xt734t6f262g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt734t6f262g/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 19371938 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 16 (1937-1938) text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 16 (1937-1938) 1937 2012 true xt734t6f262g section xt734t6f262g  _` A » E V _.   §‘s7"i;I/{.._.(J ` IFEAE _>
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 BULLETIN OF THE
A University 0f Kentucky
L LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY
I 9<< ° :¤»
   
Q q",¤$s% 
% $<~ y
GENERAL CATALOG
For 1937:38
_ YL/q·7HZ0lUl(,`€//267} ts
1938-39

 I 1
I 3
 
p {QZ PUBLICATIONS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION
I  
I fj The following publications are issued by the University for the
5   purpose of giving prospective students and others necessary informa-
. Qi,  tion about the institution, and its various divisions. Opposite each
I   publication is listed the office or offices from which it may be ob-
Q `il: tained.
g V ,Vt`` E Going to College ........................................ Publicity Bureau
.   Campus Picture Book ,...........................,. Publicity Bureau
{   General Information (Prepared
{ .·  especially for the prospective
I   student) .................................................. Registrars Office
I gi Gene1·al Catalogue .................................... Registrars Office
I j.g,;{  Summer Session Bulletin ....................,,,. Director or Summer Session
A _-jj  Law Bulletin ,,_,,,...................,.......,,,,,........ College of Law or
; .;  _ ° Registrars Office
I f  `Z Graduate Bulletin .................................... Graduate School or
  e Registrar’s Office
  Commerce Bulletin .................................. College of Commerce or
`   Registrars Office
  Agriculture Bulletin ........................ Z ....... College of Agriculture or
Q `·  ‘ Registrars Office
J   In order to assist those who may wish special information about
I   some part of the University’s program, there are listed below the
j ":`  names of officials to whom inquiries of various types may be sent.
` L In each case, the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, is the
Q   post office address. ·
  The general policies of the University..President of the University
  General information, all admissions,
é and transcripts of records .................. Registrar
  Living accommodations, student help,
_   social affairs .......................................... Dean of Men or Dean of
»   Women  Q
T information about a particular 5
, I; college and its program ...................... Dean of the College ‘
prix
_   Graduate work .......................................... Dean of the Graduate ,
  School ~
` -   Summer School ,..,....................................__ Director of the
Y Q Summer Session
  Class extension and corre-
  spondence study .................................... Director of University
  Extension
·   Agricultural extension ............................ Director of Agricultural
.   Extension
I 4
I `=? I

 DN  I
lr the coNTEN·rs
orma-
each Pag°
,8 Ob, Calendar ...................................v....................................................................,... 4
University Calendar ............................................................_....__.._.._,_.__________ 5
Registration Schedule, September, 1938 .....................i...._.,....._i..____i_,___ 6
Part I. General Information of Special Interest to the Prospective
Student ......................................,....................................................... 7
The University of Kentucky .........................l..l.......................,_,. 0
Admission to the University ..................................i...._..i.....,,_, 10
Fees and Expenses ...........................................,.....,...................... 13
1 Opportunities for Financial Help .....................,.,.,...i....,........... 16
BSE °u Living Conditions ........................c.....................r.................i......... 17
What Is Expected of the Student ...................,........................ 17
Opportunities Outside the Classroom ......,............................. 23
The Facilities of the University ...................i.......................... 27
or Part II. Educational Opportunities at the University of Kentucky 31
Degrees and Curricula ........................r......................................... 33
3 or . The College of Arts and Sciences ............................................ 36
“ The College of Agriculture ..............l...........................,,..,......... 47
The College of Engineering ...............................,,...,................... 57
b ut The College of Law ...........................................,........»................. 68
a 0 The College of Education ............................................................ 72
W the The College of Commerce ............................................i.....,.,..._, 87
t sent. The Graduate School ...........................................................,.,....., 92
is the Summer Session ............................................................................ 102
The Department of University Extension .............................. 104
Part lll. Statement of Courses Offered of the University .............,.... 105
index of Departments ....................................................r.......,... 107
lersity Key to Course Descriptions ...................,.................................... 108
Part IV. Special Services of the University .....................,......,........... 267
Part V. The Administrative and Instructional Personnel of the
‘ Unive1·sity .___...........,.......................................i.................................. 275
Board of Trustees .......................................,.................................. 277
* of i Administrative Officers ................................................................ 278
E Administrative, Instructional, and Experiment Station
Staff ____,,__________,____________________________________,________....__._......l..............._....... 279
Administrative, Secretarial, and Clerical Organization ..., 296
E Faculty Organizations and Committees .................r................ 303
_ PQFLVI. Statistical Summary ,_____________,_......_,,,.... . ............................i........ 305
’ Index .................................................................................................................. 313
.y I
iral

 i  
L?  CALENDAR
_   I 1938 1939
I ifi  _
{   July January July
1   SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
[   ....   ....   .... 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ....   ....   ....   1
‘ I};  3456789 891011121314 2345678
I 1*;}.  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
J   17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
3   24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 ....   ....   23 24 25 26 27 28 29
g   31 ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   .... 30 31 ....   ....   ....
{   August February August
5   .... 123456 ....   .... 1234 .... ....12345
1   78910111213 567891011 6789101112
    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
j  ii; 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 _
; 3;  28 29 30 31 ....   .... 26 27 28 ....   ....   27 28 29 30 31 ....  
    September March September
  ....   ....   1 2 3 ....   .... 1 2 3 4 ,._.   ....   .... 1 2
3 T}  45678910 567891011 3456789
.   11 12 13 14 15 16 17 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
3  g 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
l   · 25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
_ ¢  ...1--- 1....;--- ._.._.;———
1   October April October
‘   —-——-————-—- ——————————— -—-———————
` *1  ....   ....   ....   1 ....   ....   ....   1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  2345678 2345678 891011121314
 Q? 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
.   16 17 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  23 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 29 30 31 ....   ....  
  30 31 ....   ....   .... 30 ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ....
  November May November
  .... ....12345 .... 123456 ....   .... 1234.
§; 6789101112 78910111213 567891011
.   13 14 15 16 17 18 19 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1 "`» 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
_   27 28 29 30 ....   .... 28 29 30 31 ....   .... 26 27 28 29 30 ....  
  December June December
éx;1 ——j—-—;- -——-—————— ——--1-**
J   ....   ....   1 2 3 ....   ....   1 2 3 ....   ....   .... 1 2
`   45678910 45678910 3456789
  11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2
`   18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ~
  25 26 27 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Iii ....   ....   ....   ....   ....   ...,   ....   31 ....   ,_..   ....  
53%
l  
1  

 —- UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
l 1938-39
1 First Semester
1938 .
E September 12 Monday—Classification tests and physical examina-
tions for all new students
I Q September 13 Tuesday, 1:30 p. m.—Freshman registration
L 15 September 14 Wednesday, 8 a. m.—Freshman classiiication
22 September 14-15 Wednesday, 1:30 p. m. to 5 p. m., and Thursday—
i 29 ` Registration and classitication of upper classmen
September 16 Friday——Class work begins
  September 20 Tuesday—Meeting of Board of Trustees
W September 26 Monday—Last date on which a student may enter
_. an organized class
i 5 October 10-11 Monday and Tuesday—Period for tiling application
L 12 _ for degrees to be granted in 1939
g 19 November 24-28 Thursday, 8 a. m. to Monday, 8 a. m.——Thanksgiving
3 26 Holiday
_ ____ December 13 Tuesday—Meeting of Board of Trustees
1 December 17 Saturday noon—Christmas Holiday begins
_. 1939
[ 2 January 2 Monday, 8 a. m.—Christmas Holiday ends
g 9 January 21—28 Saturday to Saturday——Midyear examinations
5 16 January 29 Sunday—Baccalaureate services
2 23 January 30 Monday——Mid—Year Commencement
9 30
... Second Semester
Jan. 3l—F‘eh. I Tuesday and VVednesday——Registrat,ion for second
—— semester
6 7 February 2 Thursday—-—Instruction resumed
3 14 February 13 Monday—Last date on which a student may enter
0 21 an organized class
7 28 F`ebruary 20 l\ionday—Date for tiling applications for degrees by
.. ..., students who were not in college the tirst
.. .... semester
; AD1‘il 4 Tuesday—Meeting of the Board of Trustees
April 20—24 Thursday, 8 a. m. to Monday, 8 a. m.——Spring Vacation
E-;   5 Friday atternoon—May Day
' · BY 24 Wednesday afternoon—Military Field Day
0 11 May 25 Thursday 9 a. m.-—Last date for reporting grades
7 18 for candidates for degrees. »
4 25 May 25—June 1 Thursday to Thursday—Final examinations
·· ‘’‘‘ JUHG 1 Thursday—Baccalaureate address
"' Juni! 1 Thursday—Meeting of the Board of Trustees
June 2 F1‘iday——Seventy-second Annual Coinmencement
1 2 June 5-10 Junior Club Week
8 9 . S .
16 ummer Session
  23  ` Julie 12 Monday—Registi·atio1i for first term Of SUIIIITIGY
:9 30 school
  __,_ JUIY 17 Monday—Registi·atio11 for second term of summer
school
Allsllst 18 Friday—~Summer Commencement
AUF’.I1St 19 Saturday—Summer School 911dS

 I ,
I 4
I  
  _ p   
I  
E _;{ REGISTRATION s»cHEDULE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1938
I   September 12 Monday—All freshmen and all other new students
I /~‘_ will report in Memorial Hall for classification
I   tests and physical examinations. All freshmen
I   and all new students, except those enrolled in
I y the graduate school, must have the tests and
;   examinations completed before they will be per-
I ,`,»` mitted to register. The student will find it ad-
I   vantageous to 1·eport as early as possible after
. T 8 a. m.
I `°Z September 13 Tuesday, 1:30 p. m. to 4:30 p. m.—Freshmen regis-
.   tration
{   September 14 Wednsday, 8 a. m. to 12 noon—Freshmen classiilca-
I   tion
" September 14-15 Wednesday afternoon and Thu1·sday—Registratiou
— __ and classification of all upper classmen accord-
1 ing to the following alphabetical schedule:
i .
    September 14
Q; Wednesday afternoon
. is
= I 1:30 to 2:20-—T through Z
j i 2:30 to 3:20—S
, Q 3:30 to 4:20-—P through R
Y  
-   September 15
  Thursday Morning Thursday Afternoon
  8:00 to 8:50-M through O 1:30 to 2:20——C through D
  9:00 to 9:50--K through L 2:30 to 3:20-A through B
g 10:00 to 10:50-H through J 3:30 to 5:00—Miscellaneous _
  11:00 to 11:50—-—E through G A through Z
.   Freshmen wl1o register late should register with upper classmen
:   in alphabetical groups,
I   September 16 Friday——C1ass work begins
 
Q  
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GENERAL INFORMATION OF SPECIAL INTEREST
T0 THE PROSPEGTIVE STUDENT
men

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 THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
The University of Kentucky is located at Lexington, an urban
community of about 57,000 population. It is a state-supported institu-
tion operated under the direction of a board of trustees of iifteen
members. The membership of this board includes the Governor, the
Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Commissioner of Agri-
culture, ex officio, and twelve members appointed by the Governor,
three of`whom are alumni of the University and three, members of the
State Board of Agriculture. The University is one of a number of
institutions known as land-grant colleges which were established by
the Morrill Act of 1862 and which have continued to receive federal
assistance under the provisions of this and subsequent laws relating
to the teaching of agriculture and the mechanic arts and to the pro-
vision of agricultural experiment stations and extension services in
agriculture and home economics.
The University of Kentucky is a fully accredited institution. It
is on the approved list of the Association of American Universites and
holds memberships in the following organizations: the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the American Council
on Education, the National Association of State Universities, the
Association of American Colleges, the Association of Land—Grant Col-
leges, the Association of American Law Schools, the American Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Schools of Business, the Kentucky Association
‘ of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the American Association of _
Schools and Departments of Journalism, and the National Associa-
tion of Schools of Music.
The major function of the University is that of instruction. For
thc performance of this function it is organized into the College of
‘ Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, the College of Engineer- ·
ing, the College of Law, the College of Education, the College of Com-
merce, the Graduate School, and a Department of University Exten
sion. Residence instruction is given through two semesters of eighteen
weeks each, and through two summer terms of five weeks each.
In addition to giving instruction to its student body, the Uni-
versity contributes to the welfare of the state through research,
experimentation, and public service. While all departments make im-
Dortant contributions along these lines, certain divisions and bureaus
have been established speciiically for these purposes. Included in this
group are the Experiment Station and the Extension Division of the
Vollege of Agriculture, the Bureau of Business Research, the Bureau
of Government Research, the Bureau of School Service, the Bureau
of Source Materials, the Personnel Bureau, the Publicity Bureau, the

 10 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
Q   Teachers Placement Bureau, and the Department of University
  Extension.
  The University of Kentucky began as a part of Kentucky Uni-
  versity under a cooperative plan authorized by the legislature in 1865.
`   The purpose of this plan was to unite sectarian and public education
{ 3 under one organization. This experiment was tried for a number of
I   years. In the meantime, the federal funds authorized under the Morrill
{   Act were used to develop agriculture and mechanic arts in Kentucky
I   University. In 1878, when the people of Kentucky decided to estab-
  lish a state institution of higher learning, the College of Agriculture
I   and Mechanic Arts was separated from Kentucky University and re-
l   established on land given by the City of Lexington and the County of
I   Fayette. Thirty years later the legislature changed the name of the
·   institution to the State University of Kentucky, and gave it additional
I   financial support. In 1916 the name was again changed, this time
i   to the present title, and additional maintenance was arranged by I
{   legislative act.
g   ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
| Ci Students are admitted to the University of Kentucky as freshman;
j   with advanced standing from other institutions; as special students;
j YQ  and as auditors. Admission to certain colleges is also governed by
Z _»  special regulations.
3 ’v=  All students, irrespective of their classification, are required to
  `f  register on designated days at the beginning of each semester, at such
, j?  places and according to such schedules as may be announced by the
I Q  Registrar’s office. The period for registration closes on the second ,
  ·_,'` =  __ Monday following the beginning of classes. Additional fees are charged
_ i  for late 1·egistration, for late classification, or for a late change of
` I  college
` r—·_ ; Applications for admission to the University should be made to
I   the Registrar. Certified copies of high school credentials and of
  work done in other institutions should be submitted to the Regis
  trar’s office in advance of the registration period. Failure to file crc- _
*   dentials in time for checking before the registration period will delay
  the student in arranging his program.
A _ j  Admission to the Freshman Class
I   An applicant for admission to the freshman class should have
j  his principal submit a statement of his high school work on the blank
,   furnished by the Registrar’s office.
V   It is always of advantage to any student, as well as to his prirr
,   cipal, if a transcript of the student’s record is made up and mailed
  before the close of the school year. It is difficult, if not impossible,
  for the principal who is away on his vacation to comply with a
I j   request for this information.
· ll Graduates of Kentucky high schools accredited by the Kentucky
. S Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools are admitted to the
I Z
| .
I .
 .;{
"\

 GENERAL INFORMATION 11
rsity University on certificate, provided they have fifteen units of high
school work acceptable to the University. These fifteen units must
_ include five basic units as follows: three in English, one in algebra,
Um- and one in plane geometry. The remaining ten units, within the limi-
L8_65‘ tations shown in the following outline of entrance requirements, may
ltlon be distributed among the other subjects usually offered in high school,
>r of except that not more than four units may be offered in Group B,
»rr1ll usually referred to as the miscellaneous or vocational group.
icky Outline of entrance requirements. The figures in the following
stab- summary indicate the maximum and minimum number of units that
ture may be offered in any subject. The minimum amount of credit allowed
l re- in any subject is one-half unit. In addition to the five basic units, a
VY of sufficient numbe1· of units to make a total of fifteen must be offered
the from Groups A and B, provided tlhat not more than four units may be
ET; offered from Group B.
I b ) Basic Units
y English, 3. Algebra, 1. Plane Geometry, 1.
Group A
my English 1 Mathematics
ms; Foreign Languages* Advanced Arithmetic 1,4,,-1
1 by French 1 -3 Advanced Algebra. 1
German 1 ·3 Solid Geometry ¤%
d to Gi-eek 1 --3 Trigonometry FA
_ Latin 1 -4 Sciences
ffh Spanish 1 --3 Biology M-1
mj; Social SciencesT· Botany ,%-1
rggd ‘ History and Civics 1 -4 Chemistry l $$-1
Q of Economics % General Science $-1
Prob, of Democracy 1 Geology *%*1 .
Q to Sociology % Physics 1/z—1
I of Education (including Physical Geography %——1
, Psychology) %——1 Physiology and Hyg- %—1%
3glS` Zoology *:5-*1
crc- _
9laY Group B
(Only four unlts may be offered in this group)
Agricultureif %—4 Music %—1
Bookkeeping */}-1 Shop Work° %——2
rw; Commercial Law % Shorthand lyi--1
an Commercial Geography % Sllfvoyiilg lb
_ Art or Drawing° 15-2 Salesmanship %
)}`m` Drawing——lVlechanical° %-2 Typewriting° M;-1
  Home Economicsl: %-4
h a ' Not less than one unit in Foreign Languages will be accepted.
TStudents offering credit in Problems of Democracy may not offer
credit in Sociology, Economics, and Advanced Clvlcs.
Cky mmf flip; Qgfé than one_ unit may be offered ln any one subject ln Agricul-
l'Tl9 ECOIIOYIHCS.
the ° Double periods required.

 lz UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
i 1 Students who come fi·om Kentucky high schools which are not
I ii accredited may be admitted to the University if, in addition to meet-
  ing the above requirements, they successfully pass examinations for
  admission.
- gf Applicants for admission to the freshman class who have grad-
| 4f? uated from accredited high schools outside of Kentucky are admitted
Y   on certificate provided their high school work meets the above require-
!   ments and provided they rank in scholarship in the upper two-thirds
l   of their graduating classes. Students in this classification who do
I   not rank in the upper two-thirds of their classes must pass examina-
{ dj` tions for admission. Students who are graduates of non-accredited
i · high schools outside of Kentucky may be admitted if they success-
i   fully pass examinations foradmission.
    Admission to Advanced Standing
    Students coming from other institutions of higher learning are
i   required to present certified transcripts of all work done elsewhere,
2   Work done at a fully accredited college or university ordinarily will
; {ii  be recognized credit for credit at the University of Kentucky, except
I   that credit is not allowed on transfer for work done with the lowest
  passing mark. To be accepted on transfer from another institution
· Q`!  a student o1·dinarily must have made a standing which would insure
’  i: normal progress toward a degree. He must also present evidence of
f `i  honorable dismissal or leave of absence.
  4]  Advanced standing in the University may also be secured by pass
fi  ing an examination on each subject for which credit is desired, pro-
Y   vided there is evidence of a serious intent to continue a program of
  study leading to a degree.
. {  Before a transfer student can become a candidate for a degree
` ° he must have met the entrance requirements outlined above for admis-
4 ‘·  sion to the freshman class.
Q  Admission as a Special Student
` j  A graduate of another university or college may enter the Univer- ·
’   sity to pursue any special work. Under the following conditions.
2,4 other pe1·sons may be admitted as special students regardless of
j   whether they have met the entrance 1·equirements for admission to
_; the freshman class.
{   ’ 1. They must be prepared to do the work desired.
  2. They must be at least twenty-one years of age.
.   Before a special student can become a candidate for a degree he
sl must have satisfied the entrance requirements for admission to the
*   freshman class.
  · Admission as an Auditor
_   By payment of the required fees any person may be admitted to a
·   class or classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in 311Y
L   college must apply to the Dean of the college in which he is regiS·
l
I .

 GENERAL INFORMATION is
110t tered in order to be an auditor. Other persons should apply to the
eet· Registrar’s Office for admission. No credit can be given for a class
for audited, nor is the student permitted an examination for credit.
md' Admission to Cblleges and Schools
gf; The College of Education. For admission to the College of Educa-
rds tion the student must have attained junior classification with a stand-
do ing of at least one (an average of C on all previous work).
hm The College of Engineering. It is strongly recommended that a
ted student desiring to enter the College of Engineering, in addition to
3SS_ meeting general admission requirements, offer for entrance one unit
in physics, one and one-half units in algebra, and one—half unit in
solid geometry. If this is not done, he will be required to carry addi-
tional courses in college in these subjects to make up the deficiency.
The College of Law. An applicant for admission to the College
are of Law must offer sixty college credits (exclusive of gymnasium and
HF military science) with a standing of 1.0 in colleges other than Law,
ml six ot which must be in English.
BDI The Graduate School. Graduates of fully accredited institutions
Fst of higher learning may be admitted to the Graduate School upon evi-
wu dence of graduation and an official transcript of unde1·graduate
ml? courses. Applications from graduates of institutions not fully accred-
OI ited will be individually evaluated. However, students from such
schools are encouraged to secure a bachelor's degree from a fully
·SS` accredited institution before applying.
i]'O.
of FEES AND EXPENSES
.06 Fees at the University vary according to the privileges granted
liS_ and the classification of the student, that is, as a resident, non- l
resident, full-time, part—time, auditor, etc. The following table gives
the schedule of regular fees for each semester. Checks are accepted
by tl1e University in payment of fees, room rent, and board, if they are
Glu _ made out for the exact amount due. That is, no money is returned
ls, OH a check. In transmitting funds to students drafts, money orders,
of and certified checks should be used.
to
Fees for Graduation and for Special Privileges
Graduation Fee. Candidates for the bachelor's degree will be
charged a graduation fee of $9.00. This will include the 1·enta1 of
D9 cap and gown, diploma fee, and senior dues. Candidates for the
he Masters degree will be charged a fee of $15.00, which will include the
above and in addition the candidate will be presented with the Mas-
ter’s hood. Graduation fees are payable not later than the fourth day
preceding the commencement.
K Late Registration. Students entering the University after the
‘y Fégular registration period will be charged an additional fee of $1.00
S' DBF day, the total not to exceed $3.00.

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