xt73bk16pr9g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73bk16pr9g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680920  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 20, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 20, 1968 1968 2015 true xt73bk16pr9g section xt73bk16pr9g Tie
Friday Evening,

Sqt.

ECemtocky ECeenel

20, 19G8

;

NX.

The South's Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

J

(l-r-

hi:

i

Vol. LX, No.

18

Panelists Debate

sc)

Gun Control Law
By FRANK COOTS

"A gun is not an amusement piece. It is a weapon designed
to wound and kill," said Jim Stacey, English graduate student.
Staeev was one of six nanel- ists Thursday night at a forum could be achieved best n it were
in Memorial Hall entitled "Cun made a felony to sell a gun to
Control: 'Where do you stand?' " someone who did not present
About 50 persons attended the a license. This would be in adforum which was sponsored by dition to making it a felony to
the Lexington Peace Council.
possess a gun without a license.
The opponents of gun control
affirmative side of the
The
panel was composed of Don seemed unanimous in blaming
Mills, editor of The Lexington the recent clamor for stricter legHerald, Bard Sullenger, identi- islation on the "mass hysteria"
fied as a "concerned citizen," following the assassinations of
John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy
and Stacey.
Charles Palmer, local attor- and Martin Luther King.
As Howard Cabbard said,
ney, Loretta Haggard, former UK
"These three assassins have
rifle team member, and Howard
struck a blow to American gun
Cabbard, president of the
owners. The basic problem is
Sportsman League, provided the action for the negative with crime, not firearms. Are
guns committing the crimes?"
view. Don Pratt, former UK stuCabbard also claimed that
dent and a member of the LexPeace Council, acted as registration and licensing would
ington
be much too expensive for the
moderator.
sportsman since most of
Neither side seemed to view averageown a number of guns
them
registration and licensing as a for different purposes.
cure-a- ll
for the rising death rate
Cabbard, for instance, owns
by firearms in this country, but two
and two rifles. He
there was, of course, a difference said pistolsa licensing fee, such
that
of opinion regarding the effecas the one in New York which
tiveness of a gun law.
is $20, would cause people "to
Don Mills said, "A strong dump their guns for economy."
He also felt that a strict gun
gun control law will not stop
crime." He quickly countered,
law would "be as unenforceable
however, by saying, "If you make as Prohibition."
it difficult for a criminal to buy
Commenting on the effectivea gun, it may help, in some ness of gun control, Bard Sulmeasure, to diminish the proliferlenger said that "If just one life
ation of dangerous weapons." is saved," then the effort would
Mills suggested that this end be worthwhile.
Blue-gra-

Gun Control
But How?

Kernel Photo by Howard Mason

Panelists debated the gun control issue in Memorial Hall Thursday
night. Left to right, Bard Sullenger, Don Mills, Charles Palmer,
moderator Don Pratt, Loretta Haggard, Howard Cabbard and Jim
Stacey at the lectern.

.

Junot Warns Of Police Alliance

Commissioners--- !

Discuss

Relations

Police-Communit- y
By DARRELL RICE

Managing Editor
The Lexington City Council
disclosed at its meeting Thursday morning that the city commissioners, Police Chief E. C.
Hale and two of Hale's top executives will meet with Rev.
Craig Frederickson next Thurs-

cares nothing about what I think
or desire," he said. "I will not
be ignored by a university that
supports something it calls academic freedom while trying to
discourage any of my attempts
to control my own destiny."
Another Minority

Junot also took up "the plight
of another minority group that
The meeting is to deal with has been
systematically stripped
the Rev. Frederickson's state- of its
to the point
dignity
relament on
where it has turned vicious and
tions, which calls for, among
and has left itself open
other things, the creation of a mean, influence of monsters."
to the
civilian review board for the
"I am speakingofourpolice,"
police department, a replacement
he said.
for Hale and salary increases
for policemen.
Junot said CARSA is "striving to restore the good feeling
The petition is supported by
the Community Alliance for Re- between the citizens and the
police that is vital to a peacesponsible Social Action (CARSA),
ful and just society."
the Lexington-Fayett- e
County
Human Relations Commission
He said a civilian review board
and other groups.
"would help make the police
ReAbout 10 members of the UK more effective in their job.
lations between the police and
attended the council meeting, and John Junot, a the community, and especially
comCARSA member, addressed the the black segment of the
munity, have deteriorated to the
commissioners on the problems
of Blacks and on CARSA's at- point where the police and the
citizens no longer trust each
titude toward policemen.
other."
'Paternalism' Criticized
Direct Action?
s
Junot said the greatest
Junot told the commissioners
e
in
relations is that if the. Rev. Frederickson's
not encountered with open racists
petition is not acted on, CARSA
but with "rich, white Christians" may take direct action to imand their "paternalistic" atti- plement the resolutions.
tudes toward Blacks.
He then threw before the comComparing the plight of stumissioners the specter of a seemdents to that of Blacks, Junot ingly unlikely alliance between
said, "The black man is not CARSA, one of whose major isa nigger neither am I and I sues is
"police brutality," and
will not be treated like a nigpolice officers.
ger."
day.

police-communi-

...

ty

Columbia May Revoke
SDS Campus Charter

ing out the individual officer."
"You might see us chatting
sociably with them at stop
lights," he continued. "You
might see pretty girls passing
out hot coffee on those cold
nights when they direct traffic
NEW YORK (AP)-- A
Columbia University official asked a
at University football games. You
university committee Thursday to consider whether to revoke
might see us seeking them out the campus charter of the radical Students for a Democratic So
where they hang out off duty." ciety (SDS).
"And we have resources the
The committee is composed of to use university property, a
spokesman said, and also that
city can't offer," Junot added. two administrators, two faculty
the university would not recog"Does the officer have a child members and two students.
who's having trouble in school?
of the charter nize student membership in SDS.
Revocation
SDS members have led the efContinued on Fage 7, CoL 4 would mean the loss of all rights
forts to cripple the 25
university as the opening of the
fall term approaches. Classes
begin Sept. 26. The militant
group touched off the demonstrations, last spring that parLJ
UUg
J
alyzed the Ivy League school.
The university's director of
student interests, Irving de Koff,
referred the charter issue to the
:
4
O
committee, a university spokesman said.
DeKoff acted after about 150
,000-stude- nt

,J

?

fw

1

J

l.

y

militant students halted registration at the Momingside

based-CARS-

prol-lem-

black-whit-

"If

we do not soon get

ac-

"I will not be ignored by an tion on this point," he said,
impersonal

bureaucracy

that

"you might soon find us

seek

ss

'
-

rJ

Kernel Photo by Howard Maaon

The

Fairly
Active

UK Parachute Club drew one of the
largest crowd at the Student Center Activities Fair Thursday. Club exhibits and
representatives will be in the Crand Hall
until 8 p.m. tonight.

Heights campus Wednesday by
blocking a doorway. The demonstrators clashed briefly with
about a dozen campus police although there were no injuries or
arrests.
Registration resumed Thursday without incident.
The Wednesday demonstration led De Koff to suspend previously granted permission for a
meeting of international student
revolutionaries on campus. The
gathering is being sponsored by
SDS.
Several hundred young men
and women, however, pushed
into a Columbia building Wednesday night for an unauthorized
meeting ot the International Assembly of Revoh;tionar Student
Movements.

* KENTUCKY

2-- TIIE

KERNEL,

18

Friday, Sept. .20,

English Horn Recital

Morrison Performs Monday In ASA
Bruce Morrison, assistant professor of music at the University,
will present an English hom recital Sept. 23 at 8:15 p.m. in
the Agricultural Science

Morrison has performed professionally with the Houston
Symphony Orchestra under the
direction of Leopold Stokowski
and Sir John Barbirolli. He has'
been a member of the Houston

New Book Predicts Rebirth

Of State

Two-Part- y

System

"Kentucky Politics," published this week by the
University of Kentucky Press, foresees the revival of strong
A new book,

two-part-y

competition in Kentucky.
The authors, Malcolm Jewell, UK professor of political science,
and Everett Cunningham, assistant professor at Middle Tennessee
State University, cite changing population patterns, industrialization,
and the growth of urban and especially suburban areas, among
several factors promoting such a revitalization.
The political scientists find the election of a Republican governor in 1967 to be the confirmation of these changes, rather than the
factors.
result of peculiar short-terNeither party, entirely eclipsed the other, the authors note,
y
system only in the
although the state has had a strong
early years of this century and in the last decade. "Democratic
factionalism, usually centering on personalities rather than issues,
y
often has substituted for true
competition," they write.
The study details party organization, legislative politics and voting patterns. Recent developments in Kentucky, the authors believe,
may forecast the political future of the entire South, "but the
changes will be gradual and the force of tradition strong."
two-part-

two-part-

Opera Association Orchestra, the
D.C. Watergate
Washington,
Symphony, and the University
of Maryland Woodwind Quintet.
He has appeared as soloist with
the Houston
Symphony Orchestra, Wind Ensemble and
Summer Symphony, and the Lexington Philharmonic.
A graduate of Northwestern
University and a student of Ray
Still and Robert Mayers of the
Chicago Symphony, .Morrison has
taught at the University of Maryland and was on the summer
workshop faculty at the University of Kansas.

Mr. Morrison's program will
consist of selections by Luigi
Cherubini, Elliott Carter, Alan
Hovhaness, Eugene Bozza and
Arthur Honegger. He will be
assisted by Barbara Morrison,
piano; Joan Ceo, harp; John Mea-chaflute; and Rey Longyear
and William Harry Clarke, percussion.

The recital is on the UK Faculty Recital Series and there is
no admission charge.

V

.A

Personality
Professors at the University
are sometimes overlooked. The
student says: "Oh, that man
down front is just a teacher."
But sometimes the creative talents of these professors are overlooked until they are exposed to

Hlfrl STRAW D
2nd

1

r

HELD OVER
WEEK!

BREATH-TAKIN- G

What a beautiful opportunity to let the younged
how lovely the human body can be and how

pure its nakedness!

mm

nw--

THF. RF.n MANTI.F."

mm,

f

in f astman COiO

i

ill

FIRST RUN!

ri

STARTS 8:00

ADM. $1 JO

The motion picture that
puts a man on the moon...
and you follow him

the nation. Then the student
says: "Oh, that was my teacher.
He sure was a great artist."
Introducing such a professor:
Edwin Grzesnikowski, a professor at the University, was re-

ceived favorably at Carnegie Re4, 1967. The New
York Times said, "The
violinist played a bravura
debut program last night . . . His
playing was a satisfying blend
of clean, honest craftsmanship
and a singing musicality. His
bow was secure and strong, producing bite when needed, and
a rich variety of tone toward
or away from the bridge. His
small, quick vibrato gave a sense
of dynamic agility to the sweetest
or coarsest sounds."

(.)

i

cital Hall May

Pi

' SAVE 1

every terrifying
second of the way...

U0

per gallon on Ethyl

gasoline at

...

For Any

Occasion

LINCOLN-MERCUR- Y

Octane Ethyl ....33-94 Octane Regular . 3U.9c

100

TECHNICOLOR PANAVISION. -- W
FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEARTS 1

J

STEWART GRANGER

am

L

m.kj t l L

Ju

They turned the

river of blood.f

1

i

n;

frontier into a
--

7

32? FROM WARNER

H

BROS.-SEV-

EN

t

9

Unconditionally Guaranteed Quality
Hours
6:00 a.m.-9:0- 0
p.m. Mon.-Sa- t.

ALSO

s

CALL

480 EAST MAIN

The personal story of the man fata picked
to live the great adventure of the century.

Wvs

FLOWERS

in
ARTS

vl

v

TOM DOOLEY

and the
LOVELIGHTS
Friday Night
For A Big
Show

4-ho-

ur

FRIDAY'S THE DAY

At The

MIC

II L E R

FLORIST
Dial

254-038-

3

417 East Maxwell

4--

7

JAM
SESSION

825 Euclid
(Chevy Chase)

yj

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

WORLD REPORT
From the Wire of the Associated Press

INTERNATIONAL
gn
Minister
Jiri Hajek resigned Thursday, according to Prague radio. Premier
Oldrich Cernik was designated
acting foreign minister.
Hajek's resignation had been
demanded by the Kremlin. The
former foreign minister was in
Yugoslovia when the Soviet invasion of his country occurred.
SAIGON-Sou- th
Vietnamese
battle deaths have exceeded
American losses every week for
the past two months, indicating
government forces are taking a
bigger share of the fighting.
It was the first time this year
that South Vietnamese losses
have been greater than those
of American units for such along
period.
BONN, Germany The Bonn
government hit back Thursday
night at Moscow's threat of force
against West Germany, warning
that the whole Western alliance
stands ready to defend that country.
The government statement
was issued in reply to an article
in the Soviet newspaper, Izvestia.
PRACUE-Forei-

UNITED

NATIONS-Secretary-Gen-

eral

Thant called the
Soviet military intervention in
U

a grave blow to

Czechoslovakia

international morality and a
ious

setback

to

East-We-

st

serco-

operation.
Looking at the general world
picture, Thant said recent de"show how prevelopments
carious is the balance of power

between the U.S.A. and the
U.S.S.R. in the world of today."
NATIONAL
WAS 1 1 1 NCTON The House
passed and sent to the Senate
Thursday a $1.62 billion foreign
aid appropriation bill.
It was the smallest in the
history of the program.
BOSTON-Hundr- eds
of antiwar demonstrators tried to shout
down Vice President Hubert II.
Humphrey Thursday as he received a warm welcome from Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy.
Sen. Kennedy told the vice
president that he would "work
for his election."
WAS 1 1 1 NGTON The House
Commerce Committee modified
yesterday its equal-tim- e
suspension bill to insist that Richard
M. Nixon, Hubert II. Humphrey
and George C. Wallace be given
the chance to appear on the
same debate program.
However, the controversial
bill was left hanging when the
committee ran into a parliamentary snag.
WASHINGTON-- A
panel of
the House Committee on
Activities will open
hearings Oct. 1 on the role of
student organizations in the Chicago disorders during the Democratic National Convention.
Rep. Richard H. Ichord, D.
Mo., head of the committee, said
the panel would expose the part
played in the violence by the
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS).

Quiet Revolution"
November 6 "South African
Essay: Fruit of Fear"

20-ye- ar

November
Essay: One

-- " South African

20

Na-

Nation-Tw- o

tionalisms"

December
ers of Today"

4 -"- African

December
West Africa"

Writ-

"Boom town,

11

There is no admission charge,

and the showings are open to
the public.

new concept in dorm government was formalized Wlneslay
evening as residents of Haggin Hall held installation ceremonies
for the residence hall's newly elect ed officers.
Addressing the officers and elects a
a vice president
guests in the upper lounge of and an president,
intramurals representaHaggin, Dr. Stuart Forth, acting tive. These individual
governvice president for Student Affairs, ments are
represented in the Hall
emphasized the University's posiCouncil, whose members are the
tion on student rights and re- 16 floor
presidents.
sponsibilities. He told the 16
The Council elects four offimembers of Haggin Hall's Council and the four officers that cers. This year's president is Bill
they would have a chance to have Dixon, A&S freshman.
Also speaking at the service
an "influence on residents here
now, those of the past and the were Miss Rosemary Pond, associate dean of students for refuture."
Covemment in Haggin Hall sidence halls, and Wally Bryan,
this year is set up as 16 individual president of Student
floor governments. Each floor
A

PC CINEMA
I

HELD OVER!

2nd Smash Week!
from Nobel Prize Winner
JOHS. V. JENSEN'S novel.
Winner of the Danish
"Bodil" for
"Best Actress
of the Year"

I

I

...and
then

V)

sne
ninn

SPEND SATURDAY AFTERNOON WITH
YOUR FAVORITE GAL AT THE . . .

.Iff

V

RECOMMENDED

OAKHILL

Introducing

I racgmnemM

Phone

ANGELA SC0ULAR

utur tudwicts

Screenplay

Associilt

HUNTER DAVIES iZ
266-898-

by

larrTkramer

9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

COLOR!

STEVt

SPENCER
DAVIS
GROUP

WWWOOO
ANO
TRAffIC

od DvKtod

I

I
I

I

I

by

CLIVE D0NNER
by

DLua

I

I
I

NOW! Exclusive! 1st Run

$2.50 per hour
LESSONS IN WESTERN STYLE HORSEMANSHIP
$3.00 per hour
(no appointment necessary)

BLOOD-CURDLI-

LARRY KRAMER

.

by

THE

COLOR

OPEN TRAIL RIDING

IN

Music

Produced

Produce

4

MOST REASONABLE RATES IN TOWN!

Open 7 days a week

ON UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS

AVAILABLE

.

by

SHEILA WHITE

VANESSA HOWARD DIANE KEEN

ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK
tor

I

FOR ADULTS ONLY

EVANS

ADRIENNE P0STA

Tates Creek Road
12 miles from UK

BARRY

JUDY GEES0N

RIDING ACADEMY

l8-- 3

Haggin Hal1 Formalizes
New Dorm Government

AFRO FILMS
A series of films on African
topics will be shown for students
in AS 300 and PS 557 this semester. All films will be shown
in the Commerce Building audi
torium at 8 p.m.
October 9 -- "Tanzania - The

20,

smtmmnnnnnmntnnmmnnnm

Jf

Famous Imported Beer
Scotland Germany
Denmark Greece

.

Australia

Italy

Mexico

Japan

Featuring from our Kitchens

Holland

Philippines

Ireland

England

...

ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES

FRIED CLAMS

FRIED BUTTERFLY SHRIMP

CORNED BEEF
SUBMARINE SANDWICHES
IMPORTED HOLLAND HAM
HICKORY SMOKED PORK AND BEEF BARBEQUE
LUM'S FAMOUS HOT DOGS STEAMED IN BEER
OPEN:

OTO THEATER

1

a.m.

Sundays,

11-- 9

Phone 27R-6I02012 Regency Road, across from Southland Rowling Lanes
Complete

J

until

Monday-Saturda- y

A

Carry-Ou-

t

Service

2

Most Distinguisheil Food Franchise

hximmitxntttnimtimmttmiiixmitmiiMiuummiimtmntii

nmmtmmxmtsttmmmm

* KENTUCKY

2-- TIIE

18

KERNEL, Friday, Sept.. 20,

English Horn Recital

Morrison Performs Monday In ASA
Bruce Morrison, assistant professor of music at the University,
will present an English hom recital Sept. 23 at 8:15 p.m. in
the Agricultural Science

Opera Association Orchestra, the
D.C. Watergate
Washington,
Symphony, and the University
of Maryland Woodwind Quintet.
He has appeared as soloist with
the Houston
Symphony Orchestra, Wind Ensemble and
Summer Symphony, and the Lexington Philharmonic.
A graduate of Northwestern
University and a student of Ray
Still and Robert Mayers of the
Chicago Symphony, Morrison has
taught at the University of Maryland and was on the summer
workshop faculty at the University of Kansas.

Morrison has performed professionally with the Houston
Symphony Orchestra under the
direction of Leopold Stokowski
and Sir John Darbirolli. He has'
been a member of the Houston

New Book Predicts Rebirth

Of State

Two-Part- y

System

new book, "Kentucky Politics," published this week by the
y
University of Kentucky Press, foresees the revival of strong
competition in Kentucky.
The authors, Malcolm Jewell, UK professor of political science,
and Everett Cunningham, assistant professor at Middle Tennessee
State University, cite changing population patterns, industrialization,
and the growth of urban and especially suburban areas, among
several factors promoting such a revitalization.
The political scientists find the election of a Republican governor in 1967 to be the confirmation of these changes, rather than the
factors.
result of peculiar short-terNeither party, entirely eclipsed the other, the authors note,
y
system only in the
although the state has had a strong
early years of this century and in the last decade. "Democratic
factionalism, usually centering on personalities rather than issues,
y
often has substituted for true
competition," they write.
The study details party organization, legislative politics and voting patterns. Recent developments in Kentucky, the authors believe,
may forecast the political future of the entire South, "but the
changes will be gradual and the force of tradition strong."
A

two-part-

Mr. Morrison's program will
consist of selections by Luigi
Cherubini, Elliott Carter, Alan
Hovhaness, Eugene Bozza and
Arthur Honegger. He will be
assisted by Barbara Morrison,
piano; Joan Ceo, harp; John Mea-chaflute; and Rey Longyear
and William Harry Clarke, percussion.

two-part-

two-part-

k

iMitui j:

STRAND
2nd

Wniliimiij,

HELD OVER!
WEEK!

BREATH-TAKIN- G

What a beautiful opportunity to let the youngsed
how lovely the human body can be and how

pure its nakedness! Mt,x.mciTHE'RED

fahVMVi

r

r:

'IK,'

no admission charge.

Personality

Vol

C

The recital is on the UK Faculty Recital Series and there is

MANTLE-

-

-

in

f ASTMAN

COlO

FIRST RUN!

t5Wl-- l

m

STARTS 8:00

ADM. $1 JO

Professors at the University
are sometimes overlooked. The
student says: "Oh, that man
down front is just a teacher."
But sometimes the creative talents of these professors are overlooked until they are exposed to
the nation. Then the student
says: "Oh, that was my teacher.
He sure was a great artist."
Introducing such a professor.
Edwin Grzesnikowski, a professor at the University, was received favorably at Carnegie Recital Hall May 4, 1967. The New
York Times said, "The
violinist played a bravura
debut program last night . . . His
playing was a satisfying blend
of clean, honest craftsmanship
and a singing musicality. His
bow was secure and strong, producing bite when needed, and
a rich variety of tone toward
or away from the bridge. His
small, quick vibrato gave a sense
of dynamic agility to the sweetest
or coarsest sounds."

i
I
I)

1

1

The motion picture that
puts a man on the moon...
and you follow him

every terrifying
second of the way...

per gallon on Ethyl

0
FARMER

gasoline at .

FLOWERS

..

For Any

Occasion

LINCOLN-MERCUR- Y
The personal story of the man fate picked
to live the great adventure of the century.

ft

f

"A

Octane Ethyl . .
94 Octane Regular

100

. ff

TECHNICOLOR PAN AVISION
FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEARTS U

3

J

STEWART GRANGER

Vv

ALSO

-

CALL

480 EAST MAIN

.33.9c
.

3U.9c

Unconditionally Guaranteed Quality
Hours
6:00 a.m.-9:0- 0
p.m. Mon.-S-

M I C II L E R

FLORIST
Dial

254-038-

3

417 East Maxwell

at

They turned the

frontierintoa
river of bloodyir- -

1

f

FROM WARNER

(Itj

f
BROS.-SEVE-

JJft

N

ARTS

v7

V

TOM DOOLEY

and the
LOVELIGHTS

Friday Night
For A Big
Show

4-ho-

ur

FRIDAY'S THE DAY

At The
FIREPLACE

4--

7

JAM
SESSION

825 Euclid
(Chevy Chase)

rj

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Sept.

WORLD REPORT
From the Wirt of

tht Associated

INTERNATIONAL
gn
Minister
Jiri Hajek resigned Thursday, according to Prague radio. Premier
Old rich Cernik was designated
acting foreign minister.
Hajck's resignation had been
demanded by the Kremlin. The
former foreign minister was in
Yugoslovia when the Soviet invasion of his country occurred.
SAIGON-Sou- th
Vietnamese
battle deaths have exceeded
American losses every week for
the past two months, indicating
government forces are taking a
bigger share of the fighting.
It was the first time this year
that South Vietnamese losses
have been greater than those
of American units for such along
period.
BONN, Germany The Bonn
government hit back Thursday
night at Moscow's threat of force
against West Germany, warning
that the whole Western alliance
stands ready to defend that country.
The government statement
was issued in reply to an article
in the Soviet newspaper, Izvestia.
PRACUE-Forei-

UNITED

NATIONS-Secretary-Gen-

U

eral

Thant called the

Soviet military intervention in
Czechoslovakia a grave blow to
international morality and a sercoious setback to East-Weoperation.
Looking at the general world
picture, Thant said recent de"show how prevelopments
carious is the balance of power
st

Press

between the U.S.A. and the
U.S.S.R. in the world of today."
NATIONAL
WAS 1 1 1 NGTO N The House
passed and sent to the Senate
Thursday a $1.62 billion foreign
aid appropriation bill.
It was the smallest in the
history of the program.
20-ye-

BOSTON-Hundr-

of anti-

eds

war demonstrators tried to shout
down Vice President Hubert II.
Humphrey Thursday as he received a warm welcome from Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy.
Sen. Kennedy told the vice
president that he would "work
for his election."
WAS 1 1 1 NGTON The House
Commerce Committee modified
yesterday its equal-tim- e
suspension bill to insist that Richard
M. Nixon, Hubert II. Humphrey
and George C. Wallace be given
the chance to appear on the
same debate program.
However, the controversial
bill was left hanging when the
committee ran into a parliamentary snag.
WASHINGTON-- A
panel of
the House Committee on
Activities will open
hearings Oct. 1 on the role of
student organizations in the Chicago disorders during the Democratic National Convention.
Rep. Richard II. Ichord, D.
Mo., head of the committee, said
the panel would expose the part
played in the violence by the
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS).

Haggin Hall Formalizes
New Dorm Government

AFRO FILMS
A series of films on African
topics will be shown for students
in AS 300 and PS 537 this semester. All films will be shown
in the Commerce Building auditorium at 8 p.m.
October 9 -- "Tanzania - The
Quiet Revolution"

November 6 "South African
Essay: Fruit of Fear"
November
African
Essay: One Nation-Tw- o
20-"S- outh

December
ers of Today"
December
West Africa"

-"-

African

11

YVrit- -

"Boom town,

There is no admission charge,

and the showings are open to
the public.

new concept in dorm government was formalized Wednesday
evening as residents of Haggin Hall held installation ceremonies
for the residence hall's newly elect cd officers.
Addressing the officers and elects a
president, a vice president
guests in the upper lounge of and an intramurals
representaHaggin, Dr. Stuart Forth, acting tive. These individual
governvice president for Student Affairs, ments are
represented in the Hall
emphasized the University's posiCouncil, whose members are the
tion on student rights and re- 16 floor
presidents.
sponsibilities. He told the 16
The Council elects four offimembers of Haggin Hall's Council and the four officers that cers. This year's president is Bill
A8cS freshman.
they would have a chance to have Dixon,
Also speaking at the service
residents here
an "influence on
now, those of the past and the were Miss Rosemary Pond, associate dean of students for refuture."
Covemment in Haggin Hall sidence halls, and Wally Bryan,
this year is set up as 16 individual president of Student
floor governments. Each floor
A

PlfflCf WEMA
HELD OVER!

2nd Smash Week!
from Nobel Prize Winner
JOHS. V. JENSEN'S novel.
Winner of the Danish
"Bodil" for
"Best Actress
of the Year"

...d Ml

S

then

L

p

she

SPEND SATURDAY AFTERNOON WITH
YOUR FAVORITE GAL AT THE . . .

(

JMk

was

RECOMMENDED

OAKHILL

Introducing

BARRY

foconwiemfetf

266-898-

ANGELA SC0ULAR

for

JMM
miturt tudttnefs

ORIGINAL

MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

Screenplay
by
,
HUNTER DAVIESS n.v..

AVAILABLE

by

IN

BLOOD-CURDLI-

NG

j

9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

COLOR!

111

:

:j : :: :;i ;: r ; i::i:11

by STEW

SPENCER
DAVIS
GROUP

WWWOOO
A NO
TRAFFIC

Musk

Associate Producer

Produced end

CLIVE D0NNER

COLOR

y N0Wf

Filmed in Beautiful Copenhagen.

RECORDS

THE

LARRY KRAMER

I

MOST REASONABLE RATES IN TOWN!
$2.50 per hour
LESSONS IN WESTERN STYLE HORSEMANSHIP
$3.00 per hour
(no appointment necessary)

ON UNITED ARTISTS

.......
Iarry Vramer

I

4

OPEN TRAIL RIDING

Open 7 days a week

SHEILA WHITE

ADRIENNE P0STA- - VANESSA HOWARD DIANE KEEN
a

FOR ADULTS ONLY

EVANS

JUDY GEES0N

RIDING ACADEMY
Tatcs Creek Road
12 miles from UK
Phone

l8-- 3

20,

by

Directed

DLue

Exclusive! 1st

if

TTHVT

Famous Imported Beer
Scotland Germany
Greece
Denmark

..

Australia

Italy

Mexico

Japan

Featuring from our Kitchens

,

Philippines Holland
Ireland
England

.

ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES

FRIED CLAMS

FRIED BUTTERFLY SHRIMP

CORNED BEEF
SUBMARINE SANDWICHES
IMPORTED HOLLAND HAM
HICKORY SMOKED PORK AND BEEF BARBEQUE
LUM'S FAMOUS HOT DOGS STEAMED IN BEER
OPEN:

Monday-Saturda- y

until

1

a.m.

Sundays,

11-- 9

Phone 2786102
Complete Carry 'Out Service
2012 Regency Itoatl, across from Southland Howling Lanes
A Most

Distinguished Food Franchise

I

I

Run'

:;:1 11 :;1 1 : : 11 1 1 : :: i::: 1 1:11 ::;i:i ; i : i : : i ; i : : 1 11 1::::;t :1 1::::i:: ::: 1 1:i::;;11 1 1

T

by

* The Kentucky

Iernel

The South's Outstanding College Daily
ESTABLISHED 1894

University of Kentucky

FRIDAY, SEPT.
Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee

D. Decker,

20, 1968

Editor-in-Chi-

Darrcll Rice, Managing Editor
Tom Dcrr, Dmincss Manager

David Holwerk, Editorial rage Editor
, Associate Editor
Guy M. Mcndes,
II. G. Mason, Photography Editor
Jim Miller, Sports Editor
Joe Hinds, Arts and Entertainment Editor
Chuck Koehlcr,
Dana Ewell,
Terry Dunham,
Janice Barber
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors

Adviser Advice
The University

Student AdCommittee (USAC) has
visory
seized an important issue and the
Faculty Senate would do well to
listen. The academic advising system on this campus could use an
overhaul.
Specifically, USAC has recommended to the Senate that they
remake the advising system in such
a way as to allow advisers more
time for advising. That makes sense.
As

pointed out by USAC,

ad-

visers are already overloaded and

the promise of a continually increasing student enrollment offers
little hope for relief. Often, advisers
are not able to give students the
help they need both, because of
this shortage of time and because
they, themselves, do not have a
full grasp of the advising needs.
Perhaps most helpful of the sug

gestions of USAC is the one which
would require the University to
hire a professional core of advisers
to do nothing but know the requirements of students' academic
programs and know how to help
the student meet them. It would
be much easier to keep this group
of advisers informed on course and
requirement changes than it is to
inform advisers at present.
The proposals are now before
the Faculty Senate Executive Council for possible technical corrections
and criticism. No date has been
set for full Senate discussion, but
the time to act is now.
As the maze of requirements
and stipulations increase, students
are becoming more confused in
course selection. A good advisery
program would be a step in the
right direction toward the easing
of this problem.

Election Figures

Wednesday's Student Government Elections have placed that august
old body in a ticklish predicament. With the massive turnout of
and forty votes which this election inspired, it should be
clear to the members of this year's edition of
that something less than one out of twenty people on this campus
are even interested enough to vote.
This
figure should be a warning to the junior
politicians merely by itself, but just in case they can't figure out the
importance of the numbers, we'll try to make them somewhat more
meaningful.
Thanks to Wednesday's election, we can clearly see that while only
one student in twenty was interested enough to vote in the election,
the final totals show that one Student Government representative in
sixteen is Thorn Pat Juul. And if that doesn't frighten someone in the
Student Government office, then things are even further gone than we
thought.

six-hundr- ed

Watch-Democracy-Wo- rk

Give Us This Day Our Daley Bread

They' At Columbia

Many people who have read that
there are new demonstrations on
the campus of Columbia University may be inclined to dismiss
the activities with a shrug of the
and
shoulders
the comment,
"They're at it again." They are
indeed at it again, but they aren't
the students and what they are
at is not a student demonstration.
They at Columbia are the administration and Trustee