xt72fq9q4t7d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72fq9q4t7d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700911  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 11, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 11, 1970 1970 2015 true xt72fq9q4t7d section xt72fq9q4t7d THE KENTUCKY

Ei E K N
Friday, Sept. II,

1970

E

4"

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Vol. LXII, No. 0

Says Nunn 'Manipulates'

Student Code,
Asks for 'Communication'

SG Assails
By RON HAWKINS
Assistant Managing Editor
The Student Government Assembly passed a resolution last
niftht which condemned "political manipulation on our campuses by our Covemor" and suggested "that all channels of communication be utilized and completely exhausted before a resort
to demonstrations."
Submitted by SG speaker
Buck Pennington, the resolution
also called for "an alternative

to the repressive Student Code."
The resolution said "rational alternatives" should be sought to
manipulation by the governor and
the student code.

Representative

Graeme

Browning moved that the word
"repressive" be removed from the
resolution. She argued that using
the word would turn people
against efforts to change the code.
Say What We Mean'
Representative Josh O'Shea
replied, "If we believe it's repres- -

Berkelcy Says
Non-Addicti-

Opium
May Be on Horizon
ve

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) -Experiments with the highly addictive opium poppy and ordinary tobacco plants show both
may be made to grow their own
cure, a scientist said today.
The discovery opens the possibility of a nonaddictive morphine, derived from opium, and
a cigarette that will stimulate
but not "hook" or harm the
smoker, reports Dr. Henry
chemistry professor at
the University of California at
Berkeley.

"We fool the plants into doing
the hard work," Rapoport said,
describing how he gives plants
"false" compounds that are very
similar to compounds the plants
naturally produce themselves.
For example, the scientist
synthesized nicotine with a deviant molecular structure, where
a compound of one carbon and
three hydrogen atoms replaced
one hydrogen atom in one section of the molecule. Radioactive
carbon-1- 4
was hooked into the
deviant structure, as a tracer, so
the final product could be identified.
The "false" compounds are
fed into the plant by putting
them into water, then placing
the plants into the water so that
the compounds are absorbed

through the plants' root systems,
he said in an interview.
Once this is done, the amount
of the "false" compound can be
increased and the natural compound can be decreased, he said.
"What we are trying to do is
give nature a different starting
material . . .to make a close relative, a cousin" to natural compounds, Rapoport said. The
next step will be to develop
chemical substitutes for morphine and nicotine that will be
fed to the plants in the same
way as the "false compounds."
"We hope we can develop
something better than methadone," he added. Methadone, a
totally synthetic chemical which
is addictive too, is the only known
cure for heroin addiction.
findings are detailed today in the journal of the American
Chemical Society.
Once chemical substitutes can
be grown in opium and tobacco
plants, experiments with small
animals will begin to test the
reaction of the new "cousins"
to morphine and nicotine.
If they are successful, similar
"false" compounds could be
grown for such medically valuable but dangerous drugs as
quinine, cocaine, belladonna,
curare and reserpine, Rapoport
said.

sive, we should say it is. It's
time we quit implying and start til
saying what we mean."
The move to drop "repressive"
was killed and the resolution
passed despite complaints from
several representatives that demonstrations are channels of communications.
The assembly also passed a
directive which ordered the Student Affairs Committee to hold
meetings with student organizations to recommend changes
within the code "of questionable
merit."
The directive originally said
reform lies within peaceful litigation, not demonstrations. However, the bill was amended to

"destnictive
tions."

say

i

.

:

i:

demonstra-

Appointments Made
The assembly approved of the
appointment of David Howard to
the position of director of finances, the appointment of Glen
Embry as associate director of
inner-schorelations, the appointment of Mrs. Nancy Ray to
serve as administrative adviser to
Student Government and autlior-ize- d
the Student Government
committee on committees to
Continued on Page 8, CoL 3

Fountain of Youth
Something about a fountain seems to attract kids of all ages. The
fountain in the Office Tower plaza is no exception. While some
wade In the pool, dangle their feet in the water, or just sit and
watch others walk by, some find the fountain an excellent place
Kernel Photo By Ken Weaver
to get to know another person.

Possibly This Year

University Grants EAS $3,000
For Expanded Lecture Series
The Environmental Awareness Society (EAS) announced
last night that the University
has granted the organization
$3,000 to acquire speakers for
its lecture series during the coming year.
Rick Falknor, seminar chairman for EAS, said the allotment
was the first ever given to the
young organization. Falknor said
EAS proposed last spring to former acting Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Stuart Forth
and President Otis Singletary

that they be given money

for a

speaker series.
Grant Was Late
The grant was eventually approved by the office of the Dean
of Students "a little later than
we expected," said Falknor. He
said EAS has made no selection
of speakers for the series yet, but
that they are looking at the qualifications of some senators, authors, and politicians who are
active in the environment field.
The EAS already has a lecture series composed of local

Who, Us?

Firms Again Accused of Illegal Campaign Contributions

called also for a tightening of by name in the court proceedlaws on both lobbying and reings, but government files show
porting of contributions.
the campaign checks included:
His comments came in an
$1,500 for Rep. Edward A.
interview after the Associated Carmatz,
chairman of
Press disclosed a secret Justice the House Merchant Marine
Department list of the illegal Committee.
contributions by the two firms
$1,000 for Rep. William S.
which receive $43 million a year Mailliard,
in federal subsidies.
Republican of the same commitFinns Pleaded Cuilty
tee.
The largest donations went
$1,000 for Sen. Warren G.
for key members of Senate and
A story on page 1 of ThursMagnuson, chainnan of the Senday's Kernel gave the impres- House committees that guide the ate Commerce Committee.
A total of $2,400 for the top
rich tide of federal aid for the
sion that the Student Mobilization Committee to End the War shipping industry' Smaller checks four members of the House apin Vietnam was largely respon- went for such House leaders as propriations subcommittee that
sible for the planned appearance Cerald Ford and Hale Hoggs. actually votes the federal aid.
The two firms pleaded guil- One member, Rep. Robert L. F.
of Black Panther Huey Newton
is shown as reon campus. Actually, the Zoo, a ty earlier this year to making Sikes,
new student collective, had ini- the illegal contributions. The ceiving $500 in a year when he
legislators were not mentioned was unopposed for
tiated most of the planning.
By JAMES R. POLK
The
WASHINGTON (AP)
chairman of the House Ethics
Committee says illegal campaign
contributions made by two shipping firms for 16 members of Congress will be studied by his panel
in its private sessions.
Rep. Melvin Price,

-

D-Il-

-

Correction

D-Fl-

top-ranki-

)

Much smaller contributions

for such powers in Congress as

Ford, the House Republican leader, for whom a $100 campaign
check was given, and Roggs, the
Democratic whip, listed at $200.
Act Violated
The checks for Ford, Boggs
and others were included in formal charges against American
President Lines and Pacific Far
East Lines when the two firms
were fined $50,000 each in February for violating the Corrupt
Practices Act, which forbids corporate political contributions.
Justice Department files also
list a $300 campaign check for
Rep. L. Mendel Rivers,
chainnan of the House Armed
Services Committee, although
Continued on Pace 8, Col. 1

and regional experts, and Falknor said the $3,000 grant will
permit expansion of that program
to include nationally prominent
people.
May Begin Soon
The series will begin "whenever we get the first speaker
possibly as early as
but probably next semester,"
he said. A committee will meet
sometime in the next two weeks
to select possible lecturers. Falknor said he expects to get "four
to six" speakers with the $3,000
allotted EAS by the University.
The rest of the meeting was
devoted to planning projects for
the coming year and reportingon
activities during the summer.
EAS officials said they were planning to support several congressional measures, including a
Clean Air Bill and a Population
and Family Planning Act which
is currently bottled up in a House
of Representatives committee.
Will Oppose SST
They also said they would
support opposition in Congress
to the proposed supersonic transport.
locally, the EAS "action
committee" has organized a petition to encourage the banning
botof the sale of
tles in Lexington. They hope to
get 3,000 signatures on the petition, which will then be presented to city officials.
A talk on "Urban Redesign"
will be presented by the orga- Contlnued on Pace 9, CoL 5

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept. II, 1970

2

Kiddie Corps

From

Nixon's Young Staff Serves As Liaison
Between Administration, College Students
a
WASHINGTON (AD-- On
spring day this ear, shortly after
U.S. troop moved into
a young man was stopped
as he tried to enter tlie campus
of the University of Washington
at Seattle.
A policeman, doing his duty
to keep unauthorized people off
the campus during that nervous
time, demanded the man's identification. He had none from the
college-bu- t
he had one that gave
him entry into the White House.
"That cuts no ice here," said
the policeman. But after some
checking, Chester E. Finn, a
member of the White House
"kiddie corps" was allowed in.
The minor incident served to
illustrated a mission, performed
without fanfare, by eight White
House staffers on 27 college
campuses across the nation in
those troubled weeks.
Their mission was to find out
for President Nixon what really
was going on and, if possible,
to tell the administration's side.
President's Pledge
It was carrying one step further an administration objective
to dispel the notion that the
President is too isolated to get
the mood of young people.
During the presidential cam
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paign in 19GS, Nixon had said,
"Far too few of us really listen
to what young people are saying. We defend their right to
speak up and to dissent, we
at our own
smile
tolerance, anil then we pay no
attention to their message."
His campaign people set up
"listening posts" at various
places-sma- ll
recording stations
that invited the public to express views.
"We considered carrying it
over to the White House," says
Herb Klein, Nixon's director of
communications. "But we discovered the cost over a period
years would be quite expensive."
Smarting over criticism that
protests went unheard in earlier
demonstrations, the White House
arranged during the May 9 peace
gathering in Washington for administration officials to meet with
young people in small groups.
The Department of Health, Education and Welfare acted as a
clearingliouse to make people
available. And young White
House staffers moved into the
crowds to strike up conversations.
Tours Informal
Soon afterward, the staff assistants, aged 23 to 29, made
their tour of campuses. Like

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apology for having been as strong
as they were alxnit some of their
statements Or they took the other
tack: 'Here is a chance to really
lawn.
tell the White House off."
"It wasn't an attempt to sell
Others had similar experia program," says a 26- - ear-olences. "Most found that it took
staffer. "The students found out
a half hour for students to get
that the White House assistants
the hostility out, then get to
who went out were really bright the meat of the situation," said
young people who were interested one assistant.
in talking to them. And the peoSenior staff members also help
ple 1k went out found the stuin the communications effort. It
dents were not a band of wild
reaches to the very
young revolutionaries, but peolike John D. Ehrlichman, asconcerned about ivsues."
ple
sistant to the President for Dovisited three
Each staffer
mestic Affairs; H.R. Haldeman,
for
campuses, ineluding-excep- t
assistant to the President; Robert
e
they graduated from
Finch, a Presidential counselor
only a few years ago. Their report and Klein.
was summarized and brought to
All have invited young people
the President.
"It would be wrong to iso- to their offices and have gone to
late Cambodia, Kent State and the campuses to engage in the
Jackson State as exclusive causes dialogue.
of recent student discontent, al"You get the feeling for
though they serve to activate trends," says Klein. "A year ago,
many moderate students," one people on campuses were more
part of the report said.
concerned with civil rights than
Rumors Accepted
ecology. Then you could see it
"Many student appear to ac- building to ecology. The last
cept uncritically a number of bithree times I went out I haven't
as the adminzarre rumors-suc- h
been asked anything on the econistration's alleged contract with omy. Very few college students
the Rand Corp. to cancel the seem to be interested in that.
1972 elections-tha- t
confirm their They are mostly concerned with
suspicions of the government's
Vietnam, the draft, the environduplicity," said another.
ment, funds for education, narPrimarily, sas one staffer, cotics laws. Repression is a
"we learned that students were building thing."
deeply concerned over the issues,
The end result, of the drive,
but in addition there was the
Klein says, "is to build an awaresecond problem of communicaness of what people are talking
tion. If it wasn't for Viet-uaand Cambodia there still would about."
A young staffer puts it differbe this problem."
Another White House assistently. "I hope," he says, "peoant, 28 years old, walked up ple walk away and, if nothing
Ba scorn Hill, at his alma mater, else, say 'that guy's not a fasThe University of Wisconsin, to cist pig.' "
chat with a Quaker-offsprin- g
group holding a peace vigil.
"In that and every other case,
I didn't want tobeintheposition
of standing up and giving lectuThe Colonial Room of the
res-why
the Cambodian decision was made or debating the Campbell House Inn will be the
site Sunday of the third semsituation. That was not the purThe purpose was to guage iannual Meridian Callery exhibipose.
the intensity of the situation, the tion and auction.
Artists' works featured at the
base people had for their objections. I was cordially greeted. I auction will include: Pablo Pitried to convince every one I was casso, Salvador Dali, Victor
there to listen."
Marc Chagall and Joan
Miro.
Staff Approaches
The auction will consist of
Later he walked into a meeting of an organization actively some 175 original works of graphic art. The works of art have
engaged in getting political acbeen predicted by Meridian oftion into the community.
"There were about six of us. I ficials to range in price from
$20 to over $500. with the matalked with them about the acthe campus, what plans jority of the art selling between
tivity on
they had, what they thought $60 and $150.
The exhibition of art will beproduced the energy for the tpe
of work they do.
gin at noon. The auction will
are
"Halfway through I said who start at 3 p.m. Both events
I was. There was a degree of free.

Finn's, their visits were largely

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many uses for them...
seal or sign your letters,
identify books and records. Use them for date-bai- t,
or just for fun.

S3

To get your 100 photo-stamp- s,
simply cut the

name Swingline from

0

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10NC ISUM

WASHINGTON (AP)-- On
a
spring day this year, shortly after
U.S. troops moved into Cambodia, a young man was stopped
as he tried to enter the campus
of the University of Washington
at Seattle.
A policeman, doing his duty
to keep unauthorized people off
the campus during that nervous
time, demanded the man's identification. He had none from the
college-bu- t
he had one that gave
him entry into the White House.
"That cuts no ice here," said
the policeman. But after some
checking, Chester E. Finn, a
member of the White House
"kiddie corps" was allowed in.
The minor incident served to
illustrated a mission, performed
without fanfare, by eight White
House staffers on 27 college
campuses across the nation in
those troubled weeks.
Their mission was to find out
for President Nixon what really
was going on and, if possible,
to tell the administration's side.
President's Pledge
It was carrying one step further an administration objective
to dispel the notion that the
President is too isolated to get
the mood of young people.
During the presidential cam
CarreetUn

inc.

CITY. N V.

WHY PAY MORE

5

ETQ

.Zip.

2185 Versailles

ltd.

Right Next to Shoppers

f

Wiedemann
g

Finn's, their visits were largely

unannounced and all were
to what young people are sayin student unions,
ing. We defend their right to cafeterias, dormitories and on
speak up and to dissent, we lawns.
at our ow n
smile
"It wasn't an attempt to sell
tolerance, and then we pay no a program," says a
attention to their message."
staffer. "The students found out
His campaign people set up
that the White House assistants
"listening posts" at various who went out were really bright
places-sma- ll
recording stations
young people who were interest til
that invited the public to exin talking to them. And the peopress views.
ple wlio went out found the stu"We considered carrying it dents were not a band of wild
over to the White House," says young revolutionaries, but peoHerb Klein, Nixon's director of ple concerned about issues."
communications. "But we disEach staffer visited three
covered the cost over a period campuses, including-excep- t
for
Finn-th- e
one they graduated from
years would be quite expensive."
Smarting over criticism that only a few years ago. Their report
protests went unheard in earlier was summarized and brought to
demonstrations, the White House the President.
"It would be wrong to isoarranged during the May 9 peace
late Cambodia, Kent State and
gathering in Washington for administration officials to meet with Jackson State as exclusive causes
young people in small groups. of recent student discontent, alThe Department of Health, Edthough they serve to activate
ucation and Welfare acted as a many moderate students," one
clearingliouse to make people part of the report said.
available. And young White
Rumors Accepted
House staffers moved into the
"Many students appear to
crowds to strike up conversations.
uncritically a number of biTours Informal
as the adminzarre rumors-suc- h
Soon afterward, the staff asistration's alleged contract with
sistants, aged 23 to 29, made the Rand Corp. to cancel the
confirm their
their tour of campuses. Like 1972 elections-tha- t
suspicions of the government's
duplicity," said another.
Primarily, says one staffer,
"we learned that students were
deeply concerned over the issues,
but in addition there was the
second problem of communication. If it wasn't for Viet-naand Cambodia there still would
be this problem."
Another White House assistant, 28 years old, walked up
Bascom Hill, at his alma mater,
The University of Wisconsin, to
chat with a Quaker-offsprin- g
group holding a peace vigil.
"In that and every othercase,
I didn't want to be in the position
CALL 253-000- 4
of standing up and giving lectures-why
the Cambodian decision was made or debating the
situation. That was not the purpose. The purpose was to guage
the intensity of the situation, the
base people had for their objections. I was cordially greeted. I
tried to convince everyone I was
there to listen."
Staff Approaches
Later he walked into a meeting of an organization actively
engaged in getting political action into the community.
"There w ere about six of us. I
talked with them about the acChoice
Ph. 233-10G- 0
tivity on the campus, what plans
they had, what they thought
produced the energy for the type
ta
of work they do.
J1.kta-"Halfway through I said who
I was. There was a degree of
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onducted

ac-.ce- pt

kooD

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ETDTD

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19GS, Nixon had said,
too few of us really listen

paign in

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Nixon's Young SlalT Serves As Liaison
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apology for hav ing been as strong
as they were about some of their
statements. Or they took theother
tack: 'Here is a chance to really
tell the White House off."
Others had similar experiences. "Most found that it took
a half hour for students to get
the hostility out, then get to
the meat of the situation," said
one assistant.
Senior staff members also help
in the communications effort. It
reaches to the very
like John D. Ehrlichman, assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs; H.R. Haldeman,
assistant to the President; Robert
Finch, a Presidential counselor
and Klein.
All have invited young people
to their offices and have gone to
the campuses to engage in the
dialogue.
"You get the feeling for
trends," says Klein. "A year ago,
people on campuses were more
concerned with civil rights than
ecology. Then you could see it
building to ecology. The last
three times I went out I haven't
been asked anything on the economy. Very few college students
seem to be interested in that.
They are mostly concerned with
Vietnam, the draft, the environment, funds for education, narcotics laws. Repression is a
building thing."
The end result, of the drive,
Klein says, "is to build an awareness of what people are talking
top-peo-

ple

about."

A young staffer puts it differently. "I liope," he says, "people walk away and, if nothing
else, say 'that guy's not a fascist pig.'"

Art Show
The Colonial Room of the
Campbell House Inn will be the
site Sunday of the third semiannual Meridian Callery exhibition and auction.
Artists' works featured at the
auction will include: Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Victor
Marc Chagall and Joan
Miro.
The auction will consist of
some 175 original works of graphic art. The works of art have
been predicted by Meridian officials to range in price from
$20 to over $500. with the majority of the art selling between
$G0 and $150.
The exhibition of art will begin at noon. The auction will
start at 3 p.m. Doth events are
free.

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1970- -3

Electoral Reform Test May Come Next Week

WASHINGTON (AP) Senate
Democratic leader Mike Mansfield .said Thursday lie may try
next week to cut off debate on
a constitutional amendment providing for direct election of the
president.

Such a move, requiring a
majority of senators voting, would provide a crucial test
for the proposal to abolish the
Electoral College system.
Mansfield told newsmen he
didn't know what is chances
two-thir-

would be. "I haven't made am
polls," he said, "and I won't."
Rqmblican leader Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania said, meanwhile,
that President Nixon w hole heart-edl- y
supports the proposed
amendment which was approved

by the House a year ago by a
vote.
"I'm his spokesman in this
regard," said Scott. He told newsmen he had seen a White House

However, Scott predicted the
amendment would be approved,
if it could be brought to a vote
and if alternative proposals for
overhauling the electoral college
memorandum Wednesday stating system are rejected.
firmly that Nixon favors the diSenate leaders are trying to
rect election plan.
clean up the legislative schedule
"Any attempt to depict the and
but,
adjourn by
president as not wholeheartedly
in the absence of a unanimous
for it is in error," he said.
to limit debate, the
Mansfield, asked what he agreement
force a showwould do if a move to limit only way they could
down on the direct election
debate fails, said only that "I
amendment would be to apply
had no contact with McMillen will take the next step."
cloture.
since July.
This could mean a second
If the rule were put into efMcMillen was a unanimous attempt to cut off debate, if the
selection first vote was close, or could fect, each senator's speaking time
Pennsylvania
last basketball season. He scored signal a move to lay the prowould be limited to one hour.
Sen. James O. Eastland,
3,603 points for Mansfield High posed amendment aside.
chairman of the Senate
during his varsity career and was
Approval of the amendment
s
sought by 225 colleges. He was would take a
Judiciary' Committee, led the atmajority
at the top of his class acain the Senate and its supporters, tack on the amendment in Thursof the stu- including its chief
demically, president
sponsor, Sen. day's debate.
dent council, a member of the Birch Bayh,
"The repeal of the Electoral
have not
g
school band and a
College and its replacement by
yet claimed they have the neca direct popular vote would aforator.
essary margin.
fect revolutionary changes not
McMillen was reported
Sen. Roman L. Hruska,
to the Maryland campus
a leader of the opposi- only in the national political proat College Park, Md., with his tion, said he does not expect cess but in the entire thrust and
brother, Jay, who played for the
the amendment's backers to get emphasis of the nation itself,"
he said.
Terrapins.
339-7-

0

McMillen Changes Mind Agaim
Now He's Going to Maryland
MANSFIELD, Pa. (AP) -Tom McMillen,
high
school basketball star, apparently
has decided that Mom and Dad
know best.
McMillen has changed his
mind and decided to go to the
University of Maryland insteadof
his original choice, the University
of North Carolina.
The
McMillen
gave a statement to the Elmira,
N.Y.'," Cazette Thursday, which
said: "For personal and family
reasons I have decided to change
my original decision to attend
the University of North Carolina
and instead will be attendingthe
University of Maryland.
"This decision is in no way a
reflection upon the University of
North Carolina. I have the utmost

regard for basketball coach Dean
Smith, his staff and his program.
As far as I am concerned this
matter is finally closed."
McMillen's high school coach.
Rich Miller, confirmed the
switch.
Miller said he did not know
why McMillen changed his mind
after announcing last July he was
going to North Carolina over
the vigorous objections of his
parents.
The boy's father, Dr. James
McMillen, a dentist, said through
an office nurse that he had no
comment and he refused to confirm or deny the switch.
At Maryland, basketball
coach Left Driesell said he would
make no comment until he talks
with McMillen. Driesell said he

New Yorkers Challenge
18-Year-0-

Voting Age

1d

WASHINGTON (AP) The first court arguments on a challenge
to the new
voting age brought a defense from the govlimit is a historical hangover.
ernment that the
The challengers, all from New York, said Congress acted unconstitutionally when it lowered the age in a new law passed this
year. It's a matter for the states, they said.
A panel of three federal judges heard the arguments Thursday
and gave no indication when it would issue a decision. The Supreme Court has set Oct. 19 to hear arguments from nine states
challenging the new law.
Attorney Alfred Avins of New York asked for a swift judgment
from the three-ma- n
panel, particularly on the provision in the new
law suspending literacy test. It is urgent, he said, because of the
general elections coming up Nov. 3.
Avins, representing five New Yorkers, said the suspension gives
more advantage to candidates with large sums of money who
try to reach illiterates by radio and television advertisement.
"Well, you can punch doorbells, you know, and that's proved
pretty effective," Circuit Judge Ceorge E. MacKinnon commented.
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
supported the government
in arguing that Congress acted within its constitutional powers.
Kennedy, appearing on behalf of the Youth Franchise Coalition,
said, "There was recognition that there was invidious discrimination against
For the government, David L. Norma, a deputy assistant attorney general, said that persons 18, 19and20 years old work and pay
taxes like adults