounto renege on their agreement in
order to speak out on what they feel must be
revealed.
Schwab's conclusion is faulty because though
the new curriculum and emphasison sound reasoning would facilitate confrontations and accommodations, it is doubtful that all such accommodations would be made by students, as he suggests.
It seems more likely that a great deal of compromise would be made, and perhaps the traditional
but no more carefully reasoned positions of the
administrators might be the ones required to do the
accommodating.
If an administration untrained in the new logic,
or trained in it but unwilling to use it, were to
fail to yield to fully reasoned arguments, the
dissent of bitter youths might be even more severe.
Hopefully we might, instead, come and reason
together.
Most importantly, the work leaves an indelible
impression of sound thought processes: new methods and old principles, exciting classroom techniques and a subtle, yet gripping philosophic
indoctrination. The reader can only come away
remembering rare college courses in which the
most memorable hours spent were in debate
and discussion, and not in lecture, and this,
though an oversimplification, is Schwab's course
of the future.

SCHWAB

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UK Press Release

'Yesterday9 s People9
Now In Paperback
Yesterday's People: Life In Contemporary Appalachia, by Jack
Weller, University of Kentucky Press, paperback, $1.75.
The Appalachian Mountain culture breeds individuals whose
every characteristic resists change and works against, any. efforts
condition.
to help improve their poverty-riddeIn contrast to the middle- class American's emphasis on believe that the mountaineer, on
their "superior" culture,
community, church, and club ac- seeing
the mountaineer is in- will immediately want to share
tivities,
dividualistic to an extreme and it, but nothing could be further
from the truth. Due totheunique
will support only
effects of the mountaineer's enconcerns; he rejects routine and
seeks unpredictable action; is fa- vironment and resultant lifetalistic to a degree that prohibits style, individuals and groups
him from taking any part in de- seeking, to help the millions of
termining his life and goals, and persons in Appalachia often offer
lives within a reference; group programs for change that are
Very nature, to
that merely perpetuates his tra- destined, by their -fail.
:
ditionalism.
Jack Weller, a young Presbymiddle-clas- s
citizens terian
Many
minister, was sent to the
region in 1952 and encountered
the unique, fundamentalist attitudes of the mountain folk to the
established church.
He stayed in the mountains
Just 7 Minutes South on US. 27
and slowly worked to understand
CARTOON STARTS 7:30
OPEN EVERY NIGHT!
the people he was sent to minister to. Yesterday's People: Life
in Contemporary Appalachia, is
NOW SHOWING
the result of his observations;,
'GREATEST STORY EVERTOLD'
and a good book it is..
and
'MATCHLESS'
Reading this book and, perhaps, Harry Caudill's Night
Starts WED. 1st Run! Comes To The Cumberland's
would be far more valuable to UK
students than some of the presently required general studies
courses, and should be required
of anyone who plans to work in
the Appalachian region.
One Of Press's Best
Released by the University of
Kentucky Press in 1965, the book
provides invaluable and interesting insights and had "quite a
remarkable sales record about
MR. TINY TIM
six times our nonnal sales," according to Murrell Boyd, sales
manager of the Kentucky Press.
It has just been released in
paperback edition, and is available at each of the campus bookCo
stores.
with
Terry Dunham
n

self-center-

-

9

flic

Let the sun do its
work on your skin,

TO
i

but put on the

added dash of

col-

orful swimwear and
live it up .this sum
mer in style. We've
gone all out to bring
in the summer togs
to help you do it.
This twosome got
off to an early start.

it...

w

affects
the heart,
the head
and the
gut J, .
Judith Crist
Tod y, NBC-T-

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Sf.rt..

ur-i-

407 S. LIMESTONE

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IIICUUI

Rsleised
255-752-

3

tastman COLOR
HUM IUCI M COUMM UCOIDS

by COMMONWEALTH

INC.
ENTERTAINMENT,
A Division of Common tilt!)

UNITED

United Corp.

a
j

The Kentucky

ernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box
Begun as the Cadet In ltm and
as the Kernel
published
since 11)13. continuously
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail
(8.27
Per copy, from files
S. 10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Pag Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
2330
News Desk
Advertising, Business. Circulation 231f

21

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 7,

1900- -3

5 Students Charged In Theft From Sigma Chi House

By TERRY DUNHAM
Assistant Managing Editor
Five University students were
arrested one week ago Saturday
and charged with grand larceny
after allegedly taking trophies
from the Sigma Chi fraternity
house.
In Police court late last week
Judge WalterTackett complained
of having to deal with what he
called "more or less a prank,"

and told the five he would con- Interfraternity Council adviser
sider dropping the grand larceny Bob Elder said that the fraternity
charges if they worked all day has been "put on notice" that

Saturday at Woodland Park.
The five are: Edward S. Cross-fiel21; Morgan C. Atkinson,
20; John Mcihaus, 23; and Frank
Burke Jr., 21, all of Louisville,
and Mieczyslaw Kowalewski, 21,
Saginaw, Mich.
Three of the five are members
of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.

such actions will not be toler-

ated in the future.

d,

He emphasized, however, that

the theft was the action of individuals and was not considered
a "fraternity action." The other
two individuals are inactive members of other fraternities.
Most of the Sigma Chi mem

bers were in Catlinburg, Tenn.,
the night of the theft, for the
chapter's spring fonnal. Several
members had remained home,
however, to study for an embryology exam, Elder said, and
called police when they saw persons running from the house with
the trophies. Police caught the
five students several blocks away.
Among the trophies was the
Little Kentucky Derby trophy

CLASSIFIED ADS
CUssltted

adrtrtlitnr
tn a
t4 plaoadprepaid basis anly. Ada mar
lir
Maodar tbraafb
will b

parson
Friday ar by mall, payment Inelaiad.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Raan

WANTED Female roommata-rfately, to share furnisjifd
apt. Near campus. (Jan
for Carol.

Joarnallsra Bldf.

111,

Kates ara $1.25 for 20 wordi, $8.00
far tbrea conaceallva Insertion! of tba
aama ad af 20 wordi, and $S.7tt par
wnk, 20 words. la 11 a.m.
Tba deadline
tba day
prior to pabltcatton. Na advartlseincnt
may clta race, religion or national
orffin aa a qualification for ranttnf
rooms or for employment.

aSMlOt

5.

of

HONDA 50, low mUlage; good
condition; 150 mpg; excellent campus
transportation. Best drier. Call
7A3t

1966

255-52-

FOR SALE 1967 Austlnrfealey 3000
Mark III; excellent comruion; studded
snow tires; Tonnfcajr cover; radio,
Cali799-697-

after

5.
7A5t

ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR
CHOICE EACH

3A5t

r

TTPTNO
MANUSCRIPTS TYPED
law
themes,
dissertatlootf;
60c pp, 5c per cafbon. IBM
ribbon. Bill Given.
9 onlyl

Theses,
briefs,
carbon

After

7.

28M10t

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WW

SUNDAY

FUTRELL-GWIN-

N

ership, knowledge.
April 9.

1Z

Cooperation, lead
VoteJVcan'esday,

'Alt

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnns

STUDENT
OWNED

AND
OPERATED!

i

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n

tt

in

iltoad Kunner enterprises
East High

890

H

Chevy Chase

(Next to Begfoy Orvgs)

n

in
in
:n

p.m. to interview and test male applicants
for summer cmpldymcnr. Applicants must be
willing to travel .Kentucky and Southern Indiana during Jure July and August. The
position will pay $80.00 per week salary plus
travel expenses (meals lodging and transportation). Please contact your placement
officer for time and place of interview.

5.

,

7A5t

will be on campus from ,9:00 a.m. to 4:00

FOR SALE 1965 Allstate Mo6rscoot-e- r
(VESPA) 123 cc. Excellent condition; very low mlleafvfl50 or best
7A5t
offer. Call Diane at

9

fpply now for
summer or
McDonald's, 771

On THURSDAY, APRIL 10, a representative

tn.

$2495.

ork

summer Employment

FOR SALE Mink Boa or collar, worn
lA5t
twice. $33. Night.
MUST SELL practically jefw portable
typewriter; has had very little use;
good condition; iwitn ' case. Phone
3A3t
after 3

heater;

8.

254-32-

If

299-10-

MISCELLANEOUS
IT TAKES ALL KINDS to make an
organization effective. Grafuate Student Association G.SJCi will meet
Wednesday, April 94$. 7:30 In Room
213 Kastle Hail
plan for the future and elaVt representatives
at
to be there.
4A3t
large. Plan

0.

FEMALE communicatiorts major wants
roommate starting Iay 15. New efficiency near LatoSBldg. Call
4A3t
after 7 p.m.

FOR SALE Wedding gown-iiz- e
9,
white, empire walstj lorfg round
train, mantilla veil. G$l6fter S p.m.
lA5t
2.

ask
lA5t

IS

FOR SALE 1968 Honda 300 peT: wind
shield; luggage rack sinpiuded. Call

IS

one-be- d
0,

ROOMMATE WANTED May or June.
To share apartment with working
girl. Female, early .twenties. Furnished apartment yrth pool.

FOR SALE

1.

FOR RENT
FOR RENT Modern efficacy apartments, completely aAKconditioned.
Close to campufcSee at 318 Tran4A5t
sylvania Pk.

MALE FEMALE
part or full time-wafter summer
New Circle Road.

medi-

n

last year's competition. The trophy has been impounded by Lexington Police as evidence, and
Elder said, "We're hoping it can
be returned in time" for this
year's LKD.
Tackett, in offering the alternative "punishment" for the
five, said he would consider the
case again in one month and at
that time decide whether to drop
the grand larceny charge. Grand
larceny is the theft of property
woth more than $100.
The University will also investigate the theft as a violation
of the Student Code, Elder said.

ponononnoononi

JOB OPPORTUNITIES
QUALIFIED STUDENT wanted as
Business Manager, The Kentucky
Kernel for school year 1969-7Apply In person. Room 113B Journalism
3A5t
Bldg.

WANTED

b

captured by the Sigma Chi's in

10 &nit 10 a..ip- -

tn

u

12,pnn
2 o,m.

Weekdays

Vcckends

EE A
arid SANDWICHES

m

:n:;

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AT PRICES STUDENTS CAN AFFORD

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CARRV-OU-

DELIVERY

T

DINING ROOM

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south limestone

.

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4

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.

we've got bell bottoms (and)
pipes, papers, posters, postercards, blackllghts, buttons, body shirts, body paint, bangles, beads. Junk, jewelry, Incense, burners, celestial lights,
paper flowers, leather goods (purses, belts, hairbands, tailholders, earrings, sandals), strobe candles, the only blacklight room In central kentutky
and freaky clerks.

the store
157 south lime
12:30-5:3- 0

p.m.

n
n

n
n
n

n
n
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in

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flanDonoooDonoanonqnnnpononooo

the store
157

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* Up-Stat-

Education

e

It would he unpopular almost
anywhere north of Lexington to
criticize the state's decision to
Northern Kentucky State
College (NKSC), and, indeed, few
prominent leaders have ventured
to do so. The Kentucky Post, the
area's largest newspaper, has created a bandwagon on which most
citizens have been only too happy
to ride. The paper and local leaders have argued that the area, one
of the three largest in population
in the state, has gone for too long
without a
four-yecollege, thus forcing area youth
to go without an education. The
overcrowded Northern Kentucky
Community College, one of the
first such UK extensions, is inadequate to serve the area, they
have maintained.
During the last session of the
legislature, the local leaders found
an open ear, and the General Assembly passed a bill establishing,
on paper, NKSC. The state Council
on Public Higher Education recommended in January that NKSC
be given control over the Northern
Community College in Covington,
and late last month a Campbell
County site was announced for
the new college. NKSC is fast becoming a reality.
What seems to have been forgotten, at least by Northern
during this whole affair,
is the overall effect the creation of
NKSC will have on the state's
higher education system.
At present, the state is supporting fully four regional universities, Kentucky State College at
Frankfort and UK and its 15 community colleges. And in addition,
the University of Louisville is to

enter the state system for budgeting purposes by next year. NKSC,
with an estimated $10 million beginning price tag (to be requested
from the 1970 General Assembly),
will make the fight for higher education tax dollars even more vigorous than in the past. It has been
reported already that 1970 may be
a lean year for higher education,
since 1968 was not, and the lower
education system is reportedly seeking revenge.
A clamp on state funds can
mean only one thing: students will
suffer. Either needed expansion will
be halted, at student expense, or
tuition, dorm rates and other fees
will be increased, also at the student's expense. And this is what
the Northern Kentucky crusaders
seem to have most neglected.
Money going to NKSC might otherwise have gone to make education
better and cheaper for them. The
community college could have improved to grant a better and, perhaps, cheaper education to area
students, and those students would
have entered a main UK campus
featuring low tuition, dorm and
other fee rates.
If one considers the possibility of these increased rates for all
state schools, NKSC included, the
expenses of traveling to and from
the NKSC campus (it is a good
15 miles from many points in Boone
County to the campus) and the
normal living expenses one encounters either in Lexington or Covington, NKSC might not provide the
cheap education the crusaders have
said it will.
There is little that can be done
now but mourn. Maybe the whole
state really should do just that.

sh

state-supporte- d,

ar

Ken-tuckian-

s,

WftL

if.

.

'Get A Goat And Call It Lyndon!'

Tie Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

University of Kentucky

1894

MONDAY, APRIL 7, 1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
.
Lee B. Becker, Editor-in-Chi,
, ,;
M. Mendes III, Managing Editor
Darrell Rice, Editorial Page Editor
Guy
Tom Derr, Business Manager
Jim Miller, Associate Editor
Howard Mason, Photography Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Jack Lyne and Larry Kelley, Arts Editors
Frank Coots,
Dana Ewell,
Terry Dunham,
Janice Barber
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors
ef

;

...

By BOB BROWN

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions expressed in this regular column are those
of its author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Kernel.
Student
Government
Wednesday's
election has attracted an unusually weak
list of representative candidates. Of the
33 candidates who seem to be running
there are no more than six whom I feel
are qualified to fill the 16 seats. I have
attempted to find as much objective information about these people as I could.
The opinions I offer are biased. I have no
personal acquaintances in the representative contest, but the candidates I recommend have an unfair advantage because
they possess something the others lack,
qualifications or potential.
It is seldom that SG observers agree
on anything, but this spring it seems to be
the consensus of opinion that the best
of the candidates is Jerry Legere. Presently an SG representative, Legere has learned
from the experience, showing himself to
be one of the more mature, productive
and conscientious members of the assembly.
There being no other incumbents
so I'll move to the
worthy of
unprovens, keeping in mind that the only
thing worse than no record is a poor one.
Bill Dawson heads the slate here. After
serving actively in his community college,
Dawson has shown interest mostly in the
information of the YAF chapter on campus. He is, however, one of the few progressive conservatives on campus, and he
advocates a responsible type of representation that is badly needed.
A SAH candidate, Buck Pennington,
offers the most thorough campaign. The
programs Pennington has proposed liave
definite advantages for dorm residents.
Even though hedoesn'tconcentrateonthe

primary issue of compulsory housing, Pennington urges better hours for women
and a closer connection between SG and
dorm governments so the dorm resident's
views of major issues will be
better-represente-

.

d.

I feel another SAR candidate, James
Embry, is worthy of election. Embry
has distinguished himself to some extent
as (former) president of the Black Student
Union, but his potential has not been
fully explored. At a time when the University community must be receptive to
the black student and his needs, it seems
particularly appropriate that a qualified
representative be elected that can accurately express these attitudes.
In attitudes to being a keenly intelligent and perceptive man, Lyn Montgomery has shown a genuine concern for
students and their problems that sltould
be rewarded by election.
A number of people who should know
have categorized Miss Carol Runyon as
an exceptional SG candidate. She seems
to have the leadership ability to accomplish rational objectives, and the levelheadedness to provide a badly needed
balance for the assembly.
Due to a conflict of interest inherent
in the fact that a vice presidential candidate is my fraternity brother, I will limit
my comments to the presidential race.
One of the four candidates, Jim Williams has refused to take the campaign
seriously. Too much ink has been spilled
already on crack-potThorn Pat Juul has eliminated himself from serious contention. Juul has
supplemented an every thing- campaign with sensationalism, unfounded charges, personal vulgarities
aimed at the other candidates and the
objective outlook of a
s.

After appearing to embrace wholeheartedly the radical faction, Juul realized
the importance of the Greek vote and
cast himself as the savior of the system.
Of course, the independents and dorm
residents are offered their cake as well.
The sensationalism of Juul's campaign
is obvious, the unfounded charges legion,
the personal attacks unfit for. print and
the pettiness apparent to everyone.

their sentiments and a logical formula- -'
tion of their arguments. Futrell obviously
fits the formula.

A president is needed who will serve
competently and enthusiastically for the
next year. After the excitement of the election has died and the mundane work
begins, a less disciplined executive might
tend to enjoy his office more and execute
it less. In addition to being the most
disciplined person I know, Futrell has the
dedication to keep the executive office
at a high pitch the

Which leaves the Carver-Futreequation. Their platforms are nearly equal,
their aims are worthy and their arguCarver rose fast, using a joke for his
ments are sound. Carver's sincerity balbasis. I fear he could fall just as rapidances Futrell's style, and Futrell's exly with the joke being on the students.
perience cancels Carver's freedom of postelection action.
Futrell has fulfilled every job he has unIf reality were a vacuum, it would dertaken with the same precise, flexible
matter little which side of the equa- effectiveness.
For these reasons I feel Tim Futrell
tion one chose, but such is not the case.
In our changing atmosphere the students is the candidate best able to effect, any
greatly need an articulate mouthpiece for meaningful programs for the students.
ll

year-roun-

d.

o4(ernel Forum: the readers write
On The Conspiracy
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I concede the right of the Lexington
Herald-Leade- r
to advertise in the Kernel, but the alleged "Communist Rules
for Revolution" published in the issue
of March 23 is too fatuous to pass without
comment. Having studied Communist literature for some 25 years, I am not unacquainted with the peculiar idiom employed by the party faithful. It is obvious
that the statement was written by a
political illiterate whose notion of a "Red
plot" is primitive indeed. Most members

of the John Birch Society would qualify
nicely. If the document was actually
"Captured inDusseldorfGennany? May,
1919, by Anned Forces"
which I doubt
it was probably composed by one of
those
fanatics who later joined
Hitler's Nazi movement. I think the
s
"save the youth from
corruption" philosophy can better be
served without insulting the intelligence
of the university community with a fabrication of this type.
right-win-

g

Herald-Leader'-

Robert D. Warth
Professor of History

* i

ss n
i

Page

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TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April 7, 19G9

LPC Evaluates Good Friday Peace Vigil

By FRANCES DYE

Kernel Staff Writer
The Lexington Peace Council
met last night to evaluate the
demsuccess of an
onstration Friday and to formulate plans for an
programs.
About 75 persons attended the
Good Friday vigil at the Selective
Service office on Southland Drive,
council President Jay West brook
anti-militar-

y

said.

The clergy-leprogram, conof responsive readings,
sisting
hymns and prayers, was attended
d

have not publicly taken before.
by college and high school students, businessmen and members Also it let those in the Selective
of the clergy. Members of the Service office know that people
are concern cd."
news media were not present,
A prepared statement, signed
he noted.
"Since it wasn't covered by by all present, was presented to
the news media, the greatest ef- local and state Selective Service
fect it had was to pull together officials, Westbrook said.
At last night's meeting, counpeople who had similar views
on the war and the Selective cil members also voted to establish a joint committee with SDS
Service. We didn't have the program for the sake of publicity (Students for a Democratic Sobut for the exchange of views. ciety) concerning HOTC.
"I think it was worthwhile
Thursday the UK chapter of
because it made a number of SDS voted to submit a proposal
local clergy take a stand they to the Arts and Sciences council

to renovate HOTC programs on Center Friday from 7 to 10 p.m.
and Saturday from 9 to 12 a.m.
the campus.
SDS proposals call for removal and 1 to 4 p.m.
of academic credit from HOTC
Subjects of study will include
programs and the division of the draft law, alternatives tomil-itarservice, and procedural and
programs into academic and exe