xt734t6f4b14 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt734t6f4b14/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700326  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 26, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 26, 1970 1970 2015 true xt734t6f4b14 section xt734t6f4b14 TT

7

TT

Thursday, March 26, 1970

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Grad Students
Support Teach-i- n
JEANNIE ST. CHARLES
Assistant Managing Editor
At a Wednesday night meeting, the Graduate and Professional Student Association (GPSA)
passed a resolution to support
the Environmental Awareness
Teach-IApril 22, but advocated that dismissal of classes
be at the discretion of individual
By

n

professors.
The resolution was in response to a request of the UK
Environmental
Awareness Society for such action. The resolution will now be sent to the
proper University officials.
The move generated debate
over the total role of GPSA.
Newly elected President Bob
Brecht responded:
"I think we should take the
lead in a lot of things, be they
controversial or not. I can't see
why we can't be concerned with
these things. I recommend that
this organization get involved in
a lot of things. I don't see why
we sit on our laurels."
In other business, it was announced that graduate assistants
would get a 10 percent discount
on purchases at the University
Bookstore.
The GPSA passed several
resolutions during the meeting:
Changed the name of the
GPSA Council to the Council of
GPSA.
Defined a graduate student
as any student working for a
degree.
Set GPSA meetings for 7
p.m. on the third Monday of
every month, rather than Wednesday nights.

resentative.
meetings
missed.

J:,

Also, representa-tives-at-larg- e
may miss only two
before they are dis-

V

Defeated a resolution to
change election of officers from
the present February date to

sometime in May.
As part of a new program
schedule, Dr. Lewis Cochran,
dean of the Graduate School
and vice president for research,
spoke to the group about the
history of universities and the
structure of the UK grad school.

He stressed two points as
especially important to the UK
Graduate School: to upgrade
the quality of the Ph.D. program; to meet professional manpower needs of Kentucky.
Future plans of the GPSA include hosting a speaker, Dr. G.
Victor Rossi, director of biological sciences at the Philadelphia
School of Pharmacy and Science.
Dr. Rossi will be at UK April
22 and will speak at a 4 p.m.
seminar, in room 201 of the
College of Pharmacy, on
"Pre-Clinic-

al

Evaluation of New
Drugs: Approaches and Limitations.'
At 8 p.m. the same day, in the
Commerce Auditorium (tentatively), his topic will be hallucinogens.
The next meeting of the GPSA
will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 22.
!

'

:

v

mm.

Student Issue Party presidential and vice presidential candidates
Bill Dawson, rear, and Don Waggener, front made their official
announcement Wednesday. According to Dawson, the "SIP was
formed for Students."
Kernel Photo by Mlml Fuller

Mobe Committee

Plans Protests
By ELLEN STONE
Kernel Staff Writer

The Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC) met Wednesday night to plan campus
activities for the war moratorium scheduled April 13-1part
of a nationwide protest being
sponsored by the National Student Mobilization Committee.
One member suggested a
teach-i- n
to present SMC's ideas
to the "large group of uncommitted people (on the Vietnam
war) on the campus."
Members of the group's steering committee plan to meet with
the Panhellenic Council, to offer
to go to sorority and fraternity
houses for teach-inInformation sessions are also
being scheduled for dormitories.
Teach-i- n
Teams
Teach-i- n
teams will attend an
instruction meeting prior to the
information sessions at dorms
and Greek houses.
are scheduled
The teach-in- s
for Monday and Tuesday, April
13 and 14, along with leaflet
handouts.
7,

in

J

Former presidential candidate
Eugene McCarthy has been invited to speak at a mass teach-ion Wednesday at the Student
Center. Other speakers sponsored by the National Student
n

.

LXI, No. 112

.

Bridge Over Muddy Water

Two weeks ago he would have had to jump this puddle or wade
the surrounding mud. Or, with the aid of a Mary Poppins' umbrella, he could have flown over. Out now he can use the boardwalk pictured to bridge this water hazard between the Classroom
Kernel photo By Dick ware
building and the Engineering Building.

Revealed
By JEANNIE LEEDOM
Assistant Managing Editor
The Student Issues Party
(SIP) was formed Tuesday, and
its Student Government candidatesBill Dawson, presidential
candidate, Don Waggener, vice
presidential candidate, and Pat
Maney, Sallie Jo Benton and
Patrice Garity, representative
candidates made their official
announcements Wednesday.
According to Dawson, who is
a Student Government representative, "SIP was formed for
students. As a party and as candidates, Don and I are not trying to appeal to any one interest group. We are talking to
the students about what they

want."

s.

LH

Vol.

Platform

Decided that any department representative missing
three meetings will be dismissed
from GPSA and GPSA will ask
that department for a new rep-

Vt

K

7

Mobilization Committee are expected to attend and films on
the Vietnam war will also be
shown during the day.
Candlelight March
A candlelight march, starting
at the Student Center and moving through the campus, is
planned for Wednesday night
"in hopes of making it another
October 15." (The date is in
reference to the national war
moratorium held last fall.) The
march will end at the Complex
green, where crosses will be
staked in memory of Vietnam
war dead, followed by an
vigil. The committee plans
to apply for a parade permit.
One student member suggested a strike of classes on Wed
all-nig- ht

nesday, so that students can attend the day's activities.
On Thursday, SMC members
plan to picket the local Internal

Revenue Service offices in protest of taxes being spent to support the Vietnam war. A war
referendum is scheduled for Friday of protest week.

Buttons, bumper stickers and
will be
distributed
posters
throughout the week.
Ilene Robinson, SMC member, will head a committee that
will distribute moratorium literature to other Kentucky colleges.
One member suggested that
a permanent committee be formed "to aid labor when strikes
occur."

The suggestion was made after members voiced support for
the postal workers' strike now
going on. Members plan to offer their help to the local postal
workers union "if they want our
help." It was urged that student
mobilization members write on
all mail, "We support the postal workers strike."
In other action, a bleed-i- n was
suggested by steering committeeman Julian (Peck) Kennam-e- r,
to overcome the group's financial difficulties.
Volunteers
from the committee will give a
pint of blood at a local blood
bank and donate the money to
SMC. One member asked, however, "Do you think they'll take
ouf blood?"
Kennamer also suggested that
SMC members write their state
senators voicing their opinion on
the nomination of G. Harold
Carswell to the Supreme Court.

Correction
Mark Bryant was erroneously identified in a picture in the
Wednesday, March 25 Kernel as
a presidential candidate. The
Kernel regrets the error.

Dawson said, "We hope the
campus will become more habitable for students." But for this
to happen, "students will have
to help us. They will have to
cut out their general lackadaisi-cality.- "

In the SIP platform, the candidates state that in the past
there has been meaningless rhetoric concerning students.
"We intend to level with students on items that involve
them. We don't intend tj .vor-r- y
about balancing one Greek
house against another, or one interest group against another. We
will treat students as students.
We feel students will respond
to this type of campaign.
"We are not concerned about
platforms,
though," Dawson
added. "We just want to take
the discussion right to the stu-

dents."
The SIP program proposes
that Student Government be

more "relevant" to students.
"We want to return Student
Government
to the students
rather than to a group of junior
politicians," said Dawson.
"I think (Tim) Futrell (present SG president) went in with
the idea to create administrative assistants, to involve students, but instead he created
more bureaucracy."

Candidates
Announced
The Student Government Office released Wednesday the
names of people who are registered to run for Student Government positions in the Spring
elections.
The list of candidates included the names of those running
for student president, vice president, and representatives.
Listed as presidential candidates were Steve Bright, Bill
Dawson, with the Student Issues
Party, Ched Jennings, Gary
Smith, and Jim Williams.
Candidates for vice president
are Skip Althoff, Dan Crabtree,
John P. Stainback, Roger Valentine, and Don Waggener, with
the SIP.
Sixteen representatives are to
be elected, with four parties being represented in the election
along with independent candidates.
Listed with the Action Coalition (ACT) party are Joe Bou-vieGraeme Browning, Hazel
R. Colosimo, Tom Converse,
rtcake Turn To Page 3
r,

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, TliutMlay, March 2fi, 1970.

2-- TIIE

Free University Sponsors
Tutor's Tutorial Service
JOE
at

HAAS
By
Kernel Staff Writer
If you are a tutor, or thinking
of being one, then the Free University lias begun a program to
help you.
The newly formed Tutor's Tutorial Service is an open invitation to any interested tutor on
campus to take part in a class
for which is planned flexible discussions and demonstrations. It
is to be held at 7 p.m. Mondays
in Room 109 of the Student Center.
Topics will likely include
how to
ideas on
make tutoring materials, how to
relate experiences and community resources to tutoring, and
how to create interest around

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Poverty culture is another
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members.

an initial
It was decided
planning meeting on Monday,
March 23, that a reading instructor in the college of education
would conduct the class.
At the same meeting, Elizabeth Churchill of the Special
Education Library spoke to a
group of 10 tutors, displaying
and demonstrating a wide variety
of materials and resources available to tutors through the li-

brary.
It was from this meeting that
the program of a tutoring service
for tutors was established on an

experimental basis.
Maurine Hebert, the coordinator for the class, said that this
class represents "students wanting to learn."
Referring to the popular notion that the Free U was "started
by radicals," Miss Hebert expressed the opinion that "learning is a radical idea" and that
the class is set up for "those
interested in learning."
For more information on the
class, contact Maurine Hebert,
University extension 77851.

Manager
Named

0

Ched Jennings, Student

Gov-

ernment presidential candidate,
has announced the appointment
of Jerry Legere as campaign manager for the Jennings-Valentin- e
team in the upcoming SG elec-

tion.

s

i

x

"

x'"

I

I

Legere has served two terms
as representative in the Student
Government Assembly, the latter term as speaker of that assembly. He has also served as
elections chairman during the
last two fall elections.
Legere had this to say of his

f

xj?xvfrx

'Jv-

xx-

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X"

appointment:
"After having looked over the
list of candidates and having
worked with several of them,
I feel the
e
team will best fulfill the needs
of all the University of Kentucky
students. Their dedication and
diligent work in the past has
proven their ability to achieve
their goals through
with the administration and faculty. I also feel that the
team is the most
of the entire camrepresentative
Jennings-Valentin-

Jenning-

s-Valentine

j

"mm.

?

..................

Free University

i

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pus.

"Problems of a Technological
Society" 2:30 p.m. in the 3rd
floor east lounge of the Student
Center.

'

"The Impact of Science on
Society" in Room 307 in Chemistry Physics Room 307 at 8 p.m.
Axiology "Science of Values"
and the Architecture of Civilization at the Sigma Nu House 422

x:

Rose Lane.
Social Values at 8 p.m. at
350 South Upper Street.
Encounter Group at 8 p.m. in
Room 204 in the Lexington Theological Seminary.

Great ISbung Britain!

QUEST questioning

Ieknel

The Kentucky
For the price of a stamp, we'll clue
you in on the British scene.
Naming names of the spots only
vc local folk are "in" on.
We'll tell you about our native
haunts. The pubs. Coffeehouses. Discotheques. Boutiques. And the like.
We'll tell you where you can
for $2 a night, breakfast included. And
for $1.
We'll tell you about the "doings"
in the theatre. So you can see Broadway hits long before they break on
Broadway. (Tickets: 90.)
bed-dow-

chow-dow-

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We'll tell you about a crazy little
$30 ticket that'll buy you 1 , 1 00 miles

of rail and boat travel.
And fill you in on all kinds of tours
planned especially for the college
crowd.
We'll even show you how to make
it through Shakespeare country.
Even if you couldn't make it through
Shakespeare in class.
We've got hundreds of ideas. All
wrapped up in our free book: Great
Young Britain. 20 pages big. With
over 50 color photos.

It's yours for the asking. Mail the
coupon. And see your travel agent.
British Tourist Authority

Box 4 00, New York, N.Y. 10017
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Send me your free book: Great
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Name
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Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40500. Second class
pobtage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five tunes weekly during Uie
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
fcessioii.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Tost Office Dox iatlti.
liegun as the Cadet in lba--t and
as the Kernel
published
since 1013. continuously
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

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TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

2321
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2447
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* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 2f,

1970- -3

School- Bill Hassle

FRANKFORT (AP)
A bill
which would block an estimated
6,000 Kentucky children each year
from starting public school is
stirring a wave of protest from
affect ed parents.
In essence, House Bill 66 rolls
back the entrance date for a pupil
who now can enroll if he will
become six by Dec. 31 of the
school year.
The measure is on Cov. Louie
B. Nunn's desk after passage by
the legislature March 10 and it
poses something of a dilemma
for the governor.
For, if he vetoes the bill and
thereby satisfies angry parents
he also might deprive one of
his own pieces of legislation-aidi- ng
special education of a
major source of funding.
Ray Corns, director of legal
and legislative services in the

state Education Department,
said Wednesday that HB66"was
a sleeper. The general population
didn't even know what was going
on."
In 1952 the legislature rejected a similar bill, Corns said,

Candidates

Continued from Pate One
Howell Hopson, Betty Johnson,
Wendy McCarty, Sara O'Briant,
Josh O'Shea, Connie Runyon,
Donna Shoupe, and Jan Teuton.
Running on the Free Soil
Party (FSP) ticket are two candidates, Hooter Combs and
Betsy Hayes.
Student candidates with the
Students for Action and Responsibility (SAR) party include
Mary Bowers, Steve BrueRRe,
Chas Brannen, Cheryl Costanzo,
Steve Howell, Martin Ilugg,
Robert A. Kennoy, Sandy
Guy M. Mendes III, Reed
Rucliman, Doug Stewart. Sally
Viparina, Gary Williams, Bob
Walther, and Jackie Winter.
Student Issues Party candidates are Patrice Garity and
Patt Maney.
Other students running independently are Sallie Jo Benton,
Don "Dodie" Cassady, Frank
Karris, Jim Klegle, Ben Fletcher,
im Kutrell, Joe Halcomb, Eleanor Hedges, Stephen LaBreche,
Steve Miles, Miller Monarch,
Lynn Montgomery, Buck Pennington, Baxter Shilling, Jerry
Springate, John P. Stainback,
Nancy Ward and Phil Williams.
Mc-Hal- e,

after a mothers' march on Frankfort in protest against it. Corns
said that because most local districts hold
registration
in the next week or so, superintendents have been inundating
the department with requests for
clarification.
They also have passed on the
word that thousands of parents
are unhappy about the situation,
which in effect would keep their
children out of school for an additional year.
pre-scho-

ol

Gib

Dr. Kensel
Addresses
Students

,M2tZ

A researcher in the field of
micropolitics, Dr. John Kensel,
spoke Wednesday afternoon to a
group of about 30 UK students
and professors.
Dr. Kensel is a professor of
political science at Allegheny
College and an author of several
books dealing with a variety of
subj ects, including micropolitics,
coalition groups, electoral voter
groups and institutional coalitions.
In his informal talk, he described his present work. He also
gave some background information on previous work which was
included in a book he wrote for
freshman and sophomore college

students.

Micropolitics, as Dr. Kensel
explained it, is the study of politics on the group level, with
special emphasis on the particular individual. He emphasized
that much work needs to be done
in this area.
Dr. Kensel's work on party
politics deals largely with studies in the executive branch of
particularly the
government,
presidential office.
He cited a need for more
extended studies in this area.
He now is analyzing the content of the State of the Union
messages from Truman's term
to the present.

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COVINGTON (AP)-MicD. Flowers, 19, Frankfort, was
named Wednesday the first student member of theThomas More
College Board of Trustees. Flowers, a sophomore sociology mag
jor, was chosen to the
post in a competition conducted
by the college's student government.
"I was interested in the organization and how change is implemented," said Flowers, who
will serve a one year term.

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1

* This Campus Needs A Dead Week

The return from Spring Vacation has caused a look of anguish
on faces of many students on campus, who suddenly discover they
have too much to do and too
little time in which to do it. But
this isn't an unusual situation because the panic repeats itself each
semester before final exams.

Of course, much of the trouble
due to student procrastination;
the rest can be blamed on the
academic structure of the Univeris

sity. Not only do instructors schedule term projects during the final

)

BEFORE

three weeks, but most of their important tests as well. While working
frantically to meet deadlines in
three or four such courses, the
student must remember that final
exams are just around the comer
and prepare for these as well. If
the professor is one who happens
to relish an abundance of daily
assignments, sleep suddenly becomes a luxury afforded only a few.

pre-fin-

"XL

(

consider the extra time a blessing.
A bill which would have given
students a one-da- y
grace period
was introduced in Student Government last semester. It was killed
in committee. The bill needs to be
revived and amended to include
an entire week. Its passage would
not benefit the student alone; instructors could utilize the time as
a catch-u- p
period.
Let's keep bleary eyes to a
minimum and schoolwork within
reason.

so-call- ed

al

Naturally, critics will contend
that students will only consider
the week a vacation period and

Other campuses across the nation have recognized this problem
and provided for it. It is indeed
strange that UK, supposedly a pro

I

tendance and classwork in general.
The truly dedicated student would

gressive educational institution,
has made no similar effort. The
answer would be the designation
of
week as a
"dead week," in which classes
are suspended. Students would be
able to utilize this time either
studying for final exams or for the
completion of course work.

merely goof off. And many will do
just that. That same reasoning,
however, could apply for class at

3

I

I

h!J f)

"

ApfER

I

I

These are not just theoretical problems. They are evident in our present
society. The Korean and Vietnamese wars
have taken on the appearance of a crusadeour own attempt at protecting the
political system, democracy, the patriot's
own True Faith. According to these men,
persons who refuse to conform to this idea
of dying for constructive destruction are
nothing but cowards. When they voice
their opinions against the system which
encourages this attitude, they are called
traitors by the Spiro Agnews who perpetuate it. Men then, are afraid to disagree with this mass (which may or may
not be a majority) and so, join it (and
through this encouragement, by fear and
uncertainty, they become a majority-sile- nt,
because they don't know what to
say).
Americans are fighting Asians in defense of Freedom, and consider it their
"patriotic duty." Rut here the problem
arises. There are patriots who do not believe that patriotism is simply a willingness to kill or die, especially when this
killing and dying is not clearly benefitting
their country (after all, this is supposed
to be for the country's own good). Within
this mode of thinking, the patriot might
be a man whose first concern is the welfare
of his country. Because this distinction is
not too fine, it can be more rationally
applied. In this light, the patriot may
love the flag, but not at the expense of
the country itself. If by defending the
finger one loses the arm, he is, in reality,
defeated (even though he may have accomplished his objective). At the same

The
an imagination and an idea, patriotism, which

he glorifies, a man with devotion for
his country that is so great that he considers it his privilege rather than his
duty to help preserve its grandeur.
As with many idealistic concepts, men
have personally differentiated shades of
meaning for the idea (patriotism) which
seldom agree. The result of this variety
of ideas is separation and distinction between the patriots themselves.
There are patriots, who ascribe to that
phenomenal quality which men call nationalism, who would agree with Bertrand
Russell's definition of patriotism as "the
willingness to kill and be killed for trivial
reasons. ' These are the men who look
upon the flag as a holy emblem, comparable to a piece of the true Cross, considering it necessary to kill and die to
further its gl.v. They feel that a country's
honor is bovne, woven into the fabric of
the flag, and that any insult to the flag
is an affront toward the country, and vice
versa. Therefore, when the country becomes identified with a political ideology,
it suddenly becomes the patriot's duty
to protect that political ideal as if it were
the flag, for the flag has become indirectly
identified with the concept. This sedimentary process becomes even more complicated when the politicians are added,
with their slanted views, especially when
they create situations which the patriot
may not agree with but thinks he must
support to continue to be a patriot.

The Kentucky
Umveiisity

Tsxflr(

I

Iernel

of Kentucky

THURSDAY, MARCH

1894

23, 1970

Editorials represent tlie opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
James W. Miller.
Frank S. Coots, Managing Editor
Robert Duncan, Advertising Manager

Chip Untiheson, Spoit Editor
Gwt n Uunney, Women' I'age Editor
Patrick Mathes,

Editor-in-Chie-

I

&fAJ"gl

time, going to war to preserve freedom
in another country nuy be destroying
more than is saved, with little compensation for "the country the patriots are
fighting for.

The patriot in this sense, then, is the
it his duty to defend
his country's honor-b- ut
he stops and
considers before closing his eyes just to
accommodate the blind, who style them-

nun who considers

selves as leaders,

)

because

he realizes

that they are not infallible. The patriot
questions the validity of a system which
demands recognition of itself and its
own ideals, but refuses to recognize the
presence of contrary opinions, because
he understands that in order to know
itself, the system must know others. This

J

)
I

j

Mike llerudon, Editoriul Page Editor
Dan Cossett, Associate Editor
JJob Vurrone, Arts Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist

Jean Renaker

V

'

S J-

-

KRNC !

rimL (

patriot recognizes that his country's ends
are not always best served by political or
military conquests. Instead of attempting
to liberate and improve others, he finds
it necessary to liberate himself from the
odious precedents set by his predecessors.
If he is successful, and accomplishes his
objectives with respect for other men, he
will raise his country's and his own
esteem incurring a respect much more
lasting than any won on the battlefield.
This is not only applicable on an international scale, but also nationally. By
nuking his system more desirable to those
whom he considers hike-warsupporters,
he is more likely to gain their support
and admiration than by forceful means
or by issuance of ultimatums such as
"America, love it or leave it."

Kernel Forum: the readers write:
No Publish Pressure
Probably along with other readers, I
was moved to indignation as well as
somewhat surprised by the report of the
callous pressure to "publish or perish"
being applied to faculty members of the
Sociology Department. According to the
March 3 story by Jeannie Leedom and
Jerry Lewis on University Senate approval of the Appropriate Balance Report,
a Sociology Department Newsletter,
in a note to the faculty, stated that
'Research output sliould be continuous.
Administrative and service responsibilities
are not excuses for failing to conduct

"...

,

Where Is Wally?

OPEN LETTER TO WALLY URVIS
(wherever you are). Really Mr. Urvis!
If you are so intent upon helping the
SDS, why is it you are so hard to find?
Cone underground for Revolution already? At least Mr. Colten is not a figment of the Arch. School's imagination.
Why is it, Mr. Urvis, that the Student
Services Office at the Medical Center
refuses to give out your phone or address? Why is it that there is no other
record of your existence?
If you really do want to help (or all
of you, or any of you?), or perhaps substantiate your allegations against Mr.
Colten, we are always around, easily
contacted and the door is always open.
KEVIN D. HILL
JOE MACU1RE
SDS Steering Committee

and publish research.' "
After a careful investigation, I was
relieved to find that (1) there is no such
publication as a Sociology Department
Newsletter; (2) contrary to the implication of the story, the statement is not an
expression of the administrative policy of EDITOR'S NOTE: All letters to the edithe Sociology Department.
and not
tor must be typed,
Other Kernel readers may share my more than 200 worth in length. The
sense of relief in learning that the facts writer must sign the letter and give classiare at some variance with the situation fication, address and phone number. Send
of
of the Sociology Department as depicted or deliver all letters to Room 113-in the Kernel article.
the Journalism Building. The Kernel reTHOMAS 11. FORD serves the right to edit letters without
Chairman changing meaning.
double-space-

f

Jimmy Robertson, Circulation Manager
Jeannie Leedom, Rill Matthews,
Assistant Managing Editors

Jeannie St. Charles,

I

Kernel Soapbox

By JOHN VOGT
A&S Freshman
patriot is a man with

fcTAHLISHED

'

-

-

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 20,

1970-

-5

Cheap, Plentiful Marijuana Blamed

Drug Problem Develops Among Viet Troops

WASHINGTON (AP)-- A top My Lai-So- n
My massacre with
Pentagon official said Wednesmarijuana smoking.
day "a very serious drug probThe testimony, by tormer Arlem" has developed among U.S.
in Vietnam because mar- my Sgt. Charles West, 23, of
troops
Wedneswas
ijuana is cheap, plentiful and Chicago, the disputed first rewho
I
day by
to get there.
easy
"It's a very bad situation," ported the My Lai incident.
"It is my opinion from everyVice Adm. William Mack told a
thing I know about My Lai that
news conference.
the use of marijuana was in no
At the same time, Asst. SecRonof Denfese Daniel Z. Hen-ki- n way a contributing factor,"
retary
ald L. Ridenhour told a reporter.
said an Army investigation
Ridenhour's letters to Con"developed no evidence that any
gress members and government
member of the units engaged
off an inin the Son My operation was officials last year set
vestigation that has led to charges
under the influence of marijuana
of murder and other crimes
or other narcotics."
Defense officials discussed the against some of the officers and
men who were in the My Lai
drug problem which they said
operation. They were accused
Viethad been escalated by the
nam war after a Senate juvenile of slaughtering civilians.
Stacking The Evidence
delinquency subcommittee heard
Ridenhour appeared before
testimony linking members of an
outfit involved in the alleged the Senate subcommittee but he
ex-G-

was questioned only briefly about
the My Lai incident. He told
reporters afterward that the subcommittee is "stacking the evidence" to make it appear that
marijuana was responsible for the
soldiers' conduct.
Admiral Mack, who is deputy
assistant secretary of defense, did
not touch on the My Lai incident in telling newsmen that military investigators have turned
up 1,995 proven users of marijuana and 252 users of other
narcotics. Most of these were
in Vietnam, he said.
Mack said he had no information as to how drug use might
have affected combat, operations,
but he replied "absolutely" when
asked whether marijuana has
caused bad conduct. He said
there have been "isolated cases
of men going amuck," but he
gave no details. Mack said se

curity checks had resulted in discovery over the past five years
of more than 100 people assigned
to nuclear intelligence or other
sensitive tasks who used marijuana when off duty.

He indicated that these people
were removed from such assignments.
He gave no sign that any
breach of security resulted from
these cases.

1

tw--

i

I
.

i

EKU Founders Day
9

UT President Describes ;A Great University'
RICHMOND

(AP)-Emphas- izing

the importance of close
ties between a university and the
outside community, the president
of the University of Tennessee
listed Wednesday night five other
criteria for a