xt741n7xmh8k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt741n7xmh8k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331110  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 10, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 10, 1933 1933 2013 true xt741n7xmh8k section xt741n7xmh8k Best Copy Available

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S2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

MEN STUDENTS'
GRADES ISSUED

DEAN JONES

BY

By JOHN ST. JOHV
Swaying couples will glide over
Standing is 1.414 for All the polished dance floor in the
Men Students for Last
colored rays of a revolving spot
light at the Football dance sponSemester
sored by Omicron Delta Kappa
from 9 to 12 p. m. Saturday in the
ALPHA SIGMA PHI IS
FIRST AMONG FRATS Alumni gymnasium. revelry of the
Behind the gay
Loving Cup Probably Will He dancing couples will be the vision
nears
Awarded in Spring at Pan- - of a dream thatbuilding. reality the
Student Union
Hellenic Banquet
Speculation runs rampant on the
campus as to Just where the new
.
.
.
-a
l;
m
i.
duuxiuiks ui nil mri. siuuenui, building will be, what kind of archishowing an average of 1.414 for last tecture will be used and, most Imsemester, were released today by portant, what will be in it.
Some say the ignoble "sinkhole"
the dean of men's office. The average of 554 fraternity men was 1.402, near the Law building finally will
be utilized as the location of the
that of the independent men 1.422, building. Others have the "Inside"
and the average standing of men dope that It will be out on the
living In the residence halls, 1.565. agricultural experimental farm far
The highest average standing from the center of the present camamong fraternities was made by pus. A suggestion hns been made
building
Alpha Sigma Phi with 1 624. Delta that the Administration
be torn down and that) site used.
Tau Delta was second with a standSkyscrapers of the future may be
ing of 1.577. Lambda Chi Alpha.
third with an average of 1.545, and
Alpha Gamma Rho, fourth with

1

1.543.

The high fraternity standing of
this year was slightly below the
one last year, which was made by
the Campus Club. They establish- standing record with 1.721.
(d
This local merged last February
with Sigma Beta XI, another local,
in order to petition and become a
chapter of the national Sigma Phi
Epsllon.
Plans for awarding the cup to
the winner have not been completed, but it probably will be present-- ?
ed in the spring at the
banquet.
The average standings of all fra- ternities are as follows:
Alpha Sigma Phi, 1.624; Delta
Tau Delta, 1.577; Lambda Chi Alpha, 1.545; Alpha Gamma Rho,
1.543; Pi Kappa Alpha, 1.527; Kappa Sigma, 1.526; Alpha Lambda
Tau, 1.496; Sigma Alpha Epsllon.
1.455; Triangle, 1.398; Sigma Phi
Epsllon, 1.380; Phi Kappa Tau,
1.380; Delta Chi. 1.329; Alpha Tau
Omega, 1.320; Sigma Chi, 1.320;
Kappa Alpha, 1.267; Phi Sigma
Kappa. 1.177; Sigma Nu, 1.160; Phi

KENTUCKIAN

ic

,

J

,

Delta Theta,

1.139.

PRIZES OFFERED
FOR

SNAPSHOTS

Kentuckian Will Make Cash
Awards for Pictures to Be
Put in "Sweetheart Section" of Yearbook
j

i

I

,'

In an attempt to encourage stu- dents to turn in snapshots for the
snapshot section, the Ken
tuckian will offer dollar awards for
the best snapshots which will be
used for the section.
The snapshot section which will
be enlarged this year to includetwo pages, known as the sweetof
heart section, and four pagesPicpictures of campus celebrities.
tures taken for May day and for
homecoming will also be printed in
this section. The remainder of these
pages will be devoted to Informal
snapshots of the campus and individuals known on the campus.
Snapshots for the annual should
be brought to the Kentuckian office or left at the University post
office, addressed to the Kentuckian
office.

IS

'34

DROPPED

Southeastern

conference
Six
tramps ftlonir with three Southern
conference games have been tentatively scheduled for the 1934 Wildcat football team, it was announced
following a meeting of the Athletic
council Wednesday night.
As usual, Maryville will be the
season opener In Lexington on September 22. Washington and Lee
i 11 MntiA Rnunnw. nnH will meet
the Wildcats on September 29. The
third game of the season wm De
with the Cincinnati Bearcats, at
Cincinnati on October 6. Following the Bearcat game the Wildcats
will probably meet Vanderbilt here
on October 13. On the following
Saturday, October 20, the 'Cats will
Journey to Atlanta to meet Georgia
Tech.
On October 27 they will play
hosts to Auburn, a newcomer on
the schedule. Following Auburn,
will be Alabama, here on November
3, and Tulane here on November 17.
As usual, the Thansgiving game will
be with Tennessee at Knoxville.
There is an open date on November 10, and it is possible that the
council will schedule an lntersec-tiontilt for that date. At the
present time the Council is negotiating with several schools, but it
is expected to endeavor to schedule
a game with Indiana University at
Louisville on that date.
In the event it is found impossible to schedule an lntersectional
game, It Is expected the 'Cats will
meet the V. M. I. Cadets at Lexington, Virginia.
The tentative schedule:
Sept. 22 Maryville at Lexington,
Ky.
Sept. 29 Washington and Lee at
Lexington, Ky.
Oct. 6 Cincinnati or Xavier at
Cincinnati.
Oct. 13 Vanderbilt at Lexington,
Ky.
Oct. 20 Georgia Tech at Atlanta
Oct. 27 Auburn at Lexington,
Ky.. tentatively.
Nov. 10 Open.
Nov. 17 Tulane at Lexington. Ky.
Nov. 29 Tennessee at Knoxville,
Tenn.
n--

REQUIREMENT

COURSE

At a meeting of the faculty of
the College of Agriculture held at
4 p. m. Monday at the Experiment
station. It was decided that Educational psychology would no longer
be a requirement for all agriculture
prestudents except those who are agriparing to teach high school
culture. Another decision was made
to the effect that geology and
zoology would be required of all
students In the agriculture college.
Hitherto students have had the
choice of these two sciences.

Kampus
Kernels

Geology Fraternity

Will Hold Banquet

All women graduate students are
invited to attend a tea to be held
Epsilon. honorary
Sigma
in the Women's building from 2:30 geology Gamma
fraternity, will hold a
to 3:30 p. m. Monday.
Founder's Day banquet for active
and associate members today at
A meeting of the Interfraternity
10 at the Tea
council will be held at 6 p. m. Mon- 6 p. m., November
day, November 13, at the Alpha Cup inn.
Chi chapter was founded on this
Lambda Tau house.
campus November 10, 1928.
George R. Wesley, a graduate
A meeting of all fraternity intramanagers will be held Friday student In geology and one of the
mural
fraternity,
at 5 p. m. It is important that charter members of the
will present a brief history of the
every one attend.

chapter at the banquet.
Sigma Gamma Epsllon will hold
Dutch Lunch club will meet at 12
p. m.. Monday,
noon today in Patterson hall with a smoker at 7:30
November 13 In Science hall. All
A. L. Henry, Lexington magician,
active members, pledges and
as the speaker.
are urged to attend.
Chi Delta Phi banquet Thursday
PHI HOLDS MEET
at 6 p. m. at the Green Tree tea PHI DELTA Phi. professional law
hi rwiiji
room.
fraternity, held a meeting In the
7 p. m.
The Home Economics club has law school building at Dresldent of
postponed indefinitely its regular
Routine mat- meeting scheduled to be held Mon- the chapter, presided.
es

d.

day, November

I

13.

ten

were discuasea.

NEW SERIES NO.

Vesper Artist

I

?''

J

STUDENT COUNCIL HAS

g,

I
i

Polls. located in White Hall.
Will Be Open from
9 a. m., to 4 :30 p. m.

Dr. Statie E. Erickson, head of
CHARGE OF ELECTION
the department! of home economics
at the College of Agriculture, will List of Nineteen Candidates
speak it 1 l. m. Saturday, at the
to Appear 'on
fall meeting of the Kentucky Home
Ballots
Economics association, at the New
Century hotel, Dawson Springs. The
election of freshman,
Annual
subject of her topic will be " Responsibility of Home Economics n sophomore, and Junior class officers
will be held today In the center
Readjustment."
The program will begin at 7 p. m. room' on the first floor of White
today at the hotel with Mrs. L. A. hall. The polls will open at B a.m.
Washington, presiding. Mrs. Anna and close at 4:30 p. m. remaining
H. Settle, Louisville attorney, will open at noon. All proceedings of the
give an address on the subject, election will be completely in
charge of the Student council
,
"Looking Forward."
Ata Lee, state supervisor of home Members of the council will count
economics, will preside at the social the votes immediately
after the
program which is to begin at 9 election.
a. m. Saturday. Doctor Erickson
The dean of men's office today
will deliver her address at this time. announced the withdrawal of HenFrom 9:30 until 11 a. m. group dis- ry Spragens, candidate for secre
cussions will be held upon relief
of the Junior class.
work. Sections of relief work and Spragens stated in a note to the
their leaders are: food and nutri- dean that his approval was not ob
tion, Mrs. Alice Klncheloe Pace; tained before his petition was gotclothing, Miss Mary Lee Taylor; ten up and that he did not choose
family relationships, Miss Ida
to run.
and helps for a program In
The
of candidates who were
student clubs. Miss Oneta Liter. chosen list a petition containing 25
by
Annual Stroller Event Will Points of interest around Dawson names of
is
Springs will be visited from 11 until
Be Held in Training
as follows:
1 p. m., and luncheon will be served
School Auditorium
Freshman class, Curtis Wilmott
at 1 p. m. .
Tonight
The meeting will be concluded and Wallace Biiggs for president;
with a tea from 4 to 5:30 p. m. by Dorothy Nichols and J. Franklin
Doro
FOUR PLAYS SCHEDULED the home economics girls of that Wallace for
thy Broadbent and Tom Nichols,
school.
Amateur night, an annual event
Sophomore
for secretary-treasure- r.
class, Bazll Baker and J. B. Wells
sponsored by Strollers, will be held
for president; Mary Dunn Webb
at 8:30 tonight in the Training
and Freeman Griffin for
The couples
school auditorium.
James A. Moore, Victor Carr
which give the best performances
Hobday, and Howard Smathers for
secretary-treasure- r.
tryout perIn the plays during the
Junior class,
James Miller and Harry Roby Waliod will present those plays tonight.
president; Bill Conley and
ker for
Virginia
Robinson and Betsy
Virginia Riley for
Frye are the participants in the
of Elizabeth Hardin and E. F. Hanson
play entitled "The Groove." Char- U. K. Art Center is Scene
for secretary-treasure- r.
Exhibit of Home Talent
acters in "The Open Door" are Tom
Atkins and Mary Lally; "ColumCreations
bine," will be presented by Elsie
Riley and Dorothy Ann Dundon;
of
A
home talent exhibition
the remaining play, "Marriage Has paintings will be on display from
given by 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon during
Been Arranged," will be
8
Jane Crain and Carlyle Aimes.
at the
the week of November
Judges will be: Joe Jordan of art center. This exhibition is be- ing promoted by Prof. E. W. Ran-nel- ls "Sterilization" Is Subject of
The Lexington Leader, J. R. Kimbrough of The Lexington Herald,
and Miss Anne Worthington
Given by
and William Ardery, former stu- Callihan. of the faculty of the art
Health Department
University.
boy and the girl windent. The
department of the
Head
ning on Amateur Night will receive
It is planned for the pleasure of
and a those who are working indepen75 points toward Strollers,
silver loving cup; other participants dently, and would enjoy taking part ADVANTAGES ARE CITED
will receive 50 points. Twenty-fiv- e
In this community affair. College
At a law school convocation held
points will be given to those who and high school students who are
s.
were exceptionally good in the
under the supervision of an instruc- yesterday at 10 a. m. in the assemNo one will be allowed to tor are not allowed to enter works. bly room of the law school, Dr. John
participate in Amateur Night until
Each person may enter one oil S. Chambers, head of the health
they have attained Stroller eligibilpainting, and one drawing, either department of the University, spok?
Fahey, water color or print. Those in on the subject, "Sterilization."
In
ity, according to James
his talk Doctor Chambers brought
Stroller president.
charge of the exhibition will underevery entry. If every- out the advantages of such an opCombs Blanford, master of cere- take to hang
monies, will announce the plays. one responds with two entries and eration to the Individual as well as
Between each play, while the stage the exhibition becomes crowded for to society as a whole.
The speaker explained that this
is being set for the next skit, other space, one of the entries will be
movement has been greatly increascampus talent will be presented, chosen and hung.
This home talent exhibition has ed in the last 15 years by experitap dancing and singing.
including
ments carried out In Chicago where
Amateur Night is free to students been promoted as a means of bringing the amateurs and artists of it was learned that many of the
of the University.
together in monthly criminals were mentally defective.
Lexington
meetings, and the first of these
Sterilization is advocated for
meetings will be held in connection three classes: first, thjose insane
exhibition and feeble minded from a herediwith the opening of the
Sunday afternoon.
tary cause; second, those who need
the operation because of a medical
reason; third, those In a doubtful
group which many contend would
Engineering Scholarship Or
benefit society if their reproduction
ganization Honors btudents
were prevented.
Until about 50 years ago sterilizain Annual Induction. Ceretion was practiced by all races in
monies Wednesday
Pennington to a rather crude manner as comparBetty
ed to the present method. Today
Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineerHave Charge or Meeting
the operation is not serious. Doctor
ing fraternity, pledged 11 members
Chambers stated that sterilization
Which Will Be Held
of the engineering college at its
should be forced on some and perMonday
pledging ceremonies
mitted for others that the medical
held at 10 a. m. Wednesday in
benefitMemorial hall. The slide rule which ALL GIRLS ARE INVITED profession .thinks would beSterilizaed by such an operation.
bears the name and class of the
be, used as a prevention
Organization meetine of the hob tion should
making
the highest
sophomore
constanding during his freshman year by group of the Y. W. C. A. will be and never as a punishment, he
was presented to William Pell, held from & to 6 p. m. Monday in cluded.
Lewisport. His standing was 2.96 the Women's building. Betty Ann
Pennington will be in charge.
for both semesters.
More than 125 girls have signified
The 11 men pledged were C. W.
Kaufman, Nlcholasville; J. Cleve- their intention to participate in the
land, Versailles; F. LeBaron,
various hobbles sponsored Dy me
associate
Dr. J. W. Manning,
New York; J. Bishop, Mur- organization, which Include books,
ray; D. McCammon, Lebanon; C. E. art, swimming, bicycling, knitting, professor of political science, con
Westerman, Anchorage; L. M. star gazing, handicraft, music, ball- cluded a series ol weemy newspaGross, Lake Placid, New York; L. room dancing, and contract bridge. per articles November 5, on the
of
V. Raley, Lebanon; W. B. Cundiff, All olrl interested, whether thev oenernl subject "Reorganization
The
Somerset; H. M. Shedd. Lexington, All girls interested, whether or not Government in Kentucky."
Lexington
they belong to the y.W.c.a., nave series appeared in the
and O. L. White, Middlesboro.
Betty Ann Pennington has select- Herald, Courier Journal, and Kened the following girls to be leasers tucky Jost.
MORTAR BOARD PLANS
Lucille Thorn
The articles were "The State AdNATIONAL INSPECTION of various groups: Moss, Margaret ministrative Structure of Kentuc-kv- "
ton, Nancy Bell
nnrwarinir October 8: "Admin
Marjorie Fieber, Virginia
Carrying out plans for national Warren,
Holmes, and istrative Reform," October 15;
on No- Free berg, Mildred
inspection of Mortar Board
Personnel Protrram in Kentucny."
Hardin.
vember 18 and 19 was discussed at Elizabeth
"Reorganization
of
October 22;
meeting of Mortar Board at 3
the
Cnimtv Oovernment in Kentucky."
p. m. Monday in the Women's
October 29; "Reorganization of City
building. Faculty advisors, Dr. &s
Government,
November o.
ther Cole, Miss Mildred Lewis, and
Miss Rebecca Averlll, met with the
group.
nhi rwltft Phi. women's literary
A final check was made on the society, will have a dinner in honor.
returns of the Dutch dance, which of the pledges at 6:30 p. m. Thurs-jroom.
.....
was sponsored by the Board.
unj d th. rirppn Tree tea wm De
Yerkes
Prof. George Blukeslee
It was decided that the next Mrs. Lawrence Bimpson, wnoevening. observatory, Lake Oeneva, ofWlscon
meeting will be held Tuesday, No principal speaker oi me
chosen "Colonial Homes in sin, presented an Illustrated lecture
vember 14, in the Women's build h
to a large audience at 8 p. m. yes
tnflcv" for her subject.
ing.
Among the guests at the dinner terday in Memorial hall on "The
Stars."
Y SPONSORS PRAYER WEEK
will bs the faculty advisors of the Lutest News from the was lntroduc
Professor Blakeslee
nrnoniyiltillll and alumnae. Virginia
by Prof. H. H. Downing. The
In connection with the movement K. Young, president of Chi Delta ed was sponsored by
the Depart
talk
sponsored by the national associa Phi, will preside.
meat
Pledges of Chi Delta Phi are omy. of Mathematics and Astron
tion, the senior cabinet of the Y.
M. C. A. will sponsor a "week of Elizabeth Snowden. Anne iOieman,
This is the third time In recent
prayer," November 12 to 18.
Willie Hughes Smith. Helen Jones,
Professor
The freshman and senior cabinets t n. Ghmit i.nrv Jean Anderson. years that University Blakeslee has
campus and
j,ihn Henson. Pledge" of visited the
nH Ur
will meet at 7:30 a. m. Wednesday
from Entr ' suoken on various phase of as
and Friday. All students are In the society are
trouomy.
vited.
ust, majors In the university.

,.(
'it.-

I

t

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'

AMATEUR NIGHT

Hag-ma-

n;

LAWYERS HEAR
DR. CHAMBERS
Address

try-out-

ELEVEN PLEDGED
BY TAU

BETA PI

Y HOBBY

GROUP

WILL BE FORMED
Ann

semi-annu- al

Prof. Manning Has
Articles Published

Bing-hamto- n,

Literary Society
Will Have Dinner

U.K. Students Hear

Noted Astronomer

w

cm

17

CRIPPLED CATS

MEET V.M.I.
CADETS AT 2 P. M.
TO

Five Second Stringers May
Be in Starting Lineup
Tomorrow
MURPHY IS OUT FOR
REMAINDER OF YEAR

-r)

I

Big Blue Has

Series of Six
Straight Wins Over
Squadron

j

La

MISS PHILLIS

KRAEUTER

NOTED SOLOIST
TO PLAY SUNDAY

er

12-1-

al

AG COLLEGE DROPS

Dr. S. E. Erickson to Address
Kentucky Home Economics
Association

Amateur Works

Auburn and Vanderbilt Are
Added to Next Year's
Schedule; Other.
Games Same
DUKE

UNDERCLASSMEN,

Art Exhibition
To Be Held for

CATS WILL PLAY
TEN GAMES IN

built with glass and engineering
students believe the campiut should
take a step ahead and come out
with the first college building of
that kind In the country. Others
want a building of the type used
at "A Century of Progress" in glaring colors and wlndowlens.
A swimming pool, large ballrooms,
coffee shops, and rathskellers, all
would find a place if student opinions are considered. There will be
Indoor tennis courts, bowling alleys,
billiard tables, special rooms for
contract bridge, and a hundred other amusements.
Fraternity men think that each
social organization should have a
special lounge where they can adequately entertain sororities at "open
houses." Girls want a stage where
the latest fashions can be paraded
every month.
Plans of the Student Union
building will be foremost in minds
of the sponsors as the swaying
couples continue their gliding in the
colored rays of the
spot light.

PEP MEETING
TONIGHT AT 7:30 IN
MEN'S GYM

19.1.1

To Give Talk JUNIORS ELECT
At State Meet OFFICERS TODAY

BEGINS AT 8:30

Saturday will be the last
day on which pictures for
the Kentuckian may be taken,
according to an announcement by Edwin B. Patterson,
business manager. All seniors.
Juniors, and members of fraternal organizations are requested to have their pictures
taken before the time expires.
Prices are $1 for the first
'print, and 25 cents for each
additional picture. The photographer will be at the Lafayette studios.

i

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NOTICE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10,

U. of K. Woman

Student Union Building
Is Theme of ODK Dance

I

J Jt
TJL

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

VOLUME XXIV

C?

Musicale to Feature
Miss Phyllis Kraeuter,
Nationally Known
Violincellist

Second

HAS VARIED PROGRAM
Miss Phyllis Kraeuter,
t.
New York city, will be soloist
of the second Sunday afternoon
musicale to be held Sunday at 4
p. m. in the Memorial hall. Miss
Kraeuter will be accompanied by
John Selby Richardson.
Miss Kraeuter is an established
and outstanding artist, and since
her New York debut recital in Town
Hall has made appearances in 80
cities, all of them artistic triumphs.
She has been acclaimed as soloist
with such orchestras as the New
York Philharmonic,
the Minneapolis, St. Louis, Toronto, and Denver symphonies, and has won the
praise of critics at her recitals In
the chief musical centers of America and Canada.
Miss Kraeuter
also records for Victor.
This artist has the unique distinction of being able on occasion,
to subordinate the art of the virtuoso to that of the ensemble player
by appearances with such organizations as the Elshuco Trio, of which
her brother Karl Kraeuter, violinist,
is a member.
The program for Sunday is as
follows:
I Concerto in A, Wilhelm Jeral.
II
Mendel
ssohn; Toccata, Frescobaldl.
Ill Intermezzo. Granados:
Danse Orientale, Rachmaninoff;
Chanson Napolitaine, Casella.
IV Nocturne Op. 9, No. 2 in E
Flat, Chopin; Hungarian Rhapsody, Popper.
violin-cellis-

Adagio-Mitternac-

SUKY WILL HOLD
RALLY TONIGHT

By HENRY C. McCOWN
With several of his regulars definitely out of the game because of
injuries. Coach Harry Gamage has
been forced to alter his lineup considerably and probably will start
several second stringers when the
Wildcats meet the V. M. I. Flying
Squadron on Stoll field Saturday at
2 p. m.
Although the Wildcats have been
turnimr back the rtaW. rocniiariv
since Coach Gamage came to Kentucky In 1927, and although they
have been beaten several times this
season the Cadets are expected to
have a much stronger team than
usual, and due to the physical condition of the 'Cats they probably
will offer plenty of opposition.
O. B. Murphy, the Wildcats' stellar tackle received a fractured sinus
bone in the Cincinnati tilt, probably
will never play football again. Murphy reported for practice Tuesday
and had hoped to be in shape for
the Tulane game a week from Saturday, but his physician has advised
him to drop football entirely.
Wade Aulick and Olah, sophomores, are the only two tackles
that are not on the injured list and
they will be called upon to play the
entire game against the Cadets.
Aulick, a
never played
football until he entered the University in the fall of 1932 and has
not played in a regular game yet.
He has Improved considerably within the last few weeks and great
things are expected of him Saturday. Olah, who was a regular lineman on the freshman team last
season, has been injured most of
p
the season and is in
shape
for the first time this season.
Tom Cassady prooably will start
in the place of Bob Pritchard, regular halfback, who suffered a leg
injury in the Alabama game. Hay
has shown a great deal of Improvement in his kicking as well as his
and probably will
play the greater part of the game
so that Kercheval will be able to
get a
d
rest.
The Wildcats have scrimmaged
every day this week and will round
off their preparation for the Cadets
with a light workout this afternoon.
tip-to-

much-neede-

Student Directory
To Be Out Saturday
The directory of students and
faculty will be ready for distribution Saturday morning and may be
post
obtained at the University
office.
Publication of the directory was
resumed last October. It is Issued
each semester, Is compiled by the
Registrar's office, and is printed in

Pep Meeting Will Be in Gym
at 7:30 p. m.; Student Or- The Kentucky Kernel plant.
ganization Begins Plans for The new directory contains the
name, Lexington address, home adAnnual Homecoming Day
college
dress, telephone number,
SuKy Circle will sponsor a brief
pep rally tonight at 7:30, in the
Alumni gymnasium, according to an
announcement of plans which were
made at a meeting of the circle
Tuesday. J. B. Croft will be in
charge of the rally.
Preliminary plans for the home
coming celebration which will be
held Thanksgiving were considered.
Jack Faunce was appointed a committee of one to investigate prices
of the cups which will be awarded
by the circle to the sorority and
fraternity with the best decorations
for Homecoming day.
An offical key, designed by Wil
liam Eversole, was adopted by the
circle and will be the offical badge
of the organization.
The design of
the key is simple, indicating the
idea of the organization by mount
ing the outlined letters SUKY on
the segment of a circle, attached to
a ringed staff.
SuKy will sponsor a dance Saturday night, November 25, in the
Alumni gymnasium. The orchestra
has not been selected yet.

and classification of each student,
and similar information of the
faculty.

Ag Class Attends

Cattle Field Show
Dean Horlacher's class In advanced livestock judging attended the
field show of fat cattle which was
held at the Bourbon stock yards In
Louisville, yesterday.
On the way, the class stopped at
the farm of George Woodruff to see
the short-hor- n
cattle which he is
going to take to the International
Livestock show in Chicago. At the
cattle show In Louisville over 1.000
head of fat cattle were exhibited.
Members of the class included
David Clarke, John Clarke, Wallace
Coffey, Ben Gaines, Robert Graves.
Joe Howard, Charles Mathis, James
Patterson, George Weber, and Morton Henshaw.

WHEAT PROGRAM

Patterson to Head
PAYS DIVIDENDS
Club
International
Evelyn Grubbs and Walter
Osborne Are Other
Officers
senior in the
Edwin Patterson,
College of Arts and Sciences, was
elected president of the International Relations club at an organization meeting ta 3 p. m , Wednesday, in the office of Dr. Amry
Vandenbosch. Other officers who
were elected at the same time are
Evelyn Grubbs,
and
Walter William Osborn, secretary-treasure- r.

Farmers to Receive $250,000
for Their Cooperation in
Government's
duction Plan

Wheat

Re-

Kentucky farmers will receive approximately $250,000 In benefit payments on this year's wheat crop for
their cooperation in the government's wheat reduction program,
according to a preliminary report of
the College of Agriculture, which
directed the campaign in the state.
It is estimated that under provisions of the Agricultural Adjustment administration, payments will
be made on about 1.000.000 bushels
in compensation of farmers' agreement to reduce their production by
15 per cent In 1934 and 1935. Seventy per cent of the payment will be
made this fall and the remainder
next spring.
Practically all the commercial
wheat growers In the state signed

Meetings will be held every two
weeks. The organization Is sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation
for the Advancement of International Peace. The fundatlon supwith
plies the local organization
books and pamphlets.
Plans were discussed at the first
meeting for members attending the
regional convention of international the reduction contract. There are
relations clubs, held November 24 at a large number of farmers who
grow wheat for their home use only.
Louisville.

I

* Best Copy
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1911

1.14

OFMOIAb NSW8PAPIR OF TH1 STUDENTS OF INI UNIVEK8ITT OF
LEXINOTON

KENTUCKY,

Subscription $3.00
Tut. Entered al
taxing ton, Kj, Postoftlce As Second
Class MaU Matter

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENTS RIGHTS MAINTAIN
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it. Soeiatg Editor
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Carl Boone)
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Ernie Shovea

NED TURN BULL

now agree

that the cause for which
they fought was not worthy of
their lives. If men marched ten
in a row, two seconds apart, It
would tnie 46 days for the parade
to pass. A parade of dead men is
not pleasant to think about. In
regard to the money, it cost the
governments of the countries which
took part In that slaughter, nearly
a billion dollars every four days.
Think what two hundred billion
dollars would do todny toward ending this depression! Hospitals csuld
be built, the sick cared for and
men given Jobs. No wonder there
is a world depression; two hundred
billion dollars cannot be replaced in
the commerce of the world in such
a short period as 15 years. Would
It not have been better for this
war never to have happened? All
can agree that the answer is in
the affirmative.
What causes wars? It is the lack
of the principles of Christ. To this
same cause may be attributed all
the troubles of the world, but war,
it seems, is the most flagrant violation. How many wars would result if individuals of the hostile
countries could talk things over in
a friendly manner before hostilities
began? the world today needs a
more friendly spirit towards all of
its members.
World cooperation
and world brotherhood will stop
all wars, now and forever. It is a
hopeful situation because the means
of transportation and communication are rapidly drawing the world
closer together.
It Is an ideal. In
which all men can take part for,
although there are differences In
methods, the goal is the same. May
we celebrate Armistice Day for
many years to come! It Is well to
remember the words of the famous
Oerman general, Von Moltke.
"Every war is a national calamity,
whether victorious or not." The
poem of Joseph Dana Millershows
the terrors of war and the necessity
for preserving peace
And this I hate not men, nor
flag, nor race.
But only War with its wild, grinning face.
God strike it till its eyes be blind
as night.
And all its members tremble with

affright!
Oh, let it hear in its death agony
The wail of mothers for their
best-lov-

one3,

And on its head
Descend the venomed curses of its
sons
Who followed her, deluded, where
O. V. COFFMAM .
Circulation if user
its guns
Had dyed the daisies red.
WHY PICK ON ME?
All these I hate war and Its
panoply.
There are two kinds of criticism,
constructi-land destructive and The He that hides its ghastly
mockery,
the kind some professors hand out.
Criticism gently handed out in That makes it glory out of
class, polite irony or gentle sarcasm
women's tears,
sits very well with the academic
The toil of peasants through the
pose, but rudeness and abrupt comburdened years.
ment upon personal habits of stuThe legacy of long disease that
preys
dents is to be shunned.
The Kernel organization hopes to On bone and body in the after
days.
be constructive in criticism and not
argumentive.
Cod's curses pour
The case in mind happened a Until it shrivel with its votaries
And die away in its own fiery seas.
few days ago in classroom. The inThat nevermore
structor becoming irked at the vaand
Its dreadful call of murder may
pid expression of ninty-nin- e
forty-fobe heard;
hundredths per cent of
A thing accursed In every deed
his class, screwed up his face, slipped his