xt72v6988p55 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt72v6988p55/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680328  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1968 1968 2015 true xt72v6988p55 section xt72v6988p55 Student Calls Pol Use 'Liglii-IIearlc-

Law Violation'

d

Drug Laws Create 'Prohibition Era9 In '60's
By GUY MENDES

"It all relates to prohibition

...

it's

a

prohibition

ban."
That's how one UK drug user described the legal
risks of smoking marijuana.
Marijuana use across the country has, indeed, taken
on many aspects similar to the bathtub booze era of
77u? is

the fourth article of a scries on student

drug use.

An underground system, much more secretive than
that of the Prohibition era has developed along with
the drug subculture. Marijuana is smuggled into the
country from Mexico in tire tubes, automobile frames,
underwear. It may then be shipped out to various parts
of the country where small-timdealers peddle it in
nickle($5) and dime ($10) bags.
Marijuana is usually smoked in small groups. Extreme caution is stressed and security measures rivaling
e
the
speakeasy's are taken.
"No doubt about it," said one local pot smoker, "it
wouldn't be as much fun if it were legal."
"It provides excitement, what with all the danger
involved," said another. A third said 40 years from now,
people will look back on the "pot era" the same way
Prohibition is viewed now as a
violation
of the law."
e

one-tim-

the 1920's. As the Volstead Act increased the use of
alcohol, the present federal laws prohibiting marijuana
may increase its use.
Marijuana arrests in the U.S. went from 7,000 in
1964 to 15,000 in 1966. The amount of pot confiscated
in New York city during the same time period went
from 817 pounds to 1,680.

Marijuana w as outlawed in 1937 when it w as classified
as narcotic, after a campaign by Harry J. Anslingcr,
then head of the narcotics bureau, who contended
marijuana use led directly to use of heroin and that it
also led to violent crime and "lustful" sex.

"light-hearte- d

The newspapers of the time aided the cause by
printing sensational stories on "tea parties" in Harlem
where people were using marijuana.
Under federal law, possession of marijuana calls for
two to ten years imprisonment for the first offense,
five to 20 for a second and 10 to 40 for a third.
Selling pot can result in a 5 to 15 year sentence for
a first offense, but some states have even more severe
penalties. Kentucky is one of those.
Continued on Pare 4, Col. 1

TEE KENTUCKY

IKE

RNE

f

'.".

The South's Outstanding College Daily

Thursday, March 28, 1968

University of Kentucky, Lexington

W0

v

y

Vol. LIX, No. 124

SDS Yields To Pressure,

Bars Press From Meeting
By DARRELL RICE
for a Democratic So(SDS) made it clear Wedciety
nesday night that the reason for
its closed National Council meet-

Students

ing is an ultimatum from the
University administration.
Nevertheless, the group unanimously passed a resolution reaffirming and clarifying the conditions of the closed meeting
that were previously "illegally"
agreed to by the group's steering committee.
The resolution reads as follows:
"The UK chapter of SDS has
undertaken to provide meeting
space for the spring, 1968, National Council of SDS.
"The UK chapter of SDS has

the understanding that the University of Kentucky has made
conditions that the UK chapter
must meet to have permission to
sponsor the National Council on
the UK campus.
UK Listed Conditions
"These conditions are:
"1. That there be a regis

tration process limiting at
tendance to delegates, observers
and invited guests (as defined
by the conference registrars).
"2. That no meeting be held
out of doors.
"3. That all press except the
internal press of SDS be barred.
"We understand the campus

constitution saying that all pol

icy decisions must be made by
general membership and
which specified that this power
could not be delegated to the
steering committee.
Members said they had told
Dean of Students Jack Hall after the agreement was made that
will consult registrars as their constitution, which had
police
to a person's status before tak- been approved by the adminismade it unbinding and
ing action and removing him. tration
"The UK chapter, noting its that the decision would have
to be made by the group as a
responsibility to the National
Council of SDS, feels itself man- whole.
Bill Murrell said Dean Hall
dated to agree to these conat this point had said he did
ditions."
not care about the constitution
The resolution not only conand that the agreement was still
firmed a verbal agreement made
Tuesday by SDS steering com- binding.
Cites 'Disrespect'
mittee members with the admin"I think Dean Hall has
istration, but also clarified the
treated our constitution with disgroup's position.
The administration has not respect," Frampton said, "in sayofficially accepted the resolution, ing the agreement was binding."
Murrell said, "Their dealing
but a spokesman saw "no probwith us was very
lems."
SDS member Robert Framp-to- n If the University wants to bar
called the group's attention the press, why should we have
to a section of the chapter's
Continued on Pace 7, Col. 1

the

high-hande-

Prc-Rcgistrati-

d.

on

schedule
for fall semester:
A-March 25 to
M-April 1 to 5
L

29

Z

Late registrants will be

charged $20.

"""'.t

'''''"'wgaiii'11

"

I

'

s

I

'iv

At SDS Meeting

Mrs. Nancy Ray, left, faculty advisor to SDS and administrative
assistant in the office of student affairs, listens while members
of the organization criticize the administration for its alleged
effort to force closing of the weekend SDS convention to members
of the press. At right is Mrs. Francis Frampton, SDS Steering
Committee Member.

Support Lacking For
Planned War Trial
By DARRELL RICE
A mock war crimes trial at

UK on U.S. activities in Vietnam seems to be running into
difficulty in being set up because of campus groups' aversions against participating.
Jeff Wade, a senior in Arts
and Sciences who says he is not
affiliated with any group, has
approached the Young Republicans (YR), the Young Democrats

the Peace Action Group
(PAG) and the Young Americans
for Freedom (YAF) about helping
to set up the trial.
So far all but PAG have discouraged the idea. PAG Chairman Bill Allison said, "We would
participate if other groups especially those on the opposing side
of the war issue can be persuaded to take part."
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1
(YD),

IPC Considers Expansion
By TERRY DUNHAM

Socialists Solicit
Members of tlie Socialist Workers' Party were on campus yesterday
soliciting signatures for a petition to place the names of party
members Fred II ah lead and Paul Boutelle on the November ballot.
The two men, who are running as independents, oppose the war in
Vietnam and favor black control of black communities. The solicitors
were asked to leave the campus because they did not represent
a University organization, and resumed their activities on South
Limestone Street.

Fourteen national fraternities have asked the
University for permission to establish colonies
here, according to fraternity adviser Bob Elder,
and the Interfraternity Council has selected three
of the applicants for serious consideration.
Mr. Elder says "If a group doesn't come in
next year, I'd say one definitely would in the
following year." But the maximum expansion rate
would be no more than one a year.
The requests, all received since Septemler of
last year, were considered by the IFC Expansion
Committee, and Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Psi
and Pi Kappa Phi were invited to send representatives to explain their interests more fully.
The committee considered five criteria in selecting the three:
The number of alumni of each in the immediate Lexington area.
Recent experience of each in colonizing efforts at other schools.

The willingness of each to finance expansion

efforts.

The availability of assistance from each in
providing liousing within a reasonable time.
The computahility of each to the particular
systeni here.
Mr. Elder says the Expansion Committee was
formed because the IFC "felt the time was right
to consider growth iossibilities."

Fraternities have grown GO percent in the
country since World War If;and the total UK
growth rate, especially in the last five years,
lias far surpassed the growth rate of its Creek
organizations.
"We looked at the difference in growth,"
he says," and decided the University could support
more fraternities, and thus offer prospective members a wider choice."
Continued on Page 8, CoL 0

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

Thursday, March 28,

19G8

Women's Extramurals Problems
By

JEANNIE LEEDOM

Play ball? Girls?
That's exactly what many UK
coeds are doing.
"Women's athletics are no
longer looked down on," said
Rita Yerkes, a member of the
women's extramural basketball
team.
Women's extramural or intercollegiate sports now are being
promoted in most high schools
and colleges. Extramurals are
claimed to provide two main
opportunities for women:
To compete at a high level
skill.
To socialize with students
from other schools.
Emphasis now is put on being a woman first and a player
second-- at
UK anyway.
"Extramural sports are really
a good experience for everyone.
Women are out to win; but if
they lose, they've enjoyodthen
selves and that's why they are
playing," said Patty Lieber, manager of the extramural basketball team here.
No facilities are presently de- -

For Sun Or Surf
Everything's coming up floral embroidery on an
cotton pique bikini. The
top boasts
delicate embroidered garlands. Bikini pants have matchr
ing detail on an apron skirt. The
outfit
flower-powe-

sign at cd for women's extramurals. The girls usually play
basketball either in Alumni Gym
or the Women's Gym.
Funds also are limited. The
Athletic Department provided essential funds for the program this
season. Since women's extramurals are not part of the Physical Education Department, the
program is not directly sponsored
by any department of the University.
"Many students have never
seen women who are pretty
skilled participate in games,"
said Rita. "Any girl who wants
to go out for the team is welcome. There is no cutting.
"Unfortunately, most girls
aren't aware of the program,"
said Patty.
"The Olympics are crying for
women athletes," added Rita.

"Unfortunately, UK has limited
opportunities for women to participate in extramurals."
"Women have developed their
skills to such an extent that in-

tramural sports do not satisfy
their skills or competitive spirit,"
said Rita. "The program should
definitely be broadened. Many
coeds are highly skilled and interested in tennis, golf, swimming, volleyball, softball and
gymnastics, but UK offers no

extramuralparticipationforthese
students."

I'M
'use

Hie

WARREN KING'S

UONt

it

comes on white with blue needlepoint.

ii

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"n

.1

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DANCE TO THE MUSIC OF
THE MEE, DEAN & JEAN TRIO
1
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LAST TIMES
TODAY!

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VB-JriP-

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Monday . Saturday

252-934- 4

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Welcome back from Ft. Lauderdale, Glascow,
Simpsonvillc! Wc missed you. We expect' you
for dinner this week, tired, but hungry.

Limestone

MONDAY, through FRIDAY, 1:30 to 2.00

(All you can eat)

MONDAY

$1.47

FRIED CHIX, French Fries, Cole Slaw
TUESDAY

SPAGHETTI, salad, rolls, butter

w

$I.UU

THURSDAY

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(All you can eat)

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PANCAKES (buttermilk or buckwheat
FRIDAY

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(All you can eat)

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FRIED FISH, French fries, cole slaw ..

nnrvn
--

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7

Sure sorry the Wildcats lost in the Mid-EaRegionals. But, wait
until next year.
Congratulations and so long to a fine group of graduating seniors: Jim Lemaster, Steve Clevenger, Thad Jaracz, Tommy
Porter, Cliff Berger, Gary Gamble.
jj

Perkins Pancake House
920 South Lime, across from UK Med Center

Easter Seal

Benefit Dance
Featuring

The Berkshire Seven
fuc

prcT

and

Ik

IMPORTED HEER

SC0TLAND

from

DENMARK

GERMANY
GREECE

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JAPAN

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MEXICO

ENGLAND

IRELAND

Featuring a Variety of Deliriously Prepared Foods
LUMS' FAMOUS HOT DOGS
'DELICIOUSLY DIFFERENT LUMBURGERS
IMPORTED HOLLAND HAM
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ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES

(speciolly
CLAMS (sweet and tender)
SHRIMP
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Carry-Ou-

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2

Plus

prepared)

FRIED

Phone 278-610Service
2012 Regency Road, across from Southland Rowling Lanes
Complete

Silken Rope
A

Clothes Cloit up (hihion snow)

Tickets: $1.25 stag
$2.00 drag

8:30-12:3-

0

PHOENIX HOTEL

* t

'

f

I

t

t

k

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March

J

28, 19f8

.

thorn tree until the bubble erupts.
Then it must face the thorns.
The colony looks outside testing the weather.
A University on a

One day they will die on a thorn
Bleeding from the eye like a wounded Cyclops.
Joe Hinds

Oh, Who Needs This Music Today?

By SHAWN FOREMAN
New from Capitol is a group
of truly great L.P.'s.
The Hollyridge Strings are
back again, this time with "The
Beatles Songbook Vol. 5." Included are all the songs from
"Magical Mystery Tour" except
"Blue Jay Way." Also featured
are a number of tunes from
"Sgt. Pepper."
The Hollyridge Strings really
bounce back with this fifth in a
series of instrumental albums.
I feel that their "Songbook"
series (which also includes,
"The Beach Boys Songbook"
and "The Four Seasons Songbook" are making the music of
today more palatable for the
people who might otherwise
say, "Oh, this music of today,
who needs it?"
And now from the East
comes an album entitled simply
"Ravi" (Cap. ST J 0504). You
must hear it to fully realize
the brilliance of the sitar.
for disc
His performances
leave me in complete awe. The
reproduction of Ravi Shankar's
sitar on this L.P. is positively
brilliant; the stereo effect is so
real you think Ravi is sitting
in front of you.
Another performer who
knows no bounds is Lou Rawls.
On his latest album "Feelin
Good" (Cap. ST 2864) he

rocks with "The Letter," "For
What It's Worth," "My Son"
and eight others. "Feelin Good"
captures the soul sound.

Jameson, whose first name is
never mentioned, is as fine a
balladicr as has come along in
many years. His style, similar to
the Buddy Holly sound of the
late '50's, is new and different.
The album, entitled, "Color
Him In" (Verve
is
unlike the
product that has been coming out
as of late, and there is much to
be said for it. Classing this L.P.
would be about as hard as telling a 1943 Jeep from a 1944.
It is not really rock, nor is it
blues or jazz.
The instrumental tracks are
usually piano, guitar, bass and
drums, occasionally augmented
by claves, steel drums and backward guitar. The vocal tracks
V6-501- 5)

song. Kenny's flawless voice
rises above the sounds of his
guitar, embellished by strings,
flutes, and occasionally sitar,
horns, and electric guitar.
Kenny is joined by his wife
(I assume), Yvonne, on "It
Never Changes," and she adds
much to his already tremendous
sound.

'

Sundries

Drugs

Fountain
'

Kernel

The Kentucky

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second clan
paid
postage five at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed
times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Olflce Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1815.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

are enhanced by a group sound
ing like Elvis Presley's group,
"The Jordaniers."
In a similar vein is Kenny
Rankin's "Mind Dusters" (Mercury SR 61141). This L.P. is
like the Beatles "Sgt. Peppers"
(Capitol SMAS 2653) in that
it is nearly one continuous

RATES

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Per copy, from flies

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$.10

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Acrosj front UK Mtdical Center

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Friday, March 29
30

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Pyromania Blues Band

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* 4

- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL,

Thur1ayManll.28,;i9G8l!Alll

Drug Law Passage Would 'Fill Every JaiV

Continued From Taf.e 1
c
Under the state Uniform
Drug Act, a person who sells
marijuana to someone under 21
in Kentucky is subject to a fine
of not more than $20,000 and imprisonment for not less than 20
years.
In Georgia, a second offense
for selling pot to minors carries
Nar-foti-

about drugs, the better off we'll
le," said Dr. John Curtis, head
psychiatrist at the UK Student
Health Service. "I would like to
rely on good, cold information,"
he said.

Laws Necessary
Most law officials believe the
present laws are necessary in order to control the spread of marithe death penalty.
Anslinger's major arguments juana use.
Currently, a louder debate is
against marijuana have since been
questioned. Most experts agree dominating the scene that of the
marijuana is not physically ad- legal status of LSD.
The Administration has prodicting, does not lead to crime
and is not a sexual stimulant. posed a drug abuse bill that is
currently before Congress. If
Many feel the present penalenacted and many believe it will
ties are too harsh and out of proportion with other antisocial acts. be it would for the first time
make possession of LSD a crime.
'Laws Too StifT
A first offense would be a mis"There is no question the laws
a penalty of
are too stiff," said Judge Francis demeanor, carrying
up to one year in jail and a
McCarthy of San Francisco Coun$1,000 fine.
ty, an area where marijuana use
The penalty for manufacturhas boomed and where a second
conviction can bring ing or selling LSD would be
marijuana
a stiffer sentence than first degree raised from a misdemeanor to a
armed robbery or forcible rape. felony drawing up to ten years
The President's Commission imprisonment and a $1,500 fine.
The proposed law would also
on Law Enforcement and Adof Justice strongly cover depressants and stimulants
ministration
urged last year that penalties in the same manner it would
for using marijuana be eased. cover LSD.
A widespread presentation of
Law Would Affect Adults
the information concerning drug
This means the law, if enacted,
use is offered most often as an would affect not only young peoalternative to stringent laws.
ple who have experimented with
"The more facts people know LSD, but also with a middle- i

class America in which amphetamines and barbituates are frequently used.
The law would have little
effect on LSD in Kentucky, as
it is already a crime here to possess LSD. A provision of the
Uniform Narcotic Drug Act gives
the State Board of Health the
"responsbility to prescribe regu-

lation."

of this provision,
the State Board of Health made
it a crime to possess LSD or
As a result

morning glory seeds

which

action should be leveled toward
pushers and manufacturers, "the
man who takes advantageof these
youngsters in order to profit,"
and not towards students, wliom
Carter thinks it will affect detrimentally.
'2 Million Use Drugs'
Rep. Carter said "between
1.6 and 1.9 million high school
and college students do take this
drug" and that it would be "im- -

con-

tain properties of LSD. A person
caught possessing either one is
subject to the same penalties as
a person
drugs.

narcotic

possessing

'

Health Board Made Law
John R. Batt, associate professor of law at UK, said "it is
interesting" that the Board of
Health "in effect, made fhe law,
and not the legislature."
"This is a function they
shouldn't have," Prof. Batt said.
"They play the fantast ic semantic
game to define 'narcotic' the way
they want it to be defined . . .
to include psychedelic drugs.
They could define anything to be
a narcotic, any thing that doesn't
fit

ii

dents."

Mr. Carter said Congress
"should work a little slower"
and constnict a bill "whose passage we will not regret."
The commissioner of the Food
and Drug Administration, Dr.
James Coddard, has said "no

useful purpose would be served
by making a felon of the
individual who makes abusive
use of these drugs. We should
not make criminals of the young
people in our society who experiment with these drugs."
Dr. Coddard, who also has
suggested Congress consider reducing the penalties for marijuana violations, was scheduled
to appear before a Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency but his appearance was suddenly canceled amid rumors the
White House wanted to muzzle
him.

'Generational Cap

the norm."

He also said the board "gave
no valid notice of the ruling,"
that it was "buried in the middle
of a volume
no one would
ever know morning glory seeds
are narcotic."
As for the bill before Congress, some feel it is hypocritical
of the administration, whose contentions in the past have been
that the main targets were the
manufacturers and sellers.
Congressman Opposes Bill
One of the few congressmen
opposed to the proposed bill is
Kentucky's Tim Lee Carter, one
of the few physicians in the
House of Representatives.
"LSD presents a grave menace to our entire country," Rep.
Carter said recently in a televised
interview, "something should be
done about it."
But he pointed out that the

will fill every jail in the country
with high school and college stu-

...

possible" to enforce the proposed

law.
He said the law was "the
wrong way to go about it," that
one should "educate" youngsters
to the dangers of LSD instead.
"I support the part of the
bill which would penalize the
I feel the bill should
pushers
be amended to ease the penalties
on first offenders who had a pill
in their possession," Rep. Carter said.
He said the "impact of the
bill is directed toward youngsters
who might innocently use LSD."
If the law is passed and enforced, Rep. Carter said, "We

...

Prof. Batt is opposed to the
present bill before Congress and
said it is a problem of the "generational information gap. . . we
are dealing with a total absence
of information on the part of the
older generation."
He said his main argument
against the free use of psychedelic drugs was that "a clever Tim
Leary (an LSD advocate) could
turn on the whole population
. . . groups could take control of
the country, with the use ofdnigs
. because
.
people who are
turned on don't care about politicsit would be a dandy situation for any world be Hitler
or Stalin."
Prof. Batt suggest ed "training
at private centers" in the mechanics of drug use and then obtaining a "license to turn on, similar
to a driver's license."
"Personally, I think people
ought to learn to rise above the
humdrum in other ways," Prof.
Batt said,
but I don t think
we should discriminate against
it (drug use) because it's not the
cup of tea of the majority."
.'

CLASSIFIED ADS
classified
Te place
phase UK
la at the
xtentUa 2319 ar
III JaarnalUm, frem S U
1 U ft, Maaday threagh Friday.
Ratas ars Sl.tft far M wards. IS far
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FOR SALE

FOR BALK

af-ti- e;

SPORTSMAN
One owner
watch, black face, black band. $20.

at

2321.

50 cc, excel-

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ELGIN

Call Dick

1964 Honda

lent condition. Red
$135 plui
advertising cost. Contact William G.
OSATCA. Ft. Knox,
Tucker,
Ky. 40121 or call
afer

23M5t

FOR SALE
Golf cluba, brand new,
till in plastic coven. SeU for half.
0.
Phone
22JU
ATTENTION
1958
FRATERNITIES
Cadillac ambulance.
all power, good condition, good tiret.
2.
$400. Call
27Ftf

8 P.m.

25M5t

CR.E.I. course In electronic engineering technology. Complete: program
200 and communications 300 elective.
Cost $423. sell for $200. Call Barry
Atwood, ext. 2565.
25Mii
FOR SALE

Solid state transistor car
radio. Built-i- n speaker.
positive or negative ground. Ideal for
or see at
sports car. Call
134 High St, Versailles, Ky.
26MJt
FOR SALE 8' x 46 Star mobile home.
Excellent condition. $1500. Call
873-56-

For

CO-ED-

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255-96- 4.

26M3t

FOR SALE

SWEETHEART

Ring
for all occasions
Elegant enough

35 mm. VoighUander
Prominent camera. Excellent condition. Light meter, flash attachment
Included. Call UK ext. 88011 or 88021.

17M3t

FOR

SALE 1963 DKW. one owner.
24.000 miles. Good condition; good
1.
tires. $295. Call
27M3t

FOR

SALE Pontiac 1960 Bonneville
Convertible. Burgundy with white

top. Radio, heater, white wall tires.
8.
Excellent condition. Call
28M3t
FOR SALE

1962 Corvair. good condition; radio, heater. Excellent second
car. $323. Call
after 4 p.m.
2M5t
255-67-

WANTED
SMALL
pieces,
go-g- o

dance band needed, 3 or 4
nightly. Also need
Call Martin.
girls
2121 Cardinal Valley Shop12Mtf
ping Center.

The NEW
What to wear to the party?

Co-E- d

A good choice would be this John Meyer
nicety. Trim but gentle in spring green
or summer orange. Polyesterrayon.
Sizes
26.00
8-1-

6.

Acroti from Holmes

Ring

TYPING

Theller,

done

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Kennedy Book Store

reasonable.

EMPLOYMENT

Call Mrs.
27M5t

OPPORTUNITY

CANVASSER

Prefer someone with
experience in construction, but not
necessary. Need man willing to work
few hours a day. Good commission
to start. Salary plus communion after
you prove yourself. You will know in
2
days. Call

Holl

P

5:00-8:0-

TYPINQ

SWEETHEART

Created By John Roberts
NOW AVAILABLE AT

9:00-1:0- 0

0

in p.m.

27M3t

MISCELLANEOUS
DANIEL BOONE RIDING STABLE
Highway 227 between Winchester and
dooiies.txro. Trail rides down beau- 'tlful . JldWards. CreeV:
. daily

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* A & S 300: A
A beautiful thing has happened.
new course,
Life
and Culture has been added to
the University curriculum after several months of laborious petitioning
by members of the Dlack Student
Union. The students, successful in
working their way through a
student
labyrinthine of seldom-use- d
the desired course
paths, finally got
approved by the Arts & Science
College.
The feasibility of offering additional courses in the near future,
courses that relate to contemporary
events and ideas is not far off,
so it seems now. There is room
for them and certainly a need for
them.
Since the new
course is being offered on an ex
A

Afro-Americ-

an

Afro-Americ-

A

an

Tisket-a-Task-

Slarl

perimental basis this fall it is important that enough interest be
generated. Without enough interested students, the course will fail,
and with it the possibility of offering similar courses of contemporary relevance.
The course is certainly compatible with the historical ideals of
American society and American
identity. But the real reason for
taking such a course will ultimately
be the reason inside yourself.
It will be a matter of relating,
matter of wanting to know. And
here we come back to the very
reason for wanting such a course.
a

AS 300, Room 265

Chemistry-Physic-

s,

fall semester, a three credit
elective for juniors and seniors only.

et
and Tribune

No Liquor in your Basket

When the Kentucky Derby is
trad
nin this May a
dition will be severed. Derby officials have ruled that no one may
bring intoxicating beverages with
him to the "run for the roses."
However drinking will be permitted if one is of age and can afford to pay the usurious prices
charged by the hackers for beer
and mint juleps.
Gone are the days of the
brandy snifter, the barrels
of draft, and the prodigious tubs
overflowing with ice and
No Rebel Yells this year, for a
part of Kentucky's southern hospitality may be excluded with the
Southern Comfort.
This drastic measure has been
brewing for years. The fans in the
grandstand have long resented the
obvious fact that their juleps
couldn't insulate them from the
glaring sun or the drenching rain
(it's always one of the two) as
well as could the simple spirits
of the collegiates below who were
oblivious to the weather. Dwellers
of the spired clubhouse, detecting
a lack of inspiration in the infield, decided it was time this batch
was brought to a head. Beer degrades the Derby, they said, our
jiggers give it distinction.
Last year was enough. National
Guard outposts on the infield
caused many to submit to the
driving rain and watch the race on
television. But there were still some
who had enough of the college
time-honore-

two-gall-

set-up- s.

on

trmut

try after a week of finals to force
themselves to enjoy the event.
With this year's Derby in the
midst of finals week few UK students will object to the ruling.
Let the Derby officials do to the
Derby as they did to the Pegasus
parade, t Maybe then UK can install a track and make the Little
Kentucky Derby the real thing.
There is, however, a drawback.
If the Derby turns dry plans may
be made for a Mardi Gras without booze. Then if New Year's Eve
is liquorless we fear the experts
may begin work on UK's Old South
Weekend.

Martin Webb

Iernel

18'Jl

THURSDAY, MARCH

28. 1968

represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
John Richard kimmins, Editor
Robert l' Rrandt, Managing Editor
Darrcll Rice
Jo Warren
Terry Dunham
Assistant Managing Editors
llank Milam, Business Manager

Carolyn Dunnuvan, Women' Editor
Hill Thompson, Cartoonist
Mary Magee, Advertising Salesman
Robert Collins, Delivery
.,
..JMike

tO

TIMES'.

mSr

Dana Ewell

Joe Hinds, Arts Editor
Jim Miller, Sports Editor
Rick bell. Director of Photography
Priscilla Dreher, Editorial Assistant

Jlal;in, Circulation

..

I

W

tf

m

tKernel Forum: the readers write!
To the Editor of the Kernel:
As you know, instructions were recently issued by the Director of Selective
Service to State Directors to end deferments for those who would, in the Fall
of 1968, be first or second year graduate
students (in fields other than medicine,
dentistry and allied medical specialties).
The most recent study of the effect of
these instructions, compiled by the Coun-ci- l
of Graduate Schools, predicts that of
first-yestudents, the schools will lose
66 percent; of second-yea- r
students, 33
percent.
Campus dissent, since this announcement, has centered on the discriminatory
and unwise action of taking our country's scholars out of the university and
sacrificing them on the battlefield for a
war of questionable goals and negligible
results, but their protests have missed the
main point that the draft system itself
is basically inequitable.
It has been my belief since before I
introduced, on March 14, 1967, legislation (S. 1275) to provide for early transition to a fully voluntary military manpower procurement
system, that no
amount of patching will fix a selective
service structure which is essentially unfair.

Therefore I would ask that you ento send their
courage your fellow-studensuggestions and comments to the Senate
Armed Services Committee as well as to
me.
Mark O. Hatfield
United States Senator
Oregon
ts

The South's Outstanding College Daily
University ok Kentucky
Editorials

ix

Stndicalr

As a student leader, you have probably seen the growth of student apathy
and disillusionment on your campus. It
seems to me that constructive involvement is the cure for this alienation and
the draft dialogue is certainly a reason
for students to accept this cure.

The Kentucky
KSTABL1SIIK1)

lilts
i

To the Editor of the Kernel:
As usual a little hotheaded coed has
misread something and jumped to illogical conclusions. Pull in your claws, Miss
Schrepfer, and lick the poison from the
tip of your pen. I did not say that only
an English major has the right to express
himself. Read to the end of my sentence,
please, before you cu