xt744j09zh04 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt744j09zh04/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691211  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December 11, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, December 11, 1969 1969 2015 true xt744j09zh04 section xt744j09zh04 rrn

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Thursday Evening, December 11, 1969

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol.

LXI, No. f7

UK Trustees Accept New Speaker Policy
the faculty and administration had spent more than a
year reviewing and revising the
policy, which calls for the free
expression of ideas by visiting
speakers and provides measures
for preserving order.
and one abstention.
The proposal was accepted
The University expects, ac--

DOTTIE BEAN
Associate Editor
The controversial speaker policy for the University was passed
by the Board of Trustees Tuesday with one vote cast against it
By

after

sented before the board informaldent, may prescribe conditions
ly in October, was Gov. Louie B. for the conduct of programs at
Nunn. In objecting Nunn said which
speakers apthat since approval of the policy pear. These conditions may inwas a board decision he would clude requiring a University official or a senior faculty member
abide by that decision.
Former Gov. A. B. (Happy) to chair the program, requiring
for comments and
Chandler, a member of the board, opportunity
from the floor, or such
did not cast his vote. Chandler questions
other practices as may be necessaid:
sary to preserve order and to
"In good conscience I cannot insure an atmosphere of open
vote for this policy. If I cast a exchange of ideas.
vote I would vote no. However,
"In addition, the President
because of respect for President
I will withhold my may take appropriate action to
Singletary,
vote if the board will permit." insure that the University community is provided with a balanced exposure to divergent opinFree Speech
controversial issues."
The new policy was submitted ions on
to the board by a committee apOther Action
pointed in November 1968. It was
In other action the board:
passed. by the University Senate
on Nov. 10 when the Senate
Passed a recommendation for
strongly recommended tliat the a raise in room and board rates
new policy be approved by the in UK residence halls.
board.

cording to the new policy statement, that controversial and unpopular ideas may be expressed
by speakers visiting the campus.
There is no provision in the
policy for administrative
over speaker invitations.
Voting against the policy, pre- veto-pow- er

t
I

f

t

i
--

3l

T

'Approved a

Freedom Of
Speech

Presi-

report by
In substance the policy said: dent Otis
Singletary which elim"It is the policy of the Uni- inated grade transcripts as a re'A
versity to encourage its admin- quirement for entering the Uniistration, faculty and students versity from high schools. The
to invite outside speakers to its
University is one of the first
campus. The appearance of such major U.S. institutions to drop
speakers does not imply approval the requirement.
or disapproval of them or of their
Complimented the Univerviews. They are brought to the
sity and Dr. H. K. Charlesworth,
campus because it is believed
that their discussions will fur- director of the Office of Developther the educational goals of the ment Services and Business Research and an associate dean for
University.
extension in the College of Bus- in ess and Economics, for work
Qualifications
UK President Otis A. Singletary, far left, Governor Louie B. Nunn, center,
"The University will act re- on a personal income study for
Board of Trustees discussed and voted on a new campus speakand the
the state for 1969.
er policy in a Tuesday afternoon meeting. The controversial policy sponsibly in inviting speakers
and expects its guests to act
Recognized reforms in wompassed with only Co v. Nunn voting against it and Trustee A.B. Chandler
In other transactions the Board recommended a raise in room responsibly. Its policies require en's hours initiated by Dean of
abstaining.
Students Jack Hall. The new
and board rates and recognized the reforms in women's hours which are that no law or governing regulation of the University be violated reforms, including a "no hours"
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware
to be initiated next semester.
by the speech or program.
program for upperclass women,
also requires will go into effect on a trial
"The University
that meetings on its campus, at basis next semester.
which
speakers apApproved the establishment
pear, be peaceful and orderly of a Social Welfare Research Inand in no way interfere with the stitute to be responsible to the
proper functioning of the Univer- Vice President for Research.
Passed revisions in the bud- sity.

AAUP Hears Proposal

Lobbyists Seek The Vote
RACIIAEL KAMUF
Kernel Staff Writer
Student Government presi-

dent Tim Futrell said Wednesday that the new Kentucky College Student Coalition will present a proposal to the General
Assembly in January seeHngvot-inpower for student and faculmembers of boards of trustees
ty
of Kentucky colleges and universities.
Futrell revealed the strategy
in a talk to the American Association of University Professors
(AAUP) by describing the newly
formed legislative lobbying group
of student leaders from across
the state.

g

No Votes
At present neither the faculty
nor student members have voting power. They may present
student and faculty opinions on
any topic, but they may not
vote on any issue brought up before the Boards.
Futrell said that a vote by
the student and faculty members
would allow for more internal
participation in the running of
the University. He said he was

Free Coffee!
Th? Student Center will be
open until midnight during finals
week. Free coffee will be

handicapped last summer because he "had no leverage" when
the Student Code issue was before the Board of Trustees.

Dr. William P!ucknett

in-

formed the AAUP of three proposals that an AAUP committee
will suggest to the state legis-

lators. One of the proposals advocates the removal of the State
commissioner of agriculture and
the superintendent of public instruction from the Board of Trustees. They now are
members by virtue of their elective offices.

"Further, the University,

AAUP 1969-197- 0
Salary Report
to the group. The pay scale of
Associate Professors, Assistant
Professors, Professors, and Instructors has been given an A
rating by the national AAUP.
The average salary of these UK
teachers is on a level sought by
the AAUP to attract new and

through the Office of the

1

I

g

better teachers.
The average salary of full Professors was given a B rating by
the national organization. It falls
$2700 short of the suggestecaver-age- .

The AAUP will submit a proposal to the Administration that
the average salary of the full
professors be raised to meet the
Term Of Office
requirements for an A rating.
Also included in the recomSalary Increase Promoted
mendation is a proposed nine-yeAn increase in salary for prostaggered term of office for
motion from assistant professor
board members, which would preto associate professor and from
from appointvent one governor
associate professor to full proing a majority to the board. Three fessor
is also being suggested to
governors would appoint three the
University officials. The asmembers each.
board
sociation is seeking a promotion
Faculty suffrage on the board increase consisting of merit perof trustees is also being sought centage increase plus a flat dollar
by the committee.
Increase $1200 for advancement
Dr. Plucknett met with state from assistant to associate profesrepresentatives David Van Hern, sor and $1800 for promotion from
associate to full professor.
Bill Kenton and William McCann
from Fayette County Wednesday
The association is also renight to discuss the proposals.
questing that all employes of the
Dr. Plucknett said "the proposals
University receive at least a minwere received sympathetically"
imum cost of living salary increase according to the Bureau
by the legislators.
Dr. Joseph Krislov gave the of Labor Statistics.

Continued on Page 9, Col.

Presi- -

(

ar

.

Student
Power

Student Government president Tim Futrell
discusses the goals of the newly formed Kentucky College Student Coalition with members of the American Association of Univ ersity rrofessors in a lengthy meeting Wednesday afternoon. Kernel Photo by Kay Brooke ire

* c
2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Dec.

19

11,

cm
Ovtjs

Classic Filni 'Citizen Kane'
Retains Aura OfGreatnees

et-Vdur

Lead your own life.
Enjoy it.
Don't let life let you down

because of a silly headache. Happiness is as far
away as an Anacin bottle.
Anacin is twice as strong
in the specific pain re-

liever doctors

stirring refutation. Here is a genuine touchstone, a work so alive
that it never fails to gain a place
in the critics personal pantheons
(at the 1962 international symposium voted the greatest film of
all time), but which also never
falters in the ultimate arena-- wit
h the audiences. The critics
often overlook what the audiences
really love about this movie: not
techso much the
nical virtuosity a
formulation of a filmic
vocabulary but its total effect,
the bravado with which it presents an exuberant castigation
of the American dream and a negative judgment against a powerful
figure (the movie
was blatantly almost tastelessly
based on the life of William Randolph Hearst).
"Citizen Kane" was shown
Wednesday and Thursday last
week to small audiences at the
Student Center. There is a tendency to look at it as a "relic"
the old RKO Radio trademark,

By BRAD CRIScOM
Kernel Staff Writer
The camera opens on the singing mouth of Susan Alexander,
of whom Citizen Charles Foster
Kane has imperiously deckled
to make an opera star, for whom
he has built a $3 million opera
house. Moving backward it takes
in the stage, a bus tie with actors
and scenery. The rising curtain
is only suggested as light floods
the set. The camera climbs rapidly, through the flies, to two stagehands high above. Considering
Miss Alexander's abilities, one of
them turns woefully to the other
and holds his nose. From mouth
to nose, there is not a single break

never-surpasse-

-

recom-

in the continuity of the camera's
'movement.
That sequence, one of the most
justly famous in movie history,
says a lot about its characters,
about opera, about movies as a
popular art form.. To those who
regard that phrase "popular
art" as a contradiction, this
movie, made in 1941 by
old
stands as g

mend most as the other
well known extra strength
tablet.

Anacin may not bend

your mind, but it sure will
get your head together.

then-livin- g

25-ye- ar

Orson-Welle-

Continued on Page 4, Col.

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Four Corners has done it
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This looks like a two piece
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Together, it makes a heck-uv- a
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Bring your wardrobe: into
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Dec

Department Of Interior
Plans Pollution Series
The Department of the Interior's Federal Water Pollution
Control Administration is sponsoring a series of student pollution seminars "to involve the
youth of our nation in the fight
to prevent the contamination of
our environment."
The
seminars will be
held on December 29 and 30 in
cities located in the nine FWP-Cregions across the country.
"We want to tap the enthusiasm, vigor, and fresh ideas of
our country's high school and
college youth In this battle to
protect and preserve our precious
and irreplaceable water resources," Secretary Walter J.
Hickel added.
r
The
seminars will
feature speakers and participants
from the FWPCA's nine regional
offices, and will focus on what
is being done and what still
needs to be done to combat water
pollution. Particular pollution
problems which have defied technological solutions so far, and
problems in different regions of
the country will also receive attention at the seminars.
Carl L. Klein, assistant sec-- :
retary of the Interior for Wt!er
Quality and Research, said, "The
one-da- y

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seven-hou-

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PERSONAL MESSAGES IN THE KERNEL CLASSIFIED COLUMN BRING RESULTS

CINCINNATI SENIORS AND
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Contac Cold Caps,

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GRADUATE STUDENTS!
AFTER GRADUATION

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Flashcubes
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Right Guard Deodorant z.
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Here's what .

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a chance to take advantage of the career opportunities right
here in Greater Cincinnati.
On December 29 and 30 at the Cincinnati Convention-ExpositioCenter, Greater Cincinnati leading firms will gather to interview
any college senior, graduate student completing his studies, or
graduate completing military duty.
You will have the chance to learn about the many important
career opportunities that will be available to youth in Cincinnati.
n

At no cost to you!

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Any radio, TV set,

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tape recorder with
a phono jack. ;

Help yourself. Join Jn this 1969 Operation Nalive Son . . .
sponsored bv:The Greater Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce.

For complete Information contact Nal ive Son Operation Center
:innati.
area code 513... in

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REGISTER NOW BY COMPLETING. THIS FORM.
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Complete and ready ti play

Please register me for the 1969 Operation Native Son.
stand this involves no cost on my part.

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Just plug our bag
precision record playing capability.
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DIAMOND ichen it's a

seminars are planned for the
Christmas holidays so as not to
divert students from their studies
and to permit maximum participation. We think that the contributions the young people of
the country can make toward
cleaning up the environment will
be of great value. We intend to .1
use the seminars as a starting
point for enlisting their continuing help."
Klein explained that student
advisory groups will be formed
at each seminar to elect a
group to make up a regional Student Council on Pollution and the Environment
"Each regional
(SCOPE).
SCOPE will elect one member
to a national SCOPE which will
serve in an advisory capacity to
Secretary Hickel," Klein added.
Secretary Hickel will also
designate a student to serve with
national SCOPE to make it a
body.
"We hope to expand membership of the regional SCOPES
to nine members to make allowances for possibly missing full
representation at the seminars
of schools across the country,"
Kelin said.

a

11,

.Mo. of Graduation.

Mail to:

n OPERATION

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uredier isiiiuiiiiuii Vsiiamucr ui Vumiiicn.c
Suite 55, 309 Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

* 4

-- THE KENTUCKY
KERNELy Thursday, Dec 11, 1969

SOUTHERN HILLS METHODIST CHURCH
fc5o

HARRODSBURG RD.

MWV,?..t

Continued from Pare t
the artificial sets and fabricated

DONALD K HERREN, Minister

Srmon bypr. Hrren

Trontportotion Provided tor Studentt

Call

277-617-

or

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backdrops, the political naivete.
But nostalgia is An impossible

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StOl A Gr eat . Flick
attitude to maintain: the sharp
may make you
think you're looking at a tatty
old antique until someone falls
ominously Into Kane's shadow.
Suddenly you're struck with the
artistic possibilities of the medium. And "Citizen Kane" doesn't
try to Wde its method; it theatricalizes its tricks. Kane's luckless first marriage is conveyed,
for instance, in a quick series
of family breakfasts, beginning
with wedded bliss and ending
with husband and wife icily reading different newspapers. The
economy of space and time hits
you in the face. And what better
way to show Kane's defeat than to
have him walk between two mirrors: his image, regresses to infinity down the center of the

;

;; ;

beach, for example, played as a
funeral procession. Some powerful Images the smoke billowing
from the incinerators of Kane's
palace withGotterdammerungon
the sound track. And a fantastic
parody the movie shifts from a
gloomy radio-pla- y
atmosphere to
a fake March of Time newsreel
on Kane's life. Most fun I've
had this semester was hearing
the newsreel narrator intone the
"line, "
collapse . . . shameful. . . ignominious."
All of these things are the more
enjoyable for the
Most
touch.
of "Citizen
Kane's" ideas are rather pedestrian, a refreshing kind of kitsch.
And that reminds us that movies
are not primarily about ideas;
their art is the art of staccato
screen.
sensory
assault,
d
a excitement,
of
Xots
irony
movement.
picjiic motorcade down a Florida breathtaking
black-and-whi-

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WASHINGTON (CPS)-T- he
National Selective Service Head
quarters is satisfied with the fair
ness of the Dec. 1 draft lottery
despite the fact that computer
checks have shown the drawing
favored those born in the first
half of the year.
A Selective Service official
told CPS the selection process
was made as random as possible
In that capsules containing dates
were stirred with a spade before
the first one was picked, and that
the picking was done by 52 people, all of whom did not pull
out capsules from the same place
in the bowl.
Soon after the lottery, two
college students, Brian Re id of
the University of Maryland and
John Ware of USC, were reported
to have discovered, by running
the lottery results through computers, that draft officials evidently placed the dates in the
bowl in chronological order with
January at the bottom and De-cember at the top.
The figures bore them out.

People born In December had the
lowest average ranking, 121. November was close behind at an
average of 149, followed by October and September. The average January ranking was 201,
February, 202; March, 226; April,
203 and May 208.
Re id said the draft officials
fell into the same trap many
television shows do: thy assumed that stirring the contents of the bowl would ensure
a random sample. This falls short
of giving everyone an equal
chance, he said.
The Selective Service official
said the drawing qualified as
random under his agency's definition. He said serving in the
military is a "good experience"
anyway, so people shouldn't be
upset. "We all have to go

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Dillard House, located at 270
S. Limestone St. is currently accepting applications for new residents for the Spring Semester.
Cost for a semester's room
at Dillard is $160, with an additional cost for evening meals.
Interested students can get more
information from Mason Taylor
at 270 S. Limestone St.

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Dec.

i&fflfea

11, 19f9

r

OPEN MONDAY - WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY
TILL 9:00 p.m.

w

Educational Funds . .
Future Wot So Bright'

By CRAIG AMMERMAN
Kentucky College Press Service

that supplies the largest support
base for education.
There is also adverse opinion
over the large percentage of the
state budget appropriated to education.. ... .
Thus, the possibility of a large
increase in state funds to education appears dim at the best.
Gov. Louie Nunn last April
assured construction of a
college in northern Kentucky that will require at least
$10 million to erect the needed
physical plant required of such
a facility.
The University of Louisville
is applying every possible pressure to become a full partner in
the state system.
The "community college system, continually growing to every
hamlet that commands any political power, will need an increase in state monies if it expects to continue expanding.
And the four regional universities, Kentucky State College
and the' University of Kentucky
will once again be jockeying for
another substantial increase in
support to keep pace with expanding curriculum, growing
faculties and towering academic
and residential structures.
Obviously, more money
much more money
will be
sought. But from where will it

-

FRANKFORT
Kentucky
public education, the phenomenon that controls the largest
percentage of the taxpayer's dollar, finds itself in a precarious
position as maneuvering begins
to find ways to finance this

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system.

Uncertainty and unrest are
two vital factors in this educational system that's Just one
month away from a critical session with state lawmakers.
A $2 million deficit in spending revealed last spring, demands for higher wages by a
union of public
school teachers, creation of a
new
college, the pending entry of the University of
Louisville into the state system
and normal growing pains have
caused alarm in many circles.
The last session of the Legislature allotted a record $680 million to public education, the biggest increase in history.
Now, the crisis looms larger
than in 1968, and the prospects
for available funds are not so
bright.
Public opinion over the sales
tax hike has not been overwhelmingly favorable, and there is a
seemingly strong liklihood that
this General Assembly will
exempt food, medicine and possibly clothing from the source come?

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Downtown Lexington
ONE HOUR FREE PARKING ANY DOWNTOWN

LOT WITH $2.00 PURCHASE

Billfold French Purse 20.
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NEXT TO KENNEDY'S

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HAM AND TWO EGGS,

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4

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French Purse 16.

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11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Quick Service
45c
HOMEMADE CHILI
HAMBURGERS
22c

1

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The gift that reflects your
good taste

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Given a coupon worth 50 cents off, and the

j problem of locating a Sirloin Steak dinner,

baked potato, tossed salad, and a hot buttered
roll, and a budget limitation of $1.29, what do
you do? You can't find the answer In Barnes &
Noble. So bring this coupon to the Ponderosa.
Where we've got some pretty bright people.
WORTH 50

Downtown

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday,

Dec.

II,

JudgingTedm
Wins National
The livestock judging team of
the College of Agriculture has
won the annual intercollegiate
livestock judging contest at the
70th International Livestock Exposition in Chicago.
Members of the UK team
scored 401, 599 points to beat
out their nearest competitor, the
University of Missouri, with a
close 404,593 average. It was
the first national championship
for the College of Agriculture in
livestockjudging.
The team brought 10 trophies
back from its trip, and a total
of 18 awards from a
e
tour that took members to the
Fair at Memphis, the
Southeastern Fair at Atlanta, the
American Oil contest at Kansas
City, the Eastern National at
Timonium, Md., and finally the
national championship in Chi-

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FOR UK STUDENTS ONLY!

Purchase that special gift for that
special someone, or your Christmas

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Team members participating
in the tour were Buck Chastine,

Orleans, Ind.; Tim Dievert, Danville; Paul Kunkel, Independence; Randy Newton, Hopkins-villKenwood Soper, Paris; John
Wilson, Crab Orchard; and Bill
Le Crand, Warsaw.
The championship team was
coached by Bill Able, a faculty
member at the College of Agriculture.

retail price.

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fit'

When buying diamonds don't be misled
byS22f$229 . . . look under our diamond
microscope and see the quality of your
diamond before you make your purchase.

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed live times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

ft
127 West Main Street

Open nightly for your shopping convenience

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files

$9.45
$.10

Haven't Ya

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Dec.

8

Iernel

The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

1894

11, 1969

University of Kentucky

THURSDAY, DECEMBER
Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

11, 19G9

Janu s W. Miller, Editor-in-ChiII. Jopson, Managing Editor
Rob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Ccxirgc
Itclrrt Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottic Hoan, Associate Editor
Chip Hutclicson, Sports Editor
I)an Gossrtt, Arts Editor
Carolyn Dunnavan, Features Editor
Don Kosa. Cartoonist
Frank Coots,
Mike Hrrndon,
Rill Mattlirw
Jeannie Lordom.
Jean Henaker
Assistant Managing Editors

Washington Revisited

Washington D. C. This time there aren't hundreds of thousands
of young people with tons of hair. No pacifist slogans, no Agnew jibes.
Secretaries don't flash peace symbols from office windows this time;
there are no policemen with a hand relaxed in a "V" sign directing
pedestrians; there are no observers gesturing with other fingers their
sentiments of the passing demonstrators.
There are no troops in the Treasury Building this time, and no troop
carriers within the Commerce Commission's courtyard. National Guardsmen no longer line Constitution Avenue with tear gas launchers at
ready, and crying youths, jeered by police spotlights, do not huddle
around the burning contents of trash cans waiting for the pepper gas
to wash from their systems.
There is no grunting caravan of military jeeps this time, for the city
trucks carry furniture
outsiders. The
is no longer threaten-b- y
not food for temporarily starving visitors.
today,
Tents aren't pitched on street corners today; flags aren't flown at
the Monument's feet. Temporary "sanitary" facilities no longer mar the
Mall. The giant lamps of the Labor Department Building make shadows
U-Ha-

ul

of strollers, not soldiers.
The President's home, so brilliantly white that it acquires a bluish
tint, so omniously lighted as to be dim to dark, emits a blue-blac- k
blanched pale of death.
doesn't block the
A barricade of buses, backed bumper-to-bumpmorbid the Capitol doesn't need placard-carryin- g
Capitol today. To appear
mourners, traipsing across its tired toes. A silent Capitol
couched in a black greatcoat provides morbidity as he stands
guard,
near the top of the last of the four levels of the Capitol Building steps,
perhaps reflecting on the infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood
er

of

his nation.

Washingtonians? They don't speak of the Mobilization for Peace
often. When they do, it's a muted, musing conversation. "It was fun,"
said one. "Days to remember." "Sure, a few windows were broken,
but nothing bad. It was kinda nice." "Let youth have its fling," they
imply, "before they have to face the ultimatum of adulthood."
D. C. isn't vacant and it's Sunday and the bells toll. Dozens of
tourists are confined by the pine doors inside the building. Outside,
at the top of the cspitol steps, an aging-faboy baby, a long awaited
is laid to rest on a cold stone slab by an aged-famother while
hope,
she gazes at her progress.
It isn't vacant. People are coming from everywhere. Like flies to
st

st

a

carcass.

The Meaning Of Christmas

This won't be the first time
it has been said, but it seems
a bit ironic that as we approach
this holiday season we, in our
"land of plenty," can look 80 miles
to the west and see a child starve
to death.
For most of us the holiday season is one of fellowship with family and friends and a chance to
exchange gifts after that huge meal
of turkey, ham and the trimmings.

But, unfortunately, this is not
the case everywhere. Children are
starving in Kentucky as well as
the more publicized Biafras. Like
Bobby Ellis, who died
of malnutrition in Louisville the
day before Thanksgiving, others
will continue to die unless we
seek to practice the principles behind that escaping intangible called
the true meaning of Christmas
the gracious giving to those less
fortunate than ourselves.
nine-y