xt734t6f4b62 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt734t6f4b62/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610518  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 18, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 18, 1961 1961 2015 true xt734t6f4b62 section xt734t6f4b62 t"

IL
University of Kentucky

Vol. LI I, No.

.

l

ST

,

"

4

LEXINGTON,

K.Y.,

THURSDAY, MAY

18,

19fl

Eight Pagei

sc Hears Prouosal

f

?i
1

Ill

I

On Representation
By ED VAN HOOK

committee, said she was in Louis- vllle toT a debate tournament Mon- daJ' and could not attend the
meeting.
Miss Cannon explained that it
was ner understanding that Burke
Terrell. College of Law represent- atjVe an(j a committee member,
was to give the proposal to Presi- dent Garrvl Sipple, rho would
have another representative pre- sent it.
Sipple said he had understood
that Ron Porter, another com- mittee member, would bring up
the matter.
Asked why the amendment was
not presented as a "proposed"
amendment recommended by tbe
committee, the chairman renlied
that she did not know for sure
why such a procedure was follow- -

someone who had been )n favor
of the amendment previously had
changed their mind,
Harned was recognized by Sip- pie toward the meeting's close so
King Homer I
he could make the "announce- King of All Nations by Divine Call, Bishop Homer A. Tomlinson
ment." Harned said he did not
crowned himself King of the t'nivcrsity of Kentucky in ceremonies
know if Miss Cannon wished the
whirh he conducted Tuesday. King Homer I simply placed a gilded
matter to be presented as a pro- cardboard crown on his hrad and stated he was L'K'i King for
posed amendment.
"good and for plenty."
The "announcement"
was re- The amendment was presented
corded in the minutes of the
to the congress in the form of an
meeting.
Asked for his comment on the
announcement
by Norman Har- action taken by the committee,
ned. College of Engineering repre- Sipple said his Is an "unbiased"
sentative.
position, that he would not try to
Rt presentation in the congress
prevent any action. He said he
would be reduced to 80 represent- would leave it up to the congress
ativn by the amendment. There
and the committee to nnrk out
Dr. Kenneth L. Harper, assistant dean of men and Welcome are now 100 representatives in the
something.
to the ex of- John Williams, Commerce rep- Wcck director said yesterday that he has proposed a shorter co"gress, in addition
ficio.
ed.
resentative and Judiciary Board,
orientation period for new UK freshmen and one which would
She expressed her belief that chairman, said, "Student Congress
Kathy Cannon, chairman of the
has gone a long way in developplace greater emphasis on the academic side of University life
The shorter Welcome Week would
ing itself. The congress is standdrop out of school even berofe
make it desirable for new fresh classes begin.
ing on very firm ground.
"Some consideration might be
men to visit the campus during
The entire orientation process in
midsummer to clear away the de- - the fall. Dr. Harper said, would re
given that might put it on a firmer base. Personally, I feel any protails of orientation. Dr. Harper quirf about (w0 dayj The prrsent
posed changes should wait at least
saiu. oucn a inp. ne nuura, uuiu orlf.nta,ion perlod begins on Sun
1
not be mandatory, but he esti day afternoon with the president's
A total of LOSS undergraduate degrees and 104 graduate
new students tea and ends one week and one
of the
mated 90
lU1,rw.s
te awarded to UK students at the 93rd com- - Congress will continue."
would attend anyway.
.
.
,
day later with the beginning or
ine proposed amenamem pro- meucemeiit exercises, Monday, June 5.
"If th; revision of Welcome classes.
.vides for a legislative assembly
Dr. Harper
be
decrees
Keek goes through
said his plan has
Dr. Harper
103
Agriculture and with representation based on the
Continued on rage 8
said, "we would schedule about
mAito and toL students:
Home Economics students; 211 En- - enrollment of each college and the
new freshmen to visit the
gineers; 37 Law students; 275 stu- - number of representative? of each
campus every day in the middle
dents in Education; 161 students college on the University Faculty,
of the summer.
in the College of Commerce; and
it stated further, "the total en- "They would meet their advisers
44 Pharmacy students.
rollment of each college for the
and academic deans and fill out
These figures include August previous fall semester shall be di- tentative schedule cards. Entrance
and January graduates. Last year vided by one hundred and that
identification photographs would
1.166 undergraduate and 337 grad- - number
be
of representatives
be administered,
exams would
uate degrees were awarded.
granted the college. In addition,
Dr. Robert (). Weiss, associate professor of modern foreign
be made, and Immunizations would
The commencement
calendar the college shall have
repre- be given," he continued.
languages, was elected president of the International Schnitzler will begin on Friday. June 2 with sentative for each five members
would
Dr. Harper said parents
the Alumni Seminar at 9 a.m. in on the University Faculty."
pu.soarcl, Association at an assembly held April 28 at UK.
be urged to make the trip also if
the Fine Arts Building. That even- Based on last fall's enrollment.
Dr' Wel' , ?.uud" of the org.a ' Dr. Weiss said the
there will be Alumni class Arts and Sciences would have 31
the plan is approved.
library contains
lu films from the estate
"""'
collected parties,
When the freshmen return in
Continued on Page 6
and encourage inter- work and lndivIdual works on
on Saturday. June 3, from 3:30- the fall. Dr. Haroer said, the first "stimulate
"
2" an
order of business would be a con- - ef
ui,, iicoiucii, nilu ivxi a.
intlfiiin Schnitzler. tne coneciea material u.w
Most or
.. .
Frank O. Dickey will entertain
vocation presided over by Presi- - of
.. ana
dent Frank O. Dickey. The aim of Pny""3". noveiis1HW 10 Dramatist. B, tMs Ume g wriUen ,n German members of the graduation class,
no ,lvea Irom
but more of his works are being their families and friends, alumni,
the convocation would be to di- red the new students' aims to- - The literary works of Schnitzler. transjated to English.
faculty and staff, at Maxwell
accessible in only three places In
achievements.
ward academic
Dr We(ss said thflt the Amerlcan Piace.
me
ur., rr ,..-u.- c
Continued on Page 6
ls becoming interested in
"We would like Welcome Week
Archives of the Mar- - public
to cause students to stop and Schnitzlrr
s,.nit,lpr 0hnilh iitMp hs hPPn
L Kin Library at lK'
done with his works in this coun- think and ask themselves, Who iarrt
His works, saved from capti-.rAbsentee Ballots
am I?' and 'What am I here to
Austen Albu, a Labor Party-membtryi xhls fact, accompanied by the
the Nazi regime of World War sciinuzier renaissance in Austria,
by
Absentee ballots will be notoraccomplish?'" Dr. Harper said
of the Uritish Parlianow exl-s- l on ,ul,
csiaic prompted the formation of the re- - ized at the SUB ticket booth
would set
The suggested plan
""'"'y
ment, will speak on socialized
as'.d? time for the freshmen to at Cambridge. England, but the search association,
and
over 80 members from 10 dif- - today, Friday, Monday,
meet and talk with their professors estate is not open to the public.
Tuesday during the following industry at 11 a.m. tomorrow
The library on the U C L A, cam- - feient nations attended the UK hours:
before the beginning of regularly
in Guignol Theatre.
scheduled lectures, so "the new pus, containing 41,000 frames of assembly to appoint a constitution
3:30
Thursday, 10
Mr. Albu was a member of the
students could begin to realize the filmed copy of ills works, is avail- - committee and elect temporary of- - p.m. 5 p.m.
executive committee of the Fabian
able only upon receiving special ficers. These officers, including Dr.
importance of their work here."
Friday. 10 a.m. noon, 2 p.m.-- 4
Society, an early organization of
Dr. Harper said the new plan permission from his son, Henry Weiss, will serve until the consti- p.m.
socialist intellects, from 1942 until
tution calls for a new election,
would provide personal attention Schnitzler.
Monday, 10 a.m. noon, 2 p.m.-- 4 last
at UK, Dr. Weiss said there are two
year.
The Schnitzler Archives
for each student and make him
p.m.
Dr. E. G. Trimble, acting head
feel less like "just a number." He however, are available to qualified kinds of membership, both by Invi- Tuesday, 10 a.m. -- noon, 3:30 of the Political Science Depart-men- t,
said under the present plan, many scholars for research purposes tation only. Active membership is p.m. 5 p.m.
said that he expected Mr.
Continued on Page 2
freshmen become discouraged and without permission from the son.
Albu to touch on the growth of
the Labor Party in England and
Britain's foreign relations during;
his lecture.
As a member of the Fabian So"Both parties will be split." The
interview that the bill ls so compli- - bill will pass the Senate providing
By WARREN WHEAT
school con- - some form of Federal aid to edu- - split will divide party members ciety. Mr. Albu published such
cated by private-publi- c
News Editor
Tuesday
in
pamphlets as "Management
into
groups,
Sen. Thruston H. Morton troversies, including primary and cation.
"The Senate," Sen. Morton ex- - sectarian camps, and a threaten- Transition" and "The Anatomy of
secondary schools in the same bill
Private Industry."
(U-Kysaid yesterday that lit- with colleges or in separate bills, plained, "will traditionally pass ing North-Sout- h
split looms with
An engineer by profession, Mr.
is confident that a
and scholarships and grants to ins- - such a bill." The late Sen. Robert the offering of a racial discrimi- - Albu was
Deputy Director of the
A. Taft
in 1946 was able nation clause,
bill will pass the titutlon differences.
British Institute of Management
Southern votes will be lost if the prior to his election to Parliament
Even the racial discrimination to get a Federal aid to education
Senate, but only after it has issue has entered the debate.
proposal through the Senate, but po-el- l amendment, denying aid to in 1948. He received his education
undergone a multitude of An amendment was proposed the bill met defeat on the floor of ny school district allowing racial at the Imperial College of Science
the House of Representatives.
discrimination, is written into the and Technology.
amendments.
yesterday denying Federal aid to
The real fight will be encounter- - bill,
Dr. Trimble said that following
Unable to decide how he will any school district that doesn't
ed when the bill comes before the
Sen. Morton said he is tradi- - the lecture the staffs of the School
vnt
until nil amendments have prevent racial discrimination m it s
House for consideration in about tionally for any bill that Includes: of
been proposed the Senator from school enrollment adding further
Diplomacy and International
i. A needs clause. The states Commerce and the Political Sciobstructions to the passing of the two weeks.
Louisville said:
National chairman of the Repub- - tnat are the neediest should re- - ence Department will hold a lunch"It is Impossible for me to say bill.
With allhe amendments and licen party, Sen. Morton said that celve tne most aid. said the Sen- - eon in his honor.
what I'll do," when President John
The lecture ls sponsored by th
F. Kennedy's bill conies before the obstacles to' unanimous agreement pa ty differences will carry little ator He placed Kentucky into this
and quick passing of the bill, Sen. weight in the outcome of the vot- - catagory and said he feels sure American Political Science
senate for final approval.
Continued on Page 2
Morton said In a telephone Morion definitely thinks that a in?. He said:
Sen.
4

Student Congress Monday
.
night heard, hut did not vote
upon, a proposed amendment
from its constitutional revision
committee, which would have
altered the constitution's sec- tion on representation.

..

...

...

Change Proposed
For Orien ta Hon

1,192 To Graduate
In June Ceremonies

.....

wiStl

Dr. Weiss Will Head
Research Association
""Vf11,?

School Aid Will Pass, Sen. Morton Says

Englishman
To Speak
In Guignol

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

May 18, 19G1

Sen. Morion Thinks Bill
For School Aid Will Pass

Kentucky Constitution Prohibits
State Aid To Church Schools
By WARREN D. WHEAT
Tuesday News Editor
Even if certain Congressional leaders and pressure
groups manage to read a clause
including parochial schools into

indicated he did not favor direct
Federal aid to church-supporte- d
schools.
The private school issue, which
has come to mean to most citizens only parochial church-supportschools, actually would ininclude such privately-endowe- d
stitutions such as Transylvania

the controversial Federal
hill of President
College.
John V. Kennedy, the Kentucky
Gov. Combs refused to commit
himself on the private school isConstitution will prohihit
sue, but said, "Kennedy's position
of state funds to
on
is
church-supporte-

d

schools.
Article 189 of the Kentucky Constitution directs:
"School money (is) not to be
jsed- for church, sectarian, or denominational schools."
The state constitution also specifies" "No portion of any fund or
tax' now existing, or that may
npreafter be raised or levied for
educational purposes, shall be appropriated to, or used by, or in
i id" of, any church, sectarian, or
denominational school."
(
Kentucky Governor Bert T.
Combs, his administrative assistant, Ed Faucett; University President Dr. Frank G. Dickey; State
Superintendent of Public Instruction. Wendell P; Butler; Dr. Lyman
Oirtger, dean of the College of
Education, all concur In opposition to the Inclusion of private
schools in any Federal
bill.

Dr. Ginger said he is "radically
and completely opposed to including private schools" in a Federal
aid bill. He suggested:
"Parochial schools should introduce their own separate bills."
Mr. Butler said: "Legislation for
long-ranloans to parochial
school would be satisfactory," but

sound
the inclusion of
parochial schools." President Kencites the separation of church
nedy
and state as outlined in the U.S.
and opposes any
Constitution,
Federal aid to private schools.
But the Governor did say he
didn't think the bill will pass any
time soon because of the continuing controversy over Federal
support of parochial schools.
Dr. Dickey said that the parochial problem Is of no particular
consequences in Kentucky and is
only area-wid- e.
"The real problem is the precedent it establishes. If you would
include Catholic schools, it would
start a large number of parochial
schools demanding Federal aid
and this would undermine the very
fine public school educational system in the United States."
Of those opposing Federal aid
to parochial schools the most popular argnments include: Constitutional church-stat- e
separation;
refusal to allow public funds to be
used for religious indoctrination;
and that other private organizations could Justifiably demand financial aid to education if the
Catholic schools were to be included in the bill.
In the parochial camp, particu

larly the Roman Catholic, the
supporters claim that if they would
close their schools the public
schools would be overcrowded;
that they pay taxes and thus support public schools; and that they
are providing the same education
for their students as public institutions and are therefore entitled to the same financial aid.

Weiss To Head

Association
Continued from Page 1
granted to those who engage in
research, and associate membership
is granted to those who are merely
interested and enjoy the works of
Schnitzler.
There are now 50 active members and numerous associate members. President Frank O. Dickey
is a member of the Honorary Board
of Directors.
Dr. Weiss said that the association intends to make the films
available to active members by
mail and to establish research
grants. Financial obligations at
this time are met by membership
dues, but attempts are being made
to solicit aid from several of the
scholarship and research foundations in this country.

Seniors
Graduating seniors may pick
up their Commencement tickets
in the Office of the Dean of
Women anytime before Friday,
June 2. The limit is five tickets
per senior.

Continued from Page 1
there will be some expression of
need as a requirement for aid in
the bill.
states to
2. A clause binding
match Federal allocations with
some percentage of state funds.
He explained:
"States might elsewlse shun their
responsibility to educate their
citizens." But such a clause would
force them to continue their efforts
to develop education within their
own states.
Mr. Morton showed concern for
any clause directing what salaries
teachers should receive. He said,
"I'm deeply concerned about teachers' salaries. If this thing could
pass it might go on and on." The
Federal government should not
regulate the salaries of state teachers.
Justifying Federal
the Senator said:
"We have an obligation to help
our children, Just as we helped
veterans after World War II." Here
he was referring to the larg- - num- of children born during the
war who are now of school age and
are dangerously overcrowding sec- ondary schools and colleges and
universities.
One concession that will be made
to the private schools is the granting of scholarships. Sen. Morton,
who is retiring as party chairman
soon, said that the scholarships
should be granted to students who
qualify regardless of what insti- -

854

Starts 8:00

.

AtaM-tn- r(
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LAST TIMES TONIGHT?
"BEST OF EVERYTHING"
lane Stephen Boyd
Hop
"DON'T GO NEAR WATER"
Glenn ford 6i
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KENTUCKY Theatre TOMORROW!

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High St.

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FIRST RUN PROGRAM
The World's Boldest Beauty
"THE WARRIOR EMPRESS"
Karwln Mathawt
Tina Louis
In Color (at t:0o and 11:39)

TircmiiTEDsrsTC?

HOT CORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI SANDWICHES
RYE BREAD
KOSHER DILLS

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9:00 'Til 9:00 Daily
Call
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9:00 'Til 6:00 Sundays

"THE MOST

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Debra Paget
Ron Randall
(At 9:5S Only)

)nX.r"Ali7jfL'ia. J

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GREENWALD'S
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tutlon they plan to attend, whether it be I K or Notre Dame University.
But the scholarships should not
be given at random without consideration to how the colleges can
handle the rising enrollment. He
said:
"There is no use giving an unlimited number of scholarships"
without preparing the college and
universities to handle the students.
Sen. Morton went on record last
year voting against an act to provide Federal school aid to private
institutions. This indicates that the
Senator will not vote for a bill
including aid to private schools.
As far as Kentucky Is concerned "it will get more back than it
pays" if a needs clause Is included. He once again emphasized
that a needs clause will be amended into the bill.
In Kentucky, he said. "I think a
greater proportion of the people
will favor the bill.
Only a few months after, or per- haps if the bill passes the House
and final approval by the Presi-bdent, payments will be made to
the states within a few months,

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FIRST LEXINGTON SHOWING
It begin where. Peyton

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"RETURN TO PEYTON PLACE"
Carol Lynley
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In Color (at f:06 and 11:52)

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Nadja Tiller Tony Britton
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tliurwlay, May

Social Activities
Elections
Engagements
n

Witl

Smal1 Hats Dcc

Agricultural Engineers
The student branch of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers has elected Gary Russell,
London, president for the coming
year.
Other officers aic ooe Sprague,
vice president; Dave Newcom. secretary treasurer;- Larry Morgan,
scribe; William Kohout, engineering council representative; and Dr.
John Walker, fuculty advisor.

Flowers

Dominate Summer Millinery Fashion

By CINDY CAR It
Small hats worn with large but
uncluttering earrings will be the
fashion this summer. The hair will
be styled short at the sides to best
complete the picture.
After many seasons of the large
and heavier hatwear, the transistor-size
hats worn forward on
the head are leading millinery
headlines.
The pillbox with the forward
tilt Is shown this season In crisp
Soc ial Work ( lun
straw and organdy, covered with
Oakes-Leale- y
The Social Work Club has
Judith Lynn Oakes, freshman elected Sharon Brown, Lexington, floral prints. . Email saucers of
flowers are accented with dainty
commerce major from Lexington,
for the coming year.
veils.
to Oris Lesley, a graduate etuUent president officers are
Other
Nancy Percl-va- l,
Flowers this season will crown
In chemistiy from Stanton.
Hickory. N. C. vice president; the heads of many American
Vance. Lexington, sec- women. Roses of organdy, violets
Oaynelle
Tin-Matretary; Nancy Hignight, Danville; of
and leaves of
Susan Miller, freshman educa Gypsy Barker, South Charleston, satinvelvet, accent the tailored green
will
suit.
tlon major from Falls Church, Va. W. Va., publicity; and Nancy Orr, The tall clothe or helmet-shape- d
to Bin Whim-age- .
a former stuButler, Pa., program chairman.
hat, covered with petals of silk- dent and member of Delta Tau
Delta, from Madlsonville.
Lamp And Cruns
Barbara Pepper, freshman medElcctions
Tom Scott, Junior engineering
ical technology major, Villa Ma- major from Ludlow, was elected
Alpha Chi Sigma
donna College from Ross, to Fred preceptor of Lamp and Cross,
Larry Bruoe, senior chemical
Schultz, senior premedicaJ major senior men's honorary.
engineering major from Mayfleld,
from Fort Thomas and a member
Others elected were Jack Isaac, was recently elected president of
of PI Kappa Alpha fraternity.
Louisville, chancellor; Dave Stew- Alpha Chi Sigma, professional
Jo Ann Snider, freshman educa- art, Louisville, vice chancellor; chemistry fraternity.
tion major. Georgetown College, Bob Smith, Simpsonville. treasOthers elected to office were
from Taylorsville to Emil Baker. urer; and Tom Cambron, Hender- David Cornett, Winchester, vice
Miphomore
major from Taylorsson, scribe.
president; Bill Feller, Paducah,
ville and a member of Sigma Phi
corresponding secretary; Conrad
Alpha Kappa Delta
Epsllon.
Feltner, Versailles, recording secLXA SWEETHEARTS
Alpha chapter . Alpha Kappa retary; Lee Holtzclaw, Stanford,
Judy Buisson, sophomore educa- Delta, national sociology honor treasurer; David Howard, Jenkins,
tion major from Louisville, was society, has elected All Paydarfar master of ceremonies; and Ron
chosen Crescent Girl of Lambda president for the coming year.
Courtney, Stamping Ground,
Chi Alpha xecently at the fraterOthers elected to offices were alumni secretary.
were Ronald Enroth, vice president;
nity's formal. Attendants
Sharon Cornell, Judy Kreis. Becky Jay Crowe, secretary treasurer. Dr.
C. M. Coughenour, professor of
Groger, and Bonnie Dorton.
Warning
rural sociology, was selected facBUFFALO, N.Y. (') Sign on
adviser.
the rear of a florist's truck:
ulty
Nine persons were initiated Into
"Drive carefully. The next load
membership Monday: The Initi- may be for you."
R. Ford, pro- ates were Dr. Thomas
Six members of Beta P.sl chapfessor of sociology; Dr. Joseph J.
ter of Alpha Delia PI were hon- Mangalam, professor of rural soored at their 110th Founder's Day ciology; John Smith, Leroy Andluncheon at the chapter house erson, Joseph Long. Enroth, StanSaturday.
ley Smith, Bruce John, and Eml
The outstanding pledge award Naniwa.
as presented to Oralea Ziegler,
A. I. A.
Junior education major from Louisville. Judy Tribble, Mt. Sterling,
John D. Walden. Winchester,
and Lauralee Vry. Lexington, were was recently elected president of
honored as actives with the high- the student chapter of the Ameri- est overall Ftandtnas.
can Institute of Architects.
The Scholarship Improvement
Milton
elected were
Others
V.
Award was presented to Donna Minor, Danville, vice president;
Argue. Junior education major Elizabeth May, Prestonsburg, sec- from Henderson. Gloria Paulo, Jun- retary; Gibbs Reese. Louisville,
ior foreign language major from treasurer;
and Wayne Haffler,
Voungstown, Ohio, received the Lexington, and Mark Steele, Cinoutstanding Junior award.
cinnati, social chairmen.

Mr. find Mrs. William T. Aton,
Louisville, announce the engace-nirof her daughter. June Allen
Dyers, to Jennings Bryan Johnson Jr., son of Judge and Mrs.
Jennings B. Johnson, Williamsburg.
Miss Byeis, a senior Journalism
major, Is a member of Alpha XI
Delta.
Mr. Johnson, a graduate of the
UK Colk'ue of Law, Is a member
of Thl Kappa Tau.

organza, will be a favorite with
tall slender women.
The skull cap, a snug rounded
cap, Is worn with
hair stylos. This hat of mauve
ballibunt or Milan straw can be
accented with a large colorful pin.
Designers have gone wild with
colors this season. Pale greens,
pinks, yellows and dull blacks will
win their way In the tilted forward and often centered look.
The silhouette of such creations
will go to extremes with the wide
brim but follow the same color
schemes. The tall girl with the
willowy
figure could create a
Charles Adams cartoon with trying.

Spring has sprung and so have
the roses. I K roed Anna M.e
Reed models a fashionable spring
hat of pale pink and white rose
accented by moss green leaves
and veil.

Now Open!

Par

3 Golf

A wonderful way to relax

olone or with date.
Clubs for rent for those who
do not hare them.

Par 3,
18 Hole

18 Hole

Miniature
GOLF
COURSE
50c After 6 p.m.
Modern

DRIVING
RANGE

GOLF
COURSE

35c

With 9 Holes
Lighted for
Night Play

Improve your
tjolf on our
driving range
Have fun at you
develop skill

Club House with Sandwiches and Soft Drinks
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING

PAR 3 GOLF CLUB

ADPi Presents
Student Award

Mason Headley Road, Just off Horrodsburg

When the temperature
reaches 90 (ueh)

youjl need our new

Jam Session

shirts and shorts

Tonite
Yes, when summer comes to Kentucky it comes
with a bang. If you want to stay cool, comfortable
and fashionable you'll need several pairs of our

&
EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHT

handsome

BUFFALO TAVERN

walk shorts.

To top them off our knit

shirts are pure delight, colorful and cool. So when
summer hits make a bee line for the Kentuckian
shop and the coolest clothes you can wear.

Chevy Chose

Knit Shirts

6

That

t

(l

from $3.95 to $6.95

Short Sleeve Sport Shirts
Wolking Shorts
Stretch Bermuda Hose

Jarman Loafers
And the best woy is in a trailer from
Oliver Trailer Rental
service, and have 10 trailer tises to
We feature nationwide one-wa- y
choose from, one just right for your needs!! Call now and make
reservations for your move.

Oliver Trailer Rental
Phone

1405 Versailles Rd.

18, 19(71- -3

$4.25 up
$5.00 to $8.95
$1.00
$12.95

luutturiwut

10JI

At ifemui

w

f

""""--

Road

* THE READERS' FORUM

The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

Shallow Kcinark

Kentucky

pootnge Pld at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published (our timtf a week during thr rreulnr xhool yrnr exrrpt during holiday! and txami,
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR
Recond-cl-

Mike Wenninger,

Bob Ai)hRsoN, Editor

Newton Spencer, Sportt Editor
Managing Editor
Bohbie Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
THUHSDAY

NEWS STAFF

Norms Johnson, Newt Editor
Newton Spencer, Sports

Associate

Seminar Went Astray

Bert Combs'
seminar in Frankfort last Friday
went somewhat astray. The governor
had invited the editors of Kentucky's
newspapers to discuss with him, Lt.
Gov. Wilson YVyatt, and the state's
department heads how to improve the
administration of the commonwealth's
business.
The conference, we believe, fell
far short of its intended goal. Instead of offering constructive criticism on how to run the state better,
the editors sidetracked themselves on
the issue of Kentucky's highway program.
It did not take long to realize
that a large majority of the newspaper men and women had not prepared themselves for the seminar. A
few of the editors, however, did lend
themselves to a sincere desire to find
out more about our state government
and what it is doing. They were few
and far between we are sorry to say.
There were numerous pleas from
the editors for roads and more roads.
As one reporter has pointed out, the
seminar was almost a "gimmie" session similar to the governor's projects
to take government to the people..
It appears to us that most of the
editors did not go to Frankfort to
offer constructive ideas; rather, they
only wanted to know what the state
could give them.
Gov.

Michele Fearing,

If the seminar was any indication,
and if the editors reflected the opinions of their readers, Kentuckians are
mainly interested in roads.
We do not contend that Kentucky
highways are not in need of improvement or that the state does not need
more roads. We do feel, however,
that there was much more to be discussed at the seminar. One area was
education. It was discussed very
briefly.
If the part played by the editors
represents the thinking of Kentuckians, we feel that the state is split
by regional and area selfishness.
Understandably, any citizen of any
county wants to see his county progress. The stale as a whole is made
to suffer because Kentuckians refuse to care for the interests of the
state at large and only care about
their areas in particular.
This is what we believe to be one
of the greatest barriers to progress
in the state. Until Kentuckians lose
their selfish interest in roads and
strive toward the improvement of the
state's educational system, economy,
and government, we see no reason
for them to be in Frankfort wasting
the governor's time. The seminar's
results could have been more easily
accomplished by writing to the Office
of the Governor, Capitol Building,
Frankfort, Ky.

Kentuckians Aren't Stupid
Students at the
which
In the case of natural

University,
was once referred to as the "country
club of the South," in some academic
circles, have again shown skeptics
that they can hold their own with students in some of the nation's
colleges.
This is exemplified in the scores
of this year's Graduate Record Examination area test taken by all
graduating seniors in the College of
Arts and Sciences.
If one compares this year's scores
with those of 161 colleges taking the
test in 1956-57- ,
a base year, the University mean would equal or exceed
the means in all three fields humanities, natural sciences, and social sciencesof at least 75 percent of the
institutions.

sciences, the
University mean would exceed or
equal that of 88 percent of the institutions.
This comparison is particularly
significant in view of the fact that
the 161 colleges taking the test include such schools as Duquesne University, Miami University (Ohio),
and the University of Pittsburgh.
Even though this comparison
only includes scores of graduating
seniors in the College of Arts and
Sciences, we feel that a similar comparison using scores of students from
any of the University's colleges would
give the same results UK students
are not as intellectually inept as some
would think.

Books And Fame
In a study of 400 "most eminent
persons