xt73ff3kwt8s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73ff3kwt8s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170927  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 27, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 27, 1917 1917 2012 true xt73ff3kwt8s section xt73ff3kwt8s MM

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1917

VOL, X
WILDCATS AND BUTLER
TO MEET OH SATURDAY

TENNESSEE CANCELS

"REMEMBER ME TO THE

THANKSGIVING

GIRLS" SATS SHIHNICK

Contest on Stoll Field Sat- Kernel Editor of 16-1- 7
Sends News of U. K.
urday Will Prove
Interesting
Students
LEXINGTON

MEN

OUT AT

FORT

No.

HARRISON

ediSaturday will .be the first big day of
From William Shinnick, 1916-1the year. On that day our valiant tor of the Kernel, president of last
Wildcats meet the unknown quantity, year's graduating class, member of
Butler.
the Kappa Sigma and Alpha Delta SigNo one can prophecy the outcome of ma (honorary) fraternities and shinthe conflict as many considerations ing light In all University affairs,
enter the question that have never come., the following special letter to
before been reckoned with. Last year the Kentucky Kernel.
Camp Benjamin Harrison.
Butler has as heavy a team as KenSunday, Sept. 23, 1917.
tucky. This year seven of last year's
team or scrubs are back at Butler Boys and Girls in Journalism Department:
and a new athletic director Is at work.
My failure to write before this has
seen
What the result will be will be
not been due to negligence or
Saturday.
as a matter of fact I have
There are only two instructions to thought a great deal of the good old
be given to the students of Kentucky. days at the University, especially
Daddy Boles says to be there and since the papers have started their
root. It Is particularly important that stories of the opening of the school
the bleachers be decorated by many year. We are just simply too busy to
of the heads of freshmen, for it is rec- write. That Is. of course, an old
ognized that the effect of this decora- "stall," but If there Is any place In the
tive scheme Is always a good one on world where a man hasn't time to do
the team. The yell leader, to be anything outside the schedule, this Is
elected Friday, always glories in the it. We have about an hour off every
sight of such heads and the enthusi- day and Mils is devoted to suoli poetic
asm is regulated to a certain extent pursuits as shaving and taking a
by their numbers. It is a freshman's bath. Sunday is our day off, but toduty to .be at the first game, and the day I was the orderly and had to run
upper classman's privilege.
errands and beat the typewriter for
the officers, besides doing a lot of rouAdequate preparations for a flying
start In rooting have been made for tine Work.
Having just read over the first parathe chapel period. The girls of Patt
Hall have agreed to teach the fresh- graph, I come to the conclusion that
men girls the school song, and any I speak and think entirely In the bulnew man may learn "Hall, Hail, the let sentence, or In a military manner.
Gang's All Here" in any room of the Perhaps it is the typewriter, or my
dormitory at any time of the night. being unused to it. You must rememAll necessary yells will be taught and ber that I have not seen one of the
same for the last four weeks.
practiced In chapel Friday morning.
of this year's football
To tell the truth about this place,
A feature
squad is that there is a complete team there is no place in the world, with
from Loxington High School out for the possible exception of one or two,
Gay, Hedges, Boone, C. whero I would rather be. We live
the varsity:
Downing, D. Downing, Bastln, Moore, really a fine, clean life, with a good
Mahonoy, Walker, Shanklin, Clark bit of fun thrown In. Every Friday
and an extra man, McGregor. Many of night ,by dictum of the officers, we
these are expected to start Saturday have a special "feed" and an enteragainst Butler, and much is expected tainment that to mo is strongly reminiscent of the Stroller "Amateur
'of them.
Nights" of long ago.
New material on the field has lent
(Continued on Pago Three.)
some "zip" to practice for the last
week. Hober, who played end last
TWO UNIVERSITY MEN
year, has returned.
Bunch, a newCALLED IN THE DRAFT
comer from St. Mary's, is contending
position. Splendid acfor a
Tho University furnished two or the
complishments are expected from the eighteen young men, representing
two Downing brothers from the local
to tho
second contribution
High School. They aro both
national draft army, who loft last Friand all muscle. Shanklin, a for day for tho training camp.
mer star of Loxington High School,
Those two men aro Ralph II. Morhas roturnod to practlco after an in gan and Jacob Loibschultz. Mr. Morjury to his ear. Wllhelm, a member gan graduated from tho University In
of last year's Western Kentucky cham Juno, 1915, accepted a position with
pions in Paducah, is trying hard. Leo tho Elmondorr Dairy Company, later
Oldham, halfback on HopkinsvlUo going to Petersburg, Va. Mr.
High last year, is out.
Is a senior In tho College of
7

forget-fulnes-

GAME BATTALION GETS 350

Tho Tennesseo game, which was
scheduled to bo played Thanksgiving
Day, on Stoll Field, has been canceled. When Interviewed concerning
it, Professor Freeman, chairman of
tho Athletic Committee, said: "We
aro casting about north, south, east
and west for a good game to be played
Thanksgiving on Stoll Field instead of
tho canceled Tennessee game."
"Tho letter from Tennessee cancelling the Thanksgiving game, does not
give many particulars of their football
changes for this year, merely saying
they will limit their athletic activis
contests. They beties to
lieve they are following the wish of
President Wilson In their step and intend to lay as much emphasis upon
home athletics as poslble after cancelling all outside games.
"There are many good games we
could schedule for this day, but we
prefer to play at home, even if it must
be against an inferior team. We promise the students a contest worthy of
their attendance, however."
Inter-clas-

FOR

Non-Appearan-

INFANTRY

Senior Election Held Without Usual Bitter
Contest
BRITTAIN

TREASURER

In one of the quietest and smoothest
class elections ever held in the chapel
of the University, Virgil Chapman, of
Lexington, a student in the College of
Law, was elected president of the
Senior class last Friday afternoon.
Heretofore there have been bitter contests, with complicated politics.
This typical senior, of the mustache
and the cane, is an orator bred. When
ho speaks upon a delicate subject, as
he did last year at tho occasion of the
election of the ten most popular girls
In tho University, his enthusiasm becomes rampant and his soft, tender
interpretation of the language of Dixie land spontaneous.
Miss Emma Holton was elected vice
president. John Alfred Brlttaln, captain or tho 1917 Wildcats, as well as
football hero of tho two years past,
was chosen treasuror of the class.
Miss Aline Kavanaugh will bo secretary, Miss Helon Morris class poet,
and Miss Bortha Miller, giftorian.
J. J. McBrayor was olected class
representative and will niako the prin
cipal speech on commencement day.
Harry Mllward was choson class orator; Miss Freda Lemon, historian;
C. L. Morgan, grumbler, and Tllford
Wilson, giftorian.

PATT HALL ROUSED

BY

DRILL

in Chapel Clowns, Trained Elephants,
To Be Punished By
Minstrels, Mingle at
ce

Squad Drill

FIFTY R. 0. T.

C.

Circus

Co-e- d

MEN PARTY GREAT SUCCESS

With 350 men as privates, and 50
men enrolled In
third and fourth-yea- r
the Reserve Officers' Training Corp,
the battalion of the University is beginning a most favorable year.
Each man is entering his two years
of military life with greater vim and
interest than ever before in view of
the critical times. The morning company, E, composed of aspiring athletes, portends to be the banner company with its ranks of physically fit
men. The four afternoon companies,
now captained by Goosman, Richards,
Sherwood and Shouse, have already
mastered the foot movements and by
the end of the week will have thoroly
learned the squad movements.
Captain Ellis,
has received no word as to the exact
arrival of Mayor Samuel A. Smoke
who will make all appointments upon
arrival. "Big" Smoke, as he was
known at the University of Missouri,
where he spent several years as commandant, according to reports, is truly
a big man in every respect.
The compulsory attendance of the
battalion in chapel on Tuesday morning will be required this year as it
being punwas last,
ishable by squad drill.
The following men have enlisted In
the Reserve Officers' Training Corp:
D. R. Ellis, K. Goosman, H. S. Richards, V. S. Sherwood, Headloy Shouse,
T. L. Wilson, F. P. Anderson, R. S.
Arnold, J. H. Bailey, H. B. Clark, W.
R. David, P. Daveis, C. F. DoMay, Ed.
Dabney, R. N. Fenley, M. Forman, J.
L. Gayle, W. R. Galbert, A. S. Gill, H.
E. Grehan, H. Henry, V. S. Hagard,
J. J. Leman, E. A. Llllard, F. M. Jackson, Wm. MoDougle, Sam Morton, L.
McClain, R. S. Park, H. Parks, W. C.
Piper, C. E. Planck, W. T. Backett,
J. M. Pursifull, H. E. Robinson, H.
W. Stedman, S. C. Stenhauser, Moso
Smith. J. H. Taylor, C. L. Templin,
II. F. Thompson, W. B. Tabor, F. W.
Tuttle, O. C. Walker, J. S. Walling-ford- ,
G. E. Zerfoss, J. G. Taylor, W.
E. Adair, Harry Mllward, and J. T.
Clark.
t,

ELECTED SENIOR HEAD

3

WRIGHT AND PULLIAM
HERE ON A FURLOUGH

Another triumph has been added to
tho already long list of Philosophlan
successes. Would anybody have believed that a sure enough circus, sawdust ring, elephants, peanuts, red
lemonade, etc., could Invade the lofty
walls of Patterson Hall? Such was
the case and it was a howling success, according to many one of the
great successes of any school activity
in a number of years.
Bertha Miller, a "perfect gentleman"
In dress suit and high hat, led the parade to the strains of the inimitable
"Dean" Sousa's band. A bewildering
array of tight-ropwalkers, chorus
girls, clowns, etc., followed close behind and marched to the Main Tent
(Recreation Hall.)
e

Pandemonium reigned when the
crowd scrambled to get seats. Wise
"mammas" gently admonished their
"children" to keep outside the ropes
ring.
which marked off the
Peanuts and red lemonade venders
vied with each other in crying their
wares. Children tooted whistles and
Madam Crawford, fortunehorns.
teller, inveigled unsuspecting youths
and the proverbial English dudes, one
"Bernle Young" in particular, flirted
with all the girls in spite of the anxious interference of their "mammas."
To the soothing strains of "Dean"
s
Sousa's band Madam Mayes,
tight-ropwalker, in magnificent ballet costume, executed intricate
steps with such ease that thunderous
applause burst from the spectators.
Children shrieked with delight at the
antics of baby "Wohl." strangest elephant over known, but quaked with
terror at the horrible girations or
"Fredycia Lemonadye," only wild woand
man in captivity.
his brother, "heap great" Indian chieftains. Inspired the spectators with
awe.

i

saw-du-

world-famou-

e

To relieve the effects of the wild
woman and Indian chieftains, a blackface minstrel show, composed of Josephine Thomas, Mrs. F. C. Mayes, Lona
Clem, Georgia Terrey, Sallio Coleman,
Myrtle Glass and Lucllo Cequin sang

and danced in the accepted manner
for minstrels. "Pa" Duckwall. assistHarold Pulllam and "Hasty" Wright, ed by "Happy" Mayor, funniest of
former students in tho University, clowns, put on an acrobotic stunt
now enlisted in tho United States
which would havo made Barnum &
Xaval Reserve, Aviation Section, arturn pink with
morn- Balloy's acrobats
rived at Lexington Wednesday
ing on a recruiting furolugh. They envy.
aro stationed at Camp Stauloy temAmong tho moro prominent visitors
porarily.
JUNIORS NEXT MONDAY.
for tho affair wore: "Pa" Xoland and
Wright and Pulllam havo been In
"Ma" Graham accompanied by their
A meeting of the Junior class is training at Boston and havo already
ton "children," "St" Piggott, "Lefty"
A former player on Louisvlllo High, Arts and Science and ho resides In callod for Monday artornoon at 3:t$0 made several nights with Instructors.
to make Shanklin, "Pa" Duckwall, and "Ma"
Dollrovoy, is an aspirant for end on Louisville. Thoso men havo been p. m. Election of officers and other Thoy havo not been allowed
Fiegel.
"solo" (lights yet.
the Varsity. Dlshman, fullback last placed In tho Field Artillery Division. Important matters will arise.
half-bac- k

's

Lieb-sohult- z

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two.

STRAND

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P.

M.

Sc., 10c. and 15c.

Admission

ZERFOSS CABLES SAFE CAFETERIA WILL OPEN
ARRIVALFROMABROAD
BY SENIORS

ARRIVES

Gift is Purchased With
the Jubilee Prize
Money

ADDITION

TO CAMPUS

Early this week, three boxes of
great weight, labeled "F. J. McFar-land- ,
(University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.," Inscribed with the warning,
"This Side Up, With Care," were
placed at the north end of the Main
Building. Curiosity reigned supreme.
The concensus of opinion was that
they contained "liquid refreshments"
for the students. But still some were
doubtful.
The mystery has been solved. The
recipient, Mr. McFarland, landscape
gardener of the University campus,
when interviewed, by a Kernel reporter, gave out the following
The fountain, donated by the class
of 1918, and purchased with the hun
dred dollars won at the Golden Jubilee

contest last year, will be erected this
week. It is of a monumental design,
made of Bedford limestone, gray In
color and resting on a granite base.
At the top of a pyramidal column
rests a ball on which is the automatic
drinking cup from which
may be obtained the purest water In
the world, said to issue from the same
Aqua
source as did the
Vitae of Ponce de Leon.
The fountain will be placed directly
under two Norway spruce trees in the
triangle at the northeast end of the
Main Building, and upon it will be engraved "The Class of 1918." The fountain was purchased from the Eastern
Studio Company, of Bedford, Indiana,
costing one hundred dollars.
g

long-fame- d

MRS. M'LAUGHLIN DIES
McLaughlin died
.Mrs. Margaret
Tuesday afternoon at her home at 226
East Maxwell Street after an illness
of five months. She was the mother
of Miss Margaret 'McLaughlin, instructor in the Department of Journalism
at the University.

AT

THE ADA MEADE

message
MSafe" was the
received by cablegram yesterday by
D. H. Peak, business agent of the
University, from his nepliew, Tom Zer
foss, a former student here who is
now in the war zone. The message
was without date and the name of
the place from which It was sent had
been cancelled by the censor.
Zerfoss received a commission as
First Lieutenant, at the first training
camp at Fort Oglethorp. He sailed
about three weeks ago. It Is not
known whether he will remain in
France, or will return later to Instruct
the new National Army.
University students will remember
Zerfoss as a basketball, track and foot
ball star. He was highly Interested
in University Y. M. C. A. work, hold
lng the executive office at times. His
work at the Institution was of a high
standard and this friends are numer
ous. Last year Zerfoss was in Van
derbllt, where lie was graduated.
one-wor-

KENTUCKY AGGIES
MEETING EACH WEEK
The regular weekly meeting of the
Agricultural Society was held last
Monday at 7:30 p. m. in the Agriculture Building. Discussion of the stucontests
dent
at the
State Fair, in which each contest was
thoroly explained and the value of
such a contest to every participant
told, was the feature of an interest
ing meeting.
The program was as follows: Pres
ident's address, J. E. McClure; "Stock
Exhibits at Kentucky State Fair," C.
L. .Morgan; "Outlook for the Agriculture Graduate," J. W. Lindsay.
At the completion of the program,
A. 'E. McGuire, senior, was elected
circulation manager of the Rural
with Smith Gill for his assist
ant. Joseph Gayle was elected busi
ness manager. Membership of the society now totals thirty-seveThe
Ags will meet again next Monday evening at the same time in the same
building. Every student of the College of Agriculture is expected to be
present at each meeting.
stock-Judgin- g

n

WESTINGHOUSE MEETS
ELECTS NEW OFFICERS
The first meeting of the Westing-housSociety, composed of junior mechanical engineers, was held
Officers for the ensuing year
were elected. Many subjects of In
terest were discussed.
The officers for the year are: W.
S. Baugh, president; Alvln Kohn, vice
president; F. Paul Anderson, Jr., secretary; W. R. David, treasurer; H.
M. Milton, sergeant-at-arms- ;
E. A.
Lillard, janitor.
The society will hold its meetings
the fourth hour every second

e

Keith bills are popular every place,
but the Ada Meade 'has for the latter
part of this week a bill which has
gained the unstinted approval of every
audience to whic hit has showed. Do
not come expecting "Neal Abel" to
twist his face around the stage, but
do come 'prepared to see this man
with the mobile face sing coon songs
and excel in eccentric dancing. "The
Big Girl Revue' 'is the other feature
act. The Keith program for Thursday, Friday and Saturday has five
pippins.

clDA MEADE
"Superior Vaudeville"
ALL NEW BUT THE NAME
NEW SEATS
Same Management, Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh Was Worth $1.00, You'd Leave Here Rich"
Prices, 10c, 15c, 20, 30c, 35c
Boxes, 35c, 50c
612

PHONE

612

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

DENTIST

Kentucky Kernel

For any kind of dental service call on

TO

DR. J. T. SLATON

$1.00 Per Year

127 CHEAP8IDE

Students
Asked By Proprietor,

on

of

Office hours,

II

.

m. to

A

p. m.

rhoae

5c Per Copy

Ml--

Mrs. Million
BOARD AT $3.50 PER WK
The Cafeteria, under the manage
ment of Mrs. Amanda T. Million, will
be opened iMonday morning, October
1.
Mrs. Million 'has had charge of
similar enterprises for two years at
the Eastern Kentucky State Normal
Institute at 'Richmond, and for two
years at Lincoln 'Memorial Institute
at (Cumberland Gap, both of which
were highly successful.
The plan by which Mrs. (Million In
tends to manage the Cafeteria in
of every male
volves the
student on the campus. To make it a
success every student should fall in
line and do his "bit" for the Univer
sity. and likewise put a few "Iron
men" 1n his own pocket.
Board at the Cafeteria will he $3.50.
Mrs. Million, when asked how she
could afford to run on such a modest
price, made the assertion that unless
her plan met with the full approval of
the student body and secured their cooperation it would, be necessary for
her to close the doors at once.
Altho food is considerably higher
this year than at any time in the past,
Mrs. (Million is sure of success if she
can enroll from fifty to a hundred stu
dents as (boarders. The Cafeteria has
a seating capacity of about 175. Within the past few days some forty men
have signified their intentions of enrolling at the earliest opportunity. All
students wishing to start as boarders
Monday will register Saturday morning at the Cafeteria.

The College Boys' Store
INCORPORATED.

CLOTHING, TAILORING, SHOES & FURNISHINGS
"WEAR FOR YOUNG MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG"

EVERYBODY EATS AT

Uncle Charlie's
YOUNG MEN
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes For Style and Value.
better ones; they're made right and priced right;
sport suits and overcoats,
the styles are the latest Ideas in
You

can't

find

d

regular sacks or full skirted overcoats
that you get it.

anything you want

we see

BETTER MAKE IT TODAY.

DANTZLER SPEAKS AT
FIRST UNION MEETING
The lUnlon Literary Society held its
first meeting of the year Saturday
night. The feature of the occasion
was an informal talk by Professor L.
L. iDantzler.
Professor Dantzler emphasized the
value to be derived from literary societies In general, and spoke particularly of the achievements of the
Union Society during the past two
score years. Professor Dantzler said
that Governor A. O. Stanley was at
one time a member of the organization and added that the Governor's
renown as an orator was no doubt
due to the hours he spent debating
and declaiming In the Union Society,
Professor Dantzler promised that the
faculty would lend, every possible aid
and encouragement to the work of the
Union and (Patterson Societies.
J. W. Lindsay, of Covington, senior
in the College of Agriculture, was
elected president for the first semes
ter. (Mr. (Lindsay has been a member
of the society since the autumn of
1913, and has, during the four years,
been an enthusiastic Union adherent.
Other officers were elected as follows: J. J. MoBrayer, of Lawrence-burg- ,
vice president; L. F. Blsdhof, of
Louisville, secretary; R. L. Duncan, of
LaGrange, treasurer; Virgil Chapman,
prosecuting attorney,
of Lexington,
and Ed. Dabney, of Hopkinsville,

CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N

Kaufman Clothing Co.
C. D.

Calloway

&

Co.

FOOTBALL SUPPLIES, SWEATERS, KODAKS
146 WEST MAIN STREET

A

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That Is what you get when you order a Justright Suit or Overcoat. A GUARANTEE that assures you that the quality of the woolens used Is of the highest grade, the linings and other findings of the
very best, the workmanship equal to that which you get from the highest-tailors, and the Styles the very latest.
priced

We can make you this sweeping guarantee because every gar
ment is made under the direct personal supervision of our designer,
Mr. M. Levy the cuttings and fitting being done right on our premises.
Our line of new Fall Woolens Is ready for your inspection.

Suits and Overcoats $18 to $25

Justright Tailoring Co.
WE FIT YOU.

Six new students were proposed for
membership, and others are urged to
be present at 7 o'clock Saturday night.

145

West Main Street-

-

--

Lexlngton, Kentucky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
"REMEMBER ME"

ENGINEERING MAGAZINE

Graduate of '97 Wins High
Honors in Engineering
Field

REVERED

The following appreciation of Arthur Knciscl, a graduate of the
of Mechanical and Electrical Engineers In '!)7, was published In tro
September .Monad, a magazine devoted to technical engineering.
A number of years ago I had occasion to visit the Telephone Bureau of
the Public iService Department of the
city of Chicago, and was introduced to
a slight, sandyJhaired chap who, even
at first inspection, gave himself away
to bo an enthusiast of the first water,
just itho man to lead a forlorn hope
and win. This man was Arthur Kneis-el- .
Ho was, even at that time, nurturing the nucleus of the idea from
which grew the American Association
I must confess that at
of Engineers.
that time I could see neither the necessity nor the possibility for the success of such an organization, but, carried away by the intense earnestness
and persuasive powers of this human
magnet, I agreed to come to a dinner
to be held at the Boston Oyster House
that night to talk matters over. This
was the beginning of a friendship
which, while extending comparatively
few years, was of such a nature that
it increased from day to day and, as
neighbor and friend, J had the privi
lege of knowing him in private life as
few outside of his immediate family
ever knew him.
Arthur Kneisel left few earthly
goods. He was rich only in friendships accumulated by years of service for others. tMany are those whom
he 'befriended in his few years on this
earth. Ever for the under dog, he
did for others what he could not or
would not do for himself. While he
seldom spoke of such matters, I happen to know of many discouraged
men wthom he "bucked up," as he
called it, and helped on their way to
success. There are undoubtedly many
more of whom I know nothing.

Col-log- o

Ho was

a Christian who (practiced

what he preached,

JUDGE CHALKLEY AT Y.

and there is no

greater tribute

to his memory than
the simple wreath of flowers contributed by the boys of his Sunday school

class, purchased with nickels and
dimes saved for the things dear to the
boyish heart. He was never too busy
nor yet too tired to give two hours of
his time every Sunday morning to
these boys, and his teaching will be
reflected in their lives for years to
come.
citizen he was
As a

have recited for them several
times with more enthusiasm than suc
cess, although tho boys are very ap'
prcclatlve. Wo have an excellent or
chostra In tho company, and last night
wo had n dance. Handsome young
things from Indianapolis, although not
qulto so charming as tho Lexington
buds, aro certainly a treat to men
who have spent the larger part of tho
week digging trenches, said digging
resulting in tcrriblo losues from bits
tors. Wo had about thirty-fivgirls
out and the party was a success. So
you hco wo aro not entirely separated
from tho good things of life..
It has seldom been my good fortune
to meet so many good fellows as we
have in our company. iMcClarty Har
bison is one of tho lads and old U. K.
has a Wholo lot more scattered
around. John Petrie, of tho Courier- Journal staff, is in tho Twelfth and
has gotten the rest of the boys down
on him and us by hlowlng our horn
loud and long every Sunday In the
paper. Tho Tenth and the Eleventh
more especially, are little short of at
war with us. Franklin Corn and VIze
Chamberlain are in the Tenth and Curtis Park is one of the mainstays of
the Eleventh.
Ernest Holm, of the
Leader staff, is in the Eleventh also.
I

e

new-tim-

NEXT ELECTION IN 1918
Tho following letter, of Interest to
students In tho University, has been
received by Dr. P. P. Boyd, who requested that it bo published In tho
Kernel:
September 20th, 1917.
Acting President Boyd,
Lexington, Ky.
My Dear President Boyd:
Will you please announce to your
student body that on account of war
conditions no election for Rhodes
scholarships for 1918 will be held this
fall anywhero in tho United States.
However, tho qualifying examinations
will be hold as usual. The next examination to qualify candidates for the
Rhodes scholarship for Kentucky will
be held at the University of Kentucky
In Lexington, October 2nd and 3rd,
next. Those who pass this examination will havo a right, so long as they
are within the age limit, to compete
in succeeding elections. The next
election in Kentucky will perhaps be
held in December, 1918, to elect a
scholar for 1919.
Very truly yours,
M. B. ADAMS, Chairman

e

tional.

Coupon books are ready at the office
Will you please see that a Kernel is
of the chairman of the Athletic Comsent to me when the first Issue is
mittee. These tickets are good at any
printed. I want to keep up with every game and an amount equal to $6.00
thing at the University. My address worth is sold for ?5.00. Professor
is Twelfth Infantry', Co., O. T. C, Ft Freeman, chairman, is anxious that
the members of the faculty buy these
Benjamin Harrison, Ind.
books. They may be used in any
"BILL" SHINNICK.
quantity at any game, for general admission and reserved seats. EfforFs
MISS HOPKINS GETS ADVANCE,
will be made to sell these coupons to
the people of the town.
'15, has
iMiss iChristine Hopkins,
been appointed head of the English

Department,

Eastern

Departmental

School, in Louisville.
Wlille in the University, Miss

FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE

Hop-

in

Patriotic to an extreme, he dreamer, or yet

to tell a story to Baby

.Highest in the throne of the affec- might proporly ralso and educate
tions of this man wore the little wife theso children.
To a truo friond, a slncoro Chrisand three chlldron for whom ho was
every ounco of energy to tian, a patriotic citizen, and a dovoted
spending
provldo a homo and shelter against father do 1 dodlcato those fow words
May his memory
tho buffets of this world. No matter of appreciation.
how tired or worn out after a day's and tho success that was It in duo bo
work, ho was nover too tirod to help rofloctod In tho lives of others for
Paulino with hor arithmetic, or listen years to como.

latest discoveries of Ross, tho

RAYMOND

T. OLOUI).

September

HORACE MANN MEETS

at

Presby-

October

University
at
Lexington.
October 13 Miami University at
Lexington.
20 Vanderbilt University
October
at Lexington.

terian

Ootobor

27

November
Novembor
November
Novombor

LAW JOURNAL TO APPEAR SOON.

Tho first meeting of tho Horace
Literary Society for tho year
was held Thursday night in the Education Building. J. W. Milam, president, was In charge of tho meeting.
Miss Irma Wenzell was elected vice
presldont to succeed Miss Eleanor
Eaker, who did not return to school
this year. Misses Aline Kavanaugh
and Bertha Miller were appointed to
take charge of the programs of the
year.
Professor Noo discussed tho prospects of the society and set forth tho
value of tho organization to Its members. A number of now members was
added to the roll.
The Horace Mann Is tho only
literary society In tho University. It
meets weekly, on Thursday nights, in
the Educational Building.
Mann

Work on the Kentucky Law Journal, which is issued monthly by tho
students of the College of Law, is
progressing rapidly and the first Issue will bo off the press by October 1.
Virgil Chapman, of Lexington, is editor and Ben H. Scott, of Louisville,
is business manager. They aro assisted by the following: Samuel S. Morton, of Owenaboro; C. R. Barker, Ed. Patronize Our Advertisers
Dabney, of Hopkinsville; R. C. North-cutt- ,
of Burlington, and John S. Sher- M"I"M"M"M 111
H 11 1111,111
wood, of Cynthlana.
D. PURCELL CO.
This magazine has a wide circulaKY.
LEXINGTON,
tion, being sent to the members or
the Kentucky Bar Association, and
NEWEST FALL MODES IN
to all the alumni of the Law
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS,
co-e-

1

1

1

J.

SKIRTS and WAISTS.
Pleasingly Priced.

Patronize Our Advertisers

.M"M"t"l"M"M'

II liM"B"H"H

Your Attention
POR A FEW MOMENTS
PLEASE THAT
F
YOU
ARE INTERESTED IN
IS--I-

WHAT IS GOOD AND
ECONOMICAL IN FALL
AND

WINTER WEARABLES

THIS NEW IDEA SHOP BEGAN PROVING
TO THE UNIVERSITY MEN TWO YEARS
AGO THAT IT IS USELESS AND FOOLISH

TO HELP PAY THE BIG RENTS AND HIGH
FALUTIN FIXTURES OF STORES WHEN
BUYING CLOTHES.
AND

EVER-GROWIN- G

RESPONSE TO OUR ECONOMY PLAN

Butler College
Lexington.

29

Judge Lyman Chalkley, of the Law
Department, spoke at tho Y. M. C. A.
last Sunday night. His subject was,
"What We Aro Fighting For." Ho
showed that war Is Justifiable when
one is fighting for what ho loves, If
those objectives aro high and noble.
Ho also said that the allies aro right
in destroying autocracy and sitting up
a Democracy.

THE REMARKABLE

1917

kins was prominent in dramatic and

often worked on matters for the com- Carl beforo bedtime came. His only
monweal when ho should by right prayer for an extension of life was
for flvo years inoro in order that ho
havo boon earning his daily bread.

to tho

October

d

Btako, oven sacrificing

Examinations

Will Be Held in

old-tim- e

side of right.

so doing.

Preliminary

Any old Kentuckian would be aroused to a patriotic frenzy if he could
hear the yells and "Old Kentucky
Home" as it is sung at the lectures
and other gathering places. The
football rallies have nothing on
CLUB MEETS MONDAY.
our
war rallies. I am pretty HISTORY
sure that when this gang gets after
Tho History Club will hold its first
old "Bill" in Europe he will scratch
meeting of the year Monday, October
around for a hole to play possum In
(Building, at 7:30
My only hope is that I will be allowed 1, in the Education
majoring in history
to stay the camp out and he one of p. m. Students
are expected to attend; others are inthe chosen.
vited. Dr. Tuthill will meet the
If you see any of the girls that used Seniors after the meeting to discuss
to bo in love with me when I wore thesis plans.
tight shoes and white collars, remind
"COUPON BOOKS FOR SALE.
them that I am still young and emo

literary work. She has been in the
He was Louisville schools but a year, and her
over on the
never passive when lie thought that rapid advanco in this short time gives
.justice and public Interest were at further evidence of her ability.
public-spirite-

M. C. A.

(Continued from Page One.)

LAUDS ARTHUR KNIESEL

MEMORY

Page Three

the
University
of
South (Sewaneo) at
Sowanee.
College at
3 Centre
Danville.
10 Mississippi A. & M.
at Starkville.
of Ala17 Unlvorslty
bama at Lexington.
Uni29 Thanksgiving.
versity) 'ot Tennessee
at Lexington.

SHOWS THAT YOU FELLOWS

KNOW A

GOOD THING WHEN YOU SEE IT.

WE ARE GOING TO SHOW YOU SOME
REAL SPEED THIS FALL. SEE OUR FIRST

OFFERING OF NEW FALL AND WINTER
SAMPLE LINES NOW READY.
FALL
HATS, CLOTHES, UNDERWEAR.

I

It H

* Mti

iflfiitilliiliiiiiflM

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Four.

The Kentucky Kernel
Published every Thursday throughout the College year by the student body
of the University of Kentucky, for the benefit of the stude