xt72542j7073 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72542j7073/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19181121  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1918 1918 2012 true xt72542j7073 section xt72542j7073 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
--

KENTUCKY GOES OVER TOP

"FLU" AT PATT HALL

EIGHT COLD STARS

Three cases of influenza have brok-tout In as many days at Patterson
Hall; none of the cases are considered
serious. The sick girls, Julia Burbank,
Weakley
and Frances
Katherine
Marsh, are quarantined in the annex.
In order to prevent new cases, Patterson and Maxwell Hall girls are prohibited from coming to town until the
situation Is Improved.

ON

University Doubles Quota
And Then Goes 20
Per Cent. More
$2,538.23 RAISED, S.A.T.C

i

What's the matter with Kentucky?
It's all right; especially when It conies
to showing the boys "over there" how
WILDCATS WILL TACKLE
their old University stands "behind
them; especially when money is needed to prove to the men that we are
proud of their licking the Hun.
The slogan "Let's make it $4,000"
in reference to the United War Work
Drive, is ancient history, as the $4,000
mark was reacht last Saturday and
left behind as the figures crept to
100 per cent, 121 per cent and 125 per
cent, above the University's quota of
$2,500. Early Saturday morning a tele
gram was sent to headquarters at Louisville, stating that Kentucky would
raise her quota 100 per cent, but even
that did not seem to be able to stop
the enthusiastic subscriptions which
continued to pour in to Dr. Boyd's office.
On October 5th,

a conference dinner

UNIV. SERVICE FLAG being remade by Miss Lameaux and

School Honors Memory of
Those Who Paid Supreme
Sacrifice.

OUR HONOR ROLL
PRANK

Miss Clara White of the Home Econo
mlcs Department will soon be com
pleted. It is desired that the flag
may be displayed In chapel at the end
of the week, when the British Educa
tional Mission visits the University.
The flag has been remade now for the
third time. The number of stars has
increased from 995 to 1007 and is dig
nifled by eight gold stars.

W. HERNDON,

Stoll Field.

For the first time this season the
football fans of the University and
city will have a chance to see the
Wildcats perform on Stoll Field when
they meet the strong University of St.
Louis, team here Saturday. It will be
the first time that Kentucky has ever
met St. Louis, and a large crowd is
expected to greet the Westerners.
The game with Center which was
postponed on account of the flu ban,
will be played on December 7, and a
game with Wabash has been scheduled
for Thanksgiving Day.
Fighting under a heavy handicap,
Coach Gill and his squad have turned
out a football team that the University may well be proud of.. The defeat of Indiana was one that should be
set down among the great football vicThe Wildcats
tories of Kentucky.
have unusual obstacles to overcome
this year. On account of the flu ban
they were compelled to meet Vander-bll- t
after only a few days' practice,
and were defeated thru no fault of
their own. It has been no easy task
for the men to devote the little time
they have off from their military duties to football, but they have responded nobly and the team which will face
St. Louis Saturday will be a hard one
to beat.
It is up to the University to show
Its appreciation of the team, and to
give its support by turning out in a
body Saturday and rooting for the
champion football team of Kentucky.

was held at the Phoenix Hotel for the
colleges of Kentucky. Those present
from the University of Kentucky, were
Professor Melcher, State chairman for
the campaign, Judge Chalkley, Professors Freeman and Frankel; Richard
Duncan and John Davis, who represented the Y. M. C. A. and Mildred
Collins and Mildred Graham, who upheld the Y. W. end of it. At that meeting the quotas were flxt for all Kentucky colleges, the University of Kentucky quota being $2,000, which was
$500 more than was raised last year.
However, $2,000 sounded insignificant
to the delegates when they heard
Berea accept a quota of $4,000, so
with enthusiasm mixt with doubt, Kentucky raised the $500 to read $2,500,
amid the applause of the convention.
Fired with the spirit of the movement
the Y. W. representatives decided to
forego picture shows for one month
to raise their share (which decision
was aided by the flu.)
Added to the $2,500 to be raised was
$300 for the Kentucky cottage at
Blue Ridge, North Carolina, where
Y. M. and Y. W. delegates each spend
FLU CAUSES DEATH
ten days in the spring plannig assoOF WM. H. SIMRALL
ciation work. When the flu appeared,
the campaign was forgotten for a time,
William H. Synrall, of Shelbyville, a
but work was being done by the com- member of Company D, Engineers,
mittee in preparation for the opening Section A, S. A. T. C, died at 1:15
of school.
o'clock Thursday at the University of
When the campaign opened on Nov. Kentucky Hospital.
His death was
11, things began to happen. The girls caused by pneumonia following inwere greeted at Patterson Hall by Gen- fluenza.
eral Pershing, who smiled at them as Sergeant Willis of Company F, was
they opened the front door. In the detailed to accompany the body to
recreation hall "dough nuts" and blue Shelbyville and attend the funeral.
triangles
attrackt their attention, Mr. Slmrall enlisted in the S. A. T. C.
while they found the dining room lined October 4, 1918.
with women workers and boys, who
The Kerner, on behalf of the student
were to be "kept smiling." On the body, extends its sympathy to Mr.
(Continued on Page Five.)
SlmraU's family.

on

American Universi
ties.

DR. McVEY

HEREWE ARE AGAIN
RIGHT ON OUB MARK

EMMETT CULLEN,
HOWARD

KINNE,

WILLIAM

SIMRALL.

Eight gold stars among the blue
ones on the service flag of the University represent the eight sons of Kentucky who gave their lives for the
cause of Democracy. Some fell in
action on the fields of France, others
met their fate on the high seas, one
died In a training camp in this country, during the last hours of the struggle. Each has given his life for his
country and the University will ever
honor the memory of her sons who
paid the supreme sacrifice, that right
might triumph.
Coffee was killed in action in
the fighting In the Dardanelles in November, 1915. He had enlisted soon

Frank

after war was declared, and was the
first University of Kentucky man to
fall victim to the Huns.
Stanley Smith in September, 1917,
was swept off a torpedo boat, during
a storm in midocean. He was a student in the College of Law in 1916-1Lewis Washington Herndon was a
member of that body of American engineers who, when the Hun hordes
swept thru the British lines in their
great effort in March, 1918, threw
down their picks and axes, shouldered
riesfl, and stepped Into the breech to
halt that drive toward Paris. There
was a break In the trenches. Volunteers were called to cross an open
space between the two lines. The
commanding officer lead the boys and
immediately behind him came young
Herndon. A Hun sharp shooter's bullet aimed at the leader struck the
young engineer.

Men Sent to Training Camps
Allowed to Return to S.
A. T. C. Immediately
"Off again, on again, gone again,"
applies to the University as well as
the immortal Finnegan, for the year
1918.

With the cessation of hostilities the
universities of our country went back
to their ordinary curriculum, and a
bewildered faculty and student body,
are now starting the year anew.
Two terms, ending in March and
June, respectively, are now the order,
and S. A. T. C. men have
changing the personnel of classes entirely. S. A. T. C. men continue their
drill, however, and will remain in barracks thruout the year. No more men
will be sent to Officer's Training
Camps.
President Frank L. McVey, of the
University of Kentucky, has received
the following telegram from Bruce R.
Payne, Regional Director, Students'
Army Training Corps, who is stationed
at Nashville, Tennessee:
"Committee on Education requests
me to say that soldiers who have been
transferred from S. A. T. C. to Central
Officers' Training School or to Officers' Training School under control of
chiefs of Staff Corps and Department
Chiefs of Artillery and Field Artillery
will be allowed the option of transfer
back to the S. A. T. C, provided they
return to college immediately. I suggest that you wire this information
immediately to any students who have
been transferred from your unit."
President McVey directed that a telegram be sent to all such students signed In his name, as follows:
"Students in officers' training camps
may be transferred to S. A. T. C. They
must return to university at onco if
they wish to have benefit of the
transfer."

Merritt Powell, of Richmond, was
gassed whllo in active service. He returned to America, but later died from
the effects of the poison. Clarence
Gaugh, a graduate of the engineering
This telogram was sent to eighteen
collego in 1917, died October 20, 1918,
at Fort Benjamin Harrison, of In- boys who have gono from the University of Kentucky to such training
fluenza.
Emmott Cullon, of Flemingsburg, a camps, but no reply had boon received
law graduate of 1916, died of pneu- from any of them yesterday.

They uro as named below and stamonia in France this fall. He wus editor of the Law Journal while here, and tioned at the following places:
in his senior year business mauager
Camp Hancock, Georgia: Hiram T.
of the Kentuckian.
Adair and John T. Council.
(Continued on rage Six.)

m

IS ESCORT'
I'lV

4'

,

CLARENCE GAUGH,

First Game on

:

Seeks Closer
Between English and1

'

,

MERRITT POWELL,

Student Body Plans to Turn
Out to Support Team in

British Educational Mission

COFFEE,

STANLEY SMITH,
LOUIS

ST.

SERVICE FLAG REMADE DISTINGUISHED VISITORS
The 'University, Service Flag that is

n

IN UNITED WAR DRIVE

N

No. 3

LEXINGTON, JCY., NOVEMBER 21, 1918

VOL

(Continued from Page Two.)

BRITISH MISSION

PROGRAM
'

Arrival Southern Station, 10:30
a. m.
Introduction to committee.
Motor ride to Shakertown 11:30
a. m.
Luncheon, Shakertown Inn 12:15
a. m.
Review of S. A. T. C. University
Campus 3:30 p. m.
Tea, President's house 4 p.m.
Informal dinner and confer- ence, Phoenix Hotel, 7 p. m.
Departure
Southern
Station
10:45 a. m., Friday, Novem- 4
ber 22, 1918.

4

I

'

The visit of the British Educational
Mission scheduled to arrive in
ton at 10:30 Thursday

Lexing--

morning,

,

is

the standing event on the week's calOwing to
endar at the University.
the fact that it was necessary for The
Kernel to go to press before the arrival of the distinguished party, a detailed story of the program of the day
could not be given.
The mission will be met by a committee of five, composed of President
McVey, chairman, Deans Anderson and
Melcher, W. D. Funkhouser and Enoch
Grehan, representing the University
and about thirty citizens of Lexington. Following are members of the
Mission:
Dr. Arthur Everett Shipley,
of the University of Cambridge, Master of Christ's College and
Reader in Zoology.
Sir Henry Miers,
of
the University of Manchester and
Sir
Professor of Crystallorgraphy.
Henry Miers stopped over at the
of Cincinnati to study the system of municipal schools.
Unl-vorsl-

The Rev. Edward Mowburn Walker,
Fellow, Senior Tutor, and Librarian
of 'Queen's College, Member of the
Hebdomadal Council, Oxford University.
Sir Henry Jones, Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of Glasgow.
Dr. John Joly, Professor of Geology
Trinity College,
and Mineralogy,
Dublin.
The mission is on a tour of the
United States to look into conditions
affecting colloges and universities with
a view of better
between
Euglish and American universities.
It has been some time since the city

* PAGE 2

Heme of Paramount, Artcraft, Goldwyn
end Select Pictures
Rjemember, We Show Only The Best
In cTWoving Pictures
of Lexington has had the honor of en
so distinguished a group as
tfcftt which composes the British Edu
cational mission.

tertalnlng
1.

'After being received by the appoint
ed 'reception committee the party is
scheduled 'for a drive in closed cars to
siakeriown Inn, famous former home
of'the' 'Shakers. The Inn Is situated m
oe'' of'the most picturesque sections
othhk State, 'hear Harrodsburg.
An informal luncheon will be served
there; after which the guests will be
brought back to the University, where
the mission will inspect the S. A. T. C.
on the campus in front of the Administration Building. After inspection, the
program calls for an Informal meeting
at President McVey's residence,
where tea wll lbe served and a conference of .University authorities held to
discuss closer
of British
American universities.

It had been planned to take the trip
to the famous Hereford farm of Col.
E. H. Taylor, Jr., but because of the
prevailing epidemic which so seriously disconcerted the farm forces making it impossible to exhibit to the dis
tinguished visitors the
cattle herded there, the Shakertown
drive was substituted. A banquet had
also been planned for Thursday evening, but upon advice of the local health
authorities this function also had to
be canceled.
world-fame-

d

Instead of the banquet, however, a
few University men will dine with the
mission Thursday at the Phoenix
Hotel, Thursday evening.
The following have been designated
as the committee in charge of the
American tour: President Donald J.
Cowling, chairman; Professor William
H!, Schofleld, Secretary;
Dean Herman
V. Ames, 'Dean James B. Angell, Professor Frank Aydelotte, Dr. Samuel P.
Ctpen, President Frederick C. Ferry,
Professor J. F. Foakes Jackson, President McVey.
The following compose the reception
committee:
Rev. Benjamin J. Bush, R. C. Stoll,
Dr. F .H. Clark, Desha Breckinridge,
S. H. Halley, Thomas C McDowell,
Senator Thomas A. Combs, Moses A.
Kaufman, Charles Kerr, J. W. Stoll,
A. O. Whipple, E. L. Gillis, Frank
Jones, Philip Straus, Dr. Joseph Bryan,
Professor E. F. Farquhar, Dr. McVey,
Dean Anderson, Dean Melcher, William Simms, Judge R. L. Stout, A. T.
Leonard, Charles H. Berryman, Dean
Thomas P. Cooper, Dean P. P. Boyd,
Dean W. T jLafferty, Prof. A. C.
Dr. J. W. Pryor, Major E. B. Ellis, J. T. Roche, Dr. Crossfleld, Asa
Jewell, Harry Giovannola, Judge F.
A. Bullock, Dr. W. D. Funkhouser, Professor Enoch Grehan, Capt. H. N. Roy-deHon. W. F. Klalr, Senator Arch
L. Hamilton, John Skain, Wallace
Muir.
President McVey left Monday for St.
Louis, where he will join the mission
and return with it to Lexington
Zem-b'rd-

STRAND
OPEN

ADMISSION

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE
OFFERS SHORT COURSES

Concentrated Information is
Offered to Farmers and
Farmerettes Free of
" Charge

10c.

Vfusic By The Strand
Appropriate
Hawaiian Concert Company

Pieces 10
The Best Aggregation In The South
10

10 A. M. to 11 P. M.

and 20c., War Tax Included

VOCATIONAL UNIT
ADDREST BY DEAN
Th men of Section B, the vocational
training contingent at the University
of Kentucky, in
recently completed
the-ne-

machine shop
on 'the carapw

were addressed by Dean F. Paul

An-

If We Tell You Wei Do ''Thus and Sa"
You'll Find We Always Do Jt
--

Our clothes cleaning, pressing and repairing experience has been such' that waea e
promise to make you look better than the
ast, ,we 'km) tfctt' 'BfettfcM 'fey "Maktag
Good."

HOLD US TO

Q0R
PROMISE

Becker Dry Qeahihg Co.

1

Beginning Novemoer 25, the Agrl
cultural College of the University of
Kentucky will offer to the farmers of
Kentucky a series of short courses,
wliich will aid the farmers to better
qualify themselves for their work.
Each course will be on some particular
branch of farming, and so concentrated that it will be within the reach of
every one In Kentucky, who Is inter
ested In the work.
One subject at a time will he offered, the chosen subject being fully
discust for two weeks, at the end of
which time an excellent knowledge of
the course will have been obtained.
This work is offered absolutely free
by the University, and the courses
will be repeated two or three times a
year. In this way every one can become a member of these classes, and
crowding will be prevented. Permission to attend must be obtained at
least one week before the time the
farmer wishes to attend from Thomas
Cooper, dean of the Agriculture College.
These courses embrace those intendfor farmers, others, for women,
and some in which both men and women are directly interested. The following courses will be offered:
Soils and crops, farm management,
horticulture,
animal feeding, dairy
manufactures, poultry, farm tractors,
live stock Judging, killing and curing
meat, marketing, bee keeping, injurious insects, animal disease, plant diseases, dressmaking, millinery, remodeling clothes, planning meals, home
cooking and table serving, meats and
meat substitutes.
ed

derson of the College of Engineering,
who outlined the future policy of the
government toward the contingent

Corh'ar'LIMKSTONB

621-- y

HIOH

un-

der the hew conditions brought about
by the armistice.
The men of the contingent who have
not been given farm furloughs will
probably be kept here until demobilization, it is thought by the officers,
and Dean Anderson told the men that
the University will endeavor to place
each one of them in a position where
they will be most useful when they
are discharged. He also described the
advantages that they will have in civil
life as the result of the course of
training they have received at the University and the military instruction
they had been given, saying that they
will be able to make much more of
opportunities that come to them because of the eight weeks spent in Lexington.

Want
IF yoli can bethe best pipe
'ihricle, you
can get it in a W D p
'to $6. If you Want the best
genuine French Briar that
as little as 75 cents will buy,
you can get it in a W D C.
C-u-

American made, in all sizes
and styles, and sold at the
best shops.

No man ever had a better

pipe than this one. Carefully selected genuine
French Briar, a sterling
ring and vulcanite bit.
hand fitted and finished
by an expert
WM. DEMUTH & CO., New York
World's Largett Pipe Manufacturer

The talk was not in the nature of a
farewell as the men are expected to
be kept here some time, but was an explanation of what the armistice will
mean to them.
Captain H. N. Royden, commandant,
is asking for volunteers for overseas
police duty from Companies A and B.
which make up the vocational training
contingent, and Company F, the headquarters company.
The ladies of Calvary Baptist Church
sent to the soldiers in the hospital at
Camp Buell a nice Sunday dinner, consisting Of lamb roast, chicken broth,
biscuits, rolls, tapioca, gelatine, cus
tard, cookies, pies, grape juice, preserves and jellies.

Detailed information will be sent to
any one.

Captain A. K. Chambers, inspector
for the S. A. T. C, returned yesterday
from Washington, after being called
BARRACKS GOSSIP
there on official business. Captain
Lieut. Earl R. Stevens and Lieut Chambers expects to be sent south in
K. R. Cullen appeared on the campus the immediate future and is only here
last Saturday with their clothes part awaiting orders.
ly torn off, their faces and hands
Sixteen men will go to Cincinnati to
skinned, and a decided limp. The of
ficers naturally
surrounded
them take examinations for the aviation serselves with mystery, as to the cause. vice. Pilots, observers and maneuverOne thing Is certain, however, they ing officers will be selected from those
have not been In battle for the war is found qualified.
over.
Dame rumor says that Saturday afternoon a green flivver Was seen to
shoot down Winslow street, and upset
its dignity at the corner of Limestone
and Winslow.

Prop

C. R. McGbughejr,
Phone

HERE WE ARE
(Continued From Page One.)

Fort Monroe, Virginia: Joseph H.
Bailey; Lawrence F. Bischof; Horace
Col. J. G. Scugham, a member of the B. Clark; William R. David; Harry Lee
Artillery Division of the Ordnance De- Fremd; Charles Franklin Johnson and
partment, made an unofficial visit to William B. Thompson.
Camp Taylor, Kentucky; Clyde R.
In a recent psychological examina- the barracks last week. Col. Scugham
graduated from "Kentucky" in the Blakem; Thomas D. Chenault; Joe R.
tion given by Professor R. D. Cornell,
of the University of Kentucky, for test- class of 1900, from the College of En- Cambron; James Robert Hughes;
ing the mental capacity of the young gineering. He was a member of the James B. Hughes and William Justus
Jackson.
men of the S. A. T. C. unit, the highest Sigma Chi fruternity.
was made by Arthur Cameron,
Camp Grant, Illinois: Em 11 D. Choate
mark
of Lexington. Of a possible two hunTo terms that are considered and Lucius M. Hammonds.
Camp Pike, Arkansas: Henry E.
dred points, he made one hundred and synomynous at the barracks are S. A.
ninety-seven- .
T. C. and S. O. L.
Grehan.

Special Selling I
f

on

l Jnifnrms
at

330 and $40
THUS WEEK

Full Line of Navy
and Army Hats,
Shoes, Shirts,

Etc

Graves, Cox & Co.
"THE MILITARY SHOF"

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Cnptnln H. N. Hoyden, Btnto examining officer for officers' trnlnlns camp,
has been notified Hint tlio Adjutant
General Iibh cancelled calls for candidates to go to tlio Infantry Training
Schools at Camp Fremont, California,
Captain Hoyden will receive no moro
applications, and those that have been
sent In will bo returned to applicants.

pany I).

tant

It

Is

PAGE 3

probable that no assis-

ant Tapley.

THE

Company F, the hendquarters
pany, Ih being disbanded and the

MARTIN &
STOCKWELL'S
RESTAURANT

L. H. BELL

will bo appointed to aid Lieuten-

COLLEGE

FRUIT STORE

ALL THE DELICACIES

mem-

bers sent back to the companies from
which thoy wcro transferred. The company, of which Lieutenant Earl H.
Lieutenant Mark Taploy, who has Stevens, musketry instructor for tho
been serving as assistant adjutant at camp, Is In charge, was formed a
the camp, has been made ndjutant to month ago when men were called back
succeed Lieutenant William D. Marx-son- , from furloughs to fill calls for officers'
who will take command of Com training camps.

OF THE

SEASON

We cater to college patrons

com-

115 S.

Limestone.

Lexington, Ky.

FRUITS, CANDIES, CIGARS AND TOBACCOS

Matthew

A.

Mangione

Progressive Shoe Hospital
My work and prices always

UNIVERSITY VIEWS

Prepare Yourself
For Business

keep me busy
140 South Limestone
Shoes repaired while you

COLLEGE NOVELTIES

wait

Athletic Goods

FOUNTAIN PENS

FOR

While you are pursuing your regular College studies.
Our afternoon and evening classes offer splendid opportunities for men and women of State University and
many students are now enrolled here.
We court investigation.
booklet, "The Fugazzi Way
Ask for our
Leads to the Highest Positions."
12-pa- ge

Business

ol

Fugazzi school

Hay Hardware Co.

i

233

WEST

118 North Upper

123

Kaufman

Clothing Co

Because it has a distinctive snap and style about it
that pleases them. We have a large assortment of highest quality woolens in Suitings and Overcoatings in hundreds of snappy patterns ready for your inspection. Come
in and get acquainted.

Military Headquarters

SUITS AND OVERCOATS MADE TO MEASURE

to $35.00

We have long been known as headquarters for
Military Equipment in Central Kentucky

TAILORING

CO.

ARMY UNIFORMS

145 West Main Street.

ARMY OVERCOATS
ARMY RAIN COATS

BARBER SHOP

TWO MOTHERS

Caden Drug Co.

street

OURj TAILORING

JUSTRIGHT

SHORT

PHARMACISTS
Lexington, Ky.
Main and Lime
Both Phones

college Men Like

$22.50

West Main Street
Look foe the Irrn Dog
139

Universiiy Book store

Principal

MISS IRENE FUGAZZI,
MRS. L. V. JONE8, Asst. Principal

FALL AND WINTER

FLANNEL SHIRTS

HOUND THE CORNER FROM UNIVERSITY
ARMY SWEATERS

BOOK STORE

HAIR CUT

35c
15c

SHAVE

ARMY HATS
ARMY GLOVES
ARMY HOSE

t::v chc:3
OLD

CME3

Com It tnd lot m tell
you whit thii nwtnt.
We do'pot cobbU thots,

yit MbuitJ tnm.
W

til

th

famous

GoodyarWclt SiUrti..

Q

1

NEW WAY
SHOE REPAIRING SHOP
SHORT

&

MILL

CANVAS BELTS

0

Copyright 1918 Hart Schafxncr & Mais

ARMY TIES
Out stock is now complete with everything
you may need in the military line.
S.

Everybody EATS at

UNCLE CHARLIE'S

0. s.

"Get Acquainted With Us While in
Town."
Pay Kentucky's Noted Candy Shop
a Visit
HOME MADE CANDY EXCLUSIVELY
Mudo and Sold Only Dy

Schange's Candy Kitchen
115

S. Upper St.,
Main Street.

Just around corner from

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published ovory Thursdny tliruout tho Collego year by the Btudcnt body
of tbc University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the students,
nluinnl and faculty of the Institution.

cheerfulness in this changing order. Everyone here is
working under difficulties these days and The Kernel feels
in spirit
sure that faculty and students will so
and in work that this year mav be the finest ever wit
nessed in our history and may be the beginning of greater
M. H. G.
things to come.

BARBER SHOP
HAIR CUT

28c

Is

Is Issued with a view of furnishing to Its subscribers

SHAVE

1Bc

SHAMPOO

tho offlclnl newspaper of the University.
all the collcgo news
It
of Kentucky, together with a digest of Items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

W. B. MARTIN'S

25c

TONIC
153

18c

8. Limestone St.

Lex., Ky.

SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. FIVE CENTS A COPY
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Poslofflcc ns second-class

THORNTON CONNELL

1

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

,

Mies Eliza Spurrier
Mies Eliza Piggott
I. N. Parrlsli

..

Mir s Katherine Weakley

Gavin Norment
Miss Mildred Graham
Miss Austin Lilly
Miss Virginia Helm Milner
Miss Louise Will
Cecil Heavrin
N. D.

'

Witt

R.J. Raible
Adele Slade

Managing Editor
Associate Editor
Military Editor
"Squirrel Food"
Sporting Editor
"Co ed" Editor
Home Economics
Patterson Hall
Philosophlan
Law
Engineering
Literary Societies
Club Notes

REPORTERS.
H. G. Bryan, Katherlno MeGibben, Frances Marsh, Margaret
Smith, Roberta Blackburn and Margaret McClure.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager
Edwin T. Tapscott
Assistant Business Managers
J. P. Barnes and Carl Dinker

BRITISH MISSION.

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

BP?

EDITORIAL STAFF

5T00JD

PRESCRIPTIONS
4

Private ZImmie Zane, tho Kentucky
WE WONDER
wise owl, of the S. A. T. C, says: "We
know that the Germans didn't meas
There are several things about Patt
ure the length of the war by the GoldA few of
Hall life that perplex us.
en Rule."
them are as follows:
1.

FRESHIE VERSUS "MIGHTY"

Why is it that no one ever asks
M. what girl he wants when

SODA WATER
CANDIES

Join's

Drug store

The Post Office Pharmacy
MAIN & WALNUT

George

young fresh
man came rushing up tne steps oi
the New Chemistry Building at a
pace and arrived at the lecture
room just as "Mighty Alaxson was
closing the door.
"You didn't run fast enough," reprimanded "Mighty."
"I ran fast enough," retorted the
freshle, "but J didn't start in time."
An almost breathless

te'r-rifl- e

he comes to Patt Hall, but instead just
yells up to Fan that George is down

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

stairs?
2.

Would the toast at breakfast not

Becker

bo quite so hard If the bread were cut

thicker?
3.

And,

moreover,

speaking

of

toast, we don't see why Miss Stevens
doesn't give us a demonstration, show-

The University of Kentucky, students and faculty,
ing how to butter two pieces of toast
felicitate themselves upon the fact that the British Eduwith one little block of butter.
cational Mission has elected to do them the honor to visit We sympathize most deeply with the
this institution, examine its curriculum and ascertain its Duke of Wellington, for we know that 4. Since the boys are wearing uniattitude toward and prospective participation in the pro- was a real blow to his pnue ana forms, we have been wondering if Jake
posal to
British and American colleges in fu- satisfaction to see Mr. Thompson Bry- H. will devote as much time to his
ant of the Experiment Station look
ture educational activities.
Patt Hall tailor (Taylor?) as he has
The Mission which is composed of the most outstand- over the President's new office the oth In the past.
ing figures in educational work in the British empire was er day and then hear him remark,
scheduled to arrive in Lexington the same hour this paper "Well, Mr. Patrick, you have very nice 5. Does anybody know the name
was compelled to go to press with its weekly edition, but temporary quarters here. I know you of the little sailor lad whom the night
the Kernel is assured that the pubiisht program of its will be delighted when you get into watchman stoned out of the Patt Hall
yard one night a few weeks ago?
visit will be carried out. It indulges also the hope, in fact your fine new office."
6. Why was it that a certain Patt
the confident belief, that gratifying results will flow from
Hall Junior broke a date with her best
the visit of these distinguished guests of the University. Mary B. (limping into History class)
beau for one afternoon last week just
The coming of the Mission, as we see it and steadfastI just missed killing myself.
so she could beat another Patt Hall
ly hope will be, that with a national figure in American
Virginia S. Too bad.'
Junior out of making a date with a
education at its head in the person of its President, who
sweet little Patt Hall Freshle?
is also a member oi the American committee in charge We hope that 'F. L. U."hling won't
7. Letting alone the future, if everyof the tour of the Mission, this University is henceforth get
the "flu."
to be reckoned with in larger affairs of the Nation in the
body's past and present history were
post war
program.
revealed, we wonder how many anNOTHING LIKE AN
gels there'll be in Patt Hall?
It is a matter also of felicitation that this institution
EXTENSIVE VOCABULARY
been able even within the last few months to send
has
more than a thousand men and women, equipt by vocationSENIORS MEET FRIDAY
al training, to the service of the Government that has Eliza P. (orating in Public Speaking
played so large a part in conjunction with the great nation class about influenza) That
The Senior class will hold a meeting
epidemic
this mission represents in the winning of the greatest war ing and
ji
Friday afternoon at 4:80 in chapel
i
nil worm.
it
Prof. Mabie (disgustedly)
That
m tne nistorv oi trie
years will

Dry Cleaning

Co.
C. R. McGoughey,

Proprietor
WE CLEAN, PRE88 and REPAIR
ABSOLUTELY.

Phone

Cor. Lime and High

621 Y

PHOENIX
TAXI CAB CO
INCORPORATED.

PHONE8

1854-368- 0

h

i

will do, Miss P.

CARRY ON

After four years of tumult, of strife, and of war, the
world has again become quiet, no man's land is silent, and
the nations are at peace. Perhaps America is as unready
for peace as it was for war, but for the universities and
colleges of the country the cessation of hostilities came at
a very opportune moment.
The University of Kentucky is
the S. A.
T. C. men will take regular academic courses rather than
war aims, while the vocational companies have the choice
of either going across, or being demobilized. Courses are
changed; new ones are added; enrollment in the various
classes is increasing and men, who otherwise would be
fighting on Flanders Field or working at home, have the
great opportunity, now that the war is over, of getting a
university education and of helping bring true the dreams
of childhood. True the whole curriculum is changing, true
school continues until June 20. The "Flu" still rages, preventing many from attending classes, the Administration
Building is by no means finisht, the mud on the campus is
still as deep as ever, and the number of Christmas holidays
diminishes every time one hears the rumor, but what of
that.? If these things seem hard and unfair to the students, they are equally hard and unfair to the faculty and
both are to be complimented for their steadiness and

Will you please be Officers for the

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
CITY RATES 50 CENTS

be elected.

Phoenix Hotel Lobby

seated?
With apology to the T. K. B. Family
says:
tho Patt Hall
"Out last night,
Out the night before,
And I'm goin' to go out tonight.
If I never go out no more.
For when I'm out, I'm as happy, as can
be,
For I'm a member of the Strollers, see.
Glorious! Glorious! One man apieco
for the four of us.
Glory bo to rules, there uro no more
co-e-

DO YOU KNOW THAT
The Library War Service of the
American Library Association builds,
equips and operates forty-fou- r
libraries
of 30,000 volumes in camps here and
350 libraries and branches overseas.

It has more than

1,500 libraries

in

huts, canteens and hostess houses.
There are 250 vessels that have li
braries and there is a deck library on
every transport.

B Robards

COLLEGE