xt73xs5jd27p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt73xs5jd27p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691112  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1969 1969 2015 true xt73xs5jd27p section xt73xs5jd27p Tie Kmthjcky Kkeneil
Wednesday Evening, Novcmlcr

12,

19

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Trustees Hear
Testimonies On
Speaker Policy
GEORGE JEPSON
Managing Editor
The Board of Trustees' Committee on the University's speaker policy heard testimony from
some 20 students and faculty
By

members during a
open hearing Tuesday.

The

committee

four-hou-

r

comprises

board members George W. Griffin Jr., Mrs. Rexford S. Blazer,
Dr. Robert Rudd of the College
of Agriculture and Dr. Paul
Sears of the Chemistry Department.
A policy statement must be
ready when the state legislature
meets in January. Griffin felt
that the statement finally adopted "would be accepted" by the
legislature.
A statement on the University's policy toward outside
speakers was promised some 18
months ago by then President
John VV. Oswald.
The board had awaited the
arrival of a new president before implementing the policy
because, as Griffin said, 'The
new president certainly should
have something to say about
what would be in it, and it does
have the approval of Dr. Single-tarcertainly in principle."

Vol. LXI, No. 56

V
t

W1

X

4

Linda Bailey, David Blair and
Detlef Moore.
SG Suggestions

The SG representatives wanted removal of a portion of the
present document which would
give the President's Office the
right to "prescribe conditions
for the conduct of programs at
which

pear."

speakers
second

of expression."
A third sentence asked to be
removed is one stating that

'The faculty must bear the

ma-

jor responsibility for carrying
out the University's mission of

producing

and

disseminating

knowledge."
SG wants also to alter the
final sentence which states that
". . . faculty members are free
to bring speakers to the camto include administrapus
tors and registered student organizations also.
Stan Smith of the Chemistry
Department and a member of
the executive committee of the
American Association of University professors was the only person to testify before the board's

..."

y,

Hearings To Stimulate Reactions
The opening hearings were
part of the trustee committee's
effort to stimuate campus reaction to the document which it
already has drafted for the leg-

committee in the afternoon

ses-

sion.
Smith made basically the
same points as the students,
with the addition, of his objec-

islature.

The current "Policy of The
University of Kentucky Governing Speakers from
was written by Griffin, Mrs.
Blazer and Dr. N. N. Nicholas
of the Board of Trustees.

tion to the word "proposed" in
the sentence reading: "Its policies require that no law or governing regulation of the University be violated by the proposed
speech or program."
Griffin, the committee's chairman, stated after the hearings
were over that "nobody has
fallen out with the basic

s"

The morning, session of the
open hearings was largely a
discussion between the committee and a group of students led
by John Junot, Jeff Gumer and
Student Government members
Bruce Carver, Buck Pennington,

j

.

ap-

sentence which
would be eliminated in SG's
version reads: "Registered student groups bringing speakers
to the campus will be guided by
the provisions of University policy stated above to insure the
responsible exercise of freedom
A

.1

phil-Continu-

on Page 3, Col. 5

s,

1

-

George W. C tiffin

TTonrirt

Hearing

mllcc on

Jr., chairman of the Board of Trustees'

Com-Trif-

c

University's Speaker Policy, listens to policy
gesUons from Professor Stan Smith of the Chemistry Department
as Trustee Mrs. Rexford S. Blazer sits in the background.

Rejection Possible

UK Proposed Budget Forwarded
To Council On Higher Education
By BILL MATTHEWS

Coordinator of Program Budget Planning Donald Clapp commented that since he came here in
1963 the University has never received the amount
it requested in its budget. The appropriation has
always been lower than requested.
The amount the University is allot ed seems to
be a function of the amount of money available
to the state for higher education more than any
other factor.
Clapp indicated that the legislature has given
higher education "very sympathetic hearings at all
levels," but there just aren't enough funds tocover
News Analysis
all the requests.
According to Clapp no attempt is made to alWorking in conjunction with Gov. Louie B. low within
budget requests for expected cuts.
Nunn, the Department of Finance will incor"It has been our policy to make the budget as
porate the UK budget in the governor's executive realistic as possible," he added.
state budget for the next biennium.
"We submit a budget at what we consider
UK's request for state funds is not only the
highest amount the University has ever asked for, a reasonable level," said Coordinator Clapp, stressbut also the highest amount ever requested by any ing his point, "and we never submit any budget
with the idea that it may be cut."
Kentucky institution of higher education.
Will the University get the state aid it has reRealistic as the budget may be, UK will probably
quested? Does UK really need all that money? not get the funds it asked for. The governor and
the Department of Finance will have to make
And what happens if the fund request is not apreductions due to lack of funds when the state
proved?
The answers can be predicted with a fair amount budget is drawn up.
of accuracy as: (1) Probably not. (2) Yes. (3) SomeClapp indicated that the legislature has always approved the executive budget without
thing will have to be cut.

Assistant Managing Editor
The proposed UK budget of $227.8 million
for the 1970-7- 2
biennium, approved by the Board
of Trustees last week, has been forwarded to
the Kentucky Council on Public Higher Educationcarrying with it a $144.3 million request
for state funds.
After the council has reviewed the record
high budget it will be sent to the budget division of the state Department of Finance.

Carpenter Relates Interest
In 'The Ocean''s Bottom9
By HAZEL COLOSIMO
Kernel Staff Writer
"The ocean's bottom is more
interesting than the moon's back-

A xx
T

.1

-

side."
Few men perhaps are more
qualified to make such an observation as Commander Scott
Carpenter who has worn two

x

helmets: one as Project Mercury

astronaut and now as aquanaut
in his current work in oceanography research.

,
J

Secret Pals

Scott Carpenter greets an

Kernel Photo by Kay Brookshlr
unidentified UK DELT with the secret

Delta Tau Delta handshake after Ids speech Tuesday night.

Speaking at Memorial Coliseum Tuesday night as guest
lecturer for the 1969-7- 0 Central
Kentucky Concert and Lecture
Series, Commander
Carpenter
presented an "insider's view" on
the U.S. space program and the
U.S. underwater research programpresenting the pros and
cons of each.
The competition between the

U.S. and UJS.S.R.-t- he
"space
race" was viewed by Carpenter
as that which "has inspired us to

seek a national goal and expeditions to fulfill that goal."
Carpenter questl ned the validity of the term "race" and

the term "space race" saying
"race implies a finish line, where
is that finish line?" The "finish
line" was not the achievement
of being the first to put a man
in orbit, not landing a man on
the moon it is a continuing line
of achievements with no one set
goal, he said.
The next necessary achievement Is a permanently manned
earth orbiting laboratory. The
U.S. and the U.S.S.R. differed
in their attempts at this achievement. The U.S.S.R. planned on
having the orbiting laboratory
and then attempting the moon
landing. The U.S. sidestepped
the laboratory and focused its
full attention on landing on the
lunar surface.
Although the lunar landing
Continued on Paje 3, CoL 3

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov. 12,

19G9.

'Library Burning' Illuminates Campus Ills

SAN FRANCISCO (CPS)-- In
my nearly four years of covering
the campus I've found myself
spending late evenings with
Trotsky, Marcuse, Dewey and

others meticulously trying to siphon from their voluminous
works some formula that would
be helpful in explaining the terrible absurdity of the university
today.
I, personally, was at a loss
to extrapolate generalities from
the hideous events of demonstrations or academic tragedies. And
Trotsky's dialectic, while it could
almost be applied to any
didn't seem to enlighten the situation, only burden
it. And Marcuse seemed only to
agree with my observations and
could supply no real understanding. Dewey, Hutchins, Schles-singthe whole team just
couldn't come up with any viable explanation for why things
were so incredibly messed up.
er

the University," or, "The University of Tomorrow." But, "We
just couldn't do that," Rapoport
explains. "There were no ways
of telling what would happen in
a year. Nothing could be pinned
down."
So the book quickly changed
character and came out as an
interesting series of anecdotes.
With his almost insidiously macabre smile Rapoport now boasts,
"We got everything funny into
it." But to me the book is not so
funny as frightening. For the first
time r seem to realize that what
happens in the universities is not
so muchdependent on thedynam-ic- s
of the educational complex.
The understanding of why this
president calls in cops or why
that one doesn't, has little to do,
really, with tradition, or branches
of university government, or the
structure of the university at all.
It is in part explained by the
kinds of people that run our universities. The cartoonists' character of a university administrator as an
bungling
fool who is sometimes caught up
in hopes for prestige or recluse
in timidity, are really more true
than the literati's interpretation
of him as a master of craftsman
of education. Rapoport and
Kirschbaum's book succors this
characteristic.
And with such arbitrary penetrable fools at the heads of our
nation's educational institutions,
the university becomes dangerously susceptible to the whims
and biases of the community in
which it is placed. Thus, the
southern university is the most
brutal segregationist, and the Ivy
League the most arrogant elitist.
The book will no doubt be
viciously attacked. The stories
about what really happens in
universities have been stripped
.of their academic qualifications,
their "prpperV presentations, or
absent-minde- d

CORRECTION
The article on the 1969 ' Kentuckian that appeared on page
3 of the Kernel Nov. 10 stated
that the Kentuckian staff had
received complaining letters and
that copies of the book had been
returned. It has been learned
that no such letters were received
and that only one Kentuckian
has been returned to date.
I think the book, "Is the Library Burning?," to be released
this fall by Random House, does
a lot to simplify the search for
understanding the university today. When Roger Rapoport and
Laurence Kirschbaum began
writing it, they had glamorous
intentions of discussing such
august topics as "The Death of

their literary quality. They are
simple gossipy stories, crude,
sometimes choppy, but told just
like two world war cronies exchanging stories about
The facade of excellence and
quality that is presupposed of
universities shows up as the farce
it really is.
The following excerpts from
"Is the Library Burning?" are
taken from chapters three and
eight, "The Administration" and
"The War Against the Radical,"
with the permission of Random
House and authors Roger Rapoport and Laurence Kirschbaum,
copyright 1969, Rapoport and
Kirschbaum. The book is soon to
be released by Random House
(180 p. $5.93 hardback, $1.95 Vintage paperback).
y.

On December 2, 1963, his first
school day as Acting President
of San Francisco State College,
Hayakawa welcomed 600 police
to campus at 7 a.m. Urging moderation with students, he vainly
tried to get police to wear floral
leis as peace symbols. Later in

the morning Hayakawa demonstrated his own language and
thought in action by charging
through a student mob and ripping the wires out of a soundtrack. As photographers snapped
his picture for front pages across
the country, Hayakawa beamed
and said "It's the most exciting
thing since my tenth birthday
when I rode a roller coaster for
the first time . .
During the next two weeks
he was engulfed in the politics
of joy. Hayakawa watched appreciatively as the police prodded
strikers across the campus commons. Suburban police departments begged for a chance to
send their rookies to the campus
for some spring training. But
Hayakawa only had eyes for his
seasoned regulars. From the win-d- o
w , of .his, office he marveled
'

at the police efficiency. "It was
a pleasure to see their training
improve as the days went on."
On January 23, when police sur-

rounded 459 students attending
an "illegal rally" and arrested
them, Hayakawa experienced nirvana. "It was a perfect police
sweep, a complete Joy to watch.
I'm sure it will go down in
police manuals as a classic maneuver, a textbook case."
By the time the strike ended
in March 1969, Hayakawa had
become a national celebrity. He
had visited with President Nixon,
spoken before Congress, appeared
on national television countless
times, and joked with reporters
about running for "Emperor of
California." At the University of
Colorado he put on his famous
and did a dance
in rhythm to the derisive chants
of dissident students.
But most of the time Hayakawa was busy courting middle
class audiences. His
tough style was seen during one
of his speaking tours in the late
spring of 1969. While traveling
by jet to a meeting in Los Angeles to a meeting of the Pacific Coast Electrical Contractors Association, Hayakawa
glanced at a copy of the campus
paper, the Daily Cater. He had
cut off the paper's funds and
er

tried to have it banned for its
less than sympathetic coverage
of his regime. The paper survived
independently through ads and

benefits. Turning to public relations aide Harvey Yorke, Hayakawa asked, "Aren't these kids
all working in university facilities, can't we throw the little
bastards out?" Yorke, a
veteran of the Air Force, shook
his head. "I wouldn't try anything until summer vacation."
Hayakawa sputtered, then leaned
back in his seat and dozed off.
During the limousine ride
from the airport, an
20-ye-

electrical-contractin-

akawa if the campus activists

were being led around by Moscow. Hayakawa denied it. "I
resent the notion that outsiders
are running this thing. We're
quite capable of growing our
own sons of bitches right here
on campus."

Thanks to the strike,
office had all the comforts of home a big TV, a
liquor cabinet and a refrigerator. "I enjoyed myself immensely during all the rioting,"
he said, beaming. "Whenever
there was any trouble, I stocked
up for lunch in the office. From
then on the biggest problem was
whether to have sardines or pate
de fois gras."

Haya-kawa- 's

well-stock-

A

J?

'Trolley Song9 Gets 8 Minutes

Jolly 's Album: Slick But Hollow
By TOM BOWDEN
Kernel Staff Writer

"Give

A

Damn."

A&M.

Pete Jolly.

Pete Jolly is pretty slick. He
does some slick songs, like "Little

After giving a fairly true rendition of Bobby Russell's Forbidden
Fruit, Jolly muddles through
"What the World Needs Now"
and straight into the "Trolley
Song."
Now first off, he gives it 8:37
on the time log, which is a slow
shuttle by anybody's schedule.
So of course the vibrant conciseness of the song is forsaken for
Jolly's piano ramblings, which
are merely pleasing.
It's impossible to say that Pete
Jolly is not good he is. He is.
inventive, although he does not
do justice to many of his selections. The horns add a pleasing
mellowness to Jolly's often piercing piano excursions.
o
In his
opener, "The
Look of Love," he begins with
an
stiltedly
approach, but soon
loosens into a surprisingly interesting adaptation. It is list enable.
"Whistle While You Work" is
also included (which advice Jolly
might be wise to take, at times).
Jolly's group uses the song as a
vehicle for an
flight'
around the high keys of the piano, and the results are enjoy-

Green Apples" and "What the
World Needs Now Is Love," and
he has some pretty slick arrangements, too.
He's a fairly new Herb Alpert
discovery, which means of course
that he's just "got" to use some
slick horn arrangements. Petejol-lplays jazz piano.
His lead song, "Little Green
Apples," sounds vaguely like
something you heard the last time
you rode an elevator in a downtown office building. Actually,
Jolly plays piano in a kind of
hackneyed style: it's a Brubeck-jaz- z
g
and
compromise
that emerges just about like every
other mediocre jazz pianist.
But Alpert at least gave it
slickness. In producing the album, Herb no doubt pondered
the best way to stick his omnipresent brass fingers into the
jazz pie.
Frankly, it doesn't come off
too badly, if one considers it as
background music. Pete jolly well able.
isn't agenius.
Jolly
y

Basie-swin-

on-bea-

side-tw-

t,

up-tem-

closes

Presents

pur
I

uKAUUATc

Nov. 14
Nov. 15

4
at 6, 0, 10 p.m.

at

6. B. 10 b.m.
Nov. 16 ot 6 and o p.m.

A

DOWNTOWN & TURFLAND MALL

Dm

Speda

University Students and Faculty Only!
THURSDAY of Each Week
O MEN'S & LADIES'

Suits Q9C each
O LADIES' PLAIN DRESSES ...
Q9c eath
O SKIRTS

2-pi- cce

and SWEATERS

O TROUSERS & SPORT COATS

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O SHIRTS, folded or on hangers (anytime)

with "Cive a

CINEMA

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'

two-tone- s,

Damn," which must be a hit
or something, judging from the
live audience's applause at every
chorus.
Minor observation: On the
cover, he can look mean and
virile, just like Herbie.

:

'

Student Center

Boots in all styles and
browns,
heights
blues,
tans,
and blacks.

g

executive asked Hay-

49c each
49c each
for 1.00

5 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
Chevy Chase (Across from Bcglcy's)

Northland Shopping Center
Southland (Across from Post Office)
Winchester Road (Across from LaFlamo)
Turfland Mall

mm
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Dnc.

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Nov.

12, 1909- -3

Extended Bus Service Discussed At 'Student Day'

By MIKE WINES
Kernel Staff Writer
Extended bus services, parking spaces, and new hours for
open houses were among the main

opened "partially" to students
if parking patterns dictate the
need.
Police protection for women
was discussed and students were
told that the entire security force
of the campus is now being utilized. Women were encouraged to
report incidents so police could
concentrate on areas posing the
greatest threat.

Jennings noted that the route
should prove to be equal to the
needs of the students, but said
that suggestions were welcome
and should be given to the Student Services office in the Student Center.
The new bus service will continue until the end of the semester when its usefulness will
be evaluated by Jennings and
the University Safety Director,
Joe Burch. A meeting was scheduled with the Lexington Transit
Company today to finalize the
proposed routes.

topics of discussion at last night's
"Student Day" presentation at
KeenclandHall.
Chod Jennings, Student Government director of student services, outlined the new plans for
bus routes at the meeting.
"In a meeting tonight with
Lt. Cliford Long of the campus
police, we drew up the bus routes
and stops which are considerably different from the present
Parking Relief Forecast
bussing route. Two buses will be
In other presentation topics,
in operation to service the focal
point of the campus the King representatives of the Student
Covemment shed some light on
Library.
"One will commute to the the worsening parking problem
area and and forecast relief in the distant
another will commute to the Stu- future.
Ched Jennings revealed that
dent
area.
Both buses will be leaving and ar- the construction of the
complex and the new
riving at 15 minute intervals from
Rose Street parking structure
the King Library."
Detailed copies ofthenewbus have disrupted former parking
routes will be placed in dorms problems and that it will "take
throughout the campus. Service some time to find out where peowill also be extended from 10:30 ple are going to park now."
The Rose Street structure, as
p.m. to 12 midnight, thanks to an
well as a new lot built adjacent
appropriation of $G00 by the
Government Assembly.
to Memorial Coliseum, may be
Complex-Donova-

ot

Continued from Page One

an achievement, Carpenter
warned against
in the U.S. "Do not be complacent. The U.S.S.R. is a good
competitor and continued diligence is required."
Constant criticism over the
cost of the space program and
the possibility of applying its
funds to domestic issues was
seen by Carpenter as "no solution." Cancellation of the space
program would be fruitless because "we pollute the world with
people."
Instead of rejecting the space
program, Carpenter expressed the
hope that the nation would "be
patient with what we have
learned from the technology we
used to send man to the moon."
The space technology when
applied to. vital areas has proved
successful, as in the valuable
use of computers in the medical
field, and without this progress
made through the technology,
Carpenter remarked "We'd be
ten years behind."

Ts

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v.

SHARON FANNIN, Stylist
FROSTING,

Classlfiel aartislng will be Mii.
a
ted
basis nly. Ats aaay
be placed ta persea Menday threaga
Friday ar by mall, payment laeleeed,
te THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Balsa
111, Jaaraallam Bldg.
pre-pa- id

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Switching his talents from
that of the space program to the
oceanography research program,
a move necessitated by a genuine
desire and an injury to his arm
during flight. Carpenter explained that he "likes it better
. . . nobody
appreciates it."
Similarities in problems of
space and sea were evidenced
by the "strangeness" of viewing
two men speaking to each other
and to the television audience
while on the lunar surface yet
two men on the ocean floor are
"deaf mutes" since they cannot
see, hear, talk "nonavigation."
Concerning the continuing
complaint "why the moon?,"
Carpenter explained, "we must
have faith in the value of truth."
"Man's curiosity is one of his
finest gifts," and it is this "curiosity" which man is attempting
to cure by expeditions such as
those to the moon or the ocean,
for "on the moon lies knowledge
itisthe Rosetta stone."
Viewing both his areas of experience, space and the ocean

depths, Carpenter observed that
he had a "unique opportunity"
to be a participant of both programs, and he expressed the hope
that others might be as fortunate. "Anything man can imagine, he can accomplish . . . anything man sets his mind to he
can do . . . nothing is impossible
for the human intellect."

Trustees
Continued from Page One

osophy of the statement, just
with parts of the wording."
The committee spoke favorably of some of the alterations
proposed by those who testified
before it, and Griffin reiterated
his position as one of the statement's authors that "we have
no great pride of authorship."
The committee will discuss
the proposed alterations and
will have a revised statement
prepared for acceptance by the
Board of Trustees at its Dec.
9 meeting.

CLASSIFIED ADS

COLORING

AND BODY PERMANENT
SHARON

y

Former Astronaut Scott Carpenter
The Sea--NThe Moon
Explores

n

Center-Keenelandlla-

statement with a "well . . .
Questions regarding the extension of open house hours and eventually," but there was little
the frequency of the open houses hope among students that open
were turned aside as unhouses could be held more freattainable. "I don't think you can quently than twice a month.
Ten o'clock was agreed on as
expect a seven-daopen dorm,"
one SC representative com- the latest hour an open house
mented.
could be held, and representa"Why not?" was the response tives suggested referendums be
of one Keeneland resident. The held in the dorms to decide on
representative then qualified his later hours.

T3

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Bataa ara $1.28 far M wards, fS.M

far three ceaseeatlve Inaertlana at tae
ma ad af 20 wards, cad $8.78 par

week, to wards.
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prtar ta pabUcatlea. Na advarUaamaal
may cite raea, reUglea ar aatlaaal
arista aa a a.aaUfUatlea far reatlag
raama ar far empleymeat.
MOM BALK

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e
Turntable $13; AM-Ftransistor
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weekendj. Apply in person after
Nov. 13. 8 a.m. tll 4 p.m. New Link
7N20
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WANTED
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Next semester
to share efficiency, 468 Rase Lane,
walk to campus) $62.50
11N17
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COLLEGE
GIRL desires roommate
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12N13
with private phone.
TO RENT small room, near campus,
for study purppses clays and evenings; bed is oivittfnlture necessary.
U
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* Anti-Stude-

nt

Administrators

The relationship of the University's administrators to their student constituency presents an interesting phenomenon. It is often
true that our administrators refuse
contact with students unless that
contact is for the purpose of entertaining the official, presenting
him with a plaque, etc. On those occasions when administrators confront students on matters of any

their arguments so they are forced
to descend to the bottom level of

communication personal

at-

tacks on their critics.
For a group of professional administrators this is a shocking situation. These men have been
trained extensively in the art of persuasion. They are not new, for the
most part, to the sometimes rough
world they inhabit. They are cersignificance it often is converted tainly not being criticized for the
into a campaign for personal re- first time in their lives. Theirs is
not the atmosphere in which harvenge on the part of the administrator.
mony can abound indefinitely.
can do noth. October 27 Student Govern- Their
ment Student Services Committee ing but harm to all concerned.
Our administration is chosen and
meeting was the scene of an astonishing "kill Bright" attack" remunerated, in part, for their abilleveled by Student Affairs Vice ity to accept criticism of the poliPresident Stuart Forth. Members cies they establish, and to filter
of the committee and observers of out the valid portion of that criticism and apply it.
the encounter stated their impresIn this respect our administrasion that Forth had arrived at the
tion would do well to take inmeeting with the intention of attacking SC Representative Bright struction from the students they
as forcefully as possible. When so loath. The fact that a student
questions were posed to Forth, can unintentionally cause a high
he is said to have converted them official of our University to make
from their context in order to strike a spectacle ofhimselfbeforeagroup
bitterly and repeatedly at Bright. of students and staff members is
indicative of the chaotic state of
When Bright pleaded for the committee hearing to proceed along the our administration.
But perhaps those officials who
established guidelines, saying he
do not have the fortitude to face
would allow time for Forth to criticize him as long and as bitterly students when they might be cast
in an unbecoming light should be
as he wanted after the meeting,
Forth refused to quit his tactics taken to task even more strongly.
of providing personal, irrelevant President Singletary is exerting
answers to matters on which the great effort to overcome an initially unfavorable image which he precommittee needed information.
October 30 Administrative sented the student body. The PresTOn
Assistant to the President Alvin ident has been criticized mildly
Morris, who is chairman of the from many quarters, but has shown
Vice President for Student Affairs indications of his ability to field
selection advisory committee, re- the adverse comments maturely.
fused to appear before the Student
On the other hand, those men
Government Committee of the who have refused to defend their
Whole to respond to questions policies before the students they
which that body had posed regardcontrol must be made to. realize
Morris' committee. No reason they do not exist in a vacumn.
ing
Mr. Blakeman presents a case study
was given.
November 10 Mr. Robert of this attitude. When he refused to
On
Blakeman, who is in charge of the appear before the Bookstore Comoperation of the University Book- mittee he stated his reason as "fear
store, refused to appear before the there would be a personality conSG Bookstore Committee to clarify flict." In other words, someone
some points that committee had might venture to question Mr.
raised concerning the Bookstore. Blakeman as to why his office has
Due to "mechanics" Pres- allowed the University Bookstore
ident Singlet ary is unable to address to continue in its inefficiency. To
the Student Government prior to its Mr. Blakeman this would constiassembly meeting this Thursday. tute a severe conflict. It now apOn November 4 a special SG pears that he, along with Dr. Morcommittee of three students was ris, refuse to face the consequencies
allowed to confer with the Pres- of their actions.
ident. On this occasion President
Our University is not adminSinglet ary was said to have been istered by proxy. Those in charge
extremely bitter toward each of the of the operation tend too often to
students, concentrating especially forget they owe something more
on Representatives Bright and Reis. than tokenism to the student body.
At private meetings attended On an organizational chart pubby President Singletary and Vice lished by the University which
President Forth it has b