xt73r20rtn4k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73r20rtn4k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19651117  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 17, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 17, 1965 1965 2015 true xt73r20rtn4k section xt73r20rtn4k Inside Today s Kernel
IFC discusses changet in concert
gram: Foge Two.

I
University of Kentucky

Vol. LVII, No. 45

i
v

6

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,

'Focus on Lexington' seminar scheduled: Foge Two.
Concert sotutes VK with Verdi s "Requiem": foge Three.
tditor suggests senior colloquium:

Eight Pages fo9

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 19f5

Construction Continues
on the south side of the building, facing Cooper
Drive. The auditorium is being constructed by
Lane, White, and Conglcton Co., Lexington.

H ighway Conference Begins
the roads were being built for
s
1975 traffic but that
were being bought for 1990
traffic.
for four-lan- e
"Rights-of-wa- y
traffic are included in the original
estimate, although only two lanes
actually will be constructed," he
said.
To date, he said, Kentucky
has received $18 million from the
Appalachian funds, which, when
matched with state funds, will
provide $25.7 million worth of
highway improvements.
rights-of-way-

State Highway Commissioner

lenry Ward cited the recent bond
issue victory as "a vote of
confidence and one of common
sense," at the session Tuesday.
His reference to the bond issue
was a reminder that it will enable
Kentucky to obtain $597 million
I

federal matching funds for
highway construction.
Ward termed the bond issue
adoption as the best example of
team effort he has seen since he
has been a public official.
He said the bond arrangement
will enable his department to
proceed in an orderly way and
the issue's passage shows that the
people of Kentucky have confidence in the department's operation and planning.
Mr. Arthur C. Butler, Washington, D. C, director of the
National Highway Users Conference, was one of several
speakers engaged for the
conference, which is held each
year at the University. He told a
Continued On Pare 8
in

.

te

i

Under head football coach
Charlie Bradshaw's present four-yea- r
contract, the Saturday afternoon game with the University of
Tennessee
could conceivably
bring to a close his career at
the University.
Bradshaw, who signed with
UK in January 1962, has been
rumored to be heading back to
Alabama where he was an assistant football coach under Bear
Bryant.
"It's utterly fantastic. I have
no comment," said the apparprogram."
Calvin Crayson of the Ken- ently surprised Bradshaw.
UK athletic director Bernie
tucky Department of Highways
presented slides depicting the Shively said he knew nothing
four "corridors" that have been about a possible Bradshaw move
approved by the Appalachian to Alabama.
It is customary to wait until a
committee as eligible for Appateam finishes its season before
lachian monies.
J. B. Kemp of the Bureau discussing new terms for a conof Public Roads pointed out that tract r dismissal of the coach.

ships:

"

:

J

Bradshaw
Going To
Alabama?

Center fraternity establishes scholar-

Four

Poge Seven.

By JUDY CRISIIAM
Associate News Editor
Student Congress President Winston Miller has issued a statement
explaining the student governing body's policy of
in
political affairs.
The statement followed in the wake of controversy concerning
the policy.
"The Congress is now working
"A few individuals have misinterpreted the recent action of with University officials in the
Student
Congress concerning areas of student tickets to athletic
procedure,
American policy in Viet Nam," events, the drop-ad- d
and other facets of registration
Miller said.
and cafeteria services."
He explained the "overwhelming majority of Congress members
The Congress has recently
did not refuse to endorse the established the Student Summer
Vietnam policy' but established
Employment Program, the Comas their policy that "Student Conmittee of 240, the K Book, and
gress should not enter into intera Community College Seminar
national, national, state or local and is considering a Textbook
political issues.
Exchange Service, and Academic
Assistance Program.
"This decision was based primarily on the fact that Student
"Student governments on
Congress is empowered to repreother campuses that have taken
sent the interest of the student
stands on political issues have
body only on issues concerned
their time debating
with University policy," the monopolized
matters rather than
political
statement continued.
serving the student body," he
"By taking a stand on this said.
or any other political issue, Con"The policy adopted by the
gress would have set a dangerous
Student Congress averts these
precedent which would have resulted in a continual involvement
problems."
in lesser political affairs."
"I firmly concur with the
Miller said even though Stupolicy adopted by the Student
dent Congress is not empowered
to "delve into political issues," Congress and the reasons for its
it "encourages the expression of adoption," Miller said. "However, outside my capacity as
political opinions through stuStudent Congress President I
dent political organization.
support both American foreign
"The existence of these orpolicy in Vietnam and the student organization Victory in
ganizations on campus repreVietnam.
senting various policial opinions
makes this possible," he said.
"Most members of Student
Rather than expressing politCongress share similar personal
ical opinion, Student Congress opinion, but their decision, as
is concerning itself with exwas mine, is based upon the belief that we are not empowered
pressing student opinion and
providing programs which serve to make these opinions the policy
the students.
of the student governing body."

H

Kentucky's stake in the highway program of the Appalachian
Regional Act of 1965 received the
emphasis .of four speakers at this
morning's session of the Kentucky
Highway Conference, continuing
its 17th annual meeting at the
University.
the
A.
Boswell,
Harry
session's keynote speaker, outlined the provisions of the Appalachian Development Program,
while the others discussed aspects
of the program as it pertains to
highway development.
Boswell is state representative
to the Appalachian Regional
Commission.
Defining the Interstate Highway System as "the backbone
network which will make the
region more accessible," Robert
W. Duis, representative of a consulting engineering firm employed by the Appalachian Commission, stated that the interstate
system would connect the principal metropolitan cities and
industrial centers, but added that
it is inadequate.
"This direct routing between
major population areas obviously
leaves many aieas without
adequate access to this system,"
he said.
He said the region had long
been plagued with a lack of
adequate accessibility, and that
of the mounthe "barrier-effec- t
tain chain has retarded the
development of transportation
facilities," which he declared to
be a primary factor in the underdevelopment of the region.
Other speakers at the morning
session concurred in Duis" statement that "development of the
region is keyed to the highway

Community College director is looking tor ways to "stretch"
education: Foge Seven.

Explains Policy
On Viet Stand

'"T

Construction work is continuing on an auditorium
at the Agriculture Science Center, Nicholasville
Road. The new auditorium is being constructed

Somerset

SC's President

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Svky to hold annuo! torch parade and
pep rally: foge Six.

pro-

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Lecture Presented lly Architect
Abraham Beer, former associate of the late architect Corbusier, presented an illustrated lecture
on the published and unpublished works of
Corbusier to the School of Architecture Tuesday.
Beer, a resident of Paris and an architect, planner,
painter, industrial designer and educator, designed

the Anglican Church in Amman, Jordan, prefabricated housing, exhibition for the European
Cooperation Administration, and a supermarket,
museum, and plane hangars in Philadelphia. The
title of his talk was "l,c Corbusier the Total

Man."

* 2--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

TIIE

17, 1965

'Focus On Lexington' Seminar Set

IFC Views Changes
In Concert Program

The Blue Crass Centennial
Committee's seminar on "Legal
Freedoms and Responsibilities"
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today
in the University Law Building

By GARY WEST
Council met Tuesday night to discuss the
ll
administration committee's announcement that the IFC
dance could not be held in Memorial Coliseum because it did
not have any "educational or cultural values."
Carson Porter, IFC rush chair- man, said that the concert had would be guests of President
been switched to a dance to be Oswald on Dec. 11. Combs has
held in Alumni Cym Friday night requested that each fraternity
send a representative, preferably
from 8 to 12 p.m.
the president, to help in parking
The show, however, has been cars and aiding legislature memreduced to Martha and the Van-dell- bers in their visit to the Univerand the Drifters. Previously sity.
on the card were the Temptations
Combs explained the purpose
and the Tassels.
of their coming to UK was to
Porter said that he and Bobby meet with President Oswald to
Joe Cuiai, IFC president offered discuss the future expansion of
to buy the show in their names the University.
The colony of Theta Chi frain order to obtain the use of
Memorial Coliseum. Their at- ternity made a request for IFC
The colony will
tempt was in vain, however, as representation.
the concert did not meet Univer- undergo a screening period to
see that they have the potential
sity standards.
to fulfill the requirements of a
Porter added he and Cuinn fraternity. IFC will later vote on
attempted to find every available their admittance as a representative of IFC.
place in Lexington.

auditorium.

The Interfraternity

The Fayette County Bar Association in conjunction with the
University is sponsoring the fifth
seminar in a series of six dealing
with "Focus on Lexington."
Teh program will feature
Winston Miller, Student Congress president, discussing student problems. The community
side of the student problems will
be discussed by Judge Richard
P. Maloney, Jr.

rock-and-ro-

Mil

John Breckinridge and Taul
Oberst will speak on faculty prob-lems and the Rev. Don Herren,.
Southern Hills Methodist Church
will take the community side.
Moderator for theseminarwill
be Judge Scott Reed.

Darrell Hancock is acting as
chairman for the seminar. The
final seminar will be on "What
Does The Future Hold?". It is
scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Dec. 1,
at the Phoenix Hotel,

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE KERNEL!
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"We even made one attempt
to take the show to another campus," he said.
He further explained that as
far as he knew there were only
two empty buildings in Lexington
Memorial Coliseum and Alumni
Gym and they couldn't get the
Coliseum.

He'd take on any one, ?

METRO GOLDWYN

Kenneth Harper, dean of men,
said he felt as though the effort
made by Porter and Guinn was
"nothing less than a miracle."

In other IFC affairs, Tate
Combs announced that members
of the Kentucky Legislature,

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"All the doors were closed as
to finding a place to have the
concert and this is the best they
could do. I think they've done
an outstanding job," he concluded.
Porter concluded his summation of the cancellation of the
Coliseum by saying that "an
official" letter was sent in plenty
of time to committee head Bernie
Shively's
However,
Shively.
office said they never received
the letter.

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The Kentucky Kernel
Th

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SUUon. University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 4o506. Sccond-cU- s
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

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Concert Salutes UK
With Verdi 'Requiem'

Brakhage
To Lecture
At Seminar

Verdi's "The Manzoni Requiem" will be presented in three
concert performances by the University of Kentucky Department
of Music as a salute to the UK Centennial.
The first concert will be presented on Thursday, Nov. 18,
at 8:15 p.m. fn Memorial
Coliseum by the Central Kentucky Concert Association, and
on Nov. 19 and 20 concerts will
be performed at the Cincinnati
Music Hall.

f

--

Student actors conduct a rehearsal for their production of Eugene
Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano" to be presented in the Lab Theater
Nov. 18, 19, and 20. From left to right arc Susan Card well, Keith
Coodacrc, Robert Cooke, and Beth Hoagland. Tickets arc 75 cents
for students and $1.00 for adults. Curtain time is 8:30
p.m.

17, I9C.5- -3

The University Choristers is
composed of 120 students from
all the UK colleges and is dir-

ected by Aimo Kiviniemi, vice
chairman of the UK music department. The Lexington Singers
are directed by Miss Phyllis
Presenting the program will Jenness, associate professor of
be the University of Kentucky voice.
Choristers, the Lexington SingRudolf is now in his eighth
ers, and the Cincinnati Symseason as conductor of the CinOrchestra, conducted by
phony
cinnati Symphony, which has
Max Rudolf.
been chosen as the first U.S.
symphony orchestra ever selected
Soloists for the performance
d
tour by
will be James King, tenor from for an
the West Berlin Opera; Lucine the State Department..
Amara, soprano; Shirley Love,
Students will be admitted to
and bass John
contralto,
the concert on Nov. 18 by their
Macurdy, all from the MetroI.D. cards.
politan Opera.
around-the-worl-

Stanley
Cinematographer
Brakhage will be the final
speaker to participate in the
Centennial Humanities Seminar
which has presented
noted
authorities in fields as varied as
engineering and literature.
Brakhage will give a lecture
on Thursday, Nov. 18, at 4 p.m.
in Room 322 of the Commerce
Building. The public is invited
to attend.
Brakhage's films have been
shown frequently on the UK
campus by the Experimental Film
Society. His work is characterized
by the frequent use of a series
of rapidly-produce- d
images and
by a sensitive revelation of
beauty.

use the

Music Major To Present Recital
James Darling, a "Lexington junior music major, will present
a trumpet recital on Friday, Nov. 19, at 8 p.m. in Memorial
Hall at the University of Kentucky.
"Sonata for Trumpet and Piano,"
He will be assisted by Mrs.
and Poulenc's "Sonata for Horn,
Cecelia Ewing, piano; Jackson
Chadwell, organ; Harry Rich, Trumpet, and Trombone."
The public is invited to attend
trumpet; Win. Harry Clarke,
the admission-fre- e
concert.
French Horn, and John Carr,
tromljone.
Selections for the program include: John Stanley's "Trumpet
Voluntary;" Vivaldi's "Concerto
for Two Trumpets;" Hummel's
"Concerto
in E;" Kennan's

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All White Men Arc Created Superior

A Senior Colloquium?
Planners of the Centennial
Freshman Colloquium have discovered an unexpected and important effect. The senior discussion
leaders often seem more interested
in topics discussed than the freshmen.

Many of the leaders themselves
have recognized that they, and not
the freshmen, have dominated talks
on several subjects.
Perhaps there is need for a
senior colloquium in which selected
seniors could be chosen to meet
with faculty members and outside
resource persons to discuss various
topics of local and world interest
in informal discussion groups.
For it is perhaps the seniors
who have a greater interest in
world developments and who have
the best background knowledge and
perspective for meaningful discussions of University problems.
We would not advocate aboli-

tion of the Freshman Colloquium
as we feel it has had excellent
effects in acquainting the new student with the university's environment, but rather would propose
a senior colloquium in addition.
Freshmen generally show more
interest in questions concerned with
their immediate problems in adjustment to college life rather than
world problems. Indeed, a rare high
school teacher has had the courage to deal with the major contro

Sclf-Evidc- nt

versial issues of the day. Often
students are not even aware of
major world and national questions
until they are introduced to them
through their college courses. One
could hardly expect freshmen to discuss knowledgeably the academic
plan, the plan for campus development, the appearance of active
political groups on campus, and
other such issues when they have
had no opportunity to learn the
background information necessary
for understanding these issues.

How could they be expected to
discuss the nature of academic
freedom for students and faculty
members with their professors if
they've had no opportunity to know
what academic freedom really is?
A
senior colloquium offers
several advantages, including preparing the student for the world
he will face in several months
rather, in the case of the freshman, a comfortable four years from
now.

It also could provide a meaningful forum for communication between faculty, administrators, and
students with four years of observation and participation in University life under their belts.
We urge that Student Congress
and other groups in a position to
establish such a program look into
the possibilities of a senior colloquium with an eye toward experimenting with one next semester.

llers To The Editor

Two Varieties Of 'Bleeders9

Identified By Professor
To The Editor:
It seems to me that the Young
Americans for Freedom are confusing two issues in planning for
their bleed-in-. One issue is political,
the other is humanitarian.
Mr. Spradlin of YAF said that

the donation of blood will "give
tangible endorsement to American
foreign policy." This is true only
for those who give blood and who
also do support U.S. Vietnam
policy. For others, however, the
donation of blood may be a
humanitarian act to help preserve
the lives of people who have been
wounded in war.
In order to disentangle, to some
degree, the differential motives for
giving blood, I suggest that at
least two kinds of blood donors
be identified: those who are giving
primarily as an indication of their
endorsement of U.S. policy and

those who are giving primarily to
aid fellow humans and who do not
support U.S. policy.
ALBERT J. LOTT
Associate Professor of Psychology
50-Yar-

Dash Or

d

T

To The Editor:

In regard to Mr. Marsh's letter
about the many unnecessary requests for "race" on University
forms, we feel he is entirely right.
In the past the athletes among us
have answered the question "race?"
with "fifty yard dash," while those
who like to think in black and
white terms have simply said "yes."
When we are feeling insecure we

put"?!."

SALLY JACK
Sophomore in Medicine
WYLIE SLACEL
Sopfiomore in Medicine

The South's Outstanding College Daily
U.NIURSITV OF KtMLCkY

WEDNESDAY.

1894

Waltlh

Chant, Ed

NOV. 17,

15KJ5

St (waning Editor
Editor
Jldy Chisham. Aiuxiute S'eu$ Editor
Sally Sicll, Seu$ Editor
IIlnhy Rosenthal, HfHrtt Editor
Mahcaklt Hauly, Art Editor
Cay Cum, Women's Tage Editor

Linda Mills, Executive Editor

Husines--

Klnncih IIosjcin,

.uiute

Klnnlth Chlln.

Tom FiNKifc. Advertising Slaiuiger

High Stakes In Rhodesia
There are grave dangers for embargo against Rhodesia only at
Africa and the world in the act of great peril to its own delicate econrebellion against the British Crown omy. Nearby Malawi is likely to
by a Government in Rhodesia that be badly hurt. Britain itself will
represents only 220,000 whites in a imperil investments in Rhodesia

population of more than four estimated at $560 million and will
million. It was just such a situation lose $100 million in exports.
that Britain's Ambassador to the
United Nations had in mind last
The United States could easily
year when he warned his U.N. replace the tobacco for which
colleagues that the potential ex- Britain has been paying Rhodesia
plosion could be "something far L25 million a year but Britain,
bigger than anything we have still in balance of payments trouble,
known before, such as the Congo hardly can spare the dollar equior Cyprus or Suez."
valent ($70 million).

If Britain means business, and

The Kentucky Kernel
ESTABLISHED

..."

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t

Staff

Mahvin

JI

ungate.

Circulation

Sluruiger

gets the support promised by its
Commonwealth partners and its
allies, including the United States,
Ian Douglas Smith and his colleagues will not get by with this
attempt to seize independence and
perpetuate white minority rule. The
trouble is that Britain and everyone
else involved must maneuver with
great skill to prevent racial war
from erupting and to minimize the
damage to innocents, white as well
as black, in Central Africa.
On the stark facts of trade and
finance, Britain, with Commonwealth cooperation, can strangle
Rhodesia's economy over a period
of months. The United States has
little trade with Rhodesia but it
can help to deny the Smith regime
access to the world's money
markets.
But such stiff action cannot be
selective. If it ruins Smith and his
n
backers it will also ruin those

There is no moral or political
choice for the United States: We
must give Britain full support.
Washington must try to dissuade
South Africa and Portugal, to which
neighboring Mozambique belongs,
from forming an alliance with the
Smith regime. The United States
certainly can help keep Zambia and
Malawi afloat and ease Britain's
economic burden.
Of all the ironies in this situation
none is richer than the attempt of
the Smith regime to equate its
act with 1776, even to the extent
of issuing a clumsy paraphrase of
the American Declaration of Independence. Conspicuous by its
absence, needless to say, was that
truth, held by Jefferson to be
that "all men are created
equal and are endowed by their
Creator with certain inalienable
self-evide-

rights...."

If Ian Smith and his men had
accepted that principle, Rhodesia
whites who oppose his would have had its
independence
and many among the coun- long ago and there would be no
policies
try's four million Africans. Neigh- crisis today in Central Africa.
boring Zambia can join a trade
The New York Times
Rho-desia-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

'65 Education Act Marks
Century Of Federal Monies
The 19G5 education
bill,
passed in the waning days of the
89th Congress, climaxes a century
of increased federal participation
in financing higher education.
It has evoked from states-rigsmen the familiar cry of "too
much federal finger in the education pie."
The act, however, like all
those before it provides a strict
prohibition of federal control of
education.

Netcs Analysis
For example, provisions for
the teacher corps contained
within the bill clearly guarantee
that local boards will have the
right to request and dismiss the
teachers, though funds for their
salaries will be paid by federal
funds.
The opponents counter that
systems forced to request a large
number of teachers through the
corps program will become dependent on personnel and funds
provided through the federal program and therefore will be more
responsive to federal pressure.
Provisions in the bill will offer
aid to students, teachers and
colleges seeking to upgrade their
facilities.
The teacher corps program
furnish
would
experienced
teachers and teams to school
districts, giving preference to
those areas of largest concentrafamilies.
tion of
The teachers would be recruited and trained by the federal
government, but their work will
be supervised by local officials.
Teachers will be enrolled in
the corps for two years.
Also provided in the bill are
opportunities for fellowships for
teachers or those desiring to enter
teaching to do graduate work
toward the M.A. degree.
low-inco-

Congress appropriated $20,000

for this program.

Students will be assisted by
increased opportunities for part-tim- e
employment and by increased scholarships and
loans.
low-intere- st

The government will subsidize
up to 90 per cent new part-tim- e
jobs for students created by educational institutions.
The college also will receive
subsidies for administrativecosts
for the new programs.
A University participating in
programs to solve community
problems, in poverty, recreation,
employment, etc., would qualify
for added assistance.
A special provision seeks to
aid developing institutions by
footing part of the bills for
planning and carrying out cooperative programs for academic
development.

and
students
Graduate
teachers would receive special
fellowships for teaching in junior
colleges and developing institutions.
Library development aid also
will be offered.
The new bill is one of the
most ambitious in history in upgrading national education by
financial contributions of the
federal government.
Federal government participation began in 1862 with the
Morrill Act providing for the land
grant colleges.
Several acts provided for experiments and development of
university-communit- y
programs,
primarily in the field of agriculture.
Crants were first offered to
students under the National
Cancer Institute Act in 1937,
which provided public health

Pennsylvania Considers Secrecy
PHILADELPHIA (CPS)-T- he
University of Pennsylvania last
week (Nov. 4) passed a resolution asking the university administration to stop secret research on campus.
Dr. Julius VVishner, chairman of the senate, noted that the
resolution applied specifically to research in which "free publication of the results is restricted by the granting or contracting

agency."

The resolution, adopted by a 193 to 57 vote, said that "except
in the event of a national emergency declared by the President,
freedom of inquiry and the obligation to disseminate freely the
results of such inquiry should not be abrogated."
The resolution contains a clause that would allow university
professors to engage in research, classified or not, outside the
university and not under university sponsorship.

"Inside Report"

service grants to students in private institutions.
The war years stimulated federal responsibility for educational
finance when the government in
1911 provided aid for construction
and operation of schools in areas
affected by defense activities. In
the jx)st-wa- r
years, the government offered aid to veterans seeking a higher education.
Scientific research received
subsidy first through an Atomic
Energy Commission Act in 1916
and the National Science Foundation Ait in 1950.
The National Defense Education Act in 1958 accelerated
this trend. This act also provided
increased aid for students entering teaching.
A 1963 act provided loans and
grants for constniction of academic facilities for graduate
schools, colleges, and technical

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it nine o'clock

Unusual Activity Stirs
Colorado Campus This Fall
The Collegiate Press Service
BOULDER, Colo. -- Students
at the University of Colorado
have been unusually active this
year. Ad hoc committees formed
since the beginning of the year
include one on women's rights,
one on students' rights and one
on a free university.
Students planned a "bitch-in,- "
the first day of what may
become a national movement like
the teach-in- ,
that attracted a
crowd of 2,800 many of whom
used the five minutes alloted to
them to complain about the university, the world, or life in
general.
During the Vietnam Days,
an ad hoc committee
Oct.
a moderately
staged
march and lecture
session, and had a card section
which spelled out "peace in Vietnam" on one side and "Negotiations Now" on theother at the
homecoming game against Iowa
State.
A
weekly debate called
"Harangue" has also been
started, and every Tuesday at
noon a crowd gathers around the
new fountain on campus to hear
debates on topics of current
concern.
15-1-

well-attend-

Then the Senate Internal
Security Subcommittee (SISS)
which
issued a study on teach-in- s
included an unflattering report
of the two Colorado teach-inone last May and the other in
June. The source of information
was withheld by the SISS staff
which compiled the report.
s,

According to the unknown
correspondent, (students referred
to him as the "faceless fink"),
a faculty cabal of five professors
These
controlled the teach-infive were listed as close friends
of two other professors who had
been Communists in the 1930's.
s.

Colorado Daily as chairman of
the "bitch-in- "
committee, and
had tacked his name to the end of
the report of the anonymous correspondent.
day before
Then, Oct. 27-- the
Dodd retracted the
the teach-i- n
report on CU, but covered his
retreat with a parting shot at
"extreme elements" on campus.
renamed the
The teach-in- ,
"Teach-i- n
On Civil Liberties,"
went on as scheduled in spite of
retraction of the report it was
protesting. It was divided into
five panels: an answer to the
civil
unknown correspondent,
liberties in general, the politics
of denial, H