xt73n58cgn5c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73n58cgn5c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560727  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 27, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 27, 1956 1956 2013 true xt73n58cgn5c section xt73n58cgn5c Dr. Willard

Head
Med Center

Graduation
Speaker Is
Dr. Diekey

To

Dr. William R. Willard. newly
appointed dean of the UK Medical School and vice president of
the Medical Center, will meet with
architects July 30 to discuss the
plans for the new medical buildings.

The appointment of Willard at
a meeting of the University's
Board of Trustees Executive Committee July 20 has met with approval of President-elePrank G.
Dickey and retiring president Herman L. Donovan.
Dr. Willard, dean of the Upstate
Medical Center of State University
of New York for the past Ave years,
will serve as dean of the College
of Medicine, and
of
the medical center.
Dr. Donovan said he "is delighted" at Dr. WiUard's acceptance,
and Dr. Dickey expressed "great
pleasure" at the decision.
At Syracuse, N. Y., Dr. Willard
said he accepted the position "because it offers an opportunity
which is given to relatively few
people, namely to develop a medical center from the very beginning.
This - and other personal reasons
finally proved irresistible to me."
ct

vice-preside-

nt

IS. IE DSMTE IL
Vol. XLVII

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, July 27, 19"f

Trtistees
Announce
Changes

Invitations
Seniors may pick up commencement tickets for reserve
seats at the office of the dean
of women. Administration building, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Trustees

Friday.

Major changes

follow :
College of Arts and

Sciences-Appointm- ents:

Donald L. Hoch-strassinstructor, Department of
Anthropology; Dr. Buford H. Junker, visiting lecturer, Department
of Sociology; Dr. Lewis W. Cochran, acting head, Department of
Physics, effective August 4, 1956,
through June 30, 1957; William D.
er,

t

versity hopes to enroll 75' students each year in the school
when it opens. At the end of the
first four years, plans call for
300 potential doctors to be attending the school. Dr. Donovan estimated that 40 or 50 students would be enrolled in the
Dental School each year and
about 100 in the Nursing School.
According to his estimates, about
900 students will be attending
the Center within about four
years after it opens.

Dr. Willard, a graduate of Yale
University, was among four men
considered prominently for the Job.
Although speculators held that he
would be chosen for the deanship.
Dr. Dickey had previously stated
to a Kernel reporter that there
was "nothing definite" about his
acceptance; that neither University officials nor Dr. Willard had
made any decision.
Dr. Willard, a native of Seattle,
Wash., was deputy State Health
Officer in Maryland from 1937-4a member of the Public Health
Service malaria control staff in
1944, and director of public health
and welfare for the Army in Korea
in 1945 and 1946.
In 1946 he returned to Yale and
from 1948-5- 1 was assistant dean of
the Graduate School in Medical
Education there. In 1951 he became dean at Syracuse, where he
was also director of the Central
New York Regional Hospital Council, Group Hospital Council, and
United Cerebral Palsy Foundation.
In addition to being a member
of the American Medical Association, Council for Social Agencies
of Syracuse, and Syracuse Handicapped Children Association, he is
a fellow of the American Public
Health Association.
In addition to his duties as dean
of the Medical School, Dr. Willard
will act as a
between
the Medical Center personnel and
the president of the University.
The Center, besides holding the
Medical School, will include a
School of Dentistry,' a teaching
hospital, and a School of Nursing.
Each of these divisions will have a
dean or director in charge. Dr.
Willard, as vice president of the
Center, will meet with them and
then report directly to the president, taking much of the responsibility of administering the Center from the president.
3;

Knmpus Kalendar
Saturday, July 28 U.K. Sum,
mer Opera, "The Telephone" and
"The Medium" (Tickets, Guignol
Box Office), Guignol, 8:00.
Friday, August 3
Summer
School Commencement, Memorial Coliseum, 8:00.

"Should Party Rules Be Changed?" was discussed at a public
meeting held at the Lexington
YWCA, July 18.

A resolution calling for a change
in delegates and party officials was
passed, which will be sent to the

Rose Jr., geologist, Geological Sur- Governor and the legislature, folvey; Georgia Anderson Hill, part-tim- e lowing the presidential convention.

instructor, English, speech
and dramatic arts; Thomas D.
instructor,
Duncan, part-tim- e
School of Journalism.
Resignations: Thomas S. Rowland, instructor, mathematics and
astronomy; Herbert Ketter, visiting lecturer, sociology.
Leaves of absence: Shelby T.
McCloy, professor of history, fall
semester and spring semester; T.
D. Walker, associate professor,
modern foreign languages, sabbatical leave for academic year 1956-5- 7;
C. W. Hackensmith, professor
of physical education, sabbatical
leave for academic year 1956-5College of Agriculture and Home
Economics Appointments: Dr. E.
J. Nesius, professor of agricultural
and home economics extension;
Mrs. Jess Alexander, assistant professor of home economics; Miss
Annie R. Brownlie, assistant professor of home economics; Luther
Keller, assistant economist;' Dr.
(Continued on Page 4)
.

Dr. II. L. Donovan, retiring-presidenof UK, said the Uni-

Professors Talk
On Party Rules

7.

Jobs Open
To Expert
Educators
University "of Kentucky officials
announced Wednesday that openings exist for qualified specialists
in the United States Information

Agency.
Dr. A. E. Bigge, head of the UK
Department of Modern Foreign

Languages and
for
various foreign educational programs, said that requests for personnel applications have been received from the Recruitment
Branch of the information agency.
Administrators, directors of
courses, and teachers of English to
foreign students are presently
needed to serve under two-yegrants in any one of 47 binational
centers in Latin America and the
Near and Far East.
Also being sought by the agency
are cultural affairs officers to serve
under Foreign Service appointments in any one of over 200 posts
in 79 countries of the world.
"The Information Agency needs
persons who have demonstrated
superior professional achievement
in cultural fields and who possess
personal characteristics which will
gain and maintain international
understanding and good will."
Candidates for all positions must
be American citizens and have
been such for at least ten years. If
married, a candidate must be married to an American citizen, must
be in excellent physical condition,
must have a bachelor's or higher
degree, and must have a fluent
speaking knowledge of an appropriate foreign language.
Necessary age groupings are addirector of
ministrators.
courses,
and teachers,
Local persons, townspeople as
well as students, may obtain addl-lonInformation on the openings
from Dr. Bigge, Miller Hall.
tor

ar

30-5- 5;

25-4- 5;

23-4- 0.

al

Stating that the present procedures in both Kentucky parties do
not provide for participation by all
members of the respective parties,
it asks that the primary system be
adopted.
The choosing of the original
slate is regarded as important because delegates to the national
conventions elect presidential
nominees and draft party platforms.
According to a spokesman of the
group, "We believe that the only
way to make parties democratic
and responsible, is to work by this
system."
The resolution calls on both
parties to take action on this, and
asks the next session of the general assembly to enact laws concerning it.
University participants in the
program were Dr. J. E. Reeves, Dr.
Gladys Kammerer and Prof. Ruth
McQuown of the political science
department; Dr. Sidney Kaplan,
sociology, and Dr. W. D. Valleau,
agronomy.
Dr. Reeves, Dr. Valleau and Dr.
Kaplan were members of the committee's board of directors.
A spokesman for the group said
the discussion was planned to cover changes in party rules and
state law which will enable all
party members to participate in
meetings to choose delegates for
national conventions.
The crowds which attended recent county meetings and contested delegations to district and state
conventions indicate that party
rules are inadequate, the spokesman continued.
This meeting was held under the
auspices of the Fayette Committee
for Citizenship and a Committee
of Citizen Sponsors.
"Political party rules so obviously need modernizing. Come to the
meeting and see if we can start
the process of getting some good
rules for both parties," the sponsors said.

r

seminar

on

Last Kernel
Watch for the final edition of
the Kentucky Kernel which will
appear early, at the regular distribution points.
To allow ail students and visitors to the campus to obtain
copies of the paper, it will be
given out Thursday morning,
Aug. 2. Deadline for announcements will be 4 p.m. Monday,
July 30.

sylvania University.
The newly named UK president
will speak on the "Harvest of the
Future."
Dr. Dickey will address 397 candidates for degrees Commencement night. According to Recorder
Mary Page Milton. 187 Bachelor's
degrees will be awarded. Graduate degrees will be given to 207
persons. The graduate degrees are
broken down into 10 Doctor's degrees and 177 Master's degrern
These figures may change, the
Recorder said.
Dr. Dickey was named by the
Board of Trustees. June 22. to succeed Dr. Herman I Donovan a
president of the University. Dr
Dickey graduated from Henry Clay

the University campus. Keller
Dunn. Assistant, College of Adult
and Extension Education, said.
It is expected that 5 general managers and heads of utilities companies in Kentucky will
take part in the meeting. The
purpose.
seminar has a three-fol- d
Dunn said:
1. To enable management personnel to carry out more efficiently
their functions as essential parts
High School In 1935. He grad- of the management team.
- 2. To create
j
an expanded point vi n i vt a i xjm i
Minima cum laude. He received his
of. view and an interest in broader
problems of business and eco- Master of Arts degree from UK in
1942 and his Doctor of Education
nomics.
In 1947. also from UK.
3. To prepare men in middle and
Dr. Dickey did post graduate
upper executive levels for the time
when they will assume the respon- work at Harvard University during
the 1952-5- 3 school year.
sibility of top management.
He was appointed dean of the
The conference, sponsored JointCollege of Education In 1949.
ly by the utilities compnnies of
Dr. Dickey succeeds Dr. Herman
Kentucky, the College of Commerce, and the College of Adult L. Donovan, who became president
and Extension Education, will fea- of UK in 1941. after serving as
ture as instructors top leaders of president of Eastern State College.
utility organizations from through- Richmond, for 13 years. Dr. Dono. van requested a change-of-wor- k
out the nation.
Among them: John F. Childs. when he reached the age of 69. Dr.
of the Irving Trust Dickey will take over the presiCo., New York City; Dan M. Byrd. dent's post Sept. 1. Dr. Donovan
Jr., an attorney for the Southern served as UK President for 15
Bell Telephone and Telegraph Co., years.
Atlanta. Ga.; Robb M. Winsbor-ougMiddle West Service Co.,
Chicago, and H. J. Huether Jr.,
president of the General Telephone
Company of Kentucky. Huether is
to be chairman of the advisory
committee.
From the College of Commerce
instructors are Wendell E. Beals,
(Continued on Page 4)
20-2-

vice-preside-

nt

h.

16 Buildings
On Campus
Can Burn

Sixteen buildings on the University of Kentucky campus are not
fire resistant. Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain, vice president, said this

WBKY Features
Folk Musie

week.
Among the buildings listed by
Dr. Chamberlain are Patterson
WBKY will feature three pro- and Boyd Halls, women's dormigrams entitled "Our American tories. Closed this summer, the two
Heritage" next week. It is a docu- dorms house about 294 women dur-

mentary program designed to bet- ing the regular semester.
ter understand the folk music of Many of the buildings listed
the hill country of Kentucky.
have long been termed "Are trap"

UK students on the program include Lucien Rouse, Kay Marter-stecand Dick Pigman. Other
entertainers include Jean Ritchie.
Tom Paley, Bob Atcher, Gwen
Lanier, and Billy Edd Wheeler.
The program is narrated by
Ralph Albers. the engineer at
WBKY. and written by Dallas
Ison. The history of the songs and
their possible origins are to be disk,

cussed.

The programs are scheduled for
6:30 on Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday of next week. ,

Enrollment To Double
The University of Kentucky is
not the only school suffering from
growing pains, according to Dr.
Leo M. Chamberlain, administrative vice president.
National college enrollment will

pm.

Coli-

The Invocation will bo given by
Dr. Frank Rom, president of Tran-

Of Utilities
To Be Here
3

about 400 graduates at :00
Friday, Aug. 3. in Memorial
seum.

Top Leaders
A tit ilities management
is to be held July

Appointments, resignations, leaves

of absence and other staff changes
at UK were approved by the executive committee of the Board of

No.

Dr. Frank O. Dickey, presidentelect of the University, will deliver
the Commencement address to

double by 1970. Dr. Chamberlain
said. There are about 2.700.000
students enrolled in colleges and
universities now, he said. By 1970.
same proportions as the nation
there will be about 5.400,000 enrolled.

The enrollment figures for UK
are expected to increase in the
figure, he said.
The University faces many problems in dealing with the increase,
he said. One of the problems is
buildings. Dr. Chamberlain said,
that UK will not have to double
the number of buildings on the
campus to meet the Increase, but
several new buildings will have to
be constructed.
He added that students will be
forced to commute further. Students living in town will stay
further from the campus and many
will travel to and from the campus
by bus, he said.

by UK students and teachers. The
of these are the
most note-wortSocial Sciences Building and the
Euclid Avenue Classroom Building
hy

both temporary structures that
have been forced Into longer use
to meet the demands for room in
a growing institution.
Dr. Chamberlain said the remaining buildings were: the Engineering Annex. Neville Hall. Miller Hall, the Alumni Gym. the Administration Building. White Hall.
Barker Hall, the Anthropology
Museum. Pence Hall. Kastle Hall,
and the Mining Laboratory. The
UK vice president said that part
of the Experiment Station Building fell into this classification. A
new addition was recently made to
the building which is
he said.
Frazee Hall, partly destroyed by
fire last January, is also on the
list of possible fire hazards. The
list does not Include Little Commons which Is no longer used, except for storage.
Pence and Kastle Halls represent the most pressing need for
Improvement, Dr. Chamberlain
said. He estimated that the two
buildings house over a million dollars In equipment.
Plans for a new science building
were drawn several years ago, he
said, but the University has not
been able to finance it. The project
would cost about three million dollars, he said.
Dr. Chamberlain said that the
danger of any student being hurt
in a fire In one of the classroom
buildings is not too great. There
(Continued on 1'age 4)
fire-resista-

nt,

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July

UK Prof Devises
3 Aptitude Tests

27. 1956

Cheers For UK Opera;
Actors, Stories Good

"Can that mechanic repair my
car?" Is a question answered on a
almost steals the
test devised by Dr. Pari Mellen-brucThree cheers for the opera! Get the
psychology. One of three your tickets now for the last two show. Sally Hoffman Braun who
o
's plays
aptitude tests, it has recently been nights. What?
Madame Flora (Baba) is
published.
two operas, "The Medium" wonderful as the dishonest meThe Garage Mechanics test, and "The Telephone," now show- dium who comes to fear the spirits.
which has been published by the ing at the Guignol Theatre in the Phyllis Tilton is very good as
Educational Testing Dureau, is de- Fine Arts Building starting at 8:30 Monica, Madame Flora's daughter.
signed to tell quickly If an appli- p.m.
Ebba Jo Haagenson and Leonu
cant for a garage job knows his
"The Telephone" especially will ard Wolfe as Mr. and Mrs.
business. There has long been a interest students since it deals
and Margaret Dowling Wehle
need for a test of this type, since with an ever present problem in as Mrs. Nolan give a generally
so many unqualified "mechanics" college life that of the telephone. good performance as the bereaved
have obtained work.
What girl living in a dorm or sor- parents who come to the medium
It is also used in automotive ority house has not waited anx- for help.
training schools, of which there iously for the phone to ring and
Sally Braun is a graduate stuare several hundred in the coun- spent hours talking, much to the dent in music education. She is
try. The test determines how well dismay of the other girls. And from Fort Thomas and graduated
the mechanic's training fits with what boy has not felt it futile to from UK in 1955. Phyllis Tilton,
Lexington senior, is majoring in
their skill for actual garage work. compete with the talking,
The mechanic aptitude test premusic education. Ebba Jo Haagenmonster?
dicts the trainability of persons
Barbara Watson does a fine Job son, Lexington, graduated from
along mechanical lines. It is a re- of portraying the
lovUK this past June with a bachvision of an earlier test which was able Lucy who thinks the telephone elor's degree in music education.
published by the Scientific Re- is a necessity of life. Charles Sims Leonard Wolfe, Lexington, is a
search Association.
and Robert Davis, alternating as sophomore in music education.
Margaret Wehle got her Master's
The other tests, which will be Ben, the perplexed
out this summer or early fall, are turn in very creditable perform- degree in music education from
to be published by the Psycho- ances. Sims will play the part of UK last summer.
metric Affiliates of Chicago. They Ben tonight and Davis plays the
John Whittaker and Harold
are concerned with clerical work part Saturday night.
Nave, accompanists for the opera,
and thinking aptitudes.
Barbara Watson, a UK graduate do a fin ejob with the music.
The Clerical Aptitude test is one of 1955, is studying: toward her Whittaker graduates from UK this
which helps to predict the possi- Master's degree in applied voice August. He is from Corbin. Nave,
bility of success for anyone who this summer. She is from Taylors-vill- a senior from Elizabethton, Tenn.,
thinks of entering a field involving
Charles Sims, Wilmore sen- will graduate from UK in January.
clerical work. This is to precede ior, is majoring: in music. Robert
Much of the credit for the fine
training. .
Davis, Frankfort, is a graduate performance of these operas must
go to Aimo KJvinieml, director of
The Thinking Aptitude test helps student in music education.
to determine an individual's ability
"The Medium," a tragic opera, is the opera workshop, and Miss Lolo
to handle ideas. It has a high pre- as serious as "The Telephone" is Robinson, production manager.
dictive value for academic success. light. Dudley Saunders as Toby,
If you haven't been to see the
opera yet don't fail to go. Both are
well worth the time.
deaf-mut- e,

h,

Mcn-otti-

Glan-Carl-

Gobi-nea-

two-head-

fun-lovi-

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ng

boy-frien- d,

Nation's Best Hogs Seen
On U of K Campus
best and highest percentage of
primal cuts with less lard, and a
hog that will retain the fastest
growing ability, hardiness and productivity.
A National Show was held in
which there were 250 entries. The
competing hogs were then sold in

By CHARLES W. KURTZ
Kernel Swine Expert

Some 250 of the best hogs in the
country were on display this week
as the National Duroc Congress
held its meeting on the University
campus.
with the United two national sales.
Duroc Record Association of
Peoria, 111., in staging the event in
addition to the University of KenPINKSTON'S
tucky were the Kentucky Duroc
Breeders Association. It was the
WATCH SHOP
first Duroc Congress to be held
here.
Fine Watches
The congress featured an eduWatch Repairing
cational program of interest both
purebreds and
to the breeder of
GRUEN
BULOVA
ELGIN
commercial hogman. A Type
PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS
Standardization Committee made
Rolex Watches $150.00 up
up of leading college swine speDiamond Rings
cialists, packer representatives and
breeders, held type discussions on
130 N. LIMESTONE
ways to further improve the DurNext door to Chop Suty
oc hog and to find the most proLEXINGTON, KY.
PHONE
fitable hog to raise one with meat
qualities, which will produce the
Co-operat-

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COLONEL

of the
WEEK

The Kentucky Kernel
Entered at the Post Office at Lexington,
Kentucky, as second class matter under
the Act of March 3. 1879.
Published weekly during school except
holidays and exams.

Mothproofing
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Editor
Paul Daniel
Managing Editor . . . Graydon Hambrlck
News Editor
Frances Edney
Advertising Mgr
Tex Thomas
Perry J. Ashley
Business Mgr
Ray Cravens
Cartoonist
Reporters: George Ellen Asher,
Orcena Lyle, Charles W. Kurtz, Virginia
Snodgrass, Jim Miles, George Perry,
Walter Wyatt. Ann Shirley Gillock, Lois
Florence.

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The Stirrup Cup proudly announces as its Colonel of the

Week Miss Marian Louise Van Home.

A native Lexingtonian, Marian has a 3.5 overall standing.
She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, a freshman honorary
sorority, Cwens, and a member of the cabinet of Wesleyan Foundation.
Marian is a graduate of Lafayette High School and she graduated In the upper three per cent of her class. She is in the
College of Arts and Scienecs.
The Stirrup Cup hopes you will enjoy your two delicious din-,
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* THE

KU Honors 11
At Law Lunch

School Textbooks,
Materials Shown

A luncheon was held yesterday
An annual exhibit of public
for a group of 11 students In a public utilities course In the College school textbooks is on display in
of Law.
the gymnasium of the William S.
This, the second such luncheon, Taylor Education Building, Fred
was sponsored by the Kentucky Harris, professor of education, said.
Utilities Co. In an effort to correThe exhibit, which began yeslate the student's studies In law terday, features displays of textbooks and teaching
school with Kentucky activities.
materials
Keith Corday of the rates and printed by 30 leading publishers
contracting department of Ken- in the United States. Representatucky Utilities, spoke to the group tives of the publishing houses are
on "Rate Base in Public Utilities in attendance at their respective
Law." The talk was followed by a booths.
period of questions from the stuMaterial shown, Harris said, is
of particular Interest to elemendents.
In addition to the students and tary and secondary teachers. The
Corday, Prof. Roy Moreland of represented companies have sent
g
the College of Law, instructor in their latest and
books
the public utilities course, was and equipment. The exhibit will
present. He said the Utilities com- close tomorrow.
pany wants to make the luncheon
There is also being shown, at
an annual affair.
the same time, a group of foreign
language arts material In the Fine
Edwin Booth Is the only actor Arts Building. This is presented
who ever has been elected to the by some of the companies showing
Hall of Fame for Great Americans. in the Education Building.
The prime purpose of the exhibit is to acquaint teachers with
the latest teaching material, not
RENT A CABIN!
to promote sales. However, Harris
AT
said, teachers may place orders
with the representatives.
VALLEY VIEW
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67

19

Austria, Vancouver, and Canada
are linked by two cables.
New York City's Riverside
Church contains a carillon of 70
bells, the largest in the world.
The "Boston Gazette," leading
newspaper which espoused the
cause of the American Revolution,
never had more than 2,000

3

KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday, July 27. 1956- -3

Scholarships Given
To IIS Seniors

CIRCLE BAR

The scholarship committee announced that three four-yescholarships have been awarded to
Kentucky high school seniors.
The three students receiving the
awards are Hughetta Alice Bart-let- t,
e,
Shelbyvllle; Ronald W.
Springfield, and Lloyd R.
Cress, Clay City.
Cress won the University's Alumni Loyalty Fund Scholarship, valued at 1700 a year for four years.
The grant is given annually
through the Alumni Association
Fund, to which contributions are
made by the Alumni.
Cress, who will be graduated
from Powell County High School
later this month, plans to enter
the College of Law.
A scholarship is provided each
year from the income of an alumni investment. Four students hold
this scholarship at the same time.
Miss Bartlett and McCabe were
chosen to receive scholarships made
available by General Motors Corporation. Each year the corporation evaluates the need of the
students selected for the grants
and then later suggests the exact
amount to be granted.
Miss Bartlett will be graduated
from Shelbyvllle High School late
this month. She plans to become
a science teacher or engage in scientific research.
McCabe will be graduated from
Springfield High School this spring.
He expects to enter the College of
Engineering.
The three scholarships were
awarded on the basis of scholastic
ability in high school, general
character, and personality, partiactivicipation in
ties, and financial need.

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Miss Jessie Lynne Doyle, a soph
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the only girl registered in that

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July

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Leslie Caron

July

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Ernest Borgnine

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(Continued from Tage 1)
Wilburn Olenn, assistant professor
and assistant dairy technologist;
Thomas B. Hutchcnson Jr., assist
ant agronomist 'and assistant professor of soils; David Martin
Daugherty, registration inspector,
feed and fertilizer; Alexander E.
Kelly, dairy herdsman, Experiment
Station; Claude Brown, technical
assistant in rural sociology; John
Adair, assistant chemist, Experiment Station; Laura Morettl, technical assistant in home economics
research; Kob Ryen, reappointed
temporary instructor; George W.
Pope, assistant in agronomy; Clifford Kerby, assistant chemist, Experiment Station.
Resignations: M. Elizabeth Crowe,
assistant bacteriologist; J. W.
Whitehouse, state leader of
and Utopia Extension, to go on
Civil Service retirement, August

'ST6

2

KDPi Iniliates
20 Ed Students
An initiation service for 20 grad

uate and undergraduate students
in education was held Thursday,
July 26 by the Alpha Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta PI in the Training School Library.
The new members were selected
on the basis of high scholastic and
leadership ability.
The initiation program was fol
lowed by a picnic in the outdoor
court of the Training School.
Honorary membership In the or
ganization was given to Assistant
Dean of Women Jane Haselden.
The following students were ini

Willye Ramona Emerson, Leo B.
Bell, Bet ty Kidd Brown ..Maurice- -

Christopher, Charles F. Curry, Jos
eph R. Donovan, Alma Collins
Gray, Louise Fallon, Mrs. Lucile
Stokley McKenney, John Wiley
Payne, Doris G. Phelps, Gladys
Threlkeld, Keith Huffman, Allie
Baker Martin, Patrick E. Napiew,
Jeanine Osburn, Myrtle Osborn
Ray, Sam P. Simpson, Edward
Bastin Webb, and Ruby Carr
Wright.
Officers of the Alpha Gamma
chapter are Nancy McClure, presi
dent; Thomas J. Dunn, vice president; Margaret. Roser, treasurer,
and Mrs. Anne Brewer, secretary.
Dr. Morris B. Cierley is the group
counselor.

Yearbooks Out
On Aug. 3rd, 4th

16 Buildings
(Continued from Page 1)
are many people in the buildings
during the day and a fire would
be quickly discovered, he said. The
buildings are usually closed at
night.
"It should be the objective of
any institution to get rid of those"
(buildings) as soon as possible, he
said. Unfortunately, the need for
space and the lack of money keep
these plans from always being carried out immediately, he said.
.

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Leaves of absence: Carl M.
Clark, assistant professor, associate
economist, on sabbatical leave;
John Fcltner, extension specialist
and Utopia, sabbatical
in
leave for nine months, beginning
Oct. 1; James Brown, Experiment
Station, leave without pay for
three months, effective July 18,
1956; Dewey Steele, professor of
genetics, extension of leave without pay.
College of Engineering Appointments: Henry Daily, Instructor in
electrical engineering;' Roy D. Burberry, instructor in engineering
drawing.
4--

Big league baseball teams use
from three to four dozen balls dur- ng each game.
In 1900 there were only about
200,000. women stenographers
in
the United States. Today there are
more than two million.
At the end of the American
Revolution, there were 43 newspapers in the colonies.

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The Kentuckian,- - UK yearbook,
will be distributed next week in
the Journalism Building, Room 116,
Perry J. Ashley, assistant director
of student publications, has announced.
The yearbook will be handed out
a.m. and from 4 p.m.
from 11-a.m. on
on Friday and from
Saturday.
Ashley said that the Kentuckian
would be presented to candidates
for the Bachelor's Degree only. He
said that the cost of the book had
not been added to the fees for
other degrees.
All students planning to pick up
their Kentuckian, he said, should
be sure to bring their fee slips.
The Kentuckian supplement will
also be distributed along with the
annual, Ashley said. Supplements
will be mailed to students who
have already received their Ken