xt73tx353v48 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73tx353v48/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700122  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 22, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 22, 1970 1970 2015 true xt73tx353v48 section xt73tx353v48 Tie
Thursday, Jan. 22, 1970

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Kernel

Kemtucecy

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LXI, No. 73

GPSA Asks

Third Voice

Legere Raps Bright,
Questions Petitioning
By MIKE WINES
Kernel Staff Writer
A third voice has been raised
in connection with Monday
night's Student Government Assembly walkout.
Jerry Legere, speaker of the
Student Government Assembly,
issued a statement yesterday
condemning representative
Steve Bright and six other SG
for petitioning
representatives
for a special meeting of the SG
assembly.
The meeting was proposed to
consider a bill offered by Bright,
the same bill which provoked
Monday's walkout by five SG
representatives.
Bright's bill called for a rescheduling of SG elections to
coincide with advance registration for the fall 1970 semester.
The bill provided that polling
places be placed near registration tables in order to increase
participation in the elections.
Five representatives, all
Greeks, walked out of the assembly as the bill came up for
debate.

meeting broke up with no
tion taken on the bill.

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Manipulation
Legere accused Bright of
"manipulation" of the assembly
in his attempt to schedule a
special meeting. "It is his attempt not only to control the
assembly but also to gain free
in launching
his
publicity
course for the future. It is interesting to note that the meeting was scheduled for the Complex Central facility," he stated.
Legere noted that the last
Student Government meeting
marked the first time the assembly had met in a residence
hall in an attempt to make
SG more acceptable to the students.
"The results of this experiment . . . did not show encouraging signs and after consultations with several other
I decided to
representatives,
have meetings in the Commerce
Building," said Legere.
He claimed that it was the
speaker's responsibility to acquire the meeting room and
for any
that the five make preparations
Bright reported
meetings called.
representatives walked out on
"The only reaction from the
Futrell's order. Their absence
' last meeting was that it enlowered the attendance at the
couraged and spurred contend- meeting to a number insuffiPlease Turn To Pace 2
cient to call a quorum, and the

Sanction For
Beer Sales
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ST. CHARLES
Kernel Staff Writer

By JEANNIE

The Graduate and

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At its Wednesday
night
meeting, the GPSA also appointed two students to work
with the Student Government
committee on obtaining such a
license.
Elections for new GPSA officers will be at the next meeting at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 25 in
CB 106.

w

v.

Profes-

sional Student Association
(GPSA) has agreed to petition
the administration to seek a
beer license for the Student
Center.

Jerry Buckman, who will not

be running for GPSA president

again, expressed concern over
the potential power of the president's office.

.

Kernel Photo by Miml Fuller

The Graduate and Professional Student Association voted Wednesday night at its monthly meeting in the Classroom Building to
petition the Administration for a beer license for the Student Center.
Jerry Buckman, right, the president of the association announced
that he would not seek reelection when his present term of office
expires.

In an effort to meet the problem, the group appointed a committee, consisting of the executive officers, standing committee
heads, and two elected GPSA
members, to work with the
president on all appointments
and nominations to University
committees.
Buckman stressed that he
"would like to see the organization have as little centralized
power as possible."

The Effects Of Commonly Abused Drugs
EDITOR'S NOTE: This article, the fourth in a series
of nine, classifies the more popular drugs in use today
and explains what they do.
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1943 when Dr. Albert Hoffman, a chemist for a pharmaceutical corporation,
accidentally ingested a small
amount of LSD. Dr. Hoffman took the first LSD
trip, and since then an increasing number of individuals
have ventured into the fantastic world of illusions via
LSD.
A quantity of LSD as small as a speck of dust can
send its user on a trip that usually lasts about 12 hours.
LSD is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, and is often
taken in the form of a sugar cube, a cracker, a cookie,
or licked from a stamp or other object impregnated
with the drug.
LSD is one of the most potent hallucinogens available. A sintde ounce is enough to provide 300,000 average doses. At a user level, each dose has a potential
resale value of five dollars. Theoretically then, an ounce
market value of
of LSD would have a street-lev$1,500,000.

By RAY

HILL

Kernel Staff Writer
Centuries ago, Asian women chewed dried agaric,
rolled the masticated lump into sausages, and gave it
to their men to swallow. Soon after swallowing, the
men began to speak with persons not present and see
images invisible to their sober companions.
When a man felt his inebriety decreasing, he would
drink his urine and become intoxicated again, because
the active ingredient in agaric was excreted inthe urine.
Today, with the aid of advanced science and technology, hallucinogenic substances have become more
varied and powerful. And compared with the ancient
method of using agaric, probably more palatable.
In fact, drugs of all kinds have become more palatableso palatable that millions of Americans from
tender preteen years to well past 30 have smoked,
chewed, injected, or sniffed some kind of narcotic,
stimulant, depressant, or hallucinogenic drug. Many
experts believe America is currently in the grasp of a
serious drug problem.
This article tells what some of the problem drugs
are, where they come from, and what they do to the
body.
HALLUCINOGENIC DRUGS. Several drugs fall in
this category. Probably the most famous is lysergic acid
diethylamide, commonly called LSD and acid. LSD
was first synthesized in 1938 from ergot, a fungus that
grows on rye and wheat.
Accidentally Discovered
Its hallucinogenic properties were not discovered until

Chemists say that with suitable equipment and
knowledge LSD is easy to make if a supply of lysergic
acid or an ergot alkaloid is available. Lysergic acid
is produced by a fermentation process.
Increases Heart Rate
A dose of LSD increases pulse and heart rate, causes
a rise in blood pressure and temperature, dilates the
eye pupils, and causes shaking hands and feet, doctors
say. It makes the palms cold and sweaty and flushes
the face or makes it pale. Users also shiver with chills
and goose pimples, have a wet mouth, and suffer irregular breathing, nausea, and loss of appetite.
No conclusive evidence has yet been found between
LSD and chromosomal breaks, doctors report. But if
LSD does break chromosomes, the damage is permanent,
they say. Chromosomes never repair themselves.
Since LSD has been brought under federal control,
a newer and harsher synthetic has appeared on the illicit market called dimethyltryptamine (DMT). DMT is
a synthetic indole and is also found in seeds of the
South American plant Piptadenia peregrina, doctors
explain.
A DMT trip is not as long as an LSD trip. DMT
works faster and the trip lasts only about two hours.
Doctors say the trip begins and ends more abruptly
than an LSD trip.
Cactus Plant
Mescaline, another hallucinogenic agent, is a
derivative present in the buttons of the
Lophophora williamsii, a small cactus plant. It is
sometimes called the Peyote Cactus and the Mescal

chemically from the
cactus.
Peyote, long used by Indians in the southwestern
United States, produces hallucinations similar to those
of LSD. The peyote buttons are taken from the plant
and eaten as they are. Sometimes the buttons are ground
into powder and placed in capsules.
Psylocybin is another hallucinogenic agent. It is
an indole found in the Psilocybe mexicana mushroom.
It too causes effects similar to LSD. Even some varieties of morning glory seeds are hallucinogenic and
work on a principle similar to LSD.
Tolerance to the hallucinogens develops rapidly, doctors say. A regular user must constantly increase his
dosage to receive the same effects as he did with the
first dose. If the person stops using the drugs, tolerance
is usually lost in two or three days. There is
among LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline, altolerance to mescaline develops more slowly
though
than to the other two.
Psychological Effects
Hallucinogen-induce- d
dependence is psychological,
not physical, says Dr. Harris Isbell, professor of medicine
and pharmacology at the Medical Center. He says
"hallucinogens have a particular attraction for adolescents and young adults who are socially maladjusted
and who have heard of the new experiences and insights
supposedly obtained with these drugs."
Because there is no evident physical dependence,
and because tolerance develops and disappears rapidly,
periodic rather than continuous use is the pattern, says
Dr. Isbell, who is also the former director of the narcotics hospital in Fayette County.
"All hallucinogenic drugs taken in sufficient doses
are dangerous," he says. "Reappearance of the hallucinated, disorganized state may appear months after the
original effect has worn off."
"If a person is prepsychotic or has a history of
psychiatric disorders, LSD may trigger a permanent
psychotic condition," says Dr. Abraham Wikler, professor of psychiatry at the Medical Center and
drug researcher. "Accidents may occur in judgement.
A person may think he is invulnerable to injury and step
out in the path of traffic and be killed."
Suicidal Tendencies
"He may think he can fly," Dr. Wikler continued,
"and jump out a window to his death. He may act
out suicidal tendencies while under the influence of the
drug and kill himself."
Virtue Turn To gt 8

Cactus. Mescaline is extracted

cross-toleran-

well-know-

n

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan. 22, 1970

ft

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Protest Directed Against Corporations

CLASSIFIED

TODAY AND
TOMORROW

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Today
service organization,
Rotaract,
will hold Its first meeting- for this
semester on Thursday at 6 p.m. In
Hoom 109 of the Student Center. All
Interested students are invited to attend this meeting.
Free University classes for Thursday. Jan. 22 are:
QUEST,
"Questioning University
Education by Students and Teachers"
at 6:30 p.m. In Room 109 of the Student Center.
Foods Good, Bad and Indifferent
at 7:30 p.m. at 341 Lexington Ave.
Social Values at S p.m. at 350 S.
Upper St.
Impact of Science on Society at S
p.m. in Room 137 of the Chemistry-Physic- s.
The Air Force Officer's Qualification Test will be given Thursday,
Jan. 22 at 6:30 p.m. In Room 206
of Barker HaU.

Coming Up
Registration for beginning Judo
classes will be held Thursday and
Friday. Jan. 29 and 30. in the Student Center across from the TV
Lounge from 5 p.m. Advanced Judo
classes will meet In Alumni Gym on
p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 29, at 6:30 folk mass
Christ Church will hold a
at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 27 which
will be given by Fr. Mitchell, who
rewrote the liturgy and is the author
of the folk mass. A concert will also
be given at Memorial Hall at 8 p.m.
on Jan. 28.
basketThe women's
ball team will play Eastern at 1:30
Jan. 24 at Richmond.
p.m.,
There will be a Volunteer Programs
Workshop on Sat., Jan. 24 in the small
Ballroom of the Student Center from
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. All Interest students are Invited to attend. Registration forms may be obtained from
Anna N. Boiling, Director of Volunteer Programs, Human Relations Center, Room 120 of the Student Center.
Applications are available for second semester Junior women with a
3.0 accumulative average or better
at the Complex Commons Library.
See Frances Holllhan, Student Center
Information Desk, or the Office Tower, Room 531; deadline is Sunday,
Jan. 25.
Mortar Board is having a party in
the President's Room in the Student
Center on Sunday, Jan. 25 from 9
extra-mur-

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ALTERATIONS

Continued FVora Pare One
ers for the spring election to
open their campaigns earlier
than they had planned," Legere
said in attacking, the choice of
the Complex facility for the
special meeting.
Legere also accused the petiof a
tioning representatives
"grave discourtesy' in not personally informing him of the
meeting. "I was not sure that a
special meeting had been called
until I read it in the (Tuesday) Kernel," he said.
"I suppose that I should just
come to realize that the Kernel
is always the first to know
everything Steve Bright is doing, and that his fellow colleagues are expected to learn
by reading of his exploits in
the next Kernel edition."

In his statement, Legere Id
"concern has pow
reached the point of contradiction
he is attempting to
iLs
manipulate the assembly
very thing he charges Futrell
with doing. . . ."

Bright' s

...

He also accused Bright of
staging "a mass assault for publicitythe very charge he faced
Thorn Patt Juul with last year."
isSix other representatives
sued the petition for a special
meeting besides Bright. They
were Lynn Montgomery, David
Blair, Sallie Jo Benton, W.
Bruce Carver, Mike Green and
Buck Pennington.

V

in calling for a
meeting on Jan. 26, said it was
a "genuine effort to reestablish
the assembly as a viable organ
for student decision-makinThe assembly can be more than
a joke if it wants to be."
Legere made no mention of
Futrell's proposed meeting in
his statement.

The students will be tried by
the Committee on Student Conduct under a section of the discipline code prohibiting "intentionally disrupting the orderly
processes of the University or
obstructing or denying access to
services or facilities by those entitled to use thereof."

g.

VL
I

Cannonbali Adderley
Concert
FRIDAY, JAN. 30, 1970

Danville
High School Auditorium
8:00 - 12:30 p.m.

f

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BOOT SHOP
offers the largest'
selection of

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Futrell,

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$46 in cash, IA the student sec
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found please caiv UK ext. 88482 or

SKBYICE

the fundamental issue of full or
limited participation in Student
Government elections, but to
consider the business which
was not acted upon at the Jan.
19 meeting of the assembly
due to the irresponsible actions
of several members of the

A statement issued with the
petition said the meeting was
necessary "not only to decide

LOST
3488.

legal problems resulting from the
incident, but the university refusal to do more than provide
ball money on a loan basis. It
also refusal to comply with a
demand that all C.E. officials
be banned from campus.
Then approximately 50 members of SDS occupied the administration building to protest the
school's complicity with C.E.
They held the building for 16
hours despite a court injunction
against such action. Six were
cited for contempt of the court
order.
At the University of Iowa,
the administration has announced it will discipline students who attempted to remove
a U.S. Department of Labor recruiter from the school's placement office last month. The students were protesting what they
called the Labor Department's
support of the C.E. management
against strikers. Civil charges will
be brought against non students
involved in the incident.

where industrial recruiters were
stationed.
Sixty companies were represented by recruiters on campus,
including Lockheed, Ceneral Dynamics and Ceneral Electric, the
nation's top three defense contractors.
At Boston University, the C.E.
issue caused two outbreaks in as
were
many weeks. Twenty-fou- r
arrested when a group of protestors tried to disrupt a seminar
attended by a C.E. executive.
Students demanded that the university handle all medical and

'An Assault For Publicity9

2.

al

p.m.
Hillel will have Its first meeting of
the semester on Jan. 25 at 5:30 p.m.
at Ohavey Zion Synagogue. A Kosher
meal will be served.
Enrollment is now open for the

College Press Service
WASHINGTON (CPS) -R- ecent
protests on at least six campuses have been directed against
corporations,
particularly the
Ceneral Electric Company. Some
150,000 workers are currently
striking C.E. for increased wages
and fringe benefits.
At San Jose State College,
about 25 student members of the
Radical Action Movement (RAM)
a wing of SDS, clashed with 70
police who attempted to block
the students' access to a room
in the College Union building

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The Kentucky

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ernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4iM6.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Jan. 22,

1970- -3

More Young People Are Joining Radical Organisations
College Press Service

tions such as the
bor Party (PLP),
Alliance (YSA),
Youth Movement
Weathermen.

(CPS)-Wh- ile
WASHINGTON
the Moratorium and Mobilization committees have been
trying to figure out how to stop
the Vietnam War in 1970, more
young people than ever have been

Joining radical political organiza-

Birth Rate-Problem

Attendance at a recent PLP
national council meeting in New
Haven, Conn, was over 700.

-

A

By RACIIAEL KAMUF

Kernel Staff Writer
Sociologists, statisticians, and
ordinary people have long been
concerned with the expanding
population that is rapidly filling
up the habitated areas of the
world. Predictions have been
made as to how the world will be
able or unable to handle future
generations.
Zero Population Growth, Inc.
has an answer that would eliminate the necessity of these pre- dictions, for the United States

at least. If the birth rate of this
country were to remain constant
and this nation would experience no increase in population,
future generations would be able

to live comfortably.
A zero population growth
could be achieved if couples
would limit their family to an
average of two children. For those
who want larger families, ZPG
sees adoption as the answer.
ZPC is a young organization,
barely a year old, but it has gained
considerable interest among peoples of diverse backgrounds who
are concerned about an
world.
Dr. Wayne Davis, of the Biology Department, and Mrs.
Angela Cooper are heading a
drive to establish a ZPG chapter
on this campus. A ZPC class is
held every Wednesday at the Student Center at which the population explosion, its effects, and the
possible solution are presented
and discussed.
Wednesday, Dr. Walter Abbott of the Sociology Department
presented statistics, facts, and

Spokesmen for PLP, a faction of
SDS, said more than a third of
those present had joined the
group since summer. "This is one
of the largest SDS conferences
ever held, and it shows the organization is stronger now than ever
before," said John Pennington,
national PLP secretary.
Some 600 attended a four-daYSA convention
held during
Christmas vacation in Minneanational chairpolis.
man, Larry Seigle claimed YSA
has between 5,000 and 10,000
members, including 3,000-4,00- 0
members at 200 colleges and universities and 90 high schools. He
said college membership has increased one-thirover a year ago.
A five-da- y
"war council" held
by the SDS Weathermen in Flint,
Mich, over the Christmas holidays drew 300, and a recent
meeting of RYM in Atlanta, Ca.
drew the same number. RYM
spokesmen claimed a national
membership of more than 1,000.
All these groups are to the left
of both the Moratorium and Mobilization in that they subscribe
y

d

.

Dr. Abbott gave possible

al-

ternatives to population control:
intelligently designed and constructed cities that would
provide a large population with
a pleasant environment, and migration. Ninety percent of the
people live in ten percent of the
land area. If technologists could
create a method of developing
deserts and other waste lands,
the sociologists sees a movement
to these areas as a temporary
relief, not a cure.
"Repeal, not reformation" of
all existing abortion laws in an
objective of the group.
ZPG also advocates a change
in tax laws that would do away
with the present $G00 exemption
per child after the second cliild
unless a case of adoption is involved. Tliis would discourage
future births according to the
group and should not be retroactive to existing children.

to the Marxist view that capital

ism must be overthrown before
imperialism and exploitation of
workers and minority groups can
end. There are, however, serious
ideological differences between
them.
At the YSA convention, for
example, students were regarded
with esteem as a potential rev
olutionary force. Delegates decided that capturing control of
orthodox student governments
should receive prime emphasis.
At the PLP gathering on the other
hand, students were seen as secondary forces in the movement
whose task should be to organize
the workers. The Weathermen are
known to feel that students, because they accept the privileged
sanctuary of the university, are
incapable of playing a major
role in the revolution.
Both PLP and YSA passed
resolutions supporting the General Electric strike by boycotting
C.E. products andthrowingG.E.
recruiters off campus. All four
stressed the importance of building the women's liberation movement and combating male chauvinism. YSA condemned the Weathermen for being "ultra-leftist- "
adventurers who think the revolution can be won by fighting
pitched battles in the streets with
repolice. The Weathermen
portedly discussed how to in

crease violent protest in lhAnm.
ing year.
The Vietnam Moratorium
Committee, responsible for organizing the mass antiwar demonstrations Oct. 15, has announced plans for protest in 1970
that are more moderate than those
pursued duringthe fall. The plans
include helping the political campaigns of antiwar candidates,
staging April 15 taxpayer rallies,
sending entertainment troupes to
overseas G.I. bases, and circulating "we won't go" petitions
among students.
The committee, which abanh
doned its plan for regular
demonstrations after December's moratorium failed to attract many participants, said it
will push "low visibility" community organizing against the
war.
The entertainment troupes are
conceived as a way to "show
our support for the G. I. as a
person," according to Marge
Sklencar, a Moratorium
David Hawk, another
said the circulation of "we won't go" petitions
will be of special significance
because, "Now a young man
knows with more certainty whether he will be called for induction and is less inclined to put
off the decision on what he will
do about the draft."
mid-mont-

The Moratorium is also asking
for people to fast on April 13,
14, and 15 and send money saved
from not eating to agencies which

distribute relief food and funds
to victims of the Vietnam war
and the poor and oppressed in
the U.S.
The New Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam decided at a recent conference to widen the scope of its
activities. It passed resolutions
supporting the Black Panthers,
tax resistance and the C.I. movement. It asked the antiwar movement to support a rally planned
by the Black Panthers this winter
at the United Nations to get that

organization to investigate

ran

S

thers.

On April 15, the Mobilization
n
plans
picketing and
boycotting, group tax protests
or refusals, savings bond returns
at offices
by CI's, and s
and stockholder meetings of
corlarge, defense-contractianti-inflatio-

porations.
Support of the CI movement
will involve a mass action on
Good Friday, March 27, and on
Memorial Day, May 30. The first
mass
action
is tentatively
planned to include marches on
military bases across the country.

H1H 9

m3M

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11:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.

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K

I

T.

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...

II

T)uW

1

al-

leged genocide perpetrated by the
U.S. government against the Pan-

8F

over-populat-

contradictory statements concerning population growth. The
statements were contradictory
because the "experts" are unable to agree on how many people the world is able to accomodate.
Dr. Davis feels that the three
billion plus inhabitants now on
this planet are the limit. Harris
Brown gives fifty billion as the
saturation point, a figure that
will be reached in the 22nd century if the birth rate continues
at the present 1.7 percent. Man
will then possibly find nourishment from the seas' algae.

Progressive La
Young Socialist
Revolutionary
(RYM)andSDS

mm

* This Is The Year
Whatever 1370 means to other
k
countries, it could be a
year to South Vietnam. During 1970 the vast and mighty American military presence will, according to all present expectations, be
very considerably lessened. 1970
thus becomes the year in which
Saigon must show what it can do
on its own to protect itself upon
the battlefield and to strengthen
itself politically.
For years Saigon has felt that,
however desirable it might be to
weld its own military strength and
underpin its own political stability,
there were always the Americans
there to fall back on. Those days
are drawing to a close. Unless there
is a startling reversal of American
policy a reversal extremely unlikely in view of political realities in
the United States -1- 971 will dawn
with a far reduced American presence in South Vietnam. Therefore
the current twelvemonth signifies
the end of Saigon's long period of
grace.
Nor is there any reason why this
should not be so. The five years
which have passed since the United
States began its large-scal- e
military
action in Vietnam are sufficient to
have enabled Saigon to create a
successful military force, if such a
creation be at all possible. Presently, the United States is pouring
a monumental volume of military
hardware into South Vietnamese
hands. At the same time, the American forces still on hand are sufficient to provide a shield behind
make-or-brea-

which the ARVN can operate without bearing the total weight.
If such are not the provisions
for victory and success, they are at
least as much so as will ever be
possible in Vietnam. It is thus up
to Saigon to make sure that not
a moment of 1970 is thrown away.
And this applies as much to the
political situation as to the military.
No amount of military equipment,
training or indocrination will succeed if Saigon remains unable to
win at least the passive acceptance
of the South Vietnamese masses.
No one expects the peasant in the
Mekong Delta, along the coast or
in the mountains to love the Saigon
governme