xt72542j7098 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72542j7098/data/mets.xml  McDaniel, J. M. 1900 v. : ill. ; 23-25 cm.  Volume numbering changed during 1899 from Volume 8 to Volume 2.  Description based on Vol. 8, no. 2 (Nov. 1989) journals  English Lexington, Ky., [s.n., 189?-] This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine University of Kentucky. Kentucky University. Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky. University of Kentucky--Students--Periodicals. State University, Lexington. State College, Lexington. The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 2 no. 4, 1900 text The Kentuckian : a monthly magazine, vol. 2 no. 4, 1900 1900 2012 true xt72542j7098 section xt72542j7098 V 1 1 _ V"_—__—fT"`Z`""""""""_;[i"_`—`—`_;—_"" · `TQL ''`` *—'—"_"°TVW7"`€""""`*"
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,» Mau1uiuetu1·e1· of Fine Boots and Shoes. Repairing neatly executed. ' A
i ` · Special discount to students. °v,
105 East Main, . Lexington, Ky. `  
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‘DhiNii SOM Wst’lIiTB WITH HEWDLEY EMI) ,. 
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Niittll Silltt {Hill TOD GOGBS. 4   
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Fashionable Hats » ss  
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Squinch Owls, Broadway Spscizd. »~—"  
High Grads Haney Shirts.  
_ Ec1ipse—G10be—Unitecl.  J  
l Special discount to students. JH  
LOEVENHART’S a  
Clothicr, Hatter, Fumighgyy _ jg
 Q 4 East Main.  

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      3   eenenanmnc THE.   1
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d     .   LEXINGTON· Kv.  
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‘ U       2 fessions are full and the age demands 1s. Edu-
      ‘ CHM-) y011I`S61f f0I` bllS1I16SS Bdld. yOl1 W111 succeed
t     new and hereafter. HENRY Gnu.  
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        FACULTY.  ,.
  A     A ii lll  
    P5 PROF. W. A. HART, A
A.   _ A, A ._   2 S Principal, Book-keeping Department-  
. L A   A   J. H. HAVVKINS,
( A .   Instructor, Gregg and Pernin Shorthand.  
  · _ A   MRS. W. A. HART,
AA .— A _   Instructor, Pitman Shorthand.
* . . < ·§
  » M .   R. H. KEYES,
 !_ · , · ~   Business Manager and Instructor English Department.
* . ~ A _ · f G. Y. nENHAM, ,  
- — .   . Secretary and Treasurer. »
‘ i   _ A     s. osnorm, i A
A , Assistant, English Department. A
Q 2 F. GRIFFITH NVALKER,   ?
~ » Assistant, Shorthand Department.  
. A i Instructor, Tclcgraphy.  
  OUR TEACHERS. 2
A 1} The teachers of this college are experts in their
A several lines of work, and have had many years’
» A experience which not only enables them to bring
1 . A { about the best results but also gives them the pres-
‘ _ ` tige necessary to secure the C()I1IA'ld€l'lCG and respect
. of their students. They are not pupils teaching for
experience or a mere pittance to defray expenses
A until they can find a better position. They are .
  A .COXlS(3l€U’ClOllS HIGH {LIN] \VU111(!I1 \\'ll() l1E1.VO ChOSOH
_ this Held of usefulness for their life work and are
devoting their entire time and best efforts to the
_ ‘ interests of the students placed under their care. g
A A A3 i Practical Knowledge is Power.  
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‘ I I       Glimpse of the Banking Department ofthe Foutlieru l
I I {   Business College. I `
»—·i I I e l l o——·o l
_ _ _ I il In succeeding issues of the Keu·
n   V - l tuckizm we shell present to the public.
» ` I l views of our (III'I€l‘€ltlIL depz11·tments_ T
I   O”‘"—;O l
i ’e T We give to our students the most I
 ; · Q PRACTICAL AND UF’·TO· I.
I ` ` ` .
  l DATE BUSINESS TRAINING 1
I _ l of any Coinmerciel College in the l
Y t South or W est, I
 ` n I=**Y?“`\V1·ite for pau·tieulzu·s.`WH i
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  "BY THEIR FRUITS
I v_ YE SHALL KNOW THEM." _
w 'The branches of an education are like the
J / branches of a tree—the fruit they bear in
dicates the value of the tree.
A school is judged by the success of its
students. If when they graduate they go
out into the great business world qualified
to fillimportant positions, the inference is
that their business training has been thor-
ough. WE POINT VVITH PRIDE to our fruit
crop, shown IN oUR Raooim or ous s·rU-
DENTS Now IN Business.
_ OUR COURSE OF STUDY. .
IT COMBINES both study and practice. p
IT COMPRISES branches of` educatio I °
that have a direct application to the prac-
tical affairs of life. Q
IT PREPARES those who do their work ‘
diligently and faithfully to deserve and to
occupy lucrative positions in the business q _
world.
if / This is not only a practical age but an exacting T
  age. The methods of yesterday will not Ineet
it ‘ the demands of the work that must be done to-
ik day. People no longer ask "What do you
V . know?" but, "What can you do“?" Education .
  that simply crams the mind with knowledge has »
—\. no market value in the great business world. ·
O There is a great work to be done—greater work _
than was done yesterday, because greater things
, are expected. Those who can do that work will `
_ he selected to do it, and they will be given t  .
-· rewards that go with it. Plant the seed if you
expect to reap. the harvest.
4, Qualification is more essential to ·
c success than opportunity.

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  =`A _Q A   » COURSES OF STUDY.
    ·.`U _ V é
  Q      __   - Full Diploma Business Course,
¥   _ L_ {   Embraces Bookkeeping(Single and Double
V i ri ` .   entry), Commercial Arithmetic, Commer·  _\_
  _ 2 { cial Law, Penmanship, Correspondence, ·‘ v_‘‘, `
Y?      ‘   Spelling, Banking and Business Practice.  
  ` +% \¤
    ~   Commercial Course, *\-T
 I V   ‘ jj Embraces Bookkeeping, Commercial Ar- 
  ‘ - · ?’ ithmetic, Commercial Law, Penmanship ·
4   j and Spelling. O
'lnl { Shorthand Course,
l` E Embraces instruction in Shorthand (Gregg
‘ Pernin or Pitman systemn) Touch Type
___, · . . writing; Business Penmanship, Ortho- 0
_ _ graphy, Punctuation, and Business Corre-
. spondence.
` ' ~ L English Course, QS
  · I ~ Q Comprises instruction in English Gram- `
· ` ` i mar, Rhetoric, English Literature, Civil(“
. ;, .~ L GOVBFHmGHU,ATlUhm6ElC,Alg€b1‘&,&HdCOm-
_ ’ mercial Geography.
Z - , A  Special Classes
‘ ‘ ° ’ In Latin, Spanish, German, French and
P · . vi Penmanship.
,_ 5 l Social Features.
Y _/· The social features of the school are of the very ·
V ' .. gr best. By the peculiar personal interest taken ing
» i ;( the students b_y the faculty, and especially by
. `_ Prof. Hart and his wife. they are made to feel
· ‘  perfectly at home, and, while they are acquiring
; ` a most tliorough and practical education, they `
» g at the same time, have the most pleasant social G
, J V, surroundings.
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PRHGTIGHL  
  l?lumbi11g. 
Steam Heating, °
mms, wmv Mm Pumps

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· · I .,·;··»+ii. »h, v ·
. `     l i1:?*·` I   P" O` ] -. i
—‘“ _ ; _   '·   i
_. ____ ‘ B.B.JON ,Pre.s  “ gy"  W g.· , __ _
“’ . , E.G.SPINK,Wce—Pr  W,   U" v
' rua LEADING In     yi ; j
» PRACTICAL __        _ ____ ·
;   scr-a¤0¤.¤rm¤$0u ~   · _ -  
` 4C;; i BUDKKEQDIIIQ + Siltlfllldllli + IEI€QI’d|)Ily .. , s I
  Courses graded. Short, Practical, Modem. Nor-  
· · mal Course for Teachers. No vacation. Cheap · ·
Q Board, club or private. * '
· Best Home Study Courses—Shortha¤d or Book- —·—- '
keeping. Experienced Teachers. Individual In- ; .
struction. Three Departments.--All Commercial · ·
_ Branches. Enter Any Time. Open to Both Sexes. Q ‘
, · Elegant Diploma. - r : V -
‘ . POSITIONS: Tuition may be deposited in bank . I
* until position is secured. 165 former pupils hold- ·
  ing positionsin Lexington alone. For ‘Kat·a.·l0g"  
’ ' . and Iull particulars, address ’ — - · =  
=   B. B. JONES, President, ‘ ‘ ·
’ ' ____ Z nom; i3'iF{}f»%}Z’3¤%‘}E$§T>‘2’;%¤. LEx""GT°N· KY- · . 4 _
A /   -
 .  ,.·
\__ . _, . _

 Paying lnvestment. Students by calling at I ·  
Star Cllothmo House I
You can buy fine Clothing and Gents’ Wear at l0 Q
per cent discount. 34 E. Main St.  
  Greeble & Lang. ee I .  
·—“*““?—·-·——"· I
Unce we get m the wedge  
The tasd is easy. If you will give us a chance we will  
CO1'lVlI'1C€ YOU that WG 02111 Dl83.S€ yOU.. WG C3.I`I'y 3. COII1- 2
plete line. Prescriptions a specialty.  
Main and Broadway. Phone 459.  
I
S Goo pe1·’s Drug Store.  
with C11 1*2t O 11'1g 01*6 I
MC I ICI dr St  
Manufacturers and Dealers in  
I
Mears Wear.  
30 E. Main St., opp. Courthouse. L. KAHN, Manager.  
me Leamno  
Sllultm,  
Phetuzrapher- ·
5 West Main Street. i
Send your Linen to .... it
. LEXINGTBN STEAM LAUNDRY. *
For First·class Work. A
Represented by A. S. Dabney, Room 17, Old Dormitory.
· I
I

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            The Suuthsrn Ev angaInst.
  O   A il Every Week, Sixteen Pages,
    . 75 Cents Per Year. -
   r     ONLY LOW FRIOED
   *    .   PRESBYTERIHN WEEKLY.
yi it     14 DEPARTMENTS. L
j__, ~ { h Orthodox, Popular, Disinctive
V A y · A Fe3tures_  
  · ' A · Not as large as SOME but better than MANY ofthe
J same class. Beyond a doubt the best paper of its kind in
_ " v existence at tie price.
p _ . L Write for sample copy and agents’ terms.
    . THE SOUTHERN EVANGELIST BU.
  V I   5 (Incorporated)
?    . Lexington, Ky. _
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* Medal won by Mr. Leonidas
Ragan in the I. O. C. The de- v
signer and manufacturer of this
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beautiful diamond-set gold
medal is Mr. Fred J. Heintz,
135 East Main street, Lexing— ' .
* ton. As a designer of medals
and pins Mr. Heintz has few
F equals.  
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2 THE ` 'I I
  N KEN I UCKIAN
Q. A MONTHLY MAGAZINE. i
‘ Entered the Post Office of Lexington, Ky,, as second class mall matter.
L;
{ v01.2. Lsxmcron, Trim., mo. N0. 5.
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${3 At the Open Door. $,9
·§§§=§=§§é§§é§=§é%’§§é?<§§>§@é0é
Lmomoas RAGAN.
The wings of fiitting centuries produce scant disturbance "
in the etherial ocean of Eternity. And we who barely scan ‘
with careful eye and plod with weary feet, our little space of
three score years and ten, find, at the end of Centuries, that ¢
life assumes fresh forms; new thoughts arise; and unforseen ,
events bring obligations which we had not thought of meeting.
What strange disturbance of the stars it is, we do not know,
‘ ` but centuries were not adjusted so by accident. Somehow, an
era seems to close with every hundred years-another cycle of ‘
the earth begins. The world awakes from slumber, as it ware,
and must prepare to meet the obligations of another day. The
centuries of the past have faces, like angels of the Lord, and
as they pass, ghostlike, in wierd possession across the pages of
history, we recognize them, not by their numbers, but by the
great events which marked their lives. Some of them are red
with martyr’s blood, some gorgeous with imperial crowns, ~
some bear the dimly burning students’ lamp, and some are
lurid with fires of revolution. Not one of them is featureless,
not one but bears some strong significance.
And as it was in the past, so it shall be in the future. The I
action that has been—the surging sea of thought and impulse ,
and emotion that is, will be projected onward into the deeds
that are yet to be done, the lives that are yet to be lived, the
grand purposes that are yet unaccomplished. Not man, nor
world, nor systems——not time itself can pause—all-in—all, drifts
onward to eternity.
, And the significance of the small is just as the significance _
of the great. In the sight of immensity, there is no small—no
great. The fungus under the microscope is a wilderness of

 ‘ I .   F
{Q   ? flowers, the Milky Way viewed through the telescope is a  
» i, flower bed of stars. The impulses of the solar system are the  
37 `· , Q same in suns and stars and worlds—in seas and solid con- E
  ·_ I ‘`~[ ~ tinents—in great empires and individual men. The one power  
r » _. 1 . i permeates them all; the one thrill moves the King and peas-  
{ . ` 3 · ant; the one instinct stirs in the millionaire and in the “Wan—  
y 1 ’ dering Willie" of the dusty road. And that impulse—that in- .;
._ i I   stinct—in this pivotal time, tends toward aggregation of power I
- , . 1 and expansion of influence toward “Imperialism" and "benev- ;
` ’ . , ; olent assimilation." _
Y [ _ Q I know that those terms have been misused and have be-
,` - i l come the subject of seoifs and sneers. I know that men will- _?
I ‘ · ¥ F fullv distort their meaning for political effect, and others igno-
· g i rantly shudder as they think of them and Hee before them as
* . i — _ if fleeing from a grave-yard ghost. But they are fraught with
_ " no danger to the people—no peril to the soul. And whether
f they be of danger or of peril—of present evil or of possible
  . _ l   wrong—yet such is the divine impetus given to the time, and _
f . °» we are impotent to battle with it. The strong current of events
. . must run the mills of destiny, and grind out good or evil grist.
l _ We may divert a portion of it to our purposes—we cannot stem
· it in its onward course. And why should we be afraid of "Im-
perialism?" Is not the sun imperial in his golden chariot,
and the moon regnant in her gentle sway through all the quiv-
ering silences of summer nights? Is not the sea an empire
, and an emperor? Before whom does the mountain bow? And
· whose hand stays the mighty Mississippi’s sweep? Is the
." broad-breasted Nile to be bound in bonds of straw? Imperial
power pulsates through the veins of nature, giving strength to
_ the sturdy oak, and painting the pansy’s cheek with velvet
coloring. In great and small, God is imperial and all the Uni-
verse His empire. There be Kings and petty Princes in the
  realm of poetry, but is not Shakspeare emperor? In song hath
· Homer any peer? In thought hath Plato any rival? All great-
-? - ness is imperial, and in large and small, all harmony springs
from obedience to command.
And what more natural than expansion or hbenevolent as-
¢ similation" if you will so call it? That which groweth not I
i . decays, and the ceasing of assimilation is death. The expand- .
i , ing bud becomes a rose, the acorn which assimilates the rich-
ness of the earth becomes an oak. Only the inert mass re-
A mains the same, and by resistance to the powers of nature .
* ‘ looses even what it hath. The granite rock—although it fronts .
. the storm with scorn—is by the slow attrition of the rain worn X
,   i down and down until it is a pebble handled by a child. Noth- —
A ing is eternal save the infinite. The power of the Creator goes .
  on, unhasting, unresting, operating to destroy and recreate,  
* V with an everlasting energy as resistless as it is dumb. Today  
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  an island sinks, tomorrow a continent rises from the bottom of l
  the sea. There is no rest, but always change——from everlasting _
  unto everlasting, change! I
  To man alone is given the power over nature, the capacity I
  to adapt himself to changed conditions. '1`he polar bear Ends
  sweltering death between the tropics, and the sinewy tiger
  freezes in the awful North. Man slays the walrus on eternal
A ice and tracks the tiger to his jungle lair. Conditions change,
» but he is master of conditions. He bears his climate in his
,; breast and sleeps in safety underneath the polar star. He
  makes an artificial day around him in the heart of night, and ‘
underneath the noonday sun of torrid lands he sits in twilight,
  kissed by cooling winds. He bends the lightnings as arrows
· to his bow, and sails his chariot through the clouds. His eye
s scans the bottom of the sea, and his hand plaits the thunder-
bolts into imperial wreaths.
What man is there so imperial in his birth and his surround-
I ings as the American citizen? What man has such a past,
· what man such possibilities in future? \Vho has such incentive
to action, such opportunities to achieve greatness? Sprung
from the loins of freemen, trained to free institutions until he
can conceive of no other kind, who is there so fitted to carry
the torch of liberty into the darkness of the outer world? And
this Republic-aggregate of all its citizens—though young in
years has the glory of many centuries in its traditions.
Neither this great Republic-the most imperial upon which
the sun of history has ever shone,—nor its individual citizens
can afford to put aside the mission manifest destiny has pre-
pared for it. Broad as its present territory is, the scope of its
mighty iniiuence must he broader. An eloquent senator has
said: "Oceans no longer divide, but uuite nations." Swift-
winged argosies are upon every sea, and the cable throbs the
heart beats of one nation to another underneath the waves.
There is literally no East, no VVest—the world is one, and the
t Orient clinks its glasses with the Occident across the broad
Pacific. To-day is not to-day, for we keep step with the re-
volving world so closely that the twilight of to-day becomes as
one with the dawning of tomorrow. Sunset and sunrise kiss
V each other.
V Still there are those who slumber in the past. To them the
sweet procession of the Equinoxes bring no vision of the future;
Orion with his bands no new access of strength. To them all
? days are yesterdays, and they go about chained, mouth to
3 mouth, unto the corpse of what has been, with mufHed voices
·· crying out i°Unclean! Unclean!" To them “Expansion" is a
" Doubting Castle and “Imperialism" the Giant Despair. ‘
3- The man who does must always be the man who dares.
  Achievement never comes to skepticism and he who putteth
.. l V r i Y _ _ ‘— __} /

 , _  _   »:   · ·  T ’ r   »‘ ·   ‘ W ‘ W'  W  
r :‘ O ..  ~ - .  ; ti
  T V,_  » his hand to the plow dare not look back. Opportunities come  
T .; rarely——they are oftener made—but when they come, woe be  
  I unto the strong man who forgets his strengths and seizes not 3
 i , _ ~   upon them. It were better for him to have been born a weak- j.
T i g { _ ling than a coward—some brave weakling will step to his place V .
g . , i and do his work, and leave him shorn of all his strength and
` . · W fame. ~.
Q ‘ _ W T I Unto America the young giant of the West, much opportu—  
—_ ,   T nity has come. When Dewey’s guns thundered at Manila, all J
` . ‘ . the world woke. Dynasties whose escutcheons were only seen W
· . · i on moss grown monuments sprung from their sleep of cen-
‘ ‘ ~. T Q. turies and asked with pallid lips, "What monster hath done T
W . _ ’   · this?" Bugles whose cavernous throats were choked with rust
Q l blew quavering notes of fear, and war drums, cracked with the
~ ` T idleness of centuries, rolled forth groans of discontent. Musty
T   * flags were shaken out with mouldering, mildewed folds, and
» W_ toothless dogs of war grinned in cursed impotence and gnash-
. T , E ed their guns. One man had dared, one man had done—and A
` » all the panoply of strength dropped from the withered limbs
· s T · of despotism. Effete ideas of the past sank with Spanish W
· ‘ ironclads and superstition writhed and died upon their flaming
_ decks. The invincible Armada that once made English hearts of
oak fearful of their lives and liberties had dwindled to a mass of
burning wood and twisted iron. There before the clear eye of
an American commodore, the phantoms of the dark ages, for
. ‘ the last time “showed themselves like sheeted dead, to sneer,
~ I and wither, and squeak, and to vanish into nothingness." The
W- abyss opened, the Dragons of Ignorance and Tyranny were
swallowed up—it closed, and in its place, the firm land of a
_ new cycle bloomed with flowers of Hope. The chasm was
no more but in its stead a fruitful land.
y So in this time of change, from the useless speculation of
.~-· the past into the better and more helpful ages yet to come,
 ` A this young republic stood at the open door, with God’s own
·· key in its strong hand. Peace Congresses were called to ,
bind if possible the new found strength of the new nation,
while the hypocrites who "babbled of green fields" found time
i to arm themselves and make ready for the conflict sure to come.
T T Like a metaphor of peace, America stood among the function-
· v ` aries bred in the shadow of crumbling thrones. She asked no
_ _ guaranty of safety, she demanded no sureties of peace besidess
T _ · ' her innate strength. But she counseled peace and moderation;
W she preached brotherly love; she besought others to disband
. their paid cohorts, and trust, as she trusted, to the strong arms
, Tj of patriotic citizens. Still prating of peace the great powers
W _ increased their armaments, imposed new taxes for the building
_ of more ships and flew at the throats of their weaker neighbors,
; She counseled peace, they covertly prepared for war,
  Y
ill ~ l
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  Standing thus in the midst of the world’s jealousies, though J
  conscious of her own strength, she dare not make one backward I
g step. Wherever the valor of her sons has planted the flag ‘
y their fathers consecrated, there must that flag forever wave.
V _ In bleak Alaska shall it shed eternal summer on the snow, and —
underneath its shadow shall the South Sea Islands sleep.
  Symbol of an imperial republic—Oriilamme for the expanding
  hosts of Liberty, it shall be seen in every sea, it shall be loved
= in every land. Behind it stands the clear eyed, warm blooded
° young manhood of America—before it an imperial destiny and
a glory growing with the centuries.
THOROUGHBREDS.
[Scribner’s.]
Wha! Bess, you young vixen!
— Now, Nellie, your foot-
V So—hoop-la! You’ve got her?
. The beautiful brute!
Hold he1· in for a moment;
One hitch to my girth,
And 1,111 with you. my lass, '
For the ends of the earth.
Now, Duroc, my hero- n
Be careful, dear heart!
She is fresh as the fountain,
And rank for a start.
"You fear not‘?" oh, no,
But you like your sweet wills-
And we’ll give you a breathing!
Away! To the hills!
Oh, bathe me, ye winds
Of the withering downs!
Brush the scent of the "functlons,"
The taint of the towns!
What is art, to this nature! 1
, Or wine, to this air!
What/s a picture, to Nel!
And her blooded bay mare!
HER LETTERS.
I love the books that round me wait,
Great words of men the years name great,
1 love my briar (degenerate-
Banned by my betters !)—
I love the blaze I dream before,
I love a friend’s knock at the door,
.. But more than all-ah, so much more-  
I love her letters.
-[Warw1ck James Price in the April New Lippincott,

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_, ‘ V   JOHN T. GEARY. V
V , .. , Our republic is the result of a long process of evolution. Step `
V . V V ‘ by step this slow unfolding process has continued through all
· . — = the ages, each revolving century drawing nearer the perfect plan.
U `_ . · ‘ The biologist places before us the tree of life, tracing thereon
. l Q the successive stages of its progress from the simple unit until
L ` T     VZ - man stands revealed, crowning the summit of the structure.
’ f ; The highest types of life are preserved by the rejection of the
; -i i less developed ones. `In like manner the sociologist, in review-
" —. ` ~ · . ing the growth and decay of societies, sees that the fall of one
_   institution but makes way for other associations of men of
V V   , greater social efliciency. The death of one institution records
T » " l the birth of conditions favorable for the further development of
’ l the new. Our civilization is then the result of the ceaseless
, . . V V · changes of the centuries, of the countless nations that have
` perished in the struggle for existence. V
_ . Is it not then interesting and instructive to gaze back through
the mists of antiquity, and behold man as he starts on his long
and painful journey of progress? But little better than the
_ . brutes, he wanders over the earth in vast hordes. Thousands of
V E years pass over him, years of ignorance, degradation and illu-
_, sion, that have never been recorded in the annals of human
' history. A great_change has taken place. His social capaci— _
" ties have been developed. He forms clans, tribes—and at
· length great civilizations spring up, she result ot his changing
V conditions. Civilizations that mark the fair sunrise of history,
V and indicate an advancement in the higher life of the race.
  But scarcely had the new order been ushered into existence,
~ ’ , * when man encontered the problem that has been combattcd in
" , vain, from the dawn of history to the foundation of the Repub-
lic of the States. It was the problem of government.
_ From the time when human voice first rang out upon the
‘ . 1 cold still night of time, through all the vicissitudes of the
V world’s existence, there has been a ceaselcss struggle for a bet-
_ ter government. The civilization of the past—varied at differ-
_; 4, ent epochs—ha.ve been based upon principles as different as
2 the fruits they have borne. The civil life of a people is fash-
_ . ioned upon the conception which men entertain of their mutual
V . duties and rights. The interests of the individual, and the _
.· I social organism to which he belongs, are not the same; hence —
¤ the great problem of the ages has been the erection of a stable ]
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