xt72804xhm43 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72804xhm43/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581205  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  5, 1958 1958 2013 true xt72804xhm43 section xt72804xhm43 Medical School Anticipates 1,000 Enrollment
e
One thousand
students are exDocted to be
enrolled at UK's Medical Center when It reaches full
operation in the mid19G0s.
That many more are anticipated in part-tim- e
graduate work.
This Is the report of the center's planning group,
which include the Medical School dean and the nucleus
of his faculty and administrative staff.
The college programs are designed for an enrollment
of 300 medical students, 100 internes, residents and fellows. 300 nursing students. 200 students in dentistry, and
100 to 2C0 in other areas of medical education, such as
y
physiotherapists,
technicians, and dental hygienists.
Experience in other states makes it reasonable to
expect that' abcut 1,000 physicians, dentists, nurses, and
other health wcrners in active practice will attend short
courses, institutes, and seminars each year, the planning

staff reported.

full-tim-

400-bo-

Three major functions have been assigned to the renter
in planning by the group to make it as effective as possible in helping meet the state's health needs. They are:
1. Education of future practitioners.
2.

providing additional

Post-gradua- te

3.

Providing additional resources through direct care

to patients, consultation and
with voluntary
and governmental health agencies.
The first two units of the center, a medical sciences

building and a heating plant, are presently under construction and are scheduled for completion in the fall
of 1959.
Next

buildings to be constructed

4 Freshmen Highlight
Greek Concert Tonite
r

Greek Week continues tonight tickets may be purchased at $1.50
and ends tomorrow with a concert each in the SUB from 8 a. m. until
by the Four Fteshmen and a dance 4 p. m. today or at the door.
to the music of Buddy Morrow.
Buddy Morrow and his orchestra
award-winnin- g
will appear' at the God and GodThe
Four Freshmen, accompanied by the (Oyde-Tras- dess Ball from 8 until 12 p.m. toOrchestra, will sing in Me- morrow at the Phoenix Hotel.
"Mr. Trombone," as Morrow is
morial Coliseum at 8:30 tonight.
called, was raised in a
Since 1S55, this group has had a
Deen piay
succession of hits including "Day mus,c' """'y a
Ing a trombone since he was 12.
By Day," "Charmaine," "GraduaHe has been featured in several
tion Day" and "Polnciana."
leading orchestras, including those
Tehy have "made numerous tele- of
Paul Whiteman, Tommy Dorsey,
vision guest appearances and were
Artie Shaw, Eddy Duchin, and
featured in the Nat Cole-Te- d
Jimmy Dorsey.
Heath concert tour in 1956.
He is quite proud of the Deriod
The Freshmen provide their own during which he played in a
accompaniment and phony orchestra conducted by
are noted for their style of a five- - Arturo Toscanini.
voice sound with four voices.
Mr. Morrow organized his own
The group has won the "Best - band in 1957 and, since that time,
Vocal Group" category in the Met- - has had a number of hit recordings,
ronome Magazine poll for three including "Night Train," "One
years, the Downbeat poll four years Mint Julep," and "I Don't Know."
and Playboy Magazine jazz poll.
The dance is semi-formand
ine concert, sponsored oy tne is open only to fraternity and
IFC, Is open to the public and sorority members and their guests.

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON,

Vol. L

KY.. FRIDAY,

DEC. 5,

lr8

No.

41

Pre-Registrati- om

A shed By 'Committee
recommendation calling for
and
tion systems is expected to be made
at the University faculty meeting1
Monday afternoon.
A proposal to make unofficial
grades available' to
students will also be discussed..
or the sched
A

Dre-regist-

mid-semest-

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opportunities

for those in practice throughout the state to keep current with the most recent advances in medical science.

X-ra-

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Center timetable are a
hospital, an ambulsnl
patient wing and an outpatient wing. TUns are presently being finalied and are expected to be ready for
contract letting in four or five months. Construction will
take about 2' years Later, a dental wing will be added
to the center.
The planning staff has estimated the hospital will
provide 117.000 patient-day- s
of care for around 11. (XX)
patients each year. Another 50.000 to 100,000 patient vlsitf
are ei pec ted each year at the center's outpatient clinic.
The staff also anticipates .SO.000 visits to the dentil
clinic and 20.000 patient days of care per year in the
ambulant patient wing.
UK's College of Medicine will receive its first cliM
in the fall of I960. Opening dates have not yet been
established for the Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry.

V

'M m ft'

uling of classes for the next term
at the end of the current-semesteris being requested for the first
semester of next year, if possible,
which includes
payment of fees as well as class
assignment, is recommended "as
soon thereafter as feasible. The
dean of admissions and registrar
would determine when the plan
could be put Into effect and the
system used.
Before this year
at UK had not been attempted. It
was tried in September with multiple section courses such- as fresh
man English, first year physical
education and mathematics, and
was successful.
The recommendation states that
prothe limited
gram "reduced confusion" and
caused fewer schedule changes in
the courses assigned early.
According to the recommendation,
and
systems would give
the student more time for meeting
with his advisor than is now possible under the present registraAn offical spokestion set-uman said some opposition to the
recommendation has been made
because it wouki make faculty'
members devote more time to ad-

number of students taking thess

n,ni,i

.

k-

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time and the exact number of
sections and instructors needed
coud be determined Cancellation
0f courses and the adding of nevr
wnnirt h. mrte easier kn
Another advantage of the proposed system cited by the recommendation Is the possible saving of
an estimated $600 a year. This sum
represents the costs of preparing
for registration,
the Coliseum
cleaning up and paying the guards.
Also, more time would be available to the teaching staff for pre- parK "nd tting up equipment
for class work. These savings, ac
cording to the recommendation,
would partially make up for Increased funds which might bo
needed by the registrar's office.
The recommendation covering
grades proposes that
the registrar set up a system for
collecting the grades at a definite
date. Then they would be sent to
advisors, and the dean of men and
women's offices for the use of
fraternities, and sororities and
"others who have a legitimate need
for niid-F- f mester grades."
The proposed system would prohibit a student's or organization's
vising.
asking instructors for grades at
Under the proposed change, the any other time during the semesproblems involved in multiple sec- ter. Grades would be used only for
tion courses would be simplified, information and would not be put
the recommendation stated. The on the student's permanent record.
.

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The Four Freshmen

Extension Course Opened
For Road Employees
UK Extended Programs this week
is opening a course In highway
engineering for employees of the
Kentucky Department of Highways

at

centers throughout the state.
course,
it
Purpose of the
which is divided into four sections,
Is to upgrade engineering employees of the department. The
second section of the course will
begin in February; the third In
May and the last in December,
11

non-cred-

will be required each week and
written examinations will be given
at the end of each section. Upon
satisfactory completion of all four
the student will be
"sections,
awarded a certificate by Extended
Programs. The University's College
of Engineering will supervise the
classes and the highway department will pay expenses and provide meeting places.

Instructors and class locations
are H. C. Hanson. Bowling Green;
At least six hours of homework B. L. Wheat, Morehead; C. L.
Florence, Elizabethtown ; Paul' A.
Cyrus S.
Faulkner, Louisville;
Layson, Paducah; James W. Burton, Madisonville; James W. Fehr,
Louisville; L. C. Pendley, Frankfort; J. A. Dearinger, Lexington,
and Robert W. Hodges. London and
Hazard.
Coordinators for the program are
C. L. Hager, Extended Programs;
M. L. Archer. Highway Department
oificer, and David K.
SHOPPING DAYS training head of the University's
Blythe,
Civil Engineering Department.
TO CHRISTMAS

1959.

17

James Amuses Greeks
At Opening Convocation
r

Ollie James, chief editorial writer
and columnist for the Cincinnati
Enquirer, amused 400 Greek men
and women at Memorial Hall
Wednesday night.
Also at the convocation opening
Greek Week. Susan Darnell and
Bob Chambliss
were
awarded
plaques recognizing them as outstanding sorority woman and fraternity man.
Before his serious remarks about
the Greek system, James drew
laughs for some 40 minutes with
jokes wihch he has used in his
daily column in the Enquirer and

lie said the organizations taught arrival.
"Book learning," he said, "ii
a social alertness which the student
would not otherwise have gained. gained in education, but this typw
James stressed the help Greek of learning will not adjust a perlife gives a young student thrust son and help him become able to
into an educational institution in take his place in a community.
which he or she is a complete Learning how to live is the sum
stranger to almost everyone at total of all education."
"What this country needs is not
better scientists"; he stated, "not
better phykicikts; not better mathe,

.Writer Landers
Here Wednesday

maticians, but more
men and women, socially matured
and aware of their place in society."
"We need the finest core oi citizens we can raise," James pointed
out. "This is of great value today
because we are greatly outnumbered in this world. Russia has one
man who commands an entire nation of people who are gradually
becoming complete slaves."
"Maintain a pride for your fraternity," said James. "Ma) be t
well-round-

Nationally known newspaper
columnist Ann Landers will visit
Lexington next week.
The Kernel and the Herald-LeadThe humorist is a. former UK
a lecture
will
student and Kernel staff member given by the columnist 3 p. rn.
and a member of Sigma Delta Chi. Wednesday. Dec. 10, at the Gulg-n,
Theater.
Jans. himself a Sigma Nu,
She will give a free lecture,
stated his belief n the importance
of fraternity and sorority life in sponsored by the Lexington Hereducation and helping a person ald and the Sunday-Heral- d
Leader,
become "psychologically adaptable" Wednesday night, at the Henry
Clay Hih School Auditorium.
to life.
ad-lib- s.

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Continued on rage

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KFNTrCKY KERNEL. Eiid.iv, I)(t. r,

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Fu hi vis HcBu ildi ngs Spring Up With A lorn icAge
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IN LE3IONT, ILL.: Still under construction, theoffice and laboratory sections of this building
housing. The structure Is owned jointly
take their shape from the central
by the AEC and Argonne' National Laboratory.
tank-tTptrcact-

NEW YORK (AD In the lengthening .shadow of the developing
atomic age, a new type of American architecture is springing up like a
lamily of mushrooms.
Strange futuristic looking buildings, they are characterized by a
high dome, either on the main structure or set apart hi a sleek slice
cf pure geometry.
The new building type houses nuclear reactors. Although the first
began operating scarcely 1G years stitutc for the oil or coal-fire- d
pgo, there are now 149 reactors boiler and its heat is used to
operating in the United States, spin electric generators,
"Progressive Architecture" main-an- d
with 8p more under construction
67 in the planning stage.
tains that distinctive atomic archi- A recent issue of "Progressive
Architecture," a national archi
tectural journal, put trHpotHght
on this new building type. It displayed pictures of nuclear plants
completed or under construction
and reproduced design suggestions
lor reactor plants of the future
by senior architectural students of
Earphones, mikes and turntables
Pratt Institute.
are all around them bi?l the stuThe total collection adds up to dents in a newly renovated room
an awesome exhibit of architecture in Miller Hall aren't there to learn
to be disc jockeys.
with no historical past.
The third floor room houses the
The purpose of most present-da- y
University's new Language Labieactors is experimental. Basically, oratory, designed to help
students
a nuclear reactor is a device in
gain speaking proficiency in lanwhich nuclear fission occurs, divid- guage.
ing a nucleus of uranium of PlutThe room contains 13 booths,
onium into two parts and releasing
each holding a chair, a desk and
neutrons, gamma rays and heat.
an array of equipment
In experimental reactors, the it the appearance of awhich gives
miniature
neutrons and gamma rays are used
radio studio. An estimated 500
for research. In power reactors,
a week will be
the controlled fission is a sub- - hours of practice new
permitted by the
laboratory.
Dr. Iaul K. Whitaker, Modern Foreign Languages Department, said.
. i I. V
There are two turntables in each
CMtinvMis frn 2 fM
booth. One plays the recorded voice
of the instructor ml the language
FRIDAY
SATURDAY, DEC. 6
and the other, the voice of the
"OLD YELLER"
student as he repeats after the
Dorothy McGuire-Fes- s
Parker
instructor. This makes it possible
Also
for the student to spot mistakes!
"WIND ACROSS THE
in his pronunciation as he plays
EVERGLADES"
back the latter recording.
y
Burl
Rose Lee
A number of classes are already
using the $6,000 laboratory, a gift

tecture will become a familiar
American landmark in this century.,
pointing out that the Atomic
Energy Commission has been authorized 386 million dollars for new
facilities. The magazine predicts
private industry will more than
match this investment. Another
source predicts that 10 billion dollars will be spent in atomic industry during the next 25 years,
mostly on atomic power plants.

THE 'SADDLE & SPUR'

I

CLEFMEN
FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

community,
League reported.

entire

TUES, DEC.

Curtis

Sinatra-Torf- y

"ONCE UPOSNA TIME"
Dan

Martin

Rowan-Dk- k

COLOR CARTOON
THURSDAY,

WED

DEC.

10-1- 1

"WITNESS FOR THE
PROSECUTION"
Tyrone

Dietrich

Power-Marle- ne

Also

"FRAULEIN"
Mel

Ferrer-Dan-

a

the

Junior

Wynter

BEN ALI "Mardi Gras" - 12:54.
3:04. 5:14,' 7:24. 9:34.

CIRCLE 25
"Winds Across the
- 6:30. 10:26.
Everglades"
"China Doll" - 8:42.
FAMILY
"The Fiend Who
Walked the West" - 6:30, loTldT
"A Certain Smile" - 8:40.

STRAND "Tunnel

of Love" -12:00. 2:00. 4:00. 6:00. 8:00, 10:00.

irmfriiaJILJ

Open 5:45
ELECTRIC

r'

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HK

EweUj

W

VA

Micjcev

Smaugmessv

4t

K

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ROONEV V

Vm

MlCKY

1

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CO

Merrill

SAT

1ST RUN!
Victor Mature, Ward Bond and
Olympic Champ Bob Mathias
Flyinq Tigers Adventure

NOW

&

STAtttNO

AUUIt

HELD
OVER

HEATERS!

X-

-

if

'1

MURPHY
rnniFAiRFRT

f!HSO
i

Ji

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ilXIHCIOM-MINIU- tllt

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0V,ENS

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FROM BLUSHING STAGE HIT OF SEX IN THE SUBURBS!
presents

"CHINA DOLL"

DORIS DAY

(at 8:43 only)
2nd Feature
Burl 'Big Daddy' Ivaes as king
of the cottonmouth swamp

A JOSEPH FIELDS PRODUCTION

RICHARD WIDMARK

THE TUIJUEL OF LOVE"
GIG YOUNG

"Wind Across the Everglades"

GIA SCALA

In OnemaScop

(6:30 & 10:28 p.m.)
(Technicolor)
COMING SUNDAY

"CAT ON A HOT TIN
ROOF"

.

Admission 65c
SATURDAY
Hugh 0' Brian Delores Michaels
and Stephen McN ally
(If it doesn't scare you . . .
you're a LIAR!)
.

NOW

&

"THE FIEND WHO WALKED
THE WEST"
With Joan Fontaine, Rossano Brazzi
and Johnny Mathis!

"A CERTAIN SMILE"
(Colorscope)
COMING SUNDAY
Adventure in the Wilds!
Richard Todd and Juliette Greco

"NAKED EARTH" (and)

Stewart Granqer and Grace Kelly

"GREEN FIRE" (in color)
JoYUANOtS

STARTS

FIRST TIMES

SUNDAY

AT REGULAR
PRICE
65c

"The Big, Big Daddy of Show. Business"
--

2ND FEATURE TOO!

Early

Student

nrn

XV! 10

Admission 65c
'in-ca-

nm

Held Over

rs'f

4p

Open 5:45

2:42, 5:02. 7:22. 9:42.

si

STARTS SUNDAY

'

MOVIE GUIDE

KENTUCKY "Houseboat" - 12:22.

5
4

'

-9

"KINGS GO FORTH"
Frank

NOW THRU SAT.
"MARDA GRAS"

1

Jves-Gyps-

MON

--

39

A

5--

SUN

4 Miles
Georgetown Road

For Reservations
Phone
or

-

1,

1

7-8-

ll

Music by the

Mikes, Turntables
New Aid To Students
of the Junior League of Lexington,
according to Dr. Whitaker. An experimental class in Spanish for
has been orchildren, ages
ganized by Dr. J. E. Hernandez.
The laboratory is available by
appointment to all schools and the

I'

IN TLAINSKOKO. N. J.: Industrial Reactor Laboratories, Inc.. a research organization supported by 10 major U.S. companies, erected
this research plant. It houses a reactor, which develops neutrons and
gamma rays, produced by nuclear fission.

or

Tin Roof

Show!

PIT

GPIIIAICZEN

Arrive

6:30
Out

8:45 p.m.
m

BEAUTIFUL CASINO ANP CUU8
HOUSE ARE AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES ANY NIGHT. PHONEFOR INFORMATION

v

law

:

1

mm

ON THE PARIS PIKE

Dance to the Music
DAVE P)RRY
And His Orchestra

METROCOlOa

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* KIM

TIIC

Speech Center Offers

C

-

lie School System, and Marshall cording to Dr. Dirhl.
White, a therapist in the Bourbon
The services of the sprecli center
County School System.
are free for I'K students who live
For the third consecutive year, speech disorders and need therapy,
the Crusade for Children is offer- - Ir. Diehl says,
ing five $300 scholarships for the
Mr. Kenneth Burk. s'lpe'rvisor of
summer session at UK to any the
program here.
tearher in the state. Also, the cm- - summed up the importance of the
sade gives $52,000 to help pay2the UK Speech Center: "We not only
e
salary of one of the
have a
program
speech therapists at the University available to the undergraduates,
clinic.
but e also have excellent oppor- The Lexington Junior League tunities for advanced training in
makes available one $300 under- - this lield."
nt

well-round-

full-tim-

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VARSITY VILLAGE

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(Your Home Away From Home)

0

PLATE
LUNCHES

ri
XII

CL

95c

Try Our Delicious

DIXIE BURGER 50c
Pound of Fresh Ground Bef, Cheese
Lettuce, and Tomato)

(One-thir- d

-

4

Breakfast

Lunch

Dinner

:30 p.m.
SUNDAY 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

OPEN DAILY 7 a.m. to

500 Rose Street

11

Phone

....

2-90-

34

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GREETINGS

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65c to $.00
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Sparkling Class Colored
Trays
Decorate J uith 14
different Chrittmas
Greetings in fired
on Ceramic colors
Complete in individual
mai!er tcith signature
space
Mail in V.S.J.
for 4c to 8c,

Town and Country's "Plcasurc-Timo- "
uardiohc lor the collect' coi d is
jbovii ly Patty Sinmis, Li k'iitlcy, Don's Leonard, Mary Lou Huffman,
Sue Sclmler, and Judi Campbell from Alpha Delta I'i Sorority.

AND

VVvvOiO
FASHIONS FOR

Wide assortment of
Christmas cards, personalized here.

!

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11

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ip.irt. chsrn and

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Infirmary

Southland Dr.

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;

RADIO CLIB
Kinkead halls at 4:45 p. m.
The UK Amatcur Radio CIub
JAM SESSION
wlU meet in Room 130 of Andcr- Student- Union Board Social
son "au ai 3 p m" Monaa
Committee is sponsoring a Jam
Session with the Four S
WESTMINSTER
program featuring Dick Walker, Tue sday.
Westminster Fellowship
Sunday, will be "Giv-en- d Dec. 16, from 5 p.m. in the Stu .
at 6:30
ing Christ the Brush." a discus- - dent Union Ballroom. Charge is 15
sion on modern art. The program cents per person.
wil1 be preceded by dinner at
SUB RETREAT
5:30
A Student Union Board Retreat
LANCES
will be held tomorrow frojn 10
New. members will be chosen at a. m. to 4 p. m. at Cooperstown
the Lances meeting at 7 p. m. E 109.
Tuesday in the SUB.
The purpose of this workshop is
LUTHERANS
to study campus needs, evaluate
Triday November 21
"Christmas Around the World the present Student Union pro- Dismissed: Linda Waddle, Nick
is the program scheduled for the gram to see if all students on cam- Morcia.
Lutheran
Students
Association pus are being served and establish
Saturday November 22
Clarkson, 'meeting at 5 p.m. Sunday. Rides goals and plans of the second
Brenda
Admitted:
will be provided in front of the semester program in the Student
Charles K. Davis Jr.
Dismissed: Rohini A. Doshi, Lin- - Alpha Xi Delta house, Holmes and Union.
Phillip Morgan,
da Lee Scott,
Charles K. Davis Jr.
Sunday November 23
Admitted: Wendell Mobley, Robert Chesney, Patricia Lackey,
Nikki Parsons.
.....
Dismissed: Brenda Clarkson. Eugene Hayes, Robert Chesney.
Monday November 24
Dismissed: Bettye Killough.
:
,
wi ..iy 'I
Tuesday November 25
Dismissed: Nikkl Parsons, Patricia Lackey,
Wendell Mobley,
.
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,t
Steilberg.
Ernest
Monday December 1
Admitted: Phillis Lilly. Isabella
Lycan.
Dismissed: Isabella Lycan.
Tuesday December 2
Admitted: None.
Dismissed: None.
Wednesday December 3
Admitted: Martin Gebrow.

iMPOR3-GtFJ-

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Around Campus

The salary for a spech therapist
in Kentucky ranges from $3,000 to
$8,000 a year.
The Speech Center offers a student a thorough curriculum, which
includes a certain amount of stu- cm. eachin" according to Dr.
Charles F. Diehl, professor and
read of the center. Through this
ttudent teaching, the student is
given actual cases in public school
clinical situations.
Among; the outstanding men and
women who have graduated from
UK are Mr. Ernest Kronball, now

In

I.

a class
at each l u. vne li t
hononnl by their nitniNtv"
Kiirvfs from other fraternities nt d
"nut." .tamrs quickly added, Soron' '.rs.
"other students are not chosen for
various reasons for whih I hey are
not to be condemned. Being chosen
SuKy SvnthOff
as a member is a great honor, but
SiiKy will sponsor a snid-i(- f
it dors not m.ike one superior to
for tlir baskrlball Irani Imliv
those not chosen."
at the airport.
Greek Wee chairman Ronr.ie
I ransportatiun
will he provided
CVeLtl introduced of her members for anyone
wishing to attend.
of the committee Dave Broker. Jim
Cars will lrar from In front ol
Stiukert, Jane (irare. It. 11 Km-keathe
Student tiiion
lluililmt
Joan Fistrr. Teny Kuester. .shortly In fore one
oYIrk.
Joe Ann Howard. Jim Lowell, Bettv

.1

out-patie-

t

an-

working at the rehabilitation renter gradmte scholarship .;.,!
owe
rersnns interested in careers in at Louisville;
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Marftairt $.00 graduate srhol.ithii) kr a
fr.crrh therapy arc likely to have Farmer, head of the Danville Puh- - student majoring in this air.i. uc- -

Professionally trained men and
women are in great demand, nnd
this demand is increasing yearly,
according to the staff.
Such a career offers an Indi- idual the opportunity to work in
public schools, hospitals, rehabilita- lion centers, and clinics. The aca- mc requirements for public
Mhool speech eorrectionists are a
R.A. or an M.A. degree In special
education or as a topical major
in the College of Arts and Sci-

Kl KM

KY

ontinued front Page

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By MARY ANN RIVKS

f:i'er-

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James Amuses Greeks

Training In Therapy
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1he staff of the University speech

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* The Kentucky Kernel
Utr4

The Readers' Forum

University of Kentucky

the Fot Of fir at Lrcinirton, Kmtiw Wy at ircond cUm in Her inW th Act of March 3, 1879.
k during th regular ariiool yrar ncrpt holiday! and taroa,
Published four time a
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

(

f

.Jim Hampton, Editor-in-ChiLarry Van I loose. Chief Sports Editor
Amrr ErrnwoN, Chief Netc$ Editor
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Pkhry Ashlit, Business Manager
Norman McMullin, Advertising Manager
Cordon Baer, Staff Photographer
Hank Chapman, Cartoonist
Marilyn Lyvew and Judy Penncbalcer, Proofreaders
ef

FRIDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Box

Jani

Ham-mons-

Editor

,

Harrison, Assotiate Editf

Dux Nfikihk, Sports Editor

Two Attractive Proposals
If the University Faculty approves
the recommendation to establish a
and
system at UK, the frustrating ordeal at
the start of each semester, now as
unavoidable as the proverbial death
and taxes, will be done away with.
It is obvious, almost cmbrassingly
so, that UK has outgrown its registration methods. Research and investigations made by a faculty committee in
the college offering the recommendation to the University Faculty indicate that a majority of the larger colleges and universities are using some
sort of
and
plan. A 6.000 enrollment
seems "to be the critical figure at
which some sort of
becomes urgent, if not necessary."
The most obvious advantage of
and registration, student-wise,
is the added time which
would be available for consultation
with faculty advisors. The student
.should have planned his schedule for
the
semester before registration, of course and many probabpre-registrati-

on

pre-registrati-

pre-registrati- on

pre-classificati- on

up-comi-

ng

ly do so.
.

But there
are the
switches brought on by closed classes,
a change of mind and other factors.
Any one of these can completely dis
rupt the "perfect schedule," and down
on the Coliseum floor in the midst of
a mob is no place for consultation.
Advisors will almost certainly be
forced to spend more time advising.
The objections already voiced to the
recommendation on this point indici-cat- e
disturbing callowness and indifference to student welfare.
The idea of
and
classification is not new or revolutionary. It is, rather, a step which
must be taken as a university grows
bigger, and one which makes it better. There will be problems to be
worked out, but they are not uiir
last-minu- te

pre-registrati- on

solvable. Other schools have found
working solutions; UK should be no
exception.
The second proposal, that of
grades, offers a sensible solution to another dilemma. Individual
students and organizations with a

To The Editor:
I assume the gentleman who misused the word "Jesus" without even
doing it the honor of capitaliation
and (then) labeled it vomit has now
had time to regret his action.
There have been times in history
when the name of God was so holy
that it was not spoken. Not so today.
Don't throw away your
to gain campus renown. There is
both postive and negative power in
your printed word. Be a little more
respectful certainly of the weak, the
weary and the wounded who have
died with that single word on their

Hall is the University's
one structure whose lines are classically and timelessly beautiful. With its
columns and graceful steeple, it is indeed the campus most imposing example of architecture.
The aesthetic beauty one senses in
Memorial Hall's exterior ends, however, the moment he steps inside the
foyer. And a few feet beyond, in the
main auditorium itself, grandeur gives
way to shabbiness and an unfortunate
Jack of maintenance.
The walls of the auditorium are
dingy and streaked where the heating
system has caused discoloration. The
draperies on some of the windows
hang unevenly, and their linings sometimes are visible below them. At
Wednesday's convocation a number of
burned-ou- t
chandelier lights had not

ct

lips.

Dave Bettincer

mid-semest- er

ate

interest in the academic standings of their members badger the
professor for
grades.
Establishing a definite policy such as
the recommendation calls for would
mean freedom, from the patience-tryin- g
queris.
For some professors, the turning in
of mid-tergrades would mean giving a test other than the final. For
these and others, more paper work
would be necessary. This seems to be
the only logical objection, but it is
by the advantages of the
plan.
In addition to stopping individual
and group inquiries, adopting the
recommendation would be of tremendous help to the student in giving
him concrete evidence of his academic
beprogress. Freshmen especially,
cause they are not accustomed to
grading systems used in college work,
would be aided.
In some cases, these students actually have no idea of their grades
until final scores are received at the
end of the semester. By then, of
mid-semeste-

mid-semest-

r,

er

m

out-weigh-

ed

course,

self-hel-

p

is impossible.

grades also would
serve as a warning to upper classmen
who know whether a course is being
passed or failed, but who want and
really need a definite statement of
their actual grades.
If the University Faculty is truly
interested in student welfare and a
better UK, both recommendations will
be passed. But if keeping the status
quo with its somewhat lighter work
load is more important than progress,
they will fail.
Mid-semest-

er

In Memoriam, Shabbily
Memorial

Sacrilege?

self-respe-

Before The Faculty

on

A

been replaced.
It seems odd that a building in
which concerts, convocations
and
other assemblies are held regularly
has been allowed to fall into its present state of neglect.

KERNELS
Most women are not so young as

they are painted.

Sir M. Beerrohm

What a woman wants is what you're
out of. She wants more of a thing
when it's scarce.
, O. Henry
Bohemia is nothing more than the
little country in which you do not live.
O. Henry

What this country needs
5-ce- nt

cigar.

T. B.

is a good

Marshall

Military Dignity
To The Editor:
In regard to the controversy over
military discipline, I would like to say
that I am 100 per cent in favor of

pushups.
Were it not for pushups, some of the
more naive might possibly escape
from ROTC with the gross misconception that the Army permitted its men
to retain a shred of dignity or individuality.
Furthermore, I think all advanced
BOTC cadets should be required to
partake of that glorious Army tradition, the Friday night GI party. A few
hours
spent handscrubbing toilet
bowls and urinals would add immeasurably to their ability to defend
their country and give them a much
more intimate understanding of military life as it really is.
Hardly anyone disagrees with the
noble objectives set forth by eager
cadets in their letters to the editor. It
is the method of achieving these objectives that is open to question.
The typical infrantryman in today's
Army uses a broom more than a rifle,
comes out a better trained janitor .than
soldier. A more appropriate emblem
would be crossed mops instead of
crossed rifles.
Granted, it is necessary to keep the
barracks clean, but this is pursued to
the point of outright fanaticism. I
s
of
have seen more than 300
labor spent in the cleaning of one latrine for one inspection this is an
organization whose only justification
for existence is to teach men to fight.
If automobile companies ran their
businesses in such a blundering and
inefficient manner, a new car would
cost $50,000.
Finally, in regard to the quote from
Gen. Gavin, is it not true that he quit
the Army in order to be able to enjoy
the basic right of freedom of speech?
.

they .ire a start, and, if left alone by
civilian meddlers, the future leaders
of our armed forces may learn to survive in the nightmare of cold steel and
bare guts which is war. Tin's survival
cannot be taught solely with lectures
classrooms and thrilling
in sunny
training movies.
The armed forces have been driven
from some of their former combat
toughness by concealed and devious
political pressures, whose weapon of
attack has been editors who are merely interested in selling papers, not
national security.
The classic definition of "military" is
the art of killing to enforce the will of
nations, or to defend the nations. This
can't be learned if individuals such as
you, dear editor, arc constantly worrying about our military man being
embittered or harm done to
their
Try trusting the generals, admirals
and military experts, who know the
requisites necessary to mold leaders of
"em-brasse-

self-respect-

."

men.

Al Nolan

'Bridge Addict' Trumped
To The Editor:
Andy Epperson's claim that "with a
few breaks we could have walked
away with the winners' trophy"
smacks of complacency, par