xt747d2q5z2r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt747d2q5z2r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331114  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 14, 1933 1933 2013 true xt747d2q5z2r section xt747d2q5z2r L

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

Best Copy Available

UNIVERSITY
CATS TRAMPLE

V.M. I. CADETS
TO WIN 21 TO 6
Kercheval and Bach, Behind
Line, Play
Stellar Game
Fasl-Charuin-

BIG BLUE RESERVES

ARE OUTSTANDING

IOna Runs Are Feature of
Annual Battle With
Virginia School

By JAY LtTCIAN
Led by their two big (tuns, Kerchevnl and Bach, and aided by
line, the Wildcats
came out on the winning Ride of
the ledger to batter down the Flying Squadron of Virginia Military
Institute, 21 to 6, Saturday afternoon on Stoll field.
Big Jobe finally fame through to
support his publicity reputation and
played a ferocious game all after
noon, constantly breaking Into the
Cadets' backfleld to hurry and mess
up their plays. Wade Aulick and
John Olah. two giant reserves,
played almost the entire game. Rupert, Captain Kreuter, Darnaby,
Jean. Ayers, and Hay were outstanding In their play.
Ernie Janes especially deserves
game
praise for his usual
at center. He played almost the
entire game while th Cadets were
forced to use four centers against
him
Bill Smith, Dodson, Watkins. Law,
and Coleman showed up well for
V.M.I. Smith did most of his team's
offensive work, constantly threatening to break" away for touchdowns. He was successful In the
second quarter only.
The Cats scored In the first quarter when Kercheval made a
run off tackle. Previous to this the
Big Blue had marched twice down
to the two-yaline, losing the ball
on each occasion.
In the second quarter V. M.
came back. Driving down the field
top-not-

rd

rd

t

with a versatile attack that includpowr plays, passes, spinners
and cutbacks, the Cadets, led by
the brilliant Smith, made a
drive for a touchdown. The extra
point was blocked. Their first drive
was halted on the Cats' one-yaed

rd

rd

line.
On the last play of the first half
Bach received the kickoff and returned It 30 yards and was In the
clear but was dragged down from
behind.
The Kentucklans failed to score
in the third quarter although they
were within scoring distance twice.
They made several first downs to
(Continued on Page Pour)

PROF. NICHOLLS
RE-ELECT-

ED

Miss Anne Calllhan Is sponsoring a series of architectural displays of the Oothlc period, the first of which Is now
on exhibition In the Library.
The exhibit will be changed
each week, presenting various
periods In the history of art.
The purpose of the exhibit Is
to show a comparison of various periods mainly Illustrated by reproductions of famous buildings.

DRIVE
IS NEAR QUOTA
Y FINANCE

Leaders of Faculty Finance
Drive Intimate They
Expect to Pass
$1000 Mark
AG

COLLEGE

LEADS

Leaders of the Faculty-Financ- e
drive of the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.
of the University report $915.75 subscribed thus far, and expect the
final total to be over $1,000. Dr.
M. Hume Bedford, committee representative for Kastle hall reports 100
per cent subscriptions for that
building by faculty and clerical staff
for a total of $56.25, a 40 per cent
Increase over last year.
Other teams to be commended are
Mrs. M. Hume Bedford and Miss
Margaret King, Interviewing Library
staff members, who report close to
100 per cent, with a total of $24;
and the Agriculture college, the
largest single group, reporting $275.
The team Is composed of Prof. P. E.
Karraker, Prof. L. J. Horlacher,
Dean Sarah O. Blanding, Prof. H.
B. Morrison, and Mrs. Bemie Shive- iy.
Reports from other buildings are
$117;
as follows: Administration,
Education, $85; McVey, $82.50; Mens
gym, $23; House Mothers, $40; Engineering college, $67.50; White hall,
$48; Science, $39; C. and P., $23;
Law, $17; and Art Center, $12.
The committee leading the drive
Is composed of Mrs. M. Hume Bedford, chairman of the Advisory
board of the Y. W. C. A., Prof. L. J.
Horlacher, chairman of the Advisory
board of the Y. M. C. A., Miss Augusta Roberts, secretary of the Y.W.
and Mr. Bart Peak, secretary of the
Y. M. C. A.

WINNING PLAY IS

"THE OPEN DOOR"
Mary Tally and Tom Atkins
Are Best in Drama;
Stroller Edibles
Named
DANCE

of K. Radio
Studios Given

IS PLANNED

Kampus
Kernels

New equipment has been received
by the University studios, of station WHAS, which consists of an
extension panel, enabling the stu- dios to pick up broadcasts from
a mixing panel,
about Lexington,
nnrt other modern radio emiinment.
The studio is doing the switching
Asbury college to broadcast each
at 7 a. m.
This week there Is a new series
beginning
of radio programs
for
those who are Interested in reading
as an avocation but have only a
limited time at their disposal This
series is called
and
the talks In this series will come at
Dantz-le- r,
intervals of four weeks. L. L.
head of the English department,
is the speaker.
Another new feature on the U. K.
radio program Is the weekly broadcast of organ melodies, played by
Elizabeth Hardin, from the organ In
Memorial hall. Selections will be
of a
nature and will
be those numbers which are most
familiar to radio listeners.

Bess Clark.

Relations class to attend.
The Alma Magna Mater club will
meet at 5 p. m. Wednesday at Maxwell place. Plans will be made for
a Christmas party. All of the members are urged to be present. Miss
Jean Dawson, president, will preside.
A meeting of Le Cercle Francals
will be held at 3 p. m. Wednesday,
November 15, in the Women's
building.

El Ateneo Castellano will meet at
m. Thursday in the Women's
building. All persons who wish to
be members of the club are urged
to join at that time.
3 p.

A meeting of Kappa Delta PI will
be held at 3 p. m. Thursday in
room 207 of the University Training school building.

The World Fellowship committee
of the V. W. C. A. will meet at
3 p. m. Wednesday, In the Women's
building.

The Y.W.C.A. Hobby group will
(Continued on Pag Four)

GOAT PARADE" HELD
BY SORORITY PLEBS

'
I

Taylor to Address
Lexington Women

neering convocation scheduled
for 10 a. m. Wednesday In
r,
Memorial hall. W. D.
dean of the graduate
school and noted anthropologist, is to be guest speaker.
He plans to connect his talk
with his recent adventures in
the land "east of Suez". This
type of program presents a
change, former convocations
this year having been purely
professional, per t a 1 n I n g to
topics related to the science
of engineering.

at-f- or

,"

CURRENT RUMOR

al

Noted Musician
Shows Skill In

Vesper Program
7r.

Dr. James A. Yates,
U. K. Graduate, Dies
Deceased Was First Person
to Receive Ph.D. Degree
from U. K.

Library

of Classics
By DAVID SALYERS
Miss Phyllis Kraeuter, violin-elist of New York city, presented a
program of cello numbers Sunday
at 4 p. m. in Memorial hall. This
program was the second of the ser- of Vesper concerts sponsored
every year By the University. The
artist was accompanied by John
Richardson.
Miss Kraeuter. with a pleasing
personality, showed great talent in
the skillful handling of her lnstru- ment. She played with great feel- ing and the interpretation of every
number was excellent.
The first selection was the
by Mendelssohn,
because of the 12 strokes,
as of a clock, at the end of the
composition. The second selection
was three movements of the Concerto In A, by Wilhelm Jeral. One
of the most effective numbers because of its popularity, was Chopin's
Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 2 in E flat.
The program arranged in four
sections, was as follows: Concerto
In A, Wilhelm Jeral;
Mendelssohn; Toccato, Fresco bald 1: Intermezzo, Granados;
Danse O r 1 e n ta 1 s, Rachmaninoff;
Chanson Napolitalne, Casella; Nocturne, Op. 9. No. 2 in E flat, Chopin;
and Hungarian Rhapsody, Popper.
el

ed

Adagio-Mitter-nac-

Large Display of Books for
"Leisure Reading" Prepared
to Go on Exhibition at
U. K.

OPENSM'U.

Home Talent Display Will
Be Continued Throughout

Week at Art
Center

OIL WORKS NUMEROUS
The home talent art exhibition
was opened to the public at 2 p. m.
Sunday in the main corridor of
the Art Center and will continue
throughout the week.
Twenty-fiv- e
persons were asked
to enter their works In this exhibition and each of them responded.
Most of the works entered are In
sketches
oils, but many water-coland charcoal drawings also are displayed.
Those who entered works are:
Miss Anna Louise Rice, Mrs. J. W.
Pryor, Miss Gladys McAddams, Mrs.
Grant C. Knight. Mr. Clyde E.
Foushee, Mrs. Elizabeth Addams,
Callihan,
Miss Anne Worthington
Dr. Frank L. McVey, Miss Harriett
McDonald, Miss Lucille Car-rel- l.
Davis
Mr. Dick O'Hanlon, Miss Irene
Cullls, Miss Theresa Newhoff, Mrs
Elizabeth L. McKnown. Mrs. Jean
Belt, Miss Sallie Johnston, Miss
Katnerine McGinnis. Miss Coral
Braden, Mrs. E. A. Dunbar, Miss
Elizabeth Lee McCann, Miss Joy
Pride, and Mrs. Doris Rannells.
"It is a credit to the people of
Lexington and to the art depart- ment for all of these people to re
spond so wholeheartedly
and for
evry single one of the entries to be
hung," said Prof. Edward W. Ran-ie- s
nells, head of the art department,
Mr. Hanlon has four paintings
hung, and is followed by Mr.
shee. who has three. Many of the
artists have two or more works
hung. Among these are Dr. Frank
L. McVey. Mrs. Doris Rannells, Miss
Anne Callihan, Mrs. E. A. Dunbar,
Miss Lucille Carrell. and Coral
Braden.
or

Fou-Shel-

Carter Is Elected
President of Dorm
Secretary and

Councilmen
Are also Named for
Men's Halls

John M. Carter, Stanford, senior
in the College of Education, was
elected president of t he Men's
dormitories at an election held at
7 p. m. Thursday in Room 211, McVey hall.

Henry Spragens, Lebanon, Junior
In the College of Arts and Sciences,
was elected secretary.
Lysle Croft, assistant dean of
men, presided at the meeting until
O.
the president was elected and took
the chair. The men were elected
by respective sections. One student
Dr. O. H. Pinney, one of the was elected also to represent his
physicians on the medical staff at section on the board of council-methe dispensary, will be the speaker
Those elected as councilmen were:
on tonight's program at the weekly
Bradley hall, first and second floor,
meeting of the Y. M. C. A. freshBradley hall,
man cabinet. His subject will be Ralph Kercheval;
"Customs and Beliefs of the Na- third and fourth floor. Sheldon
tives" In Africa." Doctor Pinney Wagner: Kinkead hall east. Bill
served as a medical missionary for Bryan; Kinkead hall west, Leslie N.
ten years In Africa and is well ac- Mayes; Breckinridge hall north,
quainted with the customs of the Robert E. Malonev; Breckinridge
hall south, James Graber.
natives.

Dr.

II. Pinney

To Give Address

n.

Frank Fowler Features Fine Feathers

..

"Mid-Summ-

er

Powell will be remembered by auas
diences of that production
stellar performer. Howard Smath-er- s,
also of that production, appears
as 'Percy Middling" in the Levy
comedy.
Four who will make tneir debut
in this play are Dorothy Dyer
Rhodes. Oine Williamson, James
All
Alsop, and Paul W. Matnewa.
of them are said to be excellent
auignol timber, and much is ex- of their performance.
The play Itself should be the
... J
,.,4.
mum
"" Ik. flntiiMu
and unique time element will sun- ulv the decorativeness and austain- merit of unrest while curiobity
b the new UXeai- '
mi-te-

ui"u
.

a"!

Council Tabulates
Under Supervision
of Dean of Men

An exceptionally large number of
votes was cast In the class elections
held Friday, November 10, in White
hall for the selection of officers for
the Junior, sophomore, and freshman classes.
The officers elected were: Juniors,
James Miller, Henderson, president;
Virginia Riley,
and
Elwood Hanson, Cincinnati,
secretary-t-

reasurer.

Sophomores: Bazil Baker, Georgetown, president; Freeman Orifflth.
Tiptonville, Tenn.,
and James A. Moore, Madlsonville.

committee, and Ann
Schockensy, chairman of the growing - up - with - books committee, a
large display of books for "Leisure
Reading" for children, for adolescents, and for adults has been prepared.
Also Included In the display are a
number of books Just published,
"best sellers" of this summer, and
foreign books. The exhibit will be
open to the public each day this
week from 8:30 a. m. to 5 p. m. on
the third floor of the library.
The display consists of three
units; a special section for children's books, a section showing the
development of adolescence to adulthood, and a special section for adult
reading in the field of travel. The
display of children's books will be
centered around a facsimile of a
corner of a child's nursery, showing the child at his first leisure
reading, Intently interested in the
picture books before him, and surrounded by his toys, picture books,
and nursery rhymes. The second
unit of the display consists of a
large poster in the semblance of
a spider web, showing the expansion of Interest of the individual
In reading from his early years
through his adult years.

secretary-treasure- r.

Freshmen: Curtis Wilmott, Lexington, president; J. Franklin Wallace, Lexington,
and
Dorothy Broadbent, Cadiz,
secretary-t-

reasurer.

The Student council was In
charge of the voting and the votes
were counted under supervision of
the dean of men immediately after
the polls closed at 4:30 p. m.
An unusually large vote was polled, especially noticeable In the
freshman class, the greater portion
of that class voting.

O.D.K. Fraternity

Pledges Seven Men
Omicron Delta Kappa, national
men's leaderships fraternity, announced the pledging of six men by
placing their names on the traditional key hung near the Administration building Friday.
The pledges are Ralph Kerchel,
val, Wesley E. Carter, George
C. Bruce Moiford, Douglas Par-risCameron V. Coffman, and Bill
Conley. The new men were formally pledged at services held In
Memorial hall Friday at 5 p. m.
The pledges were chosen under a
new standard of rating campus acretivities which was announced
cently by O.D.K. No date has been
set for the initiation of the new
men.
Vo-ge-

h,

SPEAK

TONIGHT AT 7:30
Dean of Commerce College to
Give Second of Series
of Lectures on
New Deal
INFLATION

P. T. A. to Hear
New Orchestra

IS TOPIC

The Training School orchestra,
conducted by Louis Friedman, will
give a concert at the regular P. T.
A. meeting at 2:30 p. m. Wednesday in the auditorium of the University Training school.
The program is as follows: March.
Lawrence; Missouri Belle Waltz.
Norman; trumpet trio, Lloyd Mahan, Edward Valleau, and George
Nollau, (selected); vocal solo, Mary
L. McKenna, (selected); and Overture Majestic, De Lamater.
This concert will be the second
in this series to be given this year.
The public is Invited to attend this
meeting.

Prof. Edward Wiest, dean of the
College of Commerce, will be the
speaker of the evening at the second of a series of lectures on NRA,
to be given tonight at 7:30 in the
University Training school auditorium. Mr. W. H. Courtney, president
of the First National Bank and
Trust company, and treasurer of the
Lexington Board of Commerce, is
the chairman for the evening.
"Inflation Under the New Deal,"
is the subject of Dean Wiest's talk.
He will describe what inflation is;
give the causes of price changes,
and also endeavor to tell of the
various methods to bring about Inflation. Dean Wiest will end his
speech by discussing the powers of
the president, the attitude of various economic groups, and the future.
This will be the second of a series of lectures on the recovery legislation and its significance sponsored by the College of Commerce
Lexington Board of Commerce, and
the International Relations class.
November 6, Pres. Frank L. McVey
gave a lecture on "The New Deal
Legislation and Its Administration."
All the lectures are free and the
public is invited. The purpose of
the lectures is to acquaint the pub
lic with the New Deal. All students
taking commerce or political science are urged to attend the meetings. Every Tuesday at 7:30 p. m.
a lecture will be given.

MUSICIANS WILL
GIVE

The Cincinnati Symphony orchestra will present two performances
November 16, in Woodland auditorium, one matinee and one In
the evening. Eugene Gossens will
conduct the afternoon concert, while
the evening's program will be con-

Elected to Office
Vice-Preside- nt

J. W. Martin, professor of economics in the Commerce college,
was elected
of the
Southern Economic association after
a three day conference in Atlanta,
ending November ) '
Among the speakers on the program was Prof. E. Z. Palmer of the
College of Commerce at the University. In his address to the economists. Professor Palmer stated that
the United States should have a
"second line of defense against uncontrolled Inflation," and he recommended a stable price level as the
best such defense.
nt

PROGRAMS

Cincinnati Symphony Group
Scheduled to Appear in
Woodland Auditorium
Thursday, November 16

Professor Martin

Commerce Faculty Member
of
Is Made
Economic Group

by

Student
Votes

Library

WIEST TO

Polled

OTHER POSTS FILLED
FOR CURRENT YEAR

Miss Julia F. Carter, supervisor
of work with children in the Cincinnati public library, will speak at
3 p. m. Friday In the library science
room of the University library In
connection with the observance of
national book week.
Under the direction of Jane Ann
Matthews, chairman of the

K.

is

Elections

MISS CARTER TO SPEAK

ART EXHIBITION

Vote

Students in Annual

engi-

Funk-house-

i

lc

WEEK OBSERVED

at the

More than 300 sorority women
tended the annual Women's Pan-da- y

Heavy

NATIONAL BOOK

"How the Other Half Live"
is to be the topic of discus-Bto- n

Organizations

'

versity library by Henry H. Fuson,
Harlan attorney and educator. In
the collection are a number of valuable articles on the development of
eastern Kentucky, and manuscripts
of the state's educational and industrial development, copies of
Dean of Education College to which the library did not possess.
The collection has been given the
Discuss Educational
University with the understanding
Problems
that it will be kept Intact. These arDr. William 8. Taylor, Dean of rangements have been nnule by
the College of Education, will be Prof. T. D. Clark, of the history
one of the speakers at a panel dis- department.
problems
cussion on educational
which will be sponsored by the Lexington Business and Professional
Women's club at l November dinner meeting Tuesday night.
Dean Taylor will present the collegiate view point on education.
Other sneakers on the program will
Miss Hopkins, playing the part of
By BEN F. TAYLOR
be D. Y. Dunn, superintendent of
Commanding much research study "Minnie", although this is her first
Fayette county schools, who will
footlights,
has
present the county viewpoint; Dr. and work by the costume division adventure over the
been connected with the motion
H. H. Hill, superintendent of LexLevy picture industry along the research
of the Guignol theater, the
ington public schools, who will predoubly important to Mr.
"Mrs. Moonlight" will
sent the city viewpoint; Mrs. E. E. comedy.for the title of the best placs line, andinis this production.
Ootherman, of the Henry Clay High its bid of the season Novemberpro- Fowler the cast may not appear
20
While
school faculty, giving the teachers duction opens for a
usoneH
thn. of
week's run.
view; and W. H. Hanrarry, Lexing- when It
Mildred Schaffner. In charge of the opener. "When ladles Meet," it
attorney, giving the legal viewton
costumes, Is being assisted by Elea- will have much in its favor on sight.
point.
popular On e
Hopkins, a- - member of Dunster Foster
All business and professional nor Parker Is
Htt i
h
also an authority on nol actrese. returns t
women, and others Interested in the cast who
Sarah Mnnn. stage as ... .
education are invited to attend the periodic costumes. Each art of the theater's
win oe
meeting, which will be held at the play represents a different period hunt" Miss Petit Universityseen witn
student
in
Lafayette hotel at 6:30 p. m. The with act one being laidtwo, 1880, the MarJorle Powell.
..ipnwi
im a.,ri
in 1903,
speakers will be prepared to answer "age of bustles"; act
the "Gibson Girl" period; and act I take notice" in
questions on all phases of the
Night's Dream" of last season. MuJ
three. In the modern day.
on page Four)

FL'NKIIOUSER TO SPEAK

Interesting Program is Given
by Members of Various

COUNCIL DENIES

Writings

Their Respective Classes

Pan-Hellen- ic

semi-classic- al

Fifty-seve-

(Continued

Meetings of the debating team
have been changed from Tuesday
evening to Thursday evening at
7:30 p. m., to enable those students
who desire to hear the discussions
of the various phases of the N.RA.
at the meeting of the International

Sue Swinford,

Elected as Presidents of

Affair

Hellenic formal banquet which was
held at 6 p. m. yesterday in the
gold room of the Lafayette hotel.
The scholarship cup presented
each year to the sorority with the
highest standing was awarded to
Alpha Gamma Delta.
Virginia Pltzer, president of Pan
hellenlc, presided, made the welcome address, and introduced the
numbers on the program. Guests
of honor for the banquet were Mrs.
Frank L. McVey, Miss Sarah O.
Blanding,
and Mrs. Sarah B.
i
Holmes.
Decorations for the dinner consisted of the lighted shields of the
nine national
sororities
which were represented.
The program Included the welcome address
by the president of
songs by Kitty Cook, tap dance by
Louise Johnson, songs by Ruby
Dunn, and a take-o- ff
skit on the
usual type of program by Lorraine
Lepere, freshman, and Hallle DownReDort, Started in Knoxville ing, sophomore, Elizabeth Hardin,
Paper, that New Coach Has Junior, and Martha Lowry, senior.
Accompanists for the musical and
Been Elected at U. K., is dance numbers were Kitty Reynolds
Erroneous
and Elizabeth Hardin.
The final part of the program
The following article written from consisted of the formal presentaKnoxville appeared In the Louis- tion of the pledges of the nine
ville Courier-Journand the Lex- sororities in what Is known popuington Herald
Monday morning, larly as the "goat parade."
November 13:
The program committee Included
Phoebe Turner, Elizabeth Jones,
"Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 13 (AP)
The Knoxville Journal says It has Mary Ford Alford, and Jane Ann
learned from authoritative sources Matthews. Committee in charge of
that Major Ralph Basse, former arrangements was composed of
Army coach, will succeed Harry Louise Johnson, Kitty Cooke, and
were
Gayle Elliott.
Decorations
Gamage as head coach of the Uni
versity of Kentucky football team, prepared by Edna Brown and Vireffective Sept. 1, 1934. Gamage, gin i" Murrell.
the newspaper says, already has
landed a Job as coach in the Mid
west."
Prof. Enoch Grehan, member of
the athletic council, announced
that no action had been taken bv
the council for signing a coach for
next year.
Coach Harry Gamage declined to
make a statement in regard to his
having procured a coaching Job In Miss Phyllis Kraeuter, Violin- the middle west
Cellist, Presents Recital
"Book-Looks-

NEW SERIES NO. 18

Miller, Baker, and Wilmott

Alpha Gamma Delta Awarded Scholarship Cup at

Series of Programs to Be
Presented by English Department Head

to
Clara Hughes, Susan Johnson, Dot
Whelan, Nell Duerson. Mary Cary
n
volumes of manuMaynard, Franklin Dryden, Katy
Eleanor scripts, consisting of notes, personGover, Harry Kremer,
Davis, Mary Neal Walden. Cather- al writing, and historical data,
Broadbent, have been presented to the UniDorothy
ine Jones,
Anna

IS ATTENDED BY

New Equipment 300 U.K. WOMEN

Wll-mo- tt.

i

It

TZZ.

KENTUCKY

OF

ANNUAL BANQUET

U.

ART DISPLAYS

by Mary
"The
Farm Economics Head Chos- Lally Open Door," givenwas JudgAtkins,
and Tom
en in General Election to ed the winningB. play at Stroller's
Serve on Fayette County annual Amateur night, held at 8:30
Word was received today by Dr.
p. m. Friday, November 10, in the Jesse Adams, of the College of EdBoard of Education
University Training school auditor- ucation, that James Anderson
Prof. W. D. Nichols, head of the ium.
Yates, 71, who holds the distinction
Department of Farm Economics in
Betsy Frye, Alexander Capurso, of being the first person to receive
the College of Agriculture, was re- Hunt Thomas, Elizabeth Hardin, a Ph.D. from the University of
elected a member of the Fayette James Miller, and Robert McDow- Kentucky, died at Pittsburg, Kancounty Board of Education in the ell have gained 100 points in the sas, yesterday.
general election November 7, ac- Stroller organization and have been
Doctor Yates received his degree
cording to returns virtually com- taken into the dramatic circle with at the age of 65. His doctor's theplete.
full membership.
sis, "The Type of High School Cur
For eight years as chairman of
Those who gained Stroller eligibil- riculum Which Oives the Best
the citizens educational committee ity are: Betsy Frye, Virginia Robin- Preparation for College," is reputed
county and for the past son, Betty May, Elsie Riley, Mary to be one of the most widely
for the
read
four years as a member of the Lally, Tom Atkins, Mary Townsend, educational documents in
UnitBoard of Education, Professor Nich-ol- ls Jim Moore, Jack Thomason, Grace ed States. At the timethe
of his
has been a promoter of the Fiddler, Martha Milton, Scovell death. Doctor Yates was a member
"Better Schools" program which Bryant, Ann Dedmon, Curtis
of the faculty of State Teachers'
has attracted state as well as naDot Dunden, Mary Spratt, college at Pittsburgh. Funeral sertional attention.
Kitty Mahan, Dot McDonald, Helen vices will be held In that city toFarmer, Jean Short, Lillian Smith, day.
Ann Kraft, Lena Rue Kaywood,
Jane Turner, Jane Fiero, Carlisle
Aimes, Jane Crain, Corinna Gant, Educator Donates

.

I

BOOK WEEK
VISIT EXHIBITION AT
LIIiKARY

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1933

VOLUME XXIV

IS

C!
i

I

ducted by Vladimir Baleleinlkoff.
Miss Anna Chandler Goff, concert
manager. Is in charge of reservations for both performances.
The appearance of the Cincinnati
Symphony group is considered to be
the most important event of the
musical season and the repertoire of
selections is of particular interest
to all Lexington connoisseurs of
classical music.
In order that central Kentucky
high school and college students
may enjoy these concerts, unusually low prices have been arranged
for the afternoon performance. Any
student desirous of attending the
matinee concert may procure his

Mi'YEY ATTENDS MEETING

ticket either at the stenographic
department. Administration building, or at the University music department. Price of the tickets have
been set at 25 cents each.
Evening prices range from the
lowest priced seat at $1 to the
hlnhest at $2 50. More than half
of the auditorium is marked at the
lower prices. Anyone who has not
been able to make reservations may
procure good seats at the box office.

Pres. Frank L. McVey left Sunday
for Chicago, to attend a convention
of the Association of Land Grant
Colleges and a meeting of the National Association of 8tate Universities. The two conventions are expected to last approximately a week.

A compact football guide giving
complete schedules of college games
for the 1933 season, rules, past records, play diagrams and officials'
signals has been compiled by Grant-lan- d
Rice, nationally known sport
writer.

* Best Copy
rte Two

THE KENTUCKY

The Kentucky Kernel
PUBU8HKD OK T0C8DAYS AND FRIDAYS
Mrinbar
National Oollrn Pkm Association
Krntuck IntfrooUrtiaM Proa Association
Laalnctoa Board of Commcrc
Publmember of in Major Collr
ication, represented br A. J. Norn HIU
Co., lit B. 42nd St., New York City. 121
W. Madison
St., Chlcato; 1004 2nd At,
Seattle; 120 Maple At., Im Anfrlcs: CaN
Bldg., San Francisco.
A

chnni) 1014

e

NEWSPAPER OP THE STUDENTS OP THE UNIVERSITY OP
KENTUCKY, LEXINOTON

UFnCIAb

I

Year. Entered at
Subscription M M
Lexington, Kj., Postofflc A Second
Mall Matter
Claa

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENTS RIGHTS MAINTAIN
WESLEY E. CARTER

KtitoT-tn-Chi- tl

EDITORS
Jan M. Hamilton
Edwin Tattertaoo

ASSOCIATE

Ju

Fit tot

-- Manas-fa

J. PRANK ADAMS
8. Renter
John P. Day

EDITORS

ASSISTANT
Virginia Le Moor
Jack WUd

Edward WatU
Knight

Woodson

Arthur Muth
JANE A. MATTHEWS
STARR MENDEL
JOHNNIE CRADDOCK
ELIZABETH HARDIN
WILLIE H. SMITH

Nancy Becker
Prance Bush
Lucy Jean
Mary
SPECIAL

Virginia Robinson
Nauncrl
1

1ARY O. TERRELL
ASSISTANT

Cd Shannon

Jay Luclan

.Literary Editor
Pea(ur( frfiior
Art tittor

.

Soclel

Ant. Soclttg

idltor

till or

Eleanor HUlenmeyer
Virginia Bosworth
Anderson
Chick
WRITERS
Lorraln
Calhoun

Lepere

Na

Editor

.

NEWS EDITORS
Ban F. Taylor

John St. John
REPORTERS

Mary A. Brand
Malcolm Shot well

Plorenos Kelley
Kash
Harry Kremer
Da rid Salvers
Wallac Brlggs
Earl Bourgeois
BlHy Huston
Frank Borriaa
Jsmes D. Staphs
Charles Bennett
Carl Boon
Isabel Preston
Helen Alfrey
Walter RlddeU
Leo Spence
Charlotte Coffin an
Will H. Wasson
Miriam Rosen
Margaret Cllnkscale

Sg

Sport Idltor
1. D ELM AH ADAMS
A tit. EporU Idltor
HENRY McOOWN
Sports fdlror
JAY LDCIAN
SPORTS WRITERS
M. B. Wells
Man Lancaster
Roy Hogg
Norman Oarling
NED TURNBULL

Dav

Iluiinait Jf aaaovf

ADVERTISING STAFF
Ernie Shoves
Dlflord
Ik Moor

C. V. OOFrMAN

Clrcalatioa

Jfaar

JUST COMMON COURTESY
"I dont see why people can't observe Just common courtesy," said
someone on the campus recently.
And why not? Why Is It that people are glad of any excuse to forget
the rules of good breeding and to
do things which should not be tolerated by their associates, yet are
tolerated? One example of this occurred on the campus after the
freshman caps appeareO. A freshman was seated in the dining hall
with his cap on. Someone made a
remark about eating with one's hat
'on and he only laughed and said
that the Council required them to
be worn at all times. However, we
do not imagine that this particular
freshman slept In his cap. That,
of course, would have been uncomfortable. But as it was simpler not
to remove his cap to eat, he took
advantage of misreading the rule
in that instance.
We do not mean to advocate stilted and elaborate politeness at all
times. However, common courtesy
is certainly no trouble, and this
would be a much nicer world in
which to live if people would remember that very trite, but to the
point, axiom:
"Politeness is to do and say the
kindest thing in the kindest way."
The people who allow impoliteness topass unrebuked are as much
to blame as those who practice it.
Of course, they cannot go around
correcting people, but they can set
an example of correct behavior, and
they can refuse to admit to their
gatherings those people who refuse
to conform to their standards.
Creation of snobbish standards is
not our aim. Courtesy Is Instinctive.
The simplest forms of politeness are
often the most correct, and no one
should be criticized for his failure
to know some point ot etiquette
which is purely arbitrary and which
he has had no opportunity to learn.
However, if one will mix kindness,
observation, and the desire to please,
there will be no excuse for the small
rudenesses often noticed at present.

or not the articles would be stolon
or misplaced.
A larger and more accessible room
Is highly desirable
for the con- venlonre of the student body. To say
the least a plan should be devised
to eliminate the confusion and
Inconvenience.
The persons and the organization
now handling the cloak room con- cession nave aone remarkably wen,
considering the handicaps under
which they have been working.
Any plan to remedy this situation would certainly be appreciated by the student body.

Ropki

i

PETITE

J

PIECE

f
tl

3

connected

5
l3

Any dav about five you
find a
.. nretn . hnuse NnMv.
ever inviiea. wiry jiuti come ana
bring their friends. Lots of people
Fay It's because Greta plays; some
of them say It's because she always
has an open fire, and things to make
you comfortable; still others claim
her friendship; but those who go
to be near her without even saying
HAVE A HEART
hello, really know Oreta.
At Greta's house there are newsEver so often some
paper men and dentists playing
person bursts Into print In conbrldee; crooners and lawyers bak
demnation of something at the Uni ing their shins; playboys and settle
versity. The latest Is by some half n"'nt nol,!,e workers mixing
endless women strewn
tails;
baked individual who signs his name jBbout and roomg llke
the
the brllUant
as "A Kentucky Taxpayer" In the flowers they are.
Everybody's
Point of View column of the Loulf- - Oreta's friend; she has that "hail
attitude, and she's awfully
I fellow"
'
ville Courier-Journeasy to get along with.
In truth,