”1‘ inf-1
. l 1% ill-i:
: l E! 7‘ 342 LETTERS 0N -
l3' 3 i 3 The official person showed him that the laws
1 3 l against witchcraft were abrogated, and had little ’3
- '3 .§ difficulty to bring him to regard the matter in its ‘3
. 3 3 § true light of an accident.
3 ‘ g: It is strange, but true, that the accused herself
} 3 was not to be reconciled to the sheriff’s doctrine
3 ‘ ‘3 ' 3 so easily. He reminded her, that if she used her
'l i :1 : tongue with so much license, she must expose her-
3 1 ‘ 3 '51 ‘ self to suspicions, and that should coincidences
.7 3 ‘3 j i ';- 1 3 happen to irritate her neighbours, she might suf-
33 ' 21,32: fer harm at a time when there was no one to
- I 3 protect her. He therefore requested her to be
3 3 3 more cautious in her language for her own sake,
3 V ' professing, at the same time, his belief that her
3 1.! : 3" words and intentions were perfectly harmless,
’3 l; :3-;3‘; and that he had no apprehension of being hurt
.l ‘3 i‘ by her, let her wish her worst to him. She was
3 3 .3 rather more angry than pleased at the well-mean-
‘3 3 1. 3 ing sheriff’s scepticism. “ I would be laith to
.3 ‘: "‘1 'wish ony ill either to you or yours, sir,” she said;
313 '3 3 i :3. “for I kenna how it is, but something aye comes
3 "33? after my words when I am ill-guided, and speak
1 - 1- ower fast.” In short, she was obstinate in claim.-
53 15-3 7: ing an influence over the destiny of others by
l3 (‘3 _ words and wishes, which might have in other
T 3 a. 33' _ times conveyed her to the stake ; for which her l
.fi' §3~Z expressions, their consequences, and her disposi- 3
t ‘31: _. tion to insist upon their efficacy, would certainly
2.3 33'3“ :3 of old have made her a fit victim. At present, 3
l 3 the story is scarcely worth mentioning, but as it
31.5 3} contains materials resembling those out of which 3
3 9, ' many tragic incidents have arisen.
. I ' So low, in short, is now the belief in witch-
31 3 3:3% craft, that, perhaps, it is only received by those 3
.. 3