xt734t6f2k1z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt734t6f2k1z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19561130  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 30, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 30, 1956 1956 2013 true xt734t6f2k1z section xt734t6f2k1z Wildcat Moopsters Begin Season
Team Lacks Experience
Says Coach Adolph Hupp
Tom White

Dy

Vol. XLVIII

M

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, Nov. 30,

-

Eleven Attend
Sigma Delta Chi
Animal Meeting

S

...

Num1er9

193G

Sigma Delta Chi, men's national
professional Journalism fraternity,
opened its annual convention in
Louisville Tuesday.
The UK chapter is acting as st
along with the University of
Louisville professional chapter of
SDX and the University of Indiana undergraduate chapter.
.- Men
attending from - the - UK
chapter are Marvin Beard, Paul
Daniel, Bob (Scoop) White. Phil
Mcintosh. Dave Stewart, Perry
Ashley, Joe Goodman, Prof. J. A.
McCauley, Prof. Victor Portmann,
and Dr. William Moore.
White and the faculty members
left Wednesday and the remaining
group followed on Thursday.
Beard is the official delegate
from the UK chapter and White
--

i3

Now that cold weather is here the Kernel Kutie sittings have moved
indoors. This week's Kutie is Gay Evans from Louisville, Ky. She is
a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences. Gay is a member of

the alternate.

Two pledges will be initiated in

a model initiation today. They are
David Altemuehle and
James

Bland.
The convention will end Dec.

University of Kentucky
scientist who is nationally
known fcr her public service contributions has been selected by
her fellow faculty members as the
UK College of Arts and Sciences'
"Distinguished Professor of the
Year."
She is Dr. Gladys M. Kammerer, who has been associated
with the University since 1946,
when she resigned from a post at
Wellesley ; College to accept the
UK position.
Announcement of the selection
was made yesterday at the University by Dr. M. M. White, dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr.' Kammerer is the 13th
member of the college and the first
woman to receive the award since
it was established in 1944 as a
political

SGA Seeks

Later Hours
For Women
An effort to extend weekend late

hours for women students will be

made soon by a special SGA committee.
Terry Kuester, chairman of
SGA's Committee on Modernizing
Women's Hours, will meet, with
Dean Sarah B. Holmes and the
House Presidents' Council to discuss the issue.
One proposal of the SGA group
Is to allow women students to remain out Friday and Saturday
nights until 1 a.m. Present curfew
hour is 12:30 a.m. on those nights.
Kuester's committee has sent
queries to 100 colleges and .universities throughout the country
requesting information on women's
hours.
Of the 60 replies received by
Wednesday, 60 per cent revealed

means of recognizing outstanding
academic achievement.
Faculty members winning this
honor are given a semester free of
teaching duties to conduct research of their own choosing and
to prepare' the annual Arts and
Sciences Lecture.
Eligible for the award are faculty members in the college who
hold the rank of assistant professor or higher. Each year the choice
is made by secret vote of the
faculty.
Dr. Kammerer, who was relieved
of teaching duties during the current fall semester, is the second
member of the political science
faculty to be selected for the
award. In 1945 the honor went to
Dr. Amry Vandenbosch, head of
the Department of Political Science.
The Arts 'and Sciences Lecture
will be delivered by Dr. Kammerer
on Tuesday night, April 2, in UK's
Guignol Theater. Her subject will
be "The American Setting for
Child Welfare Administration."
A native of St. Louis, Mo., Dr.

pre-seas-

on

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1

Dr. Gladys Kammerer Named
As 'Professor Of The Year'
A

Coach Rupp's Wildcats have won
SEC titles, three NCAA national championships and have appeared in the NCAA tourney more
times than any other college. Kentucky under Coach Rupp has been
picked by sportswriters and coaches as one of the top 20 teams in
the nation many times since he
took over as coach in 1930.
Kentucky lost three valuable
starters, from last year's squad,
Phil Grawemeycr, Bob Burrow and
Jerry Bird- V- Coupled -- with- these
losses and the recent injury to
Ray Mills, probable starter at one
of the forward positions, the Wildcats will present an inexperienced
team to the fans Saturday.
Coach Rupp believes this possibly may be the weakest Kentucky team' he has coached because of this lack of experience.
polls
But the recent
taken by the many sports writers
throughout the nation pay high
tribute to Coach Rupp's ability to
build powerhouses, by picking the
Wildcats to finish among the top
20 teams.
The brightest spot on the Kentucky team is at guard. Vernon
and Gerry Calvert
Hatton (6-l)
give Kentucky two of the
finest In the nation. Hatton was
named Sophomore of the Year in
the SEC last season and has been
mentioned as a candidate for All- 16

.-

Kerncl Kutic

p.m.

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Adolph Rupp begins his 27th
year as head basketball coach
of the Wildcats Saturday when
Washington & Lee invades Memorial Coliseum. Game time is 8
p.m. with the Kittens playing hast
to the Transylvania freshmen at

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schools.

Upon completion of her undergraduate studies, she was awarded
a graduate scholarship to the University of Wisconsin, where she
received a master's degree in political science.
After a period of high school
teaching, Dr. Kammerer was selected for a Hillman Fellowship
at the University of Chicago. Two
years as an instructor in political
science at Wellesley College fol-

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lowed.
An American Association of Uni-

felversity Women
lowship was granted to her in
1945, and she received her PhJ).
degree in political science at the
University of Chicago in 1946.
In September of 1946, Dr. Kammerer joined the UK faculty as an
assistant professor of political science, and presently she holds the
(Continued on Page 7)
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Starting Five
as Kentucky opens
These five players will be In the starting line-u- p
season tomorrow night against the Washington St Lee
its basketball
Generals. They are (From L to r.) Gerry Calvert, guard; Johnny Cox,
forward; Ed Beck, center; John Crigler, forward; and Vernon Hatton, guard.

with the presentation of the trophy to the winner of the "honor"
during an intermission at the Ugly Man Dance.
Music for the Dance will be provided by Cliff Butler.
Butler is well known on the Midwestern club circuit an dis in demand for high school and college
hops. He records for several small
companies and holds down a spot

as a disc Jockey on Louisville's
largest independent radio station,
WLOU.

Butler's "small band with the
big sound" gives excellent treatment to dreamy mood music in addition to providing rock for the
"coolest of cats."
The dance will be semi-formand will begin at 8 p.m. in the
(Continued on Paje 1G)
al

Health Service
Does Not Issnc
Class Excuses
In case you're wondering why

you can't get an excuse from the

University Health Service, the

fol-

lowing is the context of a letter
from UK Vice President Leo M.
Chamberlain to members of the

administrative

staff:

and

instructional

"Apparently there are some
members of the faculty who are
not familiar with the University's
policies governing the Health Service.
"Some years ago the Health Service was asked to cease the practice of giving students excuses for
absences from classes. It has come
to our attention that some in-

I

structors have requested students
to secure such excuses when they
are absent from classes for reas-

weeks ago, and final results will
be presented at the meeting with
the Home Presidents' Council,
.

ons of Illness.
"An explanation of an absence
from a class is a matter that
should be resolved by the student

Kuester taid.

Short.

tea-ton-

Kammerer holds the A.B. degree
from Washington University,
where she was the recipient of a
four-yescholarship awarded to
valedictorians of St. Louis high

hours later than at UK.
The survey was started several

He met Wednesday with Dean
Holmes to report on the committee's progress and to outline future plans.
Assisting him on the committee
are Ttny Woolum and Fredda

(6-5-

"

Ugly Man Contest Closes
Once again male members of the
UK community are vying for the
"coveted" title of the Ugly Man.
There are 19 contestants in the
Alpha Phi Omega's annual parody
of the queen contests.
Voting in the fund raising contest began yesterGay and will continue until 4 p.m. today in the
SUB ticket booth.
The contest will climax tonight

American honors this year. Calvert is a slick ball handler and
playmakrr for the Wildcats.
Id Beck will get the starting
rail at renter Saturday but Is bring pushed hard by Dick Howe
),
.
held out last
Starting at the forward slots
Saturday will be John CrUlcr (6-and Johnny Cox (6-- 4 . Cox was
moved up into a starting role when
Ray Mills broke his Jaw in practice. As a freshman last year Cox
led the Kittens in both scoring
and rebounds.
Kentucky should have good
bench strength with men like Bill
Cassady. Earl Adkins. Johnny
Brewer, Lincoln Collingsworth.
Harold Ross and Bill Smith standing by to give relief to the starters.
Lee, roached by
Washington
BUI McCann, bring an
five into Lexington. Four seniors
and one Junior make up the General's starting Ave which i picked
to finish third In the Southern
Conference.
guard is the
Dom Flora, (6-leading scerer for the Generals
and came within 26 points of
breaking- - the national two-yescoring record as a sophomore.
Miami (Fla.) moves into the
Coliseum Monday evening as they
venture into bigtlme basketball for
the first time. Not much is known
about the Hurricanes but they lost
but one starter from last year's
squad. Pacing the Hurricane attack will be Ed Morris (6-and
who combined
Gene Stage (6-for 797 points last seasop.
Kentucky's freshmen will play
a Lexington independent team be
fore the varsity game starting at
6 p.m. Monday.

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Rl'SSEL ZACIIEM

MILTON OLIVER

STAN CHAl'VIN

and the instructor, The Health
Service has been asked not to
furnish excuses."
(Signed) Leo M. Chamberlaia

* KENTUCKY KERNEL. TrMav, Xovcmlwr

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Moot Court To Hear
Kit joy Case Monday

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Thr womai) always pays, espe- next Monday, Dec. 3. at. 2 p.m., in
cially if .she has n bank account.
room 100 of Lafferty Hall.
Such was the case of the lato
Dale Nathan and William BradMrs. John Klljny. Her husband, ford, acting as attorneys for the

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colloe professor, had married
her for her money only. This union
rould very well have been all that
John expected it to be If he had
not. jeopardized it with his careless
behavior.
For alas. Mrs. Klljoy finally
learned the bitter truth. When .she
discovered John's infidelity, she
decided to chance her will.
But before the will could be
changed. Mrs. Kiljoy died of poisoning. While her death could have
been accidental, the fact remained that Mr. Kiljoy was a well
known authority on poisons.
Consequently. John Kiljoy was
charged with the murder of his
wife. His trial is scheduled for
a

;

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Dames Club

4

nimntiiiiiTifr

Hanging Of The Greens Committee
The Hanging of the Greens will be December 12 in the Student Union
Building. Members of the committee are: (Front row from 1. to r.)
Hetty Gabehart, Louis Ewbank, and Betsy Patterson. (Back row, L to
r.) Mr. Bart Peak, Miss Mackie Rasdall. Nancy Boggs, Joan Overstreet,
Gregg Khodemyre, and Miss Brucie Cruise. Also on the committee
are: Miss Joyce Laase, Anne Emmons, Gene Cravens, Bert Worster,
and John Birdwell.

Dean White To Lead
Community Institute

state. Walter Sibbald and Luther

House, defense attorneys, are in
charge of preparing case details of
this mock trial. They are seniors
in the College of Law. These weekly

trials are open to all University

students.

TELEVISION-RADIO-SERVI-

The I K Dames Club will meet
in the music room of the SUB at
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 5
Wives of all students are invited
to attend.
A C hristmas proeram on simand
ple rioral arrangements
Christmas decorations will be
presented by Mrs. W. F. Garri-gu- s.

The Dames Bridge Club will
meet at the Faculty Club at.
7:30 p.m., Dec. 10. The Arts and
Crafts group will meet at the
Faculty Club at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Dee. 3.

CE

EVENINGS AND

SUNDAYS
NO EXTRA CHARGE

CALL

Seniors Visit
Armco Steel Co.

24

4-87-

09

ALWAYS LALL jAIMUY

Armco Steel Company, Ashland
Division, was host to a group of 24
seniors in engineering from the
University of Kentucky on Tuesday, Nov. 20.
The group, accompanied by Dr.
Roy Swift, associate professor of

A FREE GIFT FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY

COOPERSTOWN!

Mining Engineering, and - Robert
C. Duncan, supervisor of MetalDr. Martin M. White, Arts and Louisville meeting write NCCJ, 201 lurgical Laboratories, was taken
Sciences dean and professor o'f Realty Building, Louisville 2, or on a tour of the Ashland plant
which included open hearth and
Psychology, is one of the key na- call JUniper
.
rolling operations.
tional consultants who will lead
"pilot" institutes in Lexington and

Do you live in Cooperstown?

If you do

THIS COUPON GOOD FOR $2.50
ON TV SERVICE CALL

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Louisville.

The projects will be sponsored by

the National Conference of
tians and Jews.

Chris-

The University of Kentucky will
the scenj of the first Community Leaders Institute which will
be held 3:15 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday.
Dec. 6. in the Euclid Avenue classroom building.
The Louisville meeting will be
held 3:15 to 9:30 p.m., Dec. 7, in
the University of Louisville Education Building.
Theme of the two meetings Is
"Building Brotherhood in Our
Community."
The Institute is designed to
"evaluate local and state human
relations problems and to develop
an educational program for the
future."
- Dean White, a
psychologist
and past president of the .Kentucky Psychological Association,
will speak on "Prejudice in Patterns of Group Life."
Other speakers will deal with
such subjects as "The Changing
Nation." and "Where Do We Go
Prom Here?"
Delegates who will participate in
the discussions will represent community organizations, social
agencies, labor and management
groups, churches and synagogues.
PTA's, schools, colleges, and other
groups.
Reservation cards may be obtained for the Lexington Institute
by writing NCCJ, 163" East Main
Street, Lexington, Ky. For the
On ' April 24, 1704, the first
permanent American newspaper
was published in Boston.
The first commercial round -world flight was completed on
T

Question: What's funny, honey? Answer:

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While you're at it, remember: Lucky smoke
rings come from fine tobacco. This makes no
June 30. 1947.
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as the capital of the United States you. You see, fine tobacco means good taste,
on July 8, 1792.
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.Barkley Papers On Deposit
In The University Library
Personal papers and efTects of
the late Alben W. Barklcy. rormer
vice president of the United States.
U.S. representative
and senator
from Kentucky, Rre now on deposit at the Margaret I. King Library.
The collection contains Senator
Barkley's public and private papers
from 1940 until his death, April 30.
Much of the material is expected
to be intimate records and personal
views of the American political
picture during this period. Sen.
Barkley's extensive knowledge and
important role on the Kentucky
scene, in the New Deal and the
Fair Deal, make his collection an
important addition' to the library's
facilities.
A key to the political tenor of
the times may be found in the
numerous political cartoons collected by the "Veep".
Included in the Barkley possessions are his files, the gavels he
:used as presiding officer of the
Senate, canes' he collected as a
hobby, medals, flags, and the chair
he used in his vice president's of-

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Any UK student can learn in
play the ukclelc in three easy le.s- -

The Caldron croun oi tne Stu- drnt Union in sponsoring a series
of ukrlelf lessons. nic.e les.s)n.s
will be given at 3 p.m. on three

f"T

consecutive Wednesdays, Decern- ber 5. 12. 19.
Lelund Smith, inslructor at La- fayette HiKh School, will teach
these lessons. Smith is a Ruitarit

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'

LEXINGTON

!

YELLOW CAB

,

and recently has taken up playing the ukclelc.
A book of Instruction will be
selected for "uke" beginners to follow along with the lessons. This
book will be selected by Smith and
jack Zuverink, piblicity committee member. The basic fundamentals of ukclelc playing will bo

Inc.

Dial

2-22-

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taught.

to

Oil fenpus
(Author of "Dart foot Boy tl

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GUIDE FOR THE UN.MONEYED

fice.

On the back of the chair is the
following inscription: "Vice Presi-

...

dent
From Kentucky Democratic members of the House, Jan.

.
. . Presented to Albcn
W. Barkley as a token of affection
and in the recognition of long and
outstanding service to Kentucky,

20. 1949

to the nation, and to humanity."
among; the many
An
valuable articles is a large replica
of a gavel which was presented to
Sen. Barkley by his "friends of
the Western States."
During Sen. Barkley's bid for
eye-catch-

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Barkley Collection

er

Suzanne Stagg is holding a vase and Joanne Brown is reclining in a

chair both of which are included in the possessions of the late Alben
YWBarkley. The chair was used by Barkley in his vice president's
the Senate in
r,

against John
formeTTfedenT

1954

Harry S. Truman wired the "Veep'"
and volunteered to speak in Kentucky in behalf of his former vice
president. The Kentucky' statesman replied that he needed no help
in his home state Truman's letter
congratulating his former running
mate's stand is in the library's collection.
Dr. Herman L. Donovan, then
president of UK, first contacted
Sen. Barkley regarding his personal
and private papers. Dr. Bennett
H. Wall, University associate pro- lessor of history, followed up the
initial contact with frequent visits
to the "Veep" in Washington and
Paducah.
A Barkley Kotni has been
planned for the Margaret I. King
Library. Various portions of the
collection will be placed on display
there. Dedication of the room has
been tentatively set for next spring.

BOHMER
FLYING SERVICE, INC.

Lances Honorary
Seeks 'Members
Lances, junior men's honorary,'
accepting applications for
membership.
To be considered, an applicant
must be a second-semestsophomore or first semester junior; must
have anover-al- l
standing of at
least 2.5 on the 4 system: and
must have eight or more points
Dasea on tne Lances Point System,
as outlined in the organization's
point system booklet.
Applications must be made by
letter. All candidates must bring
their letter of application to Room
128, Student Union Building, at
7 p.m. Thursday, at which time
they wish to be interviewed.
Persons wishing to obtain more
information should contact Lances
president Gentry Davis at
is now

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K. L. Sitfafoo was a kirn, ambitious lad. and whon he
finished hirh school he wis hod mightily to p on with his
ciiuwitiuii. It sinned, however, a forlorn hope. Crop
failures had brought his father to the brink of, disaster.
( It. L.'s father rai-e- d
date palms which, in North Dakota,
is a form of artculture fraught with risk.) Nor couM
IJ. L.'s mother help; she had
m'own torpid since the death
of Uudolph Valentino.
II. L. could tro to college only if ho worked his way
through. This was a propeet that dismayed him.

office.

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Racked with misgivings,

K. L. paced the streets, pondering- his dilemma. One day, walking and brooding, ho
came upon a park bench and sat down and lit a Philip
Morris. (There is no occasion, happy or sad, pensive or
exuberant, when Philip Morris is not entirely welcome,
as you will discover when you go to your favorite tobacco
counter and buy some.)

R. L. was suddenly interrupted by a small, quavering
voice which said, "My boy, you are troubled. Can I help?"

Seated beside 11. L. was a tiny, gnarled man with
wispy, snow-whihair. His skin was almost transparent,
showing a delicate tracery of fragile bones beneath. His
back was bent, and his hands trembled. "Do you think,
sir," said R. L., "that a boy can work his way through
college and still enjoy a rich, full campus life?"
"Why, bless you, son," replied the stranger with a
rheumy chuckle, "of course. In fact, I did it myself."
"Was it very hard?" asked R.L.
"Yes, it was hard," the stranger admitted. "But when
one is young, all things are possible. I, for example, used
to get up at five o'clock every morning to stoke the
furnace at the SAE house. At six I had to milk the ewen
at the school of animal husbandry. At seven I gave a
fencing lesson to the Dean of Women. At eight I had a
class in early Runic poets. At nine I gave haircuts at the
Gamma Phi "Beta house. At ten I had differential calculus. At eleven I posed for a life class. At twelve I
watered soup at the Union. At one I had a class in
Oriental languages. At two I exercised the mice in psych
lab. At three I gave the Dean of Women another fencing
lesson. At four I had qualitative analysis. At five I
went clamming. At six I cut meat for the football team.
At seven I ushed at the movies. At eight I had my ears
pierced so that at nine I could tell fortunes in a gypsy
tea room. At ten I hud a class in astronomy. At eleven
I tucked in the foolball team. At twelve I studied und at
three I went to sleep."
"Sir," cried R. L., "I am moved and inspired by your
shining example!"
"It was nothing," said the stranger modestly, shaking
his frail white head. "It was jut hard work, and hard
work never hurt anybody."
"Would you mind telling mo, sir,"
R. L., "how-olyou are now?"
"Twenty-two,- "
said the stranger.
te

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7:30-10:0-

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LIME AND MAXWELL

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These lessoui will be given In
room 128 of the SUB.

.sons.

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Uhelele Lessons Offered

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I'hitip Morrit tukt fileature in bringing you

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KENTUCKY KTRV'H

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At Night Too

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It's 7:30 on Tuesday night, and Jose College,
Donovan Hall resident, class of 19G0, is through
Studying (he may have seven term papejs due in
the next two days, but as far as he's concerned,
he's through).
Over on another part of the campus, his female
counterpart, little Miss Jane Shy is also through
studying.
Now the question arises what to do? Well, Jose,
g
Cad and
if he is lucky, hops into his
heads to a local pub for a few quick ones.
Jane pours herself into the latest Dior creation
and heads downstairs to meet her newest "steady."
g
Cad, and not
But not every Jose has a
every Jane has a slinky Dior, and or a steady.
So, (and this approaches reality more), Jose
throws his leather jacket over his shoulder and
heads alone for one of the business establishments
near the campus and downs a quick cup of coffea,
or stays in the dorm for a rousing ame of ping-pon-

r

.

HOUR- S-

low-slun-

.'.

...

low-slun-

r

g.

"

"

d
Jane, if she can make it across the
street, trudges to one of the aforementioned
business establishments, crowds into a booth, and
stares at her coffee until she has to be back to
Patterson, all the while pondering how she can
d
boy she saw in Freshmeet that cute
man English today.
An imaginary situation? Not at all. It happens
all the time.
And a great part of the situation could be averted
if the University would take necessary steps to provide a place where students could go at night.
-a
The idea ofinakTnglheLittIe Commons suchplace has been thoroughly discussed, and just
as thoroughly rejected.
So, why not open the Student Union Grill at
night?
Admittedly this plan may appeal to freshmen
and sophomores more than to "sophisticated"
and women, who prefer to do their
fraternizing in places with more atmosphere, suh.
But there must be some juniors and seniors
schedule for each
who don't have a tightly-draw- n
night of the week, and who would welcome the
chance to visit the Grill at night.
And we know there are many freshmen and
sophomores who would like to have a campus
meeting place at night where they could become
better acquainted with their fellow University students, especially those of the opposite sex.- We are aware of the fact that freshmen women
are only allowed one night out a week, excluding
weekends, and sophomore women, too.
We are also aware that serious objection to this
proposal will come from some University officials
who feel that ( 1 ) the expense involved in keeping
the CriU open at night will not justify the number
of students who will visit it, and (2) the open
Grill will serve as a magnet to draw students away
'
from their studies.
To the first objection, it is impossible to say
whether this is valid or not, since the proposal has
never been' tried. To the second, we say that these
girls .on
students, especially the
not
their free nights, are going out anyway-w- hy
to a close place on the Campus?
Another point which may be raised is that the
Sweater Swings, established with the aim of helping keep students on the campus, have, in the
main, not been too successful.
But this is not hard to understand. Who, except
for a few of our more ardent lovers, wants to sit
in a dimly-li- t barn and listen to phonograph
all the while wondering if he should
speak to the girl next to him (or are you a man,
too, I can't see in this light).
So we say, oncn the Grill at night. And, if tho
idea is a success, rearrange the tables and let the
students dance or maybe even open the doors to
the cafeteria to give them more room.
If, after a sufficient length of time, nobody is
pa'tronizing the Grill, then mark it up as a bad
.
idea. A test period of this sort shouldn't bankrupt
anybody, not even the University of Kentucky.
But give it a try.
It just might work.
traffic-infeste-

I

Out In The Cold

red-haire-

up-perclass-

'semi-restricte-

d"

rec-ords-a-

nd

Letters From The Readers
Barking Pro b lent

,

To the Editor:
Being only a common student (independent), my
voice crying in the wilderness has not been listened
to. So I thought I would take my problem to the

students.
Several weeks ago it rained. Having a medical
disability that make it extremely difficult to walk
great distances, I have a parking permit for area 7.
The day it rained I drove to area 7 as I do every
day. Every parking space in area 7 was filled.
Accepting this philosophically, I spotted several
spaces in the next area 8. So I parked in one of
these, and trudged through the rain to my class.
As I passed through area 7 (my area), I noticed a
large number of staff cars with area 8, and other
area, permits. Coming back to my car after class,
I found a ticket for parking in the wrong area
(Area 8) under my wiper.
Just to check I wandered back to area 7, to check
on the staff cars parked in the wrong area there.

THEY HAD NO TICKETS.
On Tuesday following the ticket incident, I
checked the cars in area 7. I wasjight behind the
campus police as they checked the south side of the
area (in front of the Biological Sciences Building).
There were nine cars wrongly parked in this area-fi- ve
of these belonged to students, the rest to staff
members.
Four of the student cars got tickets. None of the
staff cars got tickets.
If a student has a medical reason and is assigned
a certain area to park in, that area should have a
space for him; otherwise, why assign him to that
area? If a student has a hardship in his class schedule and receives a permit, it certainly is not helping
him if there is no space in his assigned area for him
to park in.
Let's either have equal enforcement of the regulations for both the staff and students or let's give
the student a fair deal when he is forced to park in
another area, because his area is full of cars assigned to other areas.
(Name Withheld by Request)

' We Nearly Froze

poem en
a football stadium might be. Hence-t- he
closed to reflect some of their reactionsr-.Wg left our homes that morning for a 5tiip to
!.t.j,...
U. Of K,
to refine our cheers a little bit and see Kentucky
play.
We went to see Kentucky put Xavier on the run;
Some of us nearly froze but we had a lot of funl

,

.

'V

Nettie Sue thought a head scarf would just be in
the way;
And who could keep up with a pair of gloves
when he watches Delmar play? ,
But at 3 o'clock that evening, ears and fingers
u
cold and numb,
She was freezing 'most to death but she had a
lot of fun!

;

There was cheering, there was jeering, there was
booing loud and long;
There were penalties and touchdowns, still
Kentucky rolled along.
till the game was
peanuts, Coca-cola- s
Hot-dog-

s,

finally won.
We nearlv froze to death but we had a lot of
fun!
Mrs. Ruth S. Bentley, Librarian
Bush High School
After a long, long wait, we see the 195G student
directories made it in 1956 that does make it more
convenient.
Maybe everybody that lives in Cooperstown is
poor but some of them do have television sets.
Whajt ever happened to the antennas?
According to a story on page 3, UK students can
learn to play the ukelele in three easy lessons. Move
over, Arthur Godfrey.

9

To the Editor:
Oil Saturday, Nov. 17, as sponsor of the
Club in our school, I went with a crowd of students
to the Youth Day and Cheerleaders' Clinic and the
football game with Xavier,
Some of the students had not realized how cold
Tri-lIi--

"You'd better take your overcoat", Pete Jieard his
ui;,:;.
mother say;
But who wants to lug an overcoat when he takes
a holiday!
When the wind flew through he bleachers, Oh!
The good it might have done!
he had a lot of fun!
He nearly froze to death-b- ut

Y

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky
Euttrrd at th

1'o--

t

Offic

t

l--

t

Kington. Kentucky,

as second class

'matter under the Act uk Mmh 3, 1&79.
Published rtkly during school except holidays aud

ruins.

,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday. NorrmlxT
I

"

n Jinn
. :.

"HIM

TV.

.

First Visit To
A Prcssbox

It.

JIT

r.

Real Cool Cat

j

...

This kitten has the right idea, taking life easy in a photographers
bag. Hn owner is a UK student We wish life on this campus were as
simple for all of us no meetings, no classes, oh, Joy!

the glass barrier, as a
figure scampers twenty-fiv- e
yards, is no indication of the
exhiliration the fans in the stadium are experiencing. Only by seeing the frenzied waving of arms
and banners can you realize their
excitement. You're in a world
blue-cla-

Mush Melon Experts
" To
Perform Saturday
-

By JOHN MARCUS

had a serious
fault. He was the playboy of the
mush melon fields.