xt731z41sj4v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt731z41sj4v/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1963 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 55, No. 2, 1963 text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Summer Session, Vol. 55, No. 2, 1963 1963 2013 true xt731z41sj4v section xt731z41sj4v 0
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A BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF K I
Sl IMME R SESSION, 1963
Y .
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCK
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 Curricula
The University of Kentucky, a land-grant institution, will offer eight weeks
of regular summer session work and post-session courses. Courses will be
offered in seven colleges—Arts and Sciences, Agriculture and Home Economies,
Engineering, Law, Education, Commerce. and Medicinc—and in the Graduate
Schoof
Over and above its program of liberal education, the University Summer
Session provides numerous opportunities for persons to prepare for specific
occupations. The opportunities are in a number of fields such as: journalism, f
Medical Technology, Pre—Medicine, Pre-Dentistry, l’re—l’harmacy, Pre-Nursing,
Music, Library Science, Public Service, Art, Geography, Geology, Microbiology, i
Psychology, Radio, Television, Films, Social \Vork, Sociology; Agriculture in its `
various phases, Pre-Forestry, Pre—Veterinary, llome Economics; Engineering-
Agricultural, Architectural, Chemical, Civil, Communications, Electrical, Me-
chanical, Metallurgical and Mining; Law; Elementary and Iligh School Teach-
ing, Educational Supervision and Administration; General Business, Banking '
and Finance, Personnel Management, Marketing, Accounting, Business Man- Y
agement, Economics, Industrial Administration, and Secretarial \Vork.
Credit Hours
Nine semester hours are considered the normal load for undergraduates.
For graduate students, the normal load is six hours; the maximum is nine.
Graduate students who earn six or more graduate credits and who remain in
residence throughout the Summer Session are assigned nine weeks of residence.
University students may be confident of acceptance of credits at full value by
other colleges and universities, Moreover, U.K. credits always meet the tests
for employment, whether by government agencies, by corporations, or by pri-
vate companies, regardless of the field, This is a very important consideration.
In certain categories of employment, students and graduates of land-grant uni-
versities have a distinct advantage over other students and graduates.
F ees
For the Summer Session, the full—ti1ne fee for all Kentucky students, except
those enrolled in thc College of Law, will be $50.00, and for students in the
Law College $53.00. For out-of—state students, in all colleges except Law, the
fee will be $120.00, and for Law $125.00. These fees are payable at the time
of registration. .
A(l77l’l·$·S“’lO’ll  
Applicants for admission should write to the Office of the University Dean
of Admissions and Registrar for application, stating whether they wish admis- `
sion to the freshman class, to advanced standing. or to the Graduate School. i
Applications and transcripts of credits should be filed 30 days in advance with  
the Registrars Office. Students entering with advanced standing and those
entering the Graduate School should present transcripts from each institution
they have attended. Iligh school graduates are invited to start their college
careers in the 1963 Summer Session. Special courses are planned for entering ‘
freshmen and special attention will be given to them to the end that their col- 4
legiate careers will be richer, more profitable, more economical, and more
meaningful.
(Continued on inside back cover) ,
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SUMMER SESSION, 1963
I UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
I
  Iunc 14 - August S
I BULLETIN OF TIIE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
I voLuM1¤: 55 1u;1s1iuA11Y, 1062 NUMBER 2
I A- bullctin published monthly, ]unuury to October, inclusive, by the Univer-
4 sity of Kentucky, Lexington. Entcrcd as Sccond—Cluss Mutter ut the Post
~ Otiicc, Lcxington, Ky., undcr thc Act of August 24, 1912. Edited by the
` l)(‘])1l1`tllI(¥Il[ of Public Relations und published under its direction.
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 I UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
  FRANK GRAVES DICKEY, M.A., Ed.D., President
Administration Building, Room IO6
` THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
V Building Room Q
j EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT I
Z Arnold DeWald Albright, M.S., Ph.D. Adm. 116 (
VICE PRESIDENT (Business Administration)  
Frank Dewey Peterson, A.B., LL.D. Adm. 109  
VICE PRESIDENT (Albert B. Chandler Medical Center) I
William Robert \¢Villard, B.S., M.D., Dr.P.H. MN 140  
COUNSELING SERVICE i
George Walter Rogers, M.A., Ph.D., Director Adm. 204 I
DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 3
Charles F. Elton, M.A., Ph.D. I
ACTING DEAN OF MEN i
Kenneth Edward Harper, M.A., Ph.D. Adm. 203
DEAN OF WOMEN
Doris M. Seward, M.A., Ph.D. Adm. 202
` HEALTH SERVICE
Richardson K. Noback, B.S., M.D., Director MSc N114 ~
PUBLIC RELATIONS  
Raymond \Vesley \¢Vild, Ph.M., Director Adm. 205 I
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES I
Lawrence Sidney Thompson, M.A., Ph.D., Director KL 310C l
THE COLLEGES  
ARTS AND SCIENCES
Martin Marshall White, M.A., Ph.D., Dean MeVey 128 i
]acob Robert Meadow, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Dean I
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS Q
\Villiam Albert Seay, M.S., Ph.D., Dean and Director SII 101 I
Maurice Stanley VVall, M.S. in Ed., Ed.D., Associate Dean  
ENGINEERING
Robert Ezekiel Shaver, B.S., C.E., Dean and Director AH 102 ,
LANV E
\Villiam Lewis Matthews, ]r., A.B., LL.M., S.].D., Dean Laffcrty 204 L
EDUCATION  
Lyman Vernon Ginger, M.A., Ed.D., Dean TEB 128
eoMMEReE I
Cecil Clayton Carpenter, M.S., Ph.D., Dean WVH 206
PHARMACY h `
_ Earl Platt Slone, Ph.G., M.A., Dean Ph. 103
- MEDICINE Q!
1 William Robert VI/illard, B.S., M.D., Dr.P.H., Dean MN 140 }
. NURSING I
= Marcia Allene Dake, M.A., Ed.D., Dean MS 139
‘ DENTISTRY f,
¢ Alvin L. Morris, D.D.S., Ph.D., Dean MSc D136
i EXTENDED PROGRAMS `
  Raymon Dudley Iohnson, M.A. in Ed., Ed.D., Executive Dean FH 103
  GRADUATE SCHOOL
2 Albert Dennis Kirwan, M.A., LL.B., Ph.D., Dean Pence 111 ,
g Lewis WV. Cochran, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean  
   
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 C O N T E N T S
College of Arts and Sciences College of Agriculture. and
Teacher Training Institute .... . ......... 7 Home Economics
Agriculture ______'_____________v_________________ 8 Agricultural Economics ........... . ..,... 32
Aucicur Luuguuges und Lucruturcs 8 Agricultural Engineering ........,....... 32
_ Auaimpoicgy .................................... 8 Agficultumi E¤t<>m<>l¤zz.v -----·-·-·---··· $2
1 Arr _________'__________________________________________ 9 Agronomy ............r........................... 32
Butuny ________'I____________________________________ 10 Animal Science .............,.................. 33
I Ciuuurstry ________________________________________ 11 Dairy Science .................................. 33
Ecuuuuucs ________________________________________ 12 Horticulture ...................................... 33
ir Eugirshi Speech, uud Drruuuuc Arts 12 Poultry Sc1ence ................................ 34
  Gcugruphy _________________________‘______________ 14 Rural Sociology ................................ 34
4 cwiogy ............................................ 14 $¤h<>¤1 0* HMC E¢<>¤<>mi¢S ··---—--—--— 34
i l’hstory·.. ............................................. 15 College Of Engineering
1 Ilumanitics ...................................... 16 Ar _ ` I Il E _ _ 6
f llygiene and Public llealth ............ 16 Jiu} tum ilgmécrmg `''``''''````''` 3
1 Law   17 Chemical Engineering .................... 36
1 Library Science .........................,...... 17 Cml Engineering ‘j `''‘```''''`'''''‘'‘''`''' 36
. _ _ Electrical Engmeenng .................... 36
Mathematics and Astronomy .......... 18 _ _ _
i \r. . EHg1n€CflHg Mechanics .................. 37
I iiicrobiology .................................... 18 Mcchpmiml En Yinc rin 37
Modern Foreign Languages ° T B _ G _g '`''`''```‘``''' `
uud Lrtcruurrcs ________________________ 19 Metallurgical Engineering .............. 37
l Frcuch __________________________________________ 20 Mining Engineering .........,...i.......... 38
G¤¤¤¤¤ --·-·---·-~----·-—·~——--·—··—---·—~--·-· 20 College of Law .................................... 39
Russian .........,.............,........i....... 21
Spanish ......................,......,.......... 21 College of Education
Music .......,..........................,............. 22 Counsgling and Guidance ______________ 40
Pl\il0$<>l*l*Y ·-·······--··-····-·--·-··--··-······~·· 24 Administration and Supervision ...... 40
Physical Education .......................... 24 Foundations of Education ______________ 40
Pl*Y$i€$ ·····-··············—·-······················· 25 Curriculum ...........,..............,........... 41
5 P<>lifi¤¤l Science ·--···-----··--·--·-·---··-·-- 26 Instruction ........i..........i........i...,....... 42
i P$Y€hOl0Q-`Y ···········~-······-·········~·····-··-· 27 Vocational Education ................i..... 43
{ Radio, TV and Films ...................... 28
g soon work ..................,................... 28 C<>N¤g¤ ¤f C····¤¤¢r¢¤
I Sociology .......................................... 29 Economics ....,............ . ................. 44
` Statistical Courses ............................ 29 Commerce ........................................ 44
T ` ·zl Mz ' ‘ ................................ 29 .
i ZSSZQ, ...22 ...r.............................. 30 C~“¤g¤ 0* Medm
  Sciumi of Juuruuirsru ________________________ 30 Anatomy ............................ , ............. 45
Ir Sciruui Of Drpiuuuicy und Biochemistry .................................... 45
International Commerce ............ 31 Physiology .........,........ . ................ 45
CHANGES IN THE PRINTED SCHEDULE
l Any variation from the printed schedule must be authorized by the Registrar, who
requires the approval of the dean and the head of the department concerned. Application
for changes in the schedule must be made on blanks furnished by the Registrar.
€ 3

 ll
n` CALENDAR FOR 1963 SUMMER SESSION
May 15 \Vednesday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to Ad-
missions Office for 1963 Summer Session
]une 14,15 Friday and Saturday—Orientati0n and registration
]une 17 Monday—Class work begins 3
]une 20 Thursday—Last date one may enter an organized class for the Sum-  
mer Session  
]une 27 Thursday—Last date one may drop a course without a grade I
z
]uly4 Thursday—Independence Day holiday
]uly 5, 6 Friday and Saturday—Last days for filing application for August _
degree in College Dean’s office I
Aug. 8 Thursday—End of 19653 Summer Session
Aug. 10 Saturday—All grades due in Registrars OfHce by 12:00 noon
Aug. 15 Thursday—Last date to submit application and transcripts to Ad- I
missions Office for Fall Semester, 1963-64
Sept. 3 'l`uesday—Opening oi Fall Semester, 1963-64
REGISTRATION SCHEDULE FOR 1963 SUMMER SESSION  
I
_ ]unc 14 Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon—Orientation of new students  
]une 14, 15 Friday, 1:00 p.m. to Saturday, 11:00 a.m.—l1cgistration of all stu-
dents according to the following alphabetical schedule:
I
Friday Afternoon Saturday Forenoon ~
1:00 to 1:50-A through Com 8:00 to 8:50-Pb through Sta él
2:00 to 2:50-Con through Cre 9:00 to 9:50-Stb through Z [
3:00 to 3:50-Cri through K 10:0() to 11 :00—\Iiscellancous, I
l 4:00 to 4:50-L through Pa A through Z
_ june 17 Monday—CIass work begins
Q ]une 20 rl`hursday—-Last date one may enroll for the full Summer Session
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F:

 EXPLANATIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS
Colleges are arranged according to order in the catalogue and in general the depart-
ments of each College are arranged alphabetically.
Days of recitations are indicated by the initial letters of the days. For example,
M—Th indicates the class is offered Monday through Thursday, M-F indicates the class
is offered Monday through Friday, etc.
The buildings are indicated as follows:
. A. Administration FH, Frazee Hall NS, Nursery School
i AA, Administration Annex HB, Health Building Obs, Observatory
AE, Agricultural Engr. HE, Home Economics Pence, Pence Hall
AG, Alumni Gymnasium KH, Kastle Hall PA, Psychology Annex
All, Anderson Hall KL, King Library Ph, Pharmacy Bldg.
AP, Animal Pathology L, Lafferty Hall RB, Reynolds Building
l Agr, Agriculture MA, Music Annex SB, Service Bldg.
f BH, Barker Hal] MeV H, McVey Hall SC, Sports Center
  BL, Bowling Lanes MSc, Medical Science SH, Scoville Hall (Exp.Sta.)
l CA, Chemistry Annex Bldg. SP, Stock Judging Pavilion
CP, Chemistry-Physics Mefl, Memorial Hall SS, Social Sciences
D, Dairy McL, Meats Laboratory SU, Student Union
DC, Dairy Center MC, Memorial Coliseum TEB, Taylor Education
EAB, Euclid Avenue Bldg. MG, Men’s Gymnasium Bldg.
EG], journalism MH, Miller Hall TL, Tobacco Laboratory
EngrA, Enginnering Annex ML, Mining Laboratory VVG, \Vomen’s Gymnasium
FA, Fine Arts M, Museum \VH, VVhite Hall
FB, Funkhouser Biol. Sci. MN, Medical Center
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
001-099- No credit and/or non-degree courses
L 100-199- Open to freshmen; gives undergraduate credit only
i 200-299 — Prerequisite sophomore classification; gives undergraduate credit
j only
E 300-399 — Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate credit only
f 400-499—Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate and graduate
f credit for non—majors
i 500-599—Prerequisite junior classification; gives undergraduate and graduate
j credit
l* 600-799 —— Open only to graduate students
1. Freshmen 1nay be admitted to courses numbered between 200 and 499,
and sophomores to courses numbered between 300 and 499, upon approval of
the instructor and the dean of the student’s college. Such approval shall be
limited to students who have demonstrated superior ability or preparation.
1 2. Seniors with superior ability or preparation may be admitted to courses
numbered between 600 and 799 upon a proval by the instructor, the dean of
{ P
E the student’s college and the dean of the graduate school.
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   COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
i_ OUTLINE OF REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
  LOWER DIVISION
I General Requirements: 2
, English, first and second semesters, freshman year, 6 credits.  
General Hygiene, 1 semester. 1
Physical Education, freshman year, 2 credits. ‘
Aerospace Science or Military Science (men), freshman and sophomore years, 8 I
credits. (Requirement to be discontinued September, 1963.) I
I
Group Requirements:  
1. Foreign Languages (Arabic, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin,  
Russian, Spanish). Required: Twelve semester hours in one language, the first
nine of which may be waived.
2. The Humanities. To satisfy the lower division requirements in the Humanities, ;
students in the College of Arts and Sciences must earn four credits in literature I
and philosophy (Humanities 200, 201 or 202) and two credits in art or music I
(Humanities 203 or 204). These courses should be taken during the sophomore  
year, and two courses from 200, 201 or 202 may not be taken simultaneously.  
3. The Social Studies. The student is permitted to choose two of the following [
courses, to satisfy the group requirement in the social studies: History 104, 105, I
108, 109, Political Science 151, Anthropology 121, 153, Sociology 153, 154, 151, I
Geography 153, 154, Economics 251, 252.
4. The Biological Sciences. Students may satisfy the biological group requirements I
by completing a minimum of six semester credits from the following courses: I
Anthropology 100; Microbiology 1()0, 102, 200; Botany 101 or 125, 103; I
Psychology 100; Zoology 100. I
Note.—Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences I
requirements must be in courses that have laboratory.  
5. The Physical Sciences. Students will be permitted to take work in either one or  
‘ two departments in order to satisfy the physical science requirement. Six or ~
more credits can be taken from the following courses: Astronomy 191, 192; l
Chemistry 102, 104, 110, 112; Geology 1()0; 104, 105; 110 with 104; 112, I
113 with 100 or 104, 105; 214; Mathematics 101 or 111, 112, 113; Physics 151, =
152, 211, 213, 231, 232 (with 241, 242). See note under Biological Sciences. Il
Note.——A student must have attained a standing of 2.0 in order to be promoted  
to the next higher classification.
‘ UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS f
3 Specific requirements are given under each department. Plan cards outlining the
upper division work and signed by the student's advisor should be on file in the deanls
7 office at the beginning of the junior year. l
i Total Number of Credits Required for Graduation: 128 exclusive of Physical Edu- I
* cation.  
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bi  Subject Credits Days Hour   Instructor  
SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR THE TRAINING OF TEACHERS i
L Carl B. Cone, Director, Frazee Hall 312
Bot 400 Fund of Biol for Secondary
School Teachers 4 M-F 1:30-4:30 FB B-9
E Prereq: Employment as high school teacher; limited to NSF participants
8 i (Same as Zoo 400)
Che 302 Fund of Phys Sci for Jr High
l School Teachers 4 M-F 8:10-10:20 CP 244-249 Thomas
I Prereq; Employment as junior high school teacher ; Limited to NSF participants
1 Che 406 Fund of Chem for lligh School
L i Teachers 4 M-F 1:30-4:30 CP 244-249 Hammaker
gi; i Prereq: Employment as high school teacher; Limited to NSF participants
I Eco 410 Summer Seminar in Econ
S, § Prob 2 M-F 11-12:00 Christian
,6 j Prereq: Selection by an admissions committee
l
·C Eco 411 Summer Seminar in Comp
’€ Econ Sys 2 M-F 9:45-10:45
Prereq: Selection by an admissions committee
g I Eco 412 Summer Seminar in Managerial
5 { Econ 2 M-F 8:30-9:30 Haynes
l’ Prereq: Selection by an admissions committee
,
Eng 509-1 Comp for Teachers 3 M-F 8:10-10:20 McVH 210 Hatch
+ * (June 17-July 12)
.S
;; MFL 501 Adv Phonetics 3 to be arranged
3,   Prereq: MFL 207, 208 or equivalent; limited to NDEA participants
’
i MFL 512 Adv French Conversation 2 to be arranged
:S i Prereq; MFL 208 or 207 and 208; limited to NDEA participants
{ May be repeated once
yr 5 MFL 553 The Teaching of Modern Foreign
N.   Languages 3 to be arranged
)_ _ Limited to NDEA participants
Z, I Zoo 400 Fund of Biol for Secondary
L I School Teachers 4 M-F 1:30-4:30 FB B-9
' Prereq: Employment as high school teacher; limited to NSF participants
{ (Same as Bot 400)
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i NOTE; Chemistry 302 reactivation is pending approval of Faculty,
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  -
¥ 8 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES j
  I Course S b' ct Credits D1 s Hour Building Instructor  
Number U le `y and Room  
*  
i Agriculture  
L A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect toward the A. B. or B. S. degree a .
total of 30 credits from other collega of the University.
Ancient Languages and Literatures (AL) I
i
Richmond Y. Hathorn, Head of the Department, Funkhouser Building 305 i
UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS {
Reguirements in the Field of Concentration: Forty credits of advanced work in the field ,
of Literature, Philosophy, and the Arts, including the major work.  
Regirements for a Major: Prereguisites: First year of college Latin or Greek or Hebrew l
or Arabic. Reguired: A minimum of fifteen credits of advanced work in the department;
Tutorial Seminar; comprehensive examination in the senior year. i
LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 6  
Latin Language, Literature and Civilization  
101 Beg Latin 3 By Appt FB 305 Staff  
209,210 Select from Latin Lit 3 ea M-F 9:20 FB 308 l-lathorn l
Prereq: Three years of high school Latin or three semesters of college Latin or j
consent of instructor  
Note: Open to freshmen with the prereq `
Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
509, 510 Latin Lit 3 ea M-F 9:20 FB 308 Hathorn  
Prereq: Consent of instructor 1
514, 515 Latin Comp 1 ea By Appt FB 305 Staff i
Prereq: A L 203 or consent of instructor i
Greek Lan e, Literature and Civilization  
j
235 Greek Mythology 2 M-Th 11:40 FB 313 llathorn  
No Prereq: Given in English i
; Course open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students  
` 521 Roman Civilization 2 M-Th 8:10 FB 308 Staff i
_ No Prereq: Given in English  
Classics and Semitics in General i
. j'
` Course open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students  
_ 580 Indp Work in Ancient Languages 3 By Appt FB 305 Staff {
Prereq: Major and a 3.0 in the department  
Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits I
` Anthropology (ANT) I
A Frank J. Essene, Head of Department, Social Sciences 125 i
, UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
j. Regirements in the Field of Concentration; At least forty credits of advanced work in the
  major and allied subjects ~
  Regirements for a Major; Ant 100, 121, 153 (Geo 153 or Soc 153 are equivalents of Ant  
  153). Reguired: A minimum of 24 credits of advanced work, including Ant 582 repeated
._ once, and at least one course in each subdivision of Anthropology, namely in Archaeology,
  Ethnglggy and Physical gthropglgu, jigmpgghgpsjyg exam jp sgpjgp ygg;  `
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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Continued 9  
¤
  Subject Credits Days Hour aggigligil Instructor  
fl ANTHROPOLOGY - cont  
  LOWER DIVISION REQUHXEMENTS - See Page 6 A
  T
Note: Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences requirements -
must be in courses that have laboratory. .
100 Intro to Phy Anth 3 M-F 8:10-9:10 SS 128 E
101 Osteometric Techn 1 TTh 9:20-11:00 SS 115 ·
Prereq or concur: Ant 100 P
j Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
i 383 Spec Prob 2 By Appt SS 125 ,
Note; May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits
j 581 Indp Work in Anth 3 By Appt SS 125
5 Note; May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits
1
I Courses open only to Graduate Students
i
768 Res Cr for M,A. 0 By Appt SS 125
770 Seminar 2 Th 3-4:50 SS 125
790 Res Prob in Anth 3 TTh 2-3:00 SS 125 7
Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits
Art A
, Richard B. Freeman, Head of Department, Fine Arts 207 L
UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
Reqiirements in the Field of Concentration: 40 credits in advanced work in the field of litera-
ture, philosophy, and the arts, including the major work.
Requirements for a Major in Art: Prerequisites: Art 100, 101. 110, 130, 200, 201, 210 and
236 or 237. Required: A minimum of 26 credits of advanced work in art including courses 500,
509, 12 credits in studio courses, 9 credits in the history and theory of art; and a comprehensive
j examination in the senior year. ‘
  Requirements for a Major in Art Education; Prerequisites: Art 100, 101, 110, 130, 200, 201,
j 210. Required; 7 credits in the history and theory of Art, including one semester of 509 and ·
preferably 562 and 564; 20 credits in advanced studio courses, including Art. 236 or 237, 242,
310, 330 and 336, plus S additional hours to be chosen within two of the four studio areas;
Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture and Design, and Ceramics; 9 credits in Public School Art, `
A including 170, 171, 172, 173 and 577; and 23 to 26 credits in Education including 101 or 301,
202, 344 (and possibly 325), student teaching and seminar.
LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 6
110 Beg Draw 8: Paint 2 MWF 12:50-4:10 FA 202 Sternbergs
i 172 Pub Sch Art, Lec 3 MWF 12:50-1:50 FA 107
I Prereq: Art 170 ‘
173 Pub Sch Art, Stud MWF 2-4:10 FA 106
210 Intermed Draw & Paint 2 MWF 12:50-4:10 FA 102 Barnhart
Prereq: Art 110 & 3 hrs By Appt
` Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students V
n 310 Intermed Paint 3 MWF 12:50-5:20 FA 102 Barnhart ,
Prereq: Art 210 & 3 hrs By Appt ~
311 Intermed Paint 3 MWF 12:50-5:20 FA 102 Barnhart ~
, Prereq: Art 310 & 3 hrs By Appt
, 395 Indp Work: Paint, Printmaking 3 15 hrs By Appt FA 207 Thursz ’
· Prereq: Major and standing of 3.0 in the department
_ j Nm? Mg); bg ggpgamg [Q; a maximum gf 9 gredits
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§_' IO COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Continued  
ll  
I  
  1$s;l;;_ Subject Credits Days Hou: aglmmgi Instructor  
  ART - cont
_ 399 Indp Work: Hist, Criticism 3 5 hrs By Appt FA 207 Amyx ;
. Prereq; Major and standing of 3.0 in the department
‘ Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits
510 Adv Paint 3 MWF 12;50—5:20 FA 102 Barnhart I
- Prereq; Art 311 8; 3 hrs By Appt I
Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits I
_ 564 20th Century Art 3 M-F 9:20-10:20 FA 107 Thursz I
_ Courses open only to Graduate Students I
615 Trad & Exper Media in Paint 3 15 hrs By Appt FA 207 Thursz  
Prereq: Art 510 I
l
Courses offered June 1B—AJ.1g'llSt 13 in Europe (Richard B. Freeman, Instructor) ‘
' Arrangements must be made prior to April 15 with Professor Richard B. Freeman, Department
of Art for the courses listed:
100, 101 Orientation in Art 1 ea  
105 Forms of Art 2 I
200 Art Hist Surv; Primitive to Medieval Art 2 l
201 Art Hist Surv; Renaiss to Modern Art 2 :
Hum 203-2 Art; The Renaiss to the Present ;
Prereq; Soph Standing  
Courses open only to upper division and graduate students  
556 Medieval Art 3
558 Renaiss Art in Italy 3
559 Renaiss Art in Northern Eur 2 I
`
Astronomy (AST) `
J. C. Eaves, Head of Department, McVey Hall 120
See MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY
, Botany (BOT)
` Herbert P. Riley, Head of Department, Funkhouser Biological Sciences 220
t UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
Regiirements in the Field of Concentration: At least forty credits of advanced work in the
major and allied subjects. I
l l`
~ Reggirements for a Major; Prereguisites: Bot 101, 103. Reguired; A minimum of 20 credits  
of advanced work in Botany and the passing of a comprehensive examination covering chiefly the I
- fields of morphology, taxonomy, and physiology. :_
. LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 6 [
Note: Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences requirements  
I must be in courses that have laboratory. ·
101 Gen Bot, Lec 4 M—'I`h 9;20-10;20 FB 211 Garner ii
» 102 Gen Bot, Lab M—Th 7-9:10 FB 214 Garner & Warden I
{ 103 Plant Kingdom 3 M-F 10:30 FB 211 Warden
- 125 Gen Plant Biol 3 M-F 10:30—l1:30 FB 211 Garner
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`I
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Continued ll  
1
i Ig  Subject Credits Days Hour agglggggn Instructor ’
  Chemistry (CHE)
  Lyle R. Dawson, l·Iead of Department, Chemistry-Physics 127 ·
‘ UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
Classification of juniors or seniors as majors in chemistry is restricted to students having a
standing of 2.0 or higher in all chemistry courses . .
Juniors and seniors may major in chemistry either with a field of concentration in the physical I
sciences or in a combination of biological and physical sciences. Students who might want to be-
come professional chemists are advised to have their field of concentration in the physical
` sciences. Students who expect to enter medical school, obtain an advanced degree in a biological
science, teach in a high school, or use chemistry only as a part of their liberal education may
want their field of concentration to be a combination of physical and biological sciences.
i Reggirements in a Physical Sciences Field of Concentration {B, S. degee): Forty credits of
: advanced work in the physical sciences including the major work. For specific requirements
L · see the prescribed Curriculum Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in
Q Chemistry in the General Catalogue of the University.
{ Regirements in the Combined Physical-Biological Science Field of Concentration (A. B. degree):
Forty credits in courses above the freshman level in the combined fields of physical and bio-
logical sclences including the major field. Six hours of education may be included. Students I
who transfer into this field after completing the sophomore year must have a standing of 2.5 or
higher. Prereggisites: Chemistry 110,112; Mathematics 113. Reggired: Chemistry 226 or 220,
430, 432, 444, or 440, 442, 441, 443; 572; Physics 211, 213 or 231, 232, 241, 242 and suffi-
r cient courses in the biological and physical sciences to make forty credits.
LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS - See Page 6
Note: Six credits of the courses that satisfy the biological and physical sciences requirements
must be in courses that have laboratory.
I 102 Elem Gen Chem, Lec E: Rec 4 M-F 12:50-1:50 CP 148 Staff
` Prereq: Profic in math and Eng
j 103 Lab for Chem 102 0 TTh 2-4:10 CP 34 Staff
‘ 104 Elem Gen Chem, Lec K: Rec 4 M-F11;40-12:40 CP 139 Staff
, Prereq; Chem 102 I
105 Lab for Chem 104 0 TTh 12:50-3:00 CP 20 Staff I
106 Gen Chem for Engrs, Lec & Rec 4 M-F 12:50-1:50 CP 148 Staff `
j Prereq: Profic in math and Eng
‘ 107 Lab for Chem 106 0 TTh 2-4:10 CP 34 Staff
‘ 108 Gen Chem for Engrs, Lec & Rec 4 M-F11:40—12:40 CP 139 Staff
Prereq: Chem 106
109 Lab for Chem 108 0 TTh 12:50-3:00 CP 20 Staff
V 110 Gen College Chem, Lec K: Rec 5 M-F 8:10-9:10 CP 139 Staff
Prereq; Profic in math and Eng
111-1 Lab for Chem 110 0 MWF 9:20-11:30 CP 6 Staff
111-2 Lab for Chem 110 0 F 11:40-12:40 CP 6 Staff
· 112 Gen College Chem, Lec 8: Rec 5 M-F11:40—12:40 CP 148 Staff
Prereq; Chem 110 '
, 113-1 Lab for Chem 112 0 MWF 9:20-11:30 CP 8 Staff
113-2 Lab for Chem 112 0 F 12:50-1:50 CP 8 Staff
I 226 Anal Chem, Lec 5 MTThFS:10-9:10 CP 220 Wagner
, Prereq: Chem 112, 108 or 104
227-1 Lab for Chem 226 0 M-F 9:20-11:30 CP 236 Wagner ,
227-2 Lab for Chem 226 0 W 8:10-9:10 CP 236 Wagner
’" 230 Organic Chem, Lec 8: Rec 5 By Appt CP 320 Staff
Prereq: Chem 112 or 10B z
3 231 Lab for Chem 230 0 By Appt CP 336 Staff  
{ 236 Organic Chem, Lec & Rec 4 M-F 10:30-11:30 CP 320 Patterson 1
j Prereq: Chem 112, 108 or 104 i
  237 Lab for Chem 236 0 TTh 11:40-1:50 CP 340 Patterson ‘ I
-   302 Fund Phy Sci Jr. H S Tchrs, Lec, Rec, Lab 4 M-F 8:10-10:20 CP 244-249 Thomas ~
t
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gl I2 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES - Continued
  C0l\\'S€ . _ . _ _ Building
  Number Subject Credits Days Hour and Room Instructor
  CHEMISTRY - cont
T Courses open only to Upper Division and Graduate Students
{ 406 Fund Chem l-I S Tchrs, Lec, Rec, Lab 4 M-F 1:30-4:30 CP 244-249 Hammaker
1 430 Organic Chem, Lec 5 M—F 8:10-9;10 CP 320 Smith 1
` Prereq; Chem 112 or 108 I
I 431 Lab for Chem 430 O MTThF9;20-11:30 CP 336 Smith §
_ 522 Instr Anal, Lec 3 2 hrs By Appt CP 211 Wagner
Prereq; Chem 222 {
’ 523 Lab for Chem 522 0 12 hrs By Appt CP 216 Wagner  
532 Qual Organic Analysis, Lec 3 By Appt CP 320 Staff  
Prereq; Chem 232 or 432 ~
533 Lab to accom 532 0 By Appt CP 336 Staff [
l Courses open only to Graduate Students
714 Non-aqueous Soln 2 By Appt CP 143 Sears
Prereq; Chem 442, 443
736 Topics in Org Chem 2 M'I`ThF 8:10-9:10 CP 111 Staff
Prereq: Chem 432
` 768 Res Cr for M. A. 0 1-9 weeks By Appt Staff
769 Res Cr for Ph. D. 0 1-9 weeks By Appt Staff
E
Combined Degrees {
I For combined courses in Arts and Law, Arts and Medicine, Arts and Dentistry, Arts and
Forestry, and Arts and Engineering, see the University catalogue for rules and regulations.
Commerce
A A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect toward the A. B. or B. S. degree a
· total of 30 credits from other colleges of the University,
. Economics i
Economics Majors see Professor John T. Masten, Social Sciences 126
t UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS i
I Regirements in the Field of Concentration; Forty credits of advanced work in the field of
_ Social Studies, including the major work.
I Regirements for a Major; Preregisites; Econ 251, 252. Reguired; A minimum of 18 credits
i of advanced work in Econ. In addition tutorial course 396 must be taken in the senior year to
, prepare for the remxired comprehensive examination. I
For listing of Economics courses see page DLL I
i Education l
A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect toward the A. B. or B. S. degree a total  
of 30 credits from other colleges of the University. |
Y Engineering [
i A student in the College of Arts and Sciences may elect toward the A. B. or B. S. degree a