xt73n58cgn6z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73n58cgn6z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19330328  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 28, 1933 1933 2013 true xt73n58cgn6z section xt73n58cgn6z L

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

Best Copy Available

UNIVERSITY

VOLUME XXIII
PUBLICATIONS

HARD

TRACKMEN

"All ntudenU who drnlre to
apply for the position of editor of the 1934 KENTUCK-IAand all studenta who desire to apply for the positions
manager and
bwrine
for
editor of The Kentucky Ker-n- rl

FOR VANDERBILT

N,

Field Events Have Appeared
Weak During Early
Sessions

for the aralon,

Put

With the first meet of the season
with the Vanderbilt Commodores
but a few days away. Coach Bernle
Shively Is putting his track squad
through hard workouts every afternoon on the Stoll field oval.
While the boys are not yet In
first class condition, they should be
in top form by the time the meet
rolls around if they are favored with
a few nice days. The chief weakness of the team lies In the field
events.
Graduation hit this department heavier than it did the
track events. And the field events
were none too strong even last year.
Only one man Is available in most
of the field events and Shively is
searching for additional athletes
who can jump,
throw
the javelin, put the shot or toss the
discus. Ralph Kercheval, who started his track career as a javelin
thrower and ended up the 1932 season by doing the hurdles, the broad
jump and a few other things may
add several more acts to his repertoire. Kercheval may high jump
and pole vault in addition to running the low hurdles.
The sprints look to be well fortified as "Cuzey" Poster, Carroll Ball
and Ellis Johnson are in good form
and are turning in some good time
in the 100 and 220 dashes. For the
middle distance events the track
mentor has Tom Cassady, Carter
and Doug Parrish, Parrish has
lt,

turned in the best time for the
event thus far, negotiating the dash
in :54 J seconds. These three boys
along with Charley Gates will form
the relay team and they promise to
develop into a better mile relay
group than the one that Shively
had last season.
The half mile which was expected
to be one of the strongest events on
the program is deteriorating. John
Thorne and Joe Saunders who were
expected to run in the 880 are unable to run and the available ma
terial does not stack up with the
two men who 'were 'lost. "Little"
Ma nan and Gates seem to be the
best men out, but Cassady may be
used in this event.
Capt Howard Baker, one of the
best distance men to represent the
Blue and White in years is in fine
shape and recently ran the mile in
4:49, This is speedy time for this
stage of the season. "Doug" Vinson
and Gottlieb are battling for the
other post in the two mile and
either Vinson or Mahan will run in
the mile.
Harry Emmerich, flashy little
blond speedster and Doug Parrish
will run the high barriers and Parrish and Kerch will be the 'Cat entrants in the 220 low timbers.
With the departure of George
"Scaley"
Roberts,
veteran high
jumper, and Robert Porter, second
jumper, Shively faces the task
call
of developing two new men. Gene
(Continued on Page Four)

Kampus
Kernels
The newly elected officers of
Lexington chapter, Order of De
Molay, will hold, a dress rehearsal
Thursday at 7:15 n. m. at tne Ma
sonic temple. It is Imperative that
ail members 01 tne aegree warn m
present.
There will be an important meeting of Mortar Board at 4 p. m.
Wednesday in Patterson hall reading room.
Alma Magna Mater will meet
with Mrs. F. L. McVey at 8 p. m.
Wednesday, March 29, at Maxwell
place. All members and eligible
are urged to attend.

The W. 8. O. A. council will hold
an important- meeting at 5 p. m.
tomorrow in the Woman's building.
Election of officers for the coming
year will be discussed, and each representative must be present
A special called meeting of SuKy

circle will be held at 5 p. m. Tuesday, March 28, in the basement of
the Alumni gymnasium. Plans for
May Day will be discussed.

The Men's Student council will
meet at 4 p. m. Wednesday, in room
4, Administration building.
Desha Breckenrldge chapter of
Alpha Delta Sigma will hold its
spring initiation at 4:30 p. m.,
Thursday, March 30, in room 300,
Neville hall. The Initiation banquet
will be held at 6:30 in the University commons.

1933-'3-

scho-lairt-

le

n,

PnhHcationa by noon, April 4,
1933. The same to be submitted for final action."

(Signed):

JAMES SHROPSHIRE,

Secretary

DRAMA

MOTIF IS

GUIGNOL'S NEXT
Little Theater Changes Its
Program From Comedy to
Tragedy for Sixth
Presentation
APRIL 3 IS "FIRST NIGHT"
By BEN TAYLOR

In presenting its sixth production

of the year, "Death Takes a Holiday," the Guignol theater hopes to
counteract some degree of criticism
given its this past season for having
the majority of its plays either burlesque or satire. On April 3, those
"first-nigh- t"
patrons who desire
drama will witness one- - of the best
Guignol plays ever presented on the
University campus.
With such veteran players and
well-ca- st
roles, the play can not
help but meet with approval. George
White Fithlan. O. K. Brady. Wood
son Knight, Frank Fowler. Faith
Abbott, and others, quite capable of
playing their parts to perfection,
assure the audience that the professional atmosphere which seems
to haunt the Guignol theater will
not be lost during this play.
Director Frank Fowler will step
from his directorship to the stage
in his portrayal of "Hi Highness,
rrana Sirki." George White Fith
ian'i roles, like those of Doctor
Brady's, need never be questioned
as to their artistry or thoroughness
in carrying out the portrayal of
their respective characters. Wood
son Knight stages a nice comeback
after his absence from the Guig
nol's last production due to illness.
Many persons in the audience
will be present to witness the per
formance of their friends of Lex
,
and they will see them per
form admirably.
Lieut. Howard
Criswell, Mary Armstrong
Shouse,
Mrs. John S. Gardner, Faith Ab
bott. Major and Hart Gibson Fos
ter are the Lexingtonlans and new
University talent
ine entire piay is set in one
scene: a room in a castle. From
the standpoint of stage scenery, the
set to be used in this play Is ex
cellent, and shows true workman'
ship on the part of (he stage man
ager and his assistants. The Gothic
lines of the castle are faithfully
carried out in every detail from the
line of the entrances to the fireplace of the set The stage crew Is
working zealously to give the wall
the proper "stone effect," and one
of the most realistic of Guignol
sets is promised.
trig-ton-

Extension Offices
'

FRIENDS TOTAL
200 AT BANQUET
C. N. Manning, Dean Ander

son Speak at Patterson
Dinner

4,

are hereby notified that written application setting forth
qualifications for theoe various duties, together with
from the Registrar's
office establishing their
edibility, most be In
the hands of Prof. Enoch Gre-hahead of the department
of Jonrnallmn, and chairman
of the Committee on Student

SPRINTS CARED FOR
BY OLDER STARS
Raw Material Speedily
Info Form In
Workouts

FACULTY, GRADS,

NOTICE

Announce New
Summer Bulletin

The summer session bulletin, rela
tive to both terms of the 1933 sum
mer school, has Just been issued
by the extension department, and is
available at that office to interested
students. The session will last ten
weeks and will be divided into two
terms; the first to begin June 12
and close July IS; the second to
begin July 17 and close August 19.
The tuition fee for each college,
with the exception of the college of
law, is $22.75 per term. The fee
In the College of Law Is $31 50 per
term. The price of rooms has been
reduced approximately 10 per cent,
in the women's dormitories, and 20
per cent In the men's dormitories.
The Bulletin contains a schedule
of classes for the first term, a resume of requirements for degrees
in various courses, and other things
of Interest to summer session students.
The session will include a number
of
activities, among
picnic for
them an
faculty and students to be held at
Joyland Park.
extra-curricul- ar

MORTAR ROARD WILL
PLEDGE ON MAY DAY

THIRTY MINUTES OF
PROGRAM BROADCAST
Clubs Throughout State Hold
Centennial Observances
Two hundred members of the fac
ulty, graduates and friends of the
University attended a memorial
banquet Saturday night at the La
fayette hotel In honor of the 100th
anniversary of the birth of James
Kennedy Patterson, former presi
dent of the University. Charles N
Manning and Dean F. Paul Anderson made the principal addresses.
President McVey was toastmaster.
Thirty minutes of the program,
from 9:15 to 9:45 o'clock was broad
cast over an extension of WHAS,'
from the Lafayette hotel ballroom
to other alumni of the University
gathered together in a score of
cities throughout the country, to
conduct similar centennial observ
ances.
Mrs. Mabel Pollitt Adams, for 20
years secretary to President Patterson and after his death his literary
executor and biographer, related
some anecdotes of the life of the
former president. Charles N. Man
ning, president of the Security Trust
company, a friend of Doctor Patterson's for many years before his
death, told of his struggle to found
the present University. Dean Anderson spoke on "A Foundation."
This speech and a talk by Prof.
George Roberts on "The Father of
a University" were broadcast over
the radio hook-u- p with WHAS.
President McVey introduced to
the memorial gathering a number
of the present and former members
of the faculty who were associated
with Doctor Patterson during the
period of his presidency. Seated at
the speakers' table with President
and Mrs. McVey were Dr. George
H. Wilson, president of the Alumni
association of the University, and
Mrs. Wilson; Dr. and Mrs. Frank
Adams of Tampa, Florida; Alexan
der Bonnyman, Knoxvule, Term.,
University alumnus and chairman
of the James Kennedy Patterson
memorial committee; Mr.' and Mrs.
Charles Manning; 'Prof, and Mrs.
George Roberts; Miss Sarah Bland-in- g,
of the Alumni
association; and Dr. .Thomas H.
Kinnaird, who was President Patterson's close friend and physician.
President McVey, introducing Mr.
Bonnyman to the gathering, referred to, the fact that, as chairman
of the Patterson memorial committee, he has worked untiringly for
10 years to raise funds for the
monument to the University's first
president, which it was hoped would
be erected and dedicated sometime
vice-presid-

commission,

presided.

Other alumni clubs all over the
United States gave memorial banquets and meetings and sent messages to the memorial meeting at
the Lafayette hotel which were read
to the banqueteers.

Annual Y.W. Election
Is Set For Thursday
Formal Presentation of Officers Scheduled for W.A.C.
Banquet
Y. W. C. A.'s

annual election

of
officers will be held from 8:30 a. m.
to 4 p. m., Thursday, March 30, in

the main hall of the Administration building. Only members of
the campus Y. W. C. A. will be
permitted to vote.
Offices to be filled by popular
vote are those of president,
secretary, and treasurer.
Candidates for these offices as
selected by the nominating committee are as follows: for president,
si
Sarah Whittinghill; for
dent, Mary Carolyn Terrell, and
vice-pre-

Alice Caskey Lang; for secreary,
Sue Ann Irvine and Mildred
Holmes. Bettle Boyd has been added as a candidate for this office by
a signed petition; lor treasurer,
Clara Margaret Fort.
The new officers will be presented
formally for the first time at the
annual banquet of the Women's
Administrative council.
IT.
17.

K. DEBATORS WOl'LD LIST
of TENNESSEE, GEORGETOWN

Prof. W. R. Sutherland, coach of
the debating team Is attempting to
Mortar Board, senior women's schedule debates with the University of Tennessee and Georgetown
honorary sorority, will hold a meeting at 4 p. m., Wednesday. March college. Georgetown is having their
spring holidays at this time and no
29. There will be a discussion conreply has been received to Professor
cerning the election of new members to be selected on the basis of Sutherland's request for
debate
scholarship, leadership, and service. with that college. No reply has
Tennessee at
been received from
At the Woman i Administrative
council banquet. April 10, book ends the present time but if the debate
will be no meeting of the will be presented to the girl who is scheduled, it will be held here.
There
kept the neatest room In Patterson
French club this week.

The Student Forum will meet at
1:30 tonight in the recreation room
of Patterson hall. AU students interested in expression of student
opinion are urged to attend.

hall.
Pledging of new girls will be held
A
at the May Day convocation.
cup will be given to the freshman
girl with the highest scholastic
standing for the first semester.

DEAN COOPER TO SPEAK

There will be an assembly of the
seniors of the College of Agriculture. Tuesday, March 38. at 4 p. m.
in the Agriculture building. Dean

Cooper will speak.

NEW SERIES NO.

MARCH 28, 1933

How To Pull

Switches
By G. T. Tudor
Gayle Tador, Sigma Phi
Epnllon, muidclan, la a hunted
man. Let hint lay low, or he
will be laid low forever. These
threats are voired Jointly by
Elmer 8 ulcer, dim-tor- ,
and
Wesley Carter, head announcer of the University Extrntion
studios of WHA8.
This bitter feeling found It
root in an Incident developing
out of an organ recital by
Elizabeth Hardin, broadcast
Friday noon by remote control from MemorlaJ hall.
During the broadcast, Mr.

Tudor made his appearance
as sort of a "bystander to the
broadcast," bat later became
restless, his attention bring
attracted by a box which hod
a red and green light on It
For the lark of something to
do, or probably the need of
some sort of activity, our hero,
Mr. Tudor, by an almost ef-

of his
fortless movement
finger, pulled a switch and
cat WHAS's powerful 25,000
watt station off the air, and
kept it off for five seconds until he allowed It to return by
the same sort of a free, nonchalant gesturet

Comprehensive Examinations
PLEDGES NINE Plan Passed by A. & S. Faculty;
IN

CEREMONIES

Selected Members To Offer
Program at N. Middle-tow- n
Next Week
WOMAN'S CLUB

Sorority Honored in "Baton,"
National Publication of
Organization
Phi Beta, honorary music and
dramatic sorority, held Its annual
pledging ceremonies at 4 p. m. yesterday In the Recreation room of
Patterson hall.
Officers for the ensuing year were
elected at the meeting, and will be
Installed at the regular meeting
next Monday. The new officers arc.
Elizabeth Hardin, president; Lois
Robinson,
Jane
secretary; Dorothy Lykins,
treasurer, and Elizabeth Montague,
Fox-wort- h,

PLAN
TYPE PLAY

For the first time in the history
of student dramatics on the Univer
sity campus. Strollers will present
as their 1933 spring production, a
revue, planned and written around
a centralized theme, with a variety
of skits of local interest to Kentuc
kians, leading to a final dramatic
climax.
According to the director of the
spring production, the script for
which Is under the direction of
William Ardery, former University
student and member of Strollers,
the most outstanding feature of the
entire preliminary work has been
the discovery of unusual talent for
specialty acts. About six excellent
numbers. Including dialogue and all
types of dancing have been pro
cured.
Try-ou- ts
for speaking parts will
be held within the next two weeks,

vocal; Lois Robinson, cellist, ac
companied by Elizabeth Hardin; a
vocal trio composed of Dorothy
Compton, Lois Robinson, and Jean
Foxworth, accompanied by Willie
Hughes Smith. Piano selections by
Elizabeth Whitley and several dra
matic selections by Ruby Evans,
will complete the program. Hazel
Nollau will accompany the group
and announce the program.
The organization recently was
honored by the "Baton," national
publication of the sorority, which
ran a large picture, and an article
about Virginia Boyd, lauding her
work as
of the recent
Guignol play, "Alas, Poor Yorick.

To Hear

Pre-Me- ds

Dr. Carl Fortune
Syphlo-pathologi- st

Will Speak
Before Pryor
Society

At a meeting of the Pryor Pre
Medical society to be held Thursday
at 7:30 p. m. in the basement of the
museum, Dr. Carl
Archaeloglcal
Fortune, one of the leading syphlo
pathologists in the United Stafes,
will be the principal speaker.
Doctor Fortune, the son of Rev.
A. W. Fortune, Lexington minister,
was an instructor of pathology at
the University of Michigan for four
years. While there he studied under the late Doctor Worthin, who
was one of the world's leading
pathologists.
Doctor Fortune will speak on the
pathological
Fifteen replies have been received historical, clinical, and All members
of syphilis.
and more are arriving daily, in an- knowledge to come. Other matters
swer to the application mailed to are urged
of importance are also to be con405 concerns throughout the coun
try by the seniors of the Commerce sidered at this meeting.
Joe Saunders, president of the
college. The majority of the offers.
extended directly to the member, society, will preside.
have come from concerns in other
states as the result of the receipt
of the pamphlet, "Bargains in
Brains," and all have praised the
ingeniousness of the pamphlet.
So marked has been the success
of the scheme that the Commerce
film dealing with the
A one-reseniors are going to hold a meet manufacture of rayon was viewed
ing at noon today In Room 301 to
last night by the costume designing
discuss the publication and mailing class of the Home economics deNo
of another similar pamphlet.
Montgomery Ward and
contracts have actually been signed, partment, at store on East Main
company's
15 of the 35 seniors that sponbut
film gave a complete
sored the undertaking virtually have street. The rayon manufacturing
acquired positions. The original as- history of the
the raw cellulose to
sessment for each of the seniors was process from rayon products, includfinished
$1.50 and it has been agreed that the
digestion of the cellulose,
all who obtained Jobs as a result of ing the
the fibers, the weavthe pamphlet application would pay the spinning of of the cloths.
ing, and dying
$20 Into the fund to aid future
In addition to the 35 members of
seniors in procuring Jobs.
were present apthe class,
The pamphlet was mailed to 100 proximately there others Interested in
30
Kentucky alumni who graduated rayon
manufacture. According to
between 1893 and 1913, 15 schools
class,
employing secretarial teachers, 13 Miss Wade, instructor of the
Insurance companies, 30 Investment the film was Interesting and in
bankers, 25 accounting firms, and formative.
a number of general business INDEPENDENTS TO HEAR
Moreover, Eddie Cantor,
houses.
Will Rogers, O. O. Mclntyre, Irvin PROF. W. R. SUTHERLAND
8. Cobb, and Lowell Thomas, were
Prof. W. R. Sutherland. English
sent pamphlets In the hope that
they would give the scheme some department, will speak to the Inpublicity. Several newspapers have dependent group at a meeting to be
commented on the idea, and from held at 7:30 p. m. Wednesday in
results it has appeared to be a suc- Bradley hall.
The subject of Professor Suthercess.
land's address has not been made
public, but it will concern the work
GERMAN CLUB WILL HAVE
ORGANIZATION MEETING of the independents on the campus.
All members and independents are
The German club will meet at 4 urged to attend the meeting since
p. m. Thursday, March 30, In room it is of vital Importance.
304 Administration building.
The
Harry Recano, Breckinridge hall,
meeting will be one of organization,
is acting president of the group.
and all who have shown a desire
'LIB HEARS BRADY
to become members are urged to be
present as there will be a discus
The International Relations class
sion of future plana and activities
met at 7:45 p. m. Monday in Patof the club.
Officers of the German club are terson hall. Mrs. Leon Cohen preRalph Edwards, president; Julian sided over the meeting and intro
Cox,
and Charles duced Dr. George K. Brady, speak
Edmonson, secretary and treasurer. er of the evening. Doctor Brady
Dean C. R. Melcher is faculty ad subject was "Some Trends in Mod
ern Comparative Literature."
viser.

Praise
Its Readers

Designing Class
Sees Film On The
Making Of Rayon
el

Subject to Approval by Senate
PUBLICATIONS

PLAN EFFECTIVE

NOTICE

"Notice la hereby given

IS SPONSORED RY

historian.
The following girls were pledged:
Mary Dantzler, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Lexington; Martha Fugett, Delta Delta Delta, Lexington; Virginia
Murrel, Delta Zeta, Somerset; Sarah
Whittinghill, Independent, Hazard;
Virginia Riley, Zeta Tau Alpha,
Lexington;
Lucy Jean Anderson,
Zeta Tau Alpha, Paris; Mary EveSTROLLERS
lyn Craycraft, Delta Zeta, Mays- lick; Gladys Lewis, Independent,
Ashland; and Eileen Lewis, Inde
NEW
pendent, Ashland.
Several girls of the society will
Material Featuring Things of go to North Mlddlletown next week
to present a program sponsored by
Interest To Kentuckians
the Woman's club of that city.
Will Be Used As
These girls with the selections they
Background
will give are: Dorothy Compton,

IS SPRING PRODUCTION

4fi

PHI BETA GROUP

and although preliminary trials for
the dancing routine have been held,
final selections for the choruses
have not yet been announced. At
present work is centering on the
planning and preparation of sets
and costumes which will be typical
in 1934.
ly Kentucklan. O. L. Crutcher who
Congressmen James Scrughman was in charge of stage work for the
of Colorado and Virgil Chapman of Stroller production last year, again
Kentucky spoke at a banquet of will be manager of the stage crew.
University alumni at the University club In Washington, Saturday
night, commemorating the 100th Commerce Booklet
anniversary of the birth of James
Elicits Much
K. Patterson. Elmer Hays, Winchester, a member of the Interstate
From
Commerce

MEETS 7:10 P. M. TONIGHT
PAT HALL

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKYTUESDAY,

SIIIVELY WORKS

pole-vau-

OF

SECOND FORUM

that

rated bids for the printing,
engraving, and photography
of the 1934 KENTUCKIAN
will be received on or before

noon, April 18, 1933, by Prof.
Enoch Grehan, chairman of
the Committee on Student
Publications.
The committee
reserves the right to reject
any and all bids."
(Signed) !
JAMES SHROPSHIRE,
Secretary

ROBINSON'S BAND
WILL PLAY PROM
Bids Will Be Issued From
Post Office Wednesday;
Juniors, Seniors Receive Ducats
BAND IS A.M.S. FEATURE

2ND IIALF

1933-- 34

IF GIVEN OKEII
Students Required to Undergo

r
Examination
In Major Subject

Four-Hou-

COMMITTEE TO ADVISE
AS TO TYPE OF TESTS
Special Departmental Honors
May Be Available On
Quiz Success
Beginning with the second semes1933-3- 4
school year all
seniors majoring in work in the de
partments of anatomy and physiology, ancient languages, geology,
mathematics, and astronomy, philosophy, physics and zoology will be
required to take an examination in
the subject In which they are majoring, according to a ruling passed
on by the Arts and Sciences college
faculty at a meeting held at 4 p. m.
March 26 in McVey hall. This plan
is subject to approval by the University Senate at their next meeting
April 10.
Each major student is to be assigned to an advisor at the beginning of his Junior year. This adviser will guide the student's work,
meet him in conference weekly and
discuss his current work. For this
work done with a tutor, the student
will be eligible to one credit per
semester.
During the senior year the advisory direction of the student will
take the form of Independent work
courses, conferences or seminars,
carrying from one to three credits
per semester.
A committee will be appointed to
make a continuous study of the
types of examinations used and to
advise the various departments in
the formulation of their examinations. The examinations will be
written for the most part, although
oral examinations may be added at
the discretion of the department.
At the start, departmental examiners will be used. Later, However,
examiners may be brought in from

ter of the

Final arrangements have been
made to have Gordon Robinson and
his qrchestra for the Junior Prom
next Friday night in the Alumni
gymnasium, it was announced today
by Bentley Sampson, chairman of
the prom committee
Bids to the dance will be issued
Wednesday through the post office
to all Juniors and seniors. Juniors
will be given one date bid and two
stag bids and seniors will be given
one date bid.
Gordon Robinson, featured by the
American Music service of Cleveland, Ohio, has a band of growing
popularity largely due to their rhythm and style which is comparable
to that of Guy Lombardo. Engagements in the most exclusive night
clubs and cafes In the East, and at
eastern pniversities give evidence
that Kentucky will be favored by
a band of some distinction.
The music program is to be varied by vocal interpretations in which
the whole band participates. All
of the members are former glee
club men and their three, four and
six part Tiarmony has been regard'
ed as one of their most prominent other institutions if the department
so desires.
features.
Passing in the comprehensive
This outstanding band was decided upon after much correspondence examination will be a prerequisite
and deliberation by the committee for graduation for majors in these
Sampson, departments. On the basis of the
composed of Bentley
chairman; Dorothy Whittsitt, Bill student's record and his performHumber, George Vogel, Ralph Ed- ance in the comprehensive examination, he may be graduated with
wards.
special departmental honors. If the
student fails to graduate because
of failure in the examination, he
may be given another examination
when the department is convinced
that he has made sufficient addi-

Newbury To Lead
Education System
Forum Discussion

What would you say? What's
your opinion against thousands of
others? An opportunity to express
your point of view and to hear the
opinions of other students will be
afforded by a second meeting of the
Student forum at 7:30 p. m., Tuesday. March 28, in the recreation
room of Patterson hall.
A continuation of the general discussion of the present educational
system will be the topic for discussion at this week's meeting of the
Forum.

Prof. Edward Newbury,

de-

partment of psychology, will be the
faculty leader who will address the
group preceding the actual discus-

tional preparation. The total time
given to the examination will be
not less than four hours.
Special courses, tutorial work in
the subject, open only to departmental undergraduate majors, will
be asked for to take care of the
credits allowed for the conference
feature.

President McVey
Leaves On Tour
Will Sneak in Several Cities

During

Five-Da- y

Journey

sion.
Permission

Pres. Frank L. McVey left yesterday morning on a good-wi- ll
speaking tour through eastern Kentucky.
His subject will be "The Human
Side of. Education."
He will return
to the University, Friday morning.
meeting.
Monday noon he will speak in
Ashland at a meeting of the
club and will give a talk in
22, 23 Paintsvlllewillthat night. Tuesday
noon he
speak in Plkeville and
in Hazard that night.
Major B. E. Brewer, commandant
Wednesday he will speak before
of the military department, has re an alumni group in Jackson at noon
ceived notice from Corps Area head Thursday, he will address the
quarters at Fort Hayes. Ohio, that
club of Harlan and the high
the inspecting officers for the an- school students at 1 p. m. Thursnual Inspection to be held May 3 day night he will speak at a Joint
on Stoll field, will be Lieut-Co- l.
meeting of the Middlesboro and
John E. Mort. field artillery, and Pineville alumni in Middlesboro.
Major Leland 8. Devore.
James Shropshire is accompanyMajor Devore, a graduate of West ing the president on the trip.
in
Point, received national fame
1911 when he was selected tackle on FIRST
BATTALION WILL
eleven
Walter Camp's
PARADE 4 P. M. MONDAY
along with the great Sanford B.
White of Princeton and the IllusThere will be a parade of the first
trious Jim Thorpe of Carlisle. Major
Devore ranks as one of the greatest battalion on the parade ground in
tackles ever developed at West Point front of the Administration buildand holds the distinction of being ing. Monday, April 3, at 4 p. m.
under
the first man from Armv to be Harry the command of Cadet Major
Emmerich. This is the first
chosen on Walter Camp's
team, which was inaugurated of a series of four battalion parades
to be held before spring vacation
in 1908.
begins, the first battalion having
another Monday, April 10, and the
SIGMA XI CHOOSES'
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS second battalion on Wednesday,
April 5 and 12.
The Kentucky chapter of Sigma
NaPAMPHLET OV GOVERNMENT
XI met Friday evening in the
ISSl'ED BY PROF. MANNING
tural Science building. Pro$Vssor
Geology
Reid P. Meacham, of the
J. W. Manning, professor of polispoke on "The Laboradepartment,
tory Method as a Guide to the Lo- tical science, has Issued a 40 page
cation of Some Natural Resources." pamphlet treating on the fundaThe following were elected as as- mentals of national, state, county,
This pamsociate members: Nathan B. Alli- and city government.
son. Harris M. 8ullivan, Ernest W. phlet Is to be used as the basis for
made by
Kirk, Joseph H. Haynsworth, John studies of government
woman's clubs. Mimeographed copS. Kirk, Robert E. Mulllns. graduate students, and Horace M. Min- ies are being made and distributed
by the extension departments.
er, senior.
for students who will
attend the Forum to dance from 7
until 7:30 in Patterson hall has been
obtained by the committee in
charge of arrangements for the

Annual Inspection
Set For May

Kl-wa-

Ki-wa-

22-2-

* Best Copy
obsolete in that the business manager of the Kentuckian, even after
being appointed by the editor, must
be approved by the committee. And

The Kentucky Kernel
Published on Tucsdavs and Frila
National College Press Awxialion
Kentucky Intercollegiate Piw
Aunt iation
Lexington Hoard of Commerce

only of a competent person pledged
to work harmoniously and economically with the editor.
Only bona fide members of the
OfIiri.il Nrwsiarr of the Students of
the I'nivcrsiiy of Kentucky. Lexington Junior class are eligible for the positions of editor and business manSulwription $2 00 a year, f iltered at ager of the Kentuckian.
Lexington, Ky.. PiisloHice as Second
Class Mail Matter.
SHALL THE MRNFL ALL
STUDENT RK.IITS M AIN LAIN

BAH3AINS IN BRAINS

HK.RF.

pamphlet titled, "Bargains in
step
Marvin C. Wat hs . . . Managing Editor Brains," is the most recent
Fred II. Sheils.Asst. Managing Editor that seniors of the Commerce college have taken to obtain employASSOCIATE EDITORS
Mary Jo Lalfcny ment after graduation. The bookR. Miner
James
oc S. Reistcr
let contains information about each
prospective applicant and will be
EDI TORS
ASSISTANT
Virginia Lec Moore useful to business concerns in proFrank Adams
A.

Herron

anc A. Matthews
luihth C'.haduitk
johnnie Craddock
oan Cancan

Editor-in-Chie-

..

.... I.ilrrary Editor
.... Feature Editor
Art Editor
Dramatic Editor

Society Editor
Asst. Society Editor
Nancy llcckcr
Jean Anderson

II. Smith

Frances Hush
I.ik V

..

WRITERS

SPECIAL

llouard

L. Cleveland

Rithert II. Miiaiighey

.

rti'5

..

Editor

ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS
Mary Carolyn Terrell
J. I). Palmer
Hen F. Taylor

REPORTERS
Ann Hornsby
Jay Lucian
Snra Dcl.ong
Mary A. Brend
Agnes Savage
Morton Collins
Earl Bourgeois
Sylvester Ford
J. C. Hulett
Florence Kclley
llmok kirk
Sunny Dav
Jack May
Alia Mae Cole
Sports Editor
Ralph E. Johnson
Dclmar Adams . . . Asst. Sporti Editor

lrKTS
Henry C. McCown

WRITERS
Joe Quinn

Coleman R. Smith

..

curing employees.
During the present economic depression It becomes more difficult
for college graduates to find employment no matter how thoroughly trained they are. It Is necessary for students to use every available method which may lead to positions warranting the specialization
resulting from higher academic pursuits.
That prospective graduates of the
Commerce college have realized the
necessity for aggressiveness is manifested in "Bargains in Brains." By
Indicating Kentucky's contribution
to 1933 business, and by supplying
employers with information about
applicants, they have enhanced
their prospects of obtaining that
type of work for which they have
been trained.

ADVERTISING STAFF
Ned Turnbull . . Advertising Manager
By THE JESTER
Robert Nail
Dave Dilford
Dan Ewing
Miss Warren
After all, a hippopotamus is just
C V. Collman . . . Circulation Manager a rhinoceros without a radiator cap.

A B C's AND THE

UNIVERSITY
The second edition of the ABC
Bulletin, a University publication,
will make its appe