xt72bv79vm2v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72bv79vm2v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640225  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 25, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 25, 1964 1964 2015 true xt72bv79vm2v section xt72bv79vm2v Noojin, Brandenburgh Are Outstanding Greeks
Martine Noojin, Alpha Gamma Delta, and
Kenncili E. Brandenburgh, Delta Tan Delta,
were named Outstanding Greek Woman and
Man, at last night's Greek Week Banquet.
Miss Noojin and Brandenburgh were selected
by a secret faculty committee for their contributions and leadership within their chapters, and
within the Greek system generally. Contribution
to campus activities and scholastic achievement
were other criteria In their selection.
Miss Noojin, a senior mathematics major from
Lewistown, Penn., is Immediate past president of
Alpha Oamma Delta sorority. She has also served
as pledge trainer and first vice president of her
sorority. She was a member of Junior Panhellenic
Council during her freshman year as a pledge, and
this past year was vice president of Panhellenic
"ouncll.
She Is vice president of the senior class In the
llege of Arts and Sciences, and has served on the
tudent Congress Judicial Board for the past
two years.

She has been a member of Cwens, sophomore
women's honorary, social chairman of Links, junior
women's honorary, and Mortar Board, senior women's honorary. She Is also a member of PI Mu
mathematics honorary.
In Introducing her, Mrs. Charles Palmer, assistant to the Dean of Women, said Miss Noojin
was. the "almost unanimous" choice of the faculty
committee. "She has not been a mere Joiner, but
has held a high office In all her activities," one
nominating group said. Another noted her "rare
combination of poise, wisdom, integrity, sincerity,
and above all a sense of humor. She has contributed much to Greek life through her active support
In Panhellenic
and through her work with her
sorority."
Miss Noojin was nominated by Alpha Gamma
Delta, and Pi Kappa Alpha and Alpha Gamma Rho
fraternities.
Brandenburgh, a senior mechanical engineering major from Lexington, was pledged to Delta
Tau Delta at Washington and Lee University, where
Continued on Page 8

Centennial Activities
Start With Reception

With the issuing of a Centennial proclamation and the
announcement of a Centennial device and motto Saturday
President John W. Oswald opened activities leading to the
University's Centennial Observance.
At a luncheon honoring the major Centennial committees President Oswald officially proclaimed calendar year 1865 as the University's Centennial year and announced that the junior class would
officially be known as the Centennial Class and "that all future
references to this group bear this distinctive and unique title."
Bruce F. Denbo, head of the University Press and chairman of
on Centennial Publications, revealed the Centhe
tennial device and motto.
The device was arranged by P. J. Conkwright, a 1928 graduate
of the University, and was adapted from the Brioschl sculpture In
front of the Albert B. Chandler Medical Center.
Mr. Denbo said "the device subtly suggests 'UK with the upward
sweep and downward curve of its elements indicating the Centennial
theme the University's aspiration for achievement in the future
coupled with honor for the traditions of the past."
The Centennial motto Is "Sic Itur ad Astra." Taken from Virgil,
the Latin translate to "This Is The Pathway To The Stars."
Dr. Oswald challenged the faculty, students, trustees, and alumni
to "make this Centennial year
the period to wage a major battle
In
against . . .
American life."
The result of meeting this
challenge. Dr. Oswald said, will
"be a citizenry better Informed
on the roles of the University
this rapidly changing Commonwealth, and a faculty and adminto
better
istration
equipped
render maximum services to the
people we serve."
In responding to the President's challenge, Dr. Thomas
Clark, chairman of the Faculty
Centennial committee, said the
University's faculty "will consider
It a privilege to close this first
century and an even greater privTHE DEVICE
ilege to help launch It into the
second century."
of the Student Centennial Committee,
James Svara,
said that the student body would not only accept the president's
Continued on Page 8

",f
A

-

fti

By RICHARD STEVENSON
Kernel Dally Editor

fac-

ASHLAND-Univers- ity

ulty and staff will begin paying for parking Sept. 1 under
a plan adopted by the Executive Committee of the Board
of Trustees Friday afternoon.
fee system
The faculty-sta- ff
will enable the University to bethis fall to implement the
gin
parking portion of the General
parkCampus Plan. Two 500-cing structures should be under
construction by September. Their
completion is anticipated by September 1965.
Acting on the unanimous recommendation of the faculty advisory committee on parking and
traffic control, President John '
W. Oswald presented the ' revamped plan to the Board.
The plan calls for four divisions for parking. Academic and
Administrative faculty will pay a
$36 per year fee. Staff and disabled students will pay $24 per
year. Students will continue to

'

-

Sandy
junior cord Is shown bring introduced
and James Svara, iixliuirmrn of the l eu- -

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-

MARTINE NOOJIN

LEXINGTON,

(Oft

nil

Centennial Reception
to

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KEN BRANDENBURGH

KY., TUESDAY,

25, 1964

Vol. LV, No. 78

Parking Structures Series,
Fees For Faculty Approved

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University of Kentucky
FEB.

Eight Tages

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tenniul Committee,
the receiving line of the
lor Class Reception held Saturday at Alumni House.

In

pay $10 per semester. The fourth
class of parking, visitors, contains
no fee provisions.
The system will be In effect
from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
and from 7 a.m. to 12 noon on
Saturdays. The plan also includes the provision for fee parking during "all. University functions." Dr. Oswald Indicated that
this will include athletic contests and other functions not
now covered by parking fees.
A budget of $131,200 was established to come from permit
fees. $51,140 of this will be used
for the operation and personnel
for the system. The other $80,060,
earmarked for "capital development," will be used to start the
structure system.

The structures, estimated to
cost $800,000 each, will be located
between StoU Field and the Student Center, and across Rose
Street from the Men's Quad
rangle.
The third, of the seven structures proposed in the Campus
Plan, will be located near the
Medical Center. Its exact location awaits a traffic development
plan.
Larry Coleman, campus planner, indicated that the ideal plan
would be to have all surface lots
but that the University faced a
land problem.
The
steel and
concrete structures will occupy
about four acres while it would
Continued on Page 2

Dr. Martin Resigns
Dean Of Men 's Post
By BILL GRANT, Kernel Daily Editor

ASIII. AND At its regular monthly meeting, the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees named Dr. Ellis F.
Hartford to the newly created position of Dean of the Community Colleges and was told by President John W. Oswald
that Dean of Men Leslie L. Martin will resign his present
position.
Dr. Hartford's appointment and Dean Martin's resignation both
become effective on July 1. Dean Martin expressed the desire to
return to full time teaching and research in the University's College
of Education. He already holds the academic rank of professor of
education.
leave by the University in
Dr. Hartford was granted a two-yeJuly, 1962, to serve as executive secretary of the Kentucky Council
on Public Higher Education and will return to the University fur
his new position at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1965.
In moving to meet what Dr. Oswald called the rapid growth
In community colleges, the Board:
1. Officially separated
the community colleges from the Division
of Extended Programs,
2. Changed the name of the division to University Extension, and
3. Changed the title of Dr. R. D. Johnson from executive dean
of Extended Programs to dean of University Extension.
Dr. Hartford, 58, holds his bachelor and master's degrees from
the University and a doctor of education degree from Harvard
University.
In recommending changes, President Oswald told the Executive
Committee that the Dean for Community Colleges would be responsible for the University's growing system of community colleges and
that University Extension would still include home study, extension
class and evening class programs, workshops and conferences, community music services, and high school speech and drama festivals.
In announcing to the trustees that he had granted Dean Martin's
e
teaching. Dr. Oswald said, "while we
request to return to
we are thankful
regret to lose Dean Martin as an administrator,
that the I'nivertily will be able to capitalize on his abilities as m
teacher and researcher.'
Dr. Oswuld said the University would begin a "search" for a
replacement for Dr. Martin.
c
The Executive Committee approved betting up to a

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb.

25, 1901

Dr. Martin Resigns As Dean Of Men
Continued From Fage 1
scholarship program to be financed by surpluses from the University
and revenue from campus vending machines.
Book Store
The scholarships, according to the Committee's provisions, will
be unrestricted and awarded on a four yenr or continuing basis.
149 students In all classifications will be asUltimately, in 1967-6sisted annually throup.h this program.
The largest scholarship, the President's Scholarship, will be
$4,000, or $1,000 per year. The recipient must maintain a 3.0 standing
in order to keep the scholarship.
An additional 14 scholarships of $3,000 ($750 a year) will be
awarded. These are titled the Trustees' Scholarships.
Other scholarships In the program will range In value from
$250 to $2,400.
In other business the Executive Committee:
to
1. Approved the use of $50,000 from the federal government
Increase salaries of the Agriculture Experiment Station personnel.
1.
Salary increases will be on a selective merit basis retroactive to Jan.
2. Accepted $1,167,819 in research and training grants and In
and gifU. Dr. Oswald singled out a $10,000 gift from
scholarships
Spindletop Research Inc. as first payment on' a $50,000 grant
promised by Spindletop.
3. Created a Department of Orthopedic:, In the College of Medicine, and
of Animal Pathology to
4. Changed the name of the Department
the Department of Veterinary Science.

-

f
v

DEAN L. L. MARTIN

x

V

DR. ELLIS F. HARTFORD

Debaters Take Two
First Place Honors

Two University debate teams, coached by Dr. Gifford
Rlyton, won first place honors in tournaments over the
weekend.
ior from Owensboro; and John
S.

In the Capitol Hill Tournament. Phil Orogan, sophomore
commerce major from Bowling
Green, was named top speaker,
and James Crockarell, a commerce sophomore from Clarks-vill- e,
Tenn., was named runner-uGrogan and Crockarell argued
and the
both the affirmative
negative, defeating the 33 other
teams competing in the tournament.
The debate Issue was "Resolved: That the Federal Government Should Guarantee An
Opportunity for a Higher Education to All Qualified High School
Graduates."
The finals of the tourney were
held in the Senate Caurus Room
or the Senate Office Building in
Washington, D. C.
In the other Saturday meet,
at Berea, UK's debaters placed
first. Berea College second, and
Eastern Kentucky College third.
Members of the winning squad
were David McCracken. Arts and
Sciences senior from Paducah;
Michele Cleveland, Arts and Sciences sophomore from Louisville;
Richard Ford, a commerce Jun

Patton, Arts and Sciences sophomore from Ashland.

Faculty Fees

For Parking
Approved
Continurd From Page 1
take about 12 acres to park the
same 1200 cars on surface lots.
Dr. Oswald indicated that most
had
universities
urban
gone
through the same problem of
having free parking for faculty
and then having to develop a
ystem that made more sense
when It had grown.
Mr. Coleman indicated that the
will cost approxistructures
mately $1,500 per car to build on
the present three-stor- y
plan. He
said he guessed it would cost
- or
$2,000 per car for fivestructures.
will
The planned structures
and two
contain a
Btories.

7

SPECIAL LUNCH
For Students and Staff
Mti""

,

ED

Parking Structures

The University Board of Trustees Executive Committee approved
Friday a new parkins; plan for the campus. The plan include! two
parkins; strurtures for the campus.' Ti e structures (indicated by
diagonal lines) will be located between the Student Center and Stoll
Field, and across Rose Street from the Men's Quadrangle.

the

Served weekdays Tl a.m. to 2 p.m.
Selection tchang.es each day

CHAD MITCHELL

T

Alwaysunder $1.00
J

Cntr

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-

Lima

PERKINS PANCAKE HOUSE

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strand

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7;lo 14 J5 p.m.
"Th. Bft Cfnedv Ever
Made!"

Newiweek

"TOM JONES"
With ALBIIT

FINNEY

BE"N ALi
At IVOO,
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to n A VIf7:S and 00,
I
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nataii woodin
STEVi MyfiUlfN

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HELD OVER!
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY

OS,

With the Proper Strjna, er'

WHO said wc couldn't weal

Stjrrlna

'Lova

"MUTINY ON
THE BOUNTY"

p.m.

shoes on this floor?

CINEMA

)chool

KENTUCKY

A;F

'"oiU

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DEAN

Stirring
THOMAS

I

Memorial Coliseum

TAfoO'S

(wlxro IImF)

seen

actual.
--

TERRY

in

Everyone's
Fayorit
Girl . . . CAROL BUR HETT

martin
I

FRIDAY NIGHT AT 8

NOW SHOWIf

)C&ndrels
to

BRAND
MOWAR

MARLON
TREVOR

VlnMy

$2 now
Kennedy's

$2.50 then
LKD Office

Dawahare'a

Graves, Cos

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb.

Kernel Women's Page
Despite Leap Year
Elopements

Out Of Style

NEW YORK. (AP- )- As romantic as it sounds, and as
handy ;is it would he this year with no more than a fortnight
between Valentine's Day anil Leap Year Day, the elopement
is going out of style.
to more stringent-marriaglegis-

Where marriage
mills once
thrived, lovers now cool their
heels (and possibly their hearts)
feetting blood tests and marking
oft legal waiting periods.
Although a dozen states were
still without waiting periods folas ot
lowing license applications
a survey In 1961 in all but one
of these, Nevada, impetuosity was
deterred by blood test certifications.
While a handful of states,
that scrotolog-- certificates
(blood tests) and the
wait are sufficient coolers, In
nearly all others the couples are
given three to four days In which
to reconsider before the big step.
' The really big exception
is
Mississippi which demands that
Jove endure a
wait to insure that no marriage be performed in haste there to be repented at leisure anywhere.
Gretna Green on the Scottish
side of the border was the traditional haven for eloping English
couples. In the United States the
name is generic for "quickie"
marriage mills'' where any
man owning a notary
public seal could respond to the
Insistent door bell in the wee
hours, and with his yawning
negligeed wife as witness, bind
an impulsive pair Into holy matrimony, and collect a few bucks.
But states where Gretna
KenGreens once flourished
tucky, Georgia and Connecticut
to name a few, have since bowed

lation.
Sometimes, as in the case of
Greenwich, Conn., the onetime
Gretnas maintain the romantic
aura of former days even though
the rules are changed. Connecticut requires a blood test by a
laboratory, a four-da- y
wait, and a final copy of any
divorce previously obtained.
twosomes
Thus starry-eye- d
drive from out of state through
the countryside to the outsized
hamlet not one fateful time as
In the good old days. They make
the first trip for the legal formalities and again four days
later for the wedding rites.
Although the waiting period is
one day longer than in New York
state, Connecticut remains an at- -'
tractive lure for any New Yorker
marrying a second time because
it does not care where or when
he was previously divorced, as
long as the decree Is final. '
Older men and women remarry
In Connecticut "to avoid raised
eyebrows and knowing smiles and
cruel tongues of their neighbors,"
says Dr. Walter C. McKain, a
University of Connecticut expert
on aging. "Until this attitude Is
hanged, we'll always have Gretna
changed, we'll always have
Gretna Greens."
But generally, eloping has boiled down to a pastime for the
rich who can afford to Jet to
Nevada or Mexico to change their
names.

Why do women smoke?
For the same reasons that
men smoke, says a psychologist, Dr. Harold Greenwald,
who believes in giving women the beiiefit of equality.
The search' for contentment,
release of tensions, the social
aspects are all part of it.
"It used to be that almost

only business women smoked," he
says. And wicked ladies, of course.
"But the more women get involved in work particularly in
unsatisfying work the more they
seek satisfaction on a primitive
level, the same as men," Dr.
Greenwald points out.
Wheat a woman is frustrated in
ber work the smokes or eats
these beinr the primitirv, oral
pleasures psychologists' love to
talk about and smoking is better for the figure.
"Another reason women
con6moke," Dr. Greenwald
tinues, "is that they tend to be
more conformist than men,
much
and smoking now is almost a
social ritual like saying 'hello'
and 'how do you do?' Women
don't lilqe to go against the
norm."
of
The feminine

ten says, with perhaps forgive-abl- e
smugness, that men don't
like to see women smoke. Dr.
Greenwald is not convinced this
is true.
"Some men like it. In the old
days women who smoked were
considered loose. Lots of guys
or there
like loose women
wouldn't be so many of them,"
he quips.
Dr. Greenwald, who Is planning controlled research on three
methods of stopping
different
smoking, says the problem with
smoking, as with any other addiction, is that women find it
enjoyable. And anything enjoyable is harder to break off.
He suspects that if
were made sexy there would
be a better chance of women
giving up the weed. "Men, too,"
he adds.
The whole problem of addictions, of which smoking is the
most common, interests the
psychoanalyst.
"There's a new addiction, tranquilizers, which may turn out to
be the most dangerous of all.
It's interesting, a cigarette is
sometimes called the poor woman's tranquili .e" he says.
The recently released advisory
committee's report to the surgeon
general of the Public Health

The pledge class of PI Kappa
Alpha recently elected the following officers:
Gary Smith,
president; Jerry Patterson,
Phil Harris, secretary;
Joe Potts, treasurer; Nick Nickell,
chnplin; and Dave Price, sear-geat arms.
Pin-Mat-

Libliy IlazrlrigR, a freshman
English major from Owensboro,
toDavid Alexander, a Junior agricultural economics major from
Henderson, and a member of Pi
Kappa Alpha.
Sherry Moore, a senior at St.
in
School of Nursing,
Marys
W.
Va. to Larry
Huntington,
Workman, a sophomore in civil
engineering from Huntington, W.
Va. and a member of Pi Kappa
Alpha.

Engagements

Joyce Ann Watts, a senior math
major from Delbarton, W. Va., to
Gary Sewrll, a senior business
major from Lexington and a
member of PI Kappa Alpha

Horizons '6 t

Richard R. Freeman,
. Trof.
head of tbe I nivrrsity Art Department, will present an inn
formal
at 4
p.m. tomorrow in Room 206 of
the Student Center.
As part of the weekly Horizons '64 lecture, Mr. Freeman
will be speakinK about "I K in
Europe." In addition tie will
show slides from his recent
trip abroad.
Mr. Freeman has been chairman of the I'K Art Department since 1958. Originally
trained for museum work, Mr.
Freeman
received his A.B.,
from Yale and his M.A. from

The February meeting of the
University Woman's Club will be
held at 2 p.m. today at the Helen
O. King Alumni House, with Mrs.
Lyle R. Dawson serving as program chairman.
Members of the UK debate
team under the direction of Dr.
Gilford Blyton will present an
exhibition
debnte. The debate
topic will be tho current intercollegiate resolution, RESOLVED:
"That the Federal Government
should guarantee an opportunity
for a higher education to all
qualified high school graduates."
Speaking for the affirmative
will be Michele Cleveland, Louisville; and Sarah Prnther, New
The negative
Castle, Indiana.
speakers will be John Patton,
Ashland; and James Crockarell,
Clarkville, Tenn. These four students are all experienced debaters and as a group have won
over 70 percent of their debates.
Hostesses for the meeting are:
Mrs'. James Gladden, chairman;
Mrs. James Herron, Mrs. Alfred
Hu, Mrs. Georpe Jenkins Jr., Mrs.
Allen King, Mrs. - Erwin Lyons,
Mrs.- Allan Morris, Mrs. Frank
Morrow, Mrs. Vernon Musselman,
Mrs. Juan Rodriguez, Mrs. Hugh
Storrow, Mrs. Boyd Wheeler, and
Mrs. F. L. Yost.
A brief social period will precede the meeting beginning at
1:30 p.m.
The exceptive board will meet

COSMETICS

Service, "Smoking and Health,"
indicates
says that research
smokers tend to be extroverts.
"Of course extroverts smoke,"
agrees Dr. Greenwald. "Smoking
is a social ritual as much as anything else.
"The smoking woman la a sophisticated, sexual woman. But
you'll notice it's usually cigarettes.
"There are occasional campaign to interest women in pipes
or little cigars, but they don't
go over.
woman in
"The
the public mind is a hardbitten,
On television,
hillybilly grandma.
sometimes, voodoo priestesses are
seen smoking cigars. These aren't
images to get involved with," he
says with a chuckle.

Radio Free Europe speaks
daily, intheirownianguages,
to millions of captive people
in Poland, Czechoslovakia,
Bulgaria. Hungary and Romania. It tells them what is
really happening in their
countries, and right in their
own home towns.
In eflect, Radio Free Europe is the one opposition

Management

Speech

An illustrated
lecture, "Develop Mangers or Else." Will
s,
be presented by Dr. ('. V.
,

Projret

Manner-Pla-

Education, I.B.M., at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Student Center. Guests are invited.

KENTUCKY
TYPEWXIT E R
RV

SE

I

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915

S.

Limestone

Parking in Rear

Across from UK College of Medicine

E

Olivettr PortabU Typewriters
Ribbons
1
arbons
and Offics Supplies
SALES

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Phono

387 Ron St.

7

newspaper that nobody can
stop these enslaved people

lrom reading

with their

ears.

But Radio Free Europe
can t do it all alone. It needs
your help, financially. Help
to get the truth through the
Iron Curtain by mailing
your contribution to:

Radio Free EuroccBox 1364, MLVernon.H.Y.

TAKE A

9 ONUT

BREAK!

We' ri Open Till 2 a.m.
s
For

tmt hot dcH clous donuts call
your ronveifiei nc anytime between

HAVINGA PARTY

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p.m. and 2 a.m.

US FOR SPECIAL

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Dixie Cream Donut Shop
South Lime and Euclid

Across from Holmes

DRY CLEANING

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Phone

254-44- 54

LAUNDRY

S. ASHLAND

S. BROADWAY

SPECIAL! .

3

At 1 p.m. at the King Alumni
House.
are now bring
Reservations
taken for the University Woman's Club Newcomers' Spring
Luncheon and Style Show to be
held at 12:30 p.m. March 7, at
Spindletop. Third and fourth
year members are invited.
Mail reservations are $2.50 to
Mrs. Ray Ranta, 3410 Briarclill
Circle, Lexington, Ky.

AT BROADWAY

MENtS TOILETRIES

FOUNTAIN

1

llanard.

606

PRESCRIPTIONS

96

To Meet At Alumni House

Elections
ri Kappa Alpha

HALE'S PHARMACY
Rexoll

1

University Women's Club

Edited by
Nancy Loughridge

Psychologist Says Women Smoke
T o Feel Equal, For Contentment
By JOY MILLER
AP Women's Editor

25,

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ONE-HOU- R

DRY CLEANING

AT DOTH LOCATIONS

Hall

* The 'Green Door'
r

Although the fust semester of the
present year is past, there may still
be matters unresolved during the four
months just completed. This is the
situation with the infamous "green
door" at the Margaret I. King Library.
Located on the west side of
the library, the door has been the object of epithets from freshmen to faculty, those unsuspecting souls who
march brightly up to its shiny gold
barhandle, take firm hold, tug all in
vain. This door has been locked since
the new addition to the library was
completed in the fall of 1962.

one who could be spared to spend
his working hours at the side door.
the University enters a tremendous building program to provide
modern, convenient buildings, the
matter of a conveniently situated,
functional door which doesn't open
seems incongruous. The frustration it
causes is unnecessary, and the senseless waste of door and sidewalk calls
for a solution. Why can't it come this
semester?
As

unequaled
on the campus. One estimate is
that at its widest point the sidewalk
measures 15 feet. The walk is perfeet long. Quite an impreshaps
sive entrance that leads no placet

The library staff contends that the
addition of another checker at tin's
entrance would be an additional expense they cannot bear. One wonders
if perhaps a student could be employed here, if only for certain specified hours daily. At 83 cents to SI an
Jiour, the total amount would be
relatively small, and the convenience
Would certainly be worth the expense.
A reshuffling of student employees at
the loan desk might result in finding

Letters To The Editor

The residents of Holmes Hall are
being asked to serve as .hostesses in
absentia to the delegates. This is not
a "routine procedure." It is a rare
privilege and should be a welcome
one for the University to have been
chosen to host such a convention; and
along with this privilege goes the
responsibility of housing the delegates
and their sponsors (many of whom
are deans of women from their respective colleges). Holmes Hall has
been chosen for this purpose, not because it is "the largest and most convenient," as the Kernel editorial of
Teb. 19 stated, but because it offers
the most ideal facilities for this type
of situation.
It is at this point that communication breaks down, for many women
students are seemingly unaware that
AWS exists to serve them. (For example, AW'S ptoposed and put into
effect the program of extended hours
lor women students during exam
month last semester). Those Holmes
Hall tesidents who do understand the
pin poses' and functions of AW'S and
il the ((invention welcome the opportunity to do their pait as liicuibeis of
AW S lor eveiy full time woman student at the University is a member
of AW'S. When these purposes aie
more dcaily nuclei stood, we feel
lli.it the lines ol ( oiiiiiiiinic ation
will be iccslahlished and that the
women of Holmes Hall will demon-sttat- e
their matuiity and understanding of olleriug their full suppoit to
AWS.
Freshman Advisers, Holmes Hall

elt

mnttrr omto the Act ol Marefc. S, 1879.
the pout offlr at Lrdnirton, Krntucky a wctmA
nterrri
hool yrnr rxeept dunna holiday and Mama.
wwk during; the miliar
Published lour timw
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Malaysian Racial Tensions
Of

is

The theme for the IAWS convention to be held at UK during the
first part of spiing vacation is Communication: Its Art and Value. Apparently, however, there has been
some lack of communication already
concerning housing for the delegates
cil the convention.

Tlie South's Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

Prevent Formation

The concrete walkway to this

Lack Of Communication
no The Editor:

The Kentucky Kernel

Kave Folkfrs, Sophomore, Education; Claudia Jkhrey, Sophomore Arts and Sciences; Linda
Mitchell, Sophomore, Education; Karen Pall, Sophomore,
Arts and Sciences.

Civil Rights

March

To The Editor:

On March 5 there will be a peaceful march on the state capital in
Frankfort for the purpose of impressing on the state legislators that the
public wants a fair public accommodations law. It seems to me that
there should be enough people at UK
who are actively in favor of civil
lights for a contingent of marchers
to be formed.
Any student or faculty member
who might be interested in marching
should get in touch with me at my
office in Room 10 in the basement of
McVey Hall or call me at Extension
2138. In addition to hearing Martin
Luther King and Jackie Robinson
speak, the marchers will have the
moral satisfaction of having participated in the most significant social
movement of

Henry Chapin
Instructor
English Department

Clarification

To The Editor:

Due to a few comments and calls
I have had concerning my letter Feb.
21 about the Law School, I feel that

I should cl.uily myself a bit further.
Not once in my letter did I say
I was opposed to games of any kind.
Anwhing is all light in its place. I
meiely implied that I didn't think the
front lawn of Lai Icily Hall was the
place.
Lee Lawrence Jr
Freshman
Arts and Sciences

Union

All-Stude- nt

(Editor's Note: Jeff Greenfield,
editor' of the Wisconsin Daily Cardk
inal, has just completed a
tour of Southeast Asia as a member
of a student delegation sponsored by
the U.S. National Student Association and the Institute of International
Education under a grant from the
U.S. State Department.)
By JEFF GREENFIELD
For Collegiate Press Service
KAULA LUMPUR, Malaysia -fedRacial tensions in the newly-boreration of Malaysia have blocked atstudent
tempts for an
union.
The new nation, formed in September, l'Jti.'J, includes the federation
of Malayia, Singapore (a
colentity), and the
onies of Sabah and Sarawak. The federation includes Malays and Chinese,
with an English educational and political system.
The Chinese in Singapore partial
larly (where they form a numerical
majority) have strong tics to their
homeland. While of a cultural, rather than political nature, these ties
rellect their support of the Chinese
government in power.
In today's world, this means that
sentiment in Singapore is strong so strong, in fact, that
in l'JGl the
territory
almost voted a Communist government into power.
The Chinese are fiercely determined to preserve their cultural identity;
consequently, many Chinese students

Campus Parable
Where does the glory of our country lie? In the past or in the future?
Are we "on top of the world?" Or are
we "on the way down?"
"For such a time as this" what
do we see?
By industry and ingenuity we
have made progress and advances in
every direction only to discover that
it has really gotten us nowhere. With
dollars we have tried to buy everything from peace to friendship only
to find that it cannot be done.
Everywhere there are ominous
signs of a repetition of the national
tragedy brought on by a people more
interested in pleasure-givincomfort
than in the peace-givincomfort of
Cod.
"For such a time as this" nothing
is mine needed than attmion to the
admonition: "Let us test and examine
our was and return to the, Lord!"
"For such a time as this" we need
to see that turning to God with faith
in Clnist is the only stiategy guaranteed to biing victory in our
struggle with sin.
R. L. Bemklp
I'astor
Saint John's Luthern Church

attend schools patterned after the
Chinese system, in contrast to the government supported Brhish-- s y s t e m
schools.
One Singapore college Nanyang
University is the point at which all
these factors have joined to form the
dilemma facing student leadership.
Nanyang is a political hotspot. Its
students were among the most vocal
"Bhar-isa- n
supporters of the
Socialiste" (Socialist Front), and
the school has been branded a "hotbed of leftism" by most Singapore
and Malaysian government officials
including Tengh Abduhl Rahman, the
federations prime minister.
When the federation was formed,
central government in Kuala
Lumpur cracked down on Singapore's
Nanyang. Most of the student council leaders were jailed; and the school
lias not received official accreditation,
since the Malaysian government demands an ethnically integrated program, while Nanyang stands by the
Chinese pattern of education.
the

Nanyang's student council is part
of a Singapore union of students. The
Malayan union, which wants to federate with the Singapore union, cannot do so because to federate would
include Nanyang as part of the
union; and the government
of Malaysia will not permit such a
union.
In sum, the Malaysian government's policy against narrow ethnic
education has stymied the efforts at
student merger because just such an
ethnic school is part of Singapore's
student union.

The Nanyang case Is not the only
example of friction between students i
and the central government. The Uni-- "
versity of Singapore, a British-stylschool, has recently taken issue with
the government "short-listingpo