xt73xs5j9z6w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73xs5j9z6w/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1969 yearbooks ukyrbk1969 English , Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection Kentuckian '69 text Kentuckian '69 1969 2012 true xt73xs5j9z6w section xt73xs5j9z6w ^into(;&ifii!i *6@
  University Archives Margaret I.  'ing Library - North
University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky    40506

  Kentuckian '69
Reappraisal
Gretchen Marcum, Editor
University of Kentucky
Lexington, Kentucky '4&tV&,
Fall 1968Alpha Delta Pi  Formal Sal Mineo DayFall  1968
- ... ... U.K. vs. Florida1968 U.K. vs. Florida1968
 George Wallace Convocation

 Julian Bond Speech
 Fraternity Rush1968  Alpha Xi Delta Christmas Party
10
 Haggin Hall Pantie RaidSpring 1969
11 The University Board of Trustees unanimously approved a motion by Gov. Louie B. Nunn that the student body be commended for its conduct at Saturday's convocation with Presidential candidate George C. Wallace.
"They have demonstrated that they are responsible young people," Gov. Nunn said.
12
 'We will meet force with superior force.
Gov. Louie B. Nunn
13 
Autumn1968
14
 
Autumn1968
15  Fall Rush1968
17 Getting to know you: Sorority RushFall 1968
18
 Free UniversityFall 1968
19 '
20
 Overheard at a Board of Trustees meeting: Chandler to Futrell; ' I hope you will be as good a president as Wally has been, he's been a nice boy."
21 Cor.  5:7. We walk  by faith;  not  by sight.
22
  Ill
24
 
25 
I
26
RemembrancesSpring 1969
 - .
27 y
28
 Rebel FlagsHomecoming 1968
29 30
 
"m,

31 
PRIVATE

Dr. Kirwan at Student Rights Protest
32
 Dr. Kirwan at Complex Dedication Reception
 
34
Woodland Park Party
 Pi Kappa Alpha Party

35 Winter Vigil

36
 



Spring Vigilantes
37 
Presidential GreetingsStudent DemonstrationSpring 1969
38
 
Presidential GreetingsStudent DemonstrationSpring 1968
39 Guerilla Theatre1969
40
 Guignol Theatre1969
41 


"Deep in my heart I know all white men hate niggers. I am a white man."
Attorney William Kunstler

42
 "I am no racist." Senator Strom Thurmond
43 
Youth Revolution1969
44
 
45 46
 


47 
48
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In September Greeks began their semi-annual search for new members. Sorority formalities present an interesting contrast to the relaxed atmosphere of the fraternity party  yet whether hard sell or soft  the results are the same.

54
 55 H
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56
The cries of last years' aching feet were heard by the administration. In August the students began using the campus bus service. Although the buses were overcrowded and generally late, they were much appreciated on cold and rainy days.
 Kentucky Educational Television moved into full production this year. The KET network is the largest in the country. Operating from its Lexington base it serves thirteen transmitters across the state.

57 You could have predicted it. George Wallace comes to town and all the hippies from the University turn out to protest. Only . . . they're carrying Wallace signs. Ooh, those hippies. I tell you, you just can't trust them at all.
58
 H
'
59 
60

 Thanks to the Faculty Senate, the University Community now is assured of having relevant speakers. In fact, we can have only relevant speakers. That means we can have the presidential candidate of the Socialist Workers Party. And we can have Al Capp. Thank heavens: what would education be without revelant speakers?
61 
8
Although similar in appearance, the Sigma Chi and Lambda Chi Derbies are entirely different in intent. Sigma Chi Derby offers sorority pledges a chance to run around in shorts before an assembled throng of fraternity men. The Lambda Chi Alpha Pushcart Derby, later in the fall, gives fraternity men a chance to show off for the sorority girls by pushing an orange crate on wheels around the campus.
62
 63 
64 The Free University is where you learn things you can't learn in class. Things about yourself and other people. Before the Free U., people still learned these things one supposes. But the Free U. is a nicer place than the Botanical Gardens.
65 ________ **.


Even while the multi-million dollar Complex was being dedicated, university dorms were badly overcrowded. In spite of the overcrowded dorms the Board of Trustees decreed that any student, with few exceptions, could be forced to live in University housing.
66
 67 Only three plays were presented by the Guignol this year. The three, Dark of the Moon, Three Men on a Horse, and The Rivals perpetuated the tradition of fine plays for the Theater Arts Department.
68
  70
 Good Heavens, it's Sal Mineo Memorial Day!
Sal Mineo? Boy, he had some great hits.
Yeah, But that's not why we're celebrating him.
No?
Nope.  It's 'cause he is such a great figure of rebellious youth.
I
71 It's hard to believe but two national political figures graced the U.K. campus in one week. Democratic Vice-Presidential nominee, Senator Edmond Muskie, gave a "non-political" speech. Julian Bond, an up and coming young Georgia representative, charmed the crowd with his technique.
72
 73 Election Night, '68: Members of the Political Science Department kept tabs on the major elections in the computer room. Outside this hub of frontline action others watched it all on the tube. A lot of them were probably really interested. Then again, nothing else was on.
74
 
75 i
1
A

By far the most unusual social event in the land of derbies was the Beaux Arts  Ball.
76
 77 Homecoming is when you schedule somebody you think you can beat. Sometimes things don't work out, but nobody really notices. After this years' Homecoming, a whole flock of pigeons reeled wildly in the air above Stoll Field. Local authorities surmised that they had soused themselves on alcohol vapor rising from the stands.
78
 WW'V
79 1
 Football is America's vicarious frontier. After all those decades of action, spreading the nation across the continent, we all turn out for the action and excitement of gridiron clashes. It sort of makes you wonder, sometimes, just how the West was won anyway.
81 The Student Center Board is one of the few recognized student groups that does anything. A speaker series, the Grille Coffeehouse, 50 cent movies, art shows, concerts, and dances are all part of the entertainment offered by the SCB.
82
  Students expressed their opinions in two different ways with similar results. The Student Government sponsored Housing Referendum, in which 97% of those voting decided against forced housing, did not seem to impress the Board of Trustees. Intra-Fraternity Council used a form of expression popularly called a "Bitch-In" in an attempt to settle differences with the administration.
84
 GOVERNMENT
REFERENDUM
85 '                     .   
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86
It snowed.
 
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87 It was a good year for U.K. Basketball. Adolph Rupp won his 800th game. U.K. won its 1,000th game. The Wildcats won the SEC, and went to the NCAA.   Hohum.
88
  111
Parties, parties, every weekend. The strain of going to all those parties can get you down. It begins to really drag on you. After a while, it's enough to drive a person to drink.
IV
90
 91 

There are two kinds of lunch money; one kind you collect, the other you spend.
92
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93 1

94
 Les Miserables, an independent team, won the quiz bowl competition for the third consecutive year. Other students exercised their physical muscles by participating in intramurals.
95 At another convocation safety critic Ralph Nadar landed a broadside at business and industry for their laxity in safety measures.
Everytime the University needs a president, someone mentions Elvis Stahr. This year he came near enough to speak at Founders' Day.
96
 97 98
 Engineering Week gave the rest of the campus a chance to see what Engineering students do when they aren't working slide rules. The Pence Hall fires, hopefully at least, revealed almost nothing about what architects do.
99 		
		
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Among the events at the annual AWS Awards Night was the tapping of new members into Mortar Board.
100
 Miss U.K. of 1969 was Theresa Re-sig, a member of Chi Omega.
101 The Arts and Sciences Committee on Learning investigated the intellectual climate of the University.
102
 The Young Americans for Freedom brought noted South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond to campus. In his speech, he defined America's paramount issue as the dilemma over the Panama Canal.
103 
When it was too warm to snow, it rained.
104
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105 m
106
 107 
Focus '69 participants William Kunstler, noted civil liberties attorney, Ansom Mount, representative of Playboy magazine, T. George Harris, editor of Careers Today magazine, and John Sigenthaler, editor of the Nashville Tennessean, discussed Social Morality. The attendance bore mute testimony to the findings of the Learning Committee.


108
 
109 '.

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Just in case Lexington is invaded, ROTC members practiced war games in the surrounding countryside. On another front, the Lexington Peace Council conducted a silent vigil in front of Local Boards 23 and 127.
110
 9
1
 
112 
Among the many activities open to students are Blue Marlins, Precision swim team, and the Concert Band.
113 114
 Ah, Spring
115 The campaign,

I
th
the election,
116
 
the result.
117 118
 Son of Teen Angel Day, Oh yeah Ooh wah, wah, Bop-shoo  ditty  ditty.
119 


120
 I
The University's two recognized minorities  Blacks and Old Folks  both held art festivals in the past year.
121 
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Spring sports gain little student attention in the busy second semester. In spite of the lack of crowd support, the spring athletes had a good year. Both the tennis and golf teams had winning seasons, although the baseball  record was a little disappointing.
122
 The acquisition of head coach John Ray, plus the results of the spring drills and the annual Blue-White game promised to make the fall season at least as good.
123 The step child of University athletics, the soccer team, fared well in SEC competition despite the lack of equipment and depth.
In addition to Coach Press Wheelan's impressive individual and relay trackmen, field men came on strong for the first time this spring. The U.K. Relays were well attended by over 900 competitors and after the semester U.K. hosted the NCAA National Federation Meet.
124
 

p
125 Religion is still a vital force on campus. College Life discussions were well attended throughout the year. As in past years, Ash Wednesday services were conducted for the faithful.
126
 127 The University truly had the South's outstanding college weekend this year. In addition, the Little Kentucky Derby was held.
128
 129 130
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132 The end of the spring semester is a mixed blessing. Warm weather means classes outside; it also means finals.
133 134 Statistics show that for each hour of class credits earned, a graduating senior will have consumed four gallons of beer, two hundred cigarettes, and ten days of his life.
135 m
Dr. Otis Singletary, new President of the University of Kentucky, was introduced to the University Community at a reception after the termination of the semester.
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EPACE PACEPACE PACEPACE PACE; ESET SETPACE PACESET SETPACE E SETPACE SETPACE SETPACE S E| Darrell Rice, though seemingly shy and unassuming, is a crusader. This crusading spirit was exemplified in the editorials written by him as editorial page editor of the Kernel. The spirit showed itself in quieter ways too: an excellent student, he turned down an invitation to Phi Beta Kappa; a capable journalist, the quality of his endeavors regardless of subject was outstanding; a gentle person, the subtle influence of philosophy gained him the respect of those who knew him.
140
 Dr. Thomas Blues possesses a rare and unde-finable talent, he is able to teach. The English pro-fessor's classes are a cascade of insight into literature and life. His lectures demand nothing less than the sharpest mind a student dan muster, and his standards require excellence. His interest and ability in dealing with both student and subject extend beyond fifty-five minutes.
141 142
 Mike Hall, assistant art professor, serves the University in two capacities. An outstanding sculptor, he has shown pieces in prestigeous shows all over the country. Hall was named New York's "Sculptor of the Month" and later displayed one of his works in New York's Whitney Museum. As a teacher he has created an atmosphere encouraging student initiative, and molded the University Art School into one of the finest in the country.
143 Mason Taylor, graduate student in sociology, was instrumental in the development of the Graduate Student Association. While the idea for such an organization had been discussed by others too, Mason served to get everyone together to give graduate students a much needed voice in University affairs.
144 
Dr. l_6wis Donohew's contributions to the University have been many. The journalism professor, in addition to being a fine teacher, is an excellent and prolific researcher. He recently presented a paper to an international symposium in Yugoslavia. Donohew has served the University community as one of the thirteen sponsors of the "Non-Violent Seminars", has worked hard on the Student Code, and has been a key figure in obtaining a doctoral program in Communications.
145 Committee of Five
Guy Mendes took the initiative in organizing the Student Rights Protest. The managing editor of the Kernel began his journalistic career as a freshman, and has held nearly every position available on the paper. He is on the executive committee of the United States Student Press Association, and has won several awards for his writing ability. Mendes was awarded the Speech Club's award presented to an outstanding speaker who is not a Speech major. His talents earned him a spot as one of Newsweek's 15 interns.
Thom Pat Juul's main interest has been student politics. A member of Young Americans for Freedom, he expanded his interest to an active level serving as a Student Government Representative and a representative on the Graduate Student Council. Juul formed and headed a political party in S.G. and ran for the presidency on their ticket. A dynamic plan for the reorganization of student affairs was also Juul's brainchild.
Linda Bailey, the only woman on the committee also served in Student Government and sponsored some meaningful legislation. The political science major, who has resigned from a political and a social organization on moral grounds, was a corridor advisor in Holmes Hall.
146
 Geoffery Pope, a freshman transfer student from Transylvania, made his presence on campus known in one short semester. After a few months of membership he was elected chairman of the Community Alliance for Responsible Social Action. Level headed and amiable, the Zeta Beta Tau pledge, has shown a potential for leadership.
Mike Farmer has been active in many areas of campus life. The senior sociology major was graduated Phi Beta Kappa, received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship to study at the State University of New York, participated in the Dillard House Experiment, and served as the first president of the re-established Sigma Nu chapter. Upon graduation Farmer was presented the highest honor the University bestows on any of its students, the Sullivan Medallion.
147 
Jim Green is a pacesetter in a real physical sense. The Eminence, Kentucky speedster qualified for the '68 Olympic Trials and only injuries kept him from competing in Mexico City. Green has shattered nearly all the University sprint records. An exceptional individual runner, he works well in team relays. Green holds the NCAA record for the 60 yard dash and set the Madison Square Garden 60 yard mark while defeating two Olympic medal winners.
148 
Sue Dempsey, junior agriculture major, is a versatile person, distinguished in many areas of campus life. In addition to being a fine student, she was president of her residence hall, in Links, junior women's honorary, a Girl Scout leader of a troop at Manchester Center, and an active member of the YWCA. She was one of two selected to take part in the Experiment in International Living, and this summer is gaining practical education in the application of her major working on a project in Kenya.
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149 Dr. A. D. Albright has a sign on his desk stating, "The buck stops here." and at the University, it does. An able administrator, Albright is kept so busy that he is rarely seen by students. In fact, numerous theories questioning his existence have been hypothesized by some whose efforts to see him have been thwarted. These photographs hopefully disprove the doubting theorists. The executive Vice-President has guided the University through many years as the President's right hand man. In the fall Dr. Albright will be going to Belgium on a Fulbright Fellowship. (He is pictured here speaking Flemish.) There he will conduct seminars at two Belgian universities, and will also serve as a special consultant to the Belgian government.
150 

151
 Judy Schroeder, only a freshman, plunged into college life the way few do. Judy cared, not only about her friends, or this campus, though she served as president of her residence hall, but about what goes on outside the cloistered university. Judy helped to mobilize, first in the dorm and later on campus, the Emergency Committee for Biafran Relief.
152 \
Dr. Gene Mason, associate political science professor, is recognized as an authority on Kentucky politics, but his expertise extends much further. Dr. Mason has worked with political figures of the stature of the late Senator Robert F. Kennedy. One of the co-sponsors of the colloquium, "Working Solutions to the Dimensions of Poverty," he brought nationally and internationally known speakers to U.K. for the series. Mason has served on numerous student and community panels. His article on politics in Appa-lachia was published in the Nation. Dr. Mason is educating not only within the university, but in the community as well.
153 Dr. David Denton's classes are an experience. Sessions with the education professor are somewhat unique and experimental as sensitivity training is frequently part of his teaching technique. Dr. Den-ton is one of the new breed of teachers that encourages student initiative and creativity in previously structured subject material. He extended "educating" to include the Free University, conducting classes in multi-senuous knowing. A student of psychology, philosophy, and drama as well as education, Dr. Denton is an experience.
154 Don Pratt sometimes student is a draft resister. While his actions speak louder than words, perhaps his words are more revealing than any that could be written about him.
"We have come to a time when each of us has had to ask ourselves, society remains the same or radically changes.
Today's world has certain ideals which must be attained and then upheld: FREEDOM, JUSTICE, AND EQUALITY. Each of these ideals should've been given to us as a "constant," but since they were not, and are not, the "crusade" toward them Is (constant).
When it comes to achieving these ideals, in part or in total, when answering the question of "the same or radical change," "inactivity or revolution," to-day's world or a potential tomorrow's," then give me the latter in each case."
155 J^i

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EAPPRA EPPARA PAPAAI Free University: An
In
158 Innovation In Education
That unstructured, free flowing, initiative based concept of education known as Free University found its way to U.K. in '68. Founded by Miss Meg Tassie and carried on with the guidance of Dr. David Denton, and students Robert Ladner and Jeff De Luca, the Free University, for three months offered interested students an alternative to the anonymity of the University learning experience.
Based on various off-campus locations and conspicuous in its informality, Free U. classes covered Multi-Sensuous Knowing.
Using the sense of touch, students participated in McLuhan inspired sensitivity experiences.
159 
Bob musi banjc of m
160
 Bob Ladner lead the assault on the auditory sense in a Free U. session in ethno-musicology. Students listened to the music of such folk instruments as the guitar, banjo, and dulcimer. The participants were given a chance to discover what kind of music they could make.
161 A session exploring the gastronomic delights of international cooking was conducted by Jeff De Luca.


162
 
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Free U. lasted only three months. Its death however, can be attributed less to student attrition than to an inability of the instructors to devote sufficient time to develop the program fully.
Participants were aware that Free U. was both an idea and an experiment. The experiment met with less than success but the idea still lingers. Free University will most likely return.
163
 1
I
Innovations In Art Hang From The
The Reynolds Building.
Stan Mock opens its dark, battered door and plods up the uneven, seasick stairway to the second floor, waving a foggy hello to secretary Donna Van Winkle, surreptitiously back-handing snow-white tufts from his denim jacket.
He creaks across the Reynolds building's wooden floor, pondering in wooly wooziness this March day's strange beginnings, finally sighing what thehell and turning to enter a classroom, humming a vague f a c s m i I e of the Beatles "Eleanor Rigby."
164
_____________________
 Rafters In The Reynolds Building
Another lamb stands waiting patiently inside, surrounded by a small group of students with that gosh-whiz-mommy-l-never-touched-the-cookies dewiness dampening their beady little eyes. This is the third such creature to confront Stan Mock this morning, the first found waiting in his front yard at seven o'clock.
Mock stops humming and creaks in place. At this moment he is jolted by a large blue-uniformed gentleman who comes on like Little Caeser, informing him of his impending arrest on three counts of lamb theft. Mock laughs. Sort of.
Stan Mock is an art instructor at the university who this chilly morning simply happened to be on his way to the Reynolds Building to meet with his regularly scheduled class. The policeman, of course, is a plant in a bit of a grand sham by Mock's students.
Such behavior hardly typifies student - instructor exchanges. From their educational inception students are taught to present more traditional offerings, such as the decorous and always ingratiating apple. Seldom do students serve up sheep to their instructors. But then, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish students from sheep in Academe.
165
 II
The institution seems to take on progressively more pejorative connata-tions in direct ratio to the number of years spent within it.
The freshman's virginal dreams of educational ecstacy are methodically debauched, as learning becomes more and more a hollow ritual.
The high-sounding rhetoric of "the pursuit of knowledge" too soon crashes against the reality of gross memorization and pavolian regurgi-tation, as subject matter complexity is reduced to a castrated dwarf of a test form with shriveled, oversimplified multiple choice or true-false format.
Professors become faces and names who faithfully appear three hours weekly to recite their observations before rooms of numbered chairs, leaving the grading to graduate students who are products of the same Orwel-lian system.
166
 There remain notable exceptions to this automatist syndrome among the university faculty, but their paucity is depressing and too often they are subjected to whithering colleague criticism or even the educational albatross of an unrenewed teaching contract.
Ill
In the midst of this dream that fails, the Reynolds Building stands as a veritable fortress. The rather plain-looking two-story brick structure on South Broadway faces directly across from Adams' Restaurant, the latter a central artifact in the university's pre-Os-wald reputation as "the country club of the South" and still renown for its Wednesday night drinking bouts following Greek gatherings.
Inside this somewhat drab exterior a large segment of the university Department of Art has been slowly and somewhat quietly building an empire with
the magic missing element of academe, participation, serving as a touchstone.
Art is quite often conjured up in the mass mind-set as a separate, segmented, esoteric, even sto