xt747d2q5z4x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt747d2q5z4x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19400329  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1940 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1940 1940 2013 true xt747d2q5z4x section xt747d2q5z4x The World

HE JKJENTUCKY irkEKNEL

Whirls On
By DREW . EARSOVS VIEWS
Drew Pearson, noted Washington
correspondent
and European ob- server, stated in an address Monday'
night at Henry Clay that the
of power in World War II will
soon be held by Germany.
Britain's blockade, he said, has
been a failure. Food rations are
nothing new to the German people;
they have been forced to live on a
limited diet for over six years and
they haven't whimpered. If anything, their condition Is becoming

VOLUME XXX

Allies Weakening
An indication that the Allies are
weakening somewhat is found in
Sumner Welles recent visit to London to sound out British feeling in
regard to a possible peace move by
President Roosevelt. Heretofore, the
Chamberlain government has stood
firm by their sine qua nons of German withdrawal from Poland and
Czechoslovakia, and the removal of
Hitlerism from German government
as its terms.
The American Undersecretary of

State found that Britain had

down somewhat from their
peace prerequisites.
Chamberlain
said that he might now be willing
to leave Poland and Czechoslovakia
a part of Germany and only insist
upon Hitler's removal.
Hitler Forming Alliance
But Hitler has no intention of
being removed. The day after the
conference
in London, evidently
time enough for the news to leak
out to him, der Fuehrer dashed off
to the Alps for a quick conference
with Mussolini.
The German dictator, Pearson
said, renewed the bonds of friendship with his ally and possibly secured the future help of the Italian
army if necessary. Under the present conditions, it is better for Germany that Italy remain neutral and
keep the French army from march
ing through the Italian Alps into
Naziland.
It is said that Hitler has since
secured the support of both Russia
and Japan in a secret alliance of
the four totalitarian nations to oppose the democracies. As soon as
their union is perfected, Pearson
prophecied, war will begin in earnest.
His prediction seems to be correct, for Tuesday the Russian ambassador was recalled from France
and diplomatic relations between

the communist state and the democracy were ended.
LAST MIXITE FLASHES
Washington

$1,000,-000,00-

cion from anyone." Officials added
that modern planes become outmoded so quick, and new models
have to be bought continuously, so
the loss of one group of planes will
not hurt matters greatly.
Bangor, Maine An announcement
from Maine Democratic circles stated that Maine would back Roosevelt
for a third term, and picked Jim
Farley for the vicepresident's spot.

By BOB AMMONS
Question

"Has the new Student Government Association been a success?.
Mark Jacobs, A & S junior "No.
It hasn't accomplished a thing because it hasn't any power."
Carroll Forston, Engineering junior "It has been a fair success with
possibilities of doing much more in
the future. It just takes time to r,et

started."
5

Ag freshman

more

say-s-

o.

--

If

turn out right
it on someone

MargarelU lUtliff, A St S junior
"I don't know much about it, but according to what John Ed Pearte
bays it hasn't accomplished much."
"FairCharlie Smith, Ag senior
ly successful, considering the short
time it has been in effect."
Jim McGraw, A & S sophomore
"No. Too much faculty

Viol

l

'Courtship, Marriage'
To Be Subject
Of Lecture

...

building.

In the spring of 1938, Doctor
visit to
Burkhart made a three-da- y
the University campus, and by popular request, he returned in October of that year, and spoke to numerous campus organizations.
While in Lexington this time.
Doctor Burkhart is conducting a
religious emphasis conference at
Transylvania college, and the YM- YW has arranged this one meeting
for University students and faculty
members.
Doctor Burkhart speaks to over
600 young people and women every
week, and has personal interviews
on home and marriage problems
with approximately 80 persons each
week. He has written several books,
and his latest is titled "From Friendship to Marriage."

Season's Theater Series To End
Monday With 'Hedda Gabler'
Ibsen's "Hedda Gabler," starring
Eva Le Galliene, Earle Larimore,
and James Spottswood, will be presented as the final play of the current Legitimate Theatre series at
8:15 p. m., Monday, at Henry Clay
high school auditorium.
Critics have acclaimed Eva Le
Gallienne "the greatest living exponent of Ibsen's women." She
achieved her first Ibsen success in
"The Master Builder" and a few
years later she appeared as Hedd;i
in "Hedda Gabler."
Earle Larimore of stage, screen,
and radio will portray the role of
Eilert Lovborg in the play, which Is
being presented under auspices oi

the Lexington Junior League. He
starred in many New York Theatre

Guild

"Strange

Interlude"

including
"Volpon",'

"Mourning Becomes Electra,' and
"Marco Millions."
As Judge Brack in "Hedda Gabler," James Spottswood will bring
to Lexington talents developed during a career of 25 years on the
stage and four years on the screen.
He has also been heard on several
radio programs with Edward TJ.
Robinson, Constance Bennett, Dick
Powell, and Fanny Brice.
Individual tickets for the play
will be sold at the door, Junior
League officers have announced.

Men's Music Honorary
Formal Initiation
For April 28

agriculture students interested in becoming
members of Block and Bridle,
honorary agriculture fraternity, must apply before April
6 at the office of Dean L. J.
Horlacher, John Clore. report-

Starnes Elected Head
Of Honorary
'

ies.

Other officers elected were Virgil
of Transylvania college,

F. Payne

Louis Clifton,
of University extension,
ary-treasurer;
and Maurice F.
Seay, director of school service, faculty sponsor.
Although no formal program was
planned for the banquet, a Ladies
night dinner, a tall story contest
was held.
Initiates are Henry L. Adams,
Shelbyville; Clarence H. Albro, Jr.,
3 p.
Central City; W. L. Anderson,
Funeral services for Mrs. Georgina Cokeville, Tennessee: H. S. Arhelger,
New Richmond,
Wisconsin J. M.
Palmer Evans, 55, wife of Dean
Boles. Lexington; H. W. Bond, Levi;
E. Evans of the law college, M. J. Clarke, Lexington; H. J. Dai-leJr., Lexington; Robert M. Dren-nawill be held at 3 p. m. today at the
Lancaster; C. M. Evars. LexCentral Christian church. Burial
ington; C. F. Gaines, Owenton;
cemetery.
will be in the Lexington
J. W. LaGrone. Clemson, South Car
Mrs. Evans died at 9:25 a. m. olina; C. G. Lamb, Covington; E.
Wednesday, at the Good Samaritan a Mattox Blue Diamond; B. K,
hospital following a short illness, Rjggi Falmouth; and R. K. Waters,
She nad Deen admitted to tne nos- - Louisville.
pital on Tuesday.
T
Born in Michigan, a daughter of!
L,dW
the late Charles A. and Elizabeth
Under a ruling decided upon by
member!
Wurts Palmer, she was a
of the Central Christian church and 'he Court of Appeals Tuesday, the
was active in church circles. She lequirements for entrance to the
was on the board of directors of the law school will call for two years
Lexington Public Health center and c"ege work instead of the present
had taken part in the Community requirement of one year,
This rule, which has been under
Chest drive recently.
University ' consideration since April 1939, will
A Dast Dresident of the
-"
hiirh srhool P. T. A.. Mrs. Evans had
been elected first
for
the coming year. She was also a
member of the American Association
of University Women.
will
be
President
Pallbearers
Frank L. McVey; Professors Frank
R. Randall, Roy Moreland, Amos
H. Eblen, William Pittman, George
Skinner, and W. L. Roberts of the
second annual Drama Festi- law school faculty; and Bart N. Peak,
val of Kentucky colleges will open
YM secretary.
Besides her husband, Mrs. Evans: at,2:3 P' m' tomorrow at the Guia-i- s
survived by a daughter, Missjno1 theatre. The program includes
plays, a dinner, a
Patricia Evans of Lexington; a son, four one-aEvans of Paterson. N. J .: a! Ies of roundtables, and a frolic.
The Roswitha Dramatic club of
sister. Mrs. Albert Palmer Holcomb
ill
present
college
Wis.; and two Nazareth
of Wauwatosa,
"Fourteen" by Alice. Gerstenberg,
nephews and a niece.
and "Red Carnations," a comedy,
by Glenn Hughes, will be given by
the Mask Craf ters of Georgetown
college.
The Studio Little theatre of Kentucky Wesleyan college will present
Dean Thyrsa Amos, nationally
Ho- known dean of women at the Uni "The Last Curtain" by Neal L.
Guignol will present "Apnl
vcrsity of Pittsburgh, will be the
guest speaker of the annual Wo- - mm mi uy liatnenne rneips, uii
men s banquet to be held at 6 p. m. alumna of the University. The cast
Tuesday, April 16, in the Bluegrass will be composed of Sarah Elizabeth McLean, Dorothy Love Elliott,
Room of the Union building.
Dt'an Amos is the founder of Lolo Robinson, Clarence Geiger, and
Cwens sophomore honorary society Frank Fowler. Mr. Fowler is directlor women. University women to be ing.
Following the plays E. F.
initiated into Cwens for the comprofessor of English, will
ing year will be recognized at the

RITES ARRANGED

Sets!

secret-

MRSJVANS

Funeral Will Be Held
m. Today
At

Al-v- in

y,
n,

I?qUiremeniS

will speak

at the Ag

PRIZES

OFFERED

Phi Mu Alpha men's honorary
music fraternity, held their formal
pledging for ten students at 6:45.
last night, in the Art Center.
The following men were pledged:
John Kerr, commerce freshman;
The annual livestock judging conPerry Adams, arts and sciences test, under
sponsorship of Block
freshman; Doniphan Burrus. arts and Bridle, the
honorary animal husand sciences junior; Albert Baldwin, bandry fraternity, will be held at 1
sophomore;
commerce
Clifford p. m.,
Saturday, in the livestock
Ammerman, agriculture junior Robert Miles, arts and sciences sopho- judging pavilion.
Entrants must register before 5
more; Ralph Kemp, arts and
sophomore; Jack Morris, arts p. m. today. Registration sheets
and sciences freshman; and Bob have been placed on the bulletin
Farriss, arts and sciences freshman. boards in the Agriculture and Dairy
To be eligible for membership, buildings for this purpose.
Awards will be given to the seone must have a University standing of 1.5 and must be interested nior, upperclassman, and freshman,
in music. The purpose of the fra- having the highest scores in his reternity is to increase music inter- spective class. These awards will be
presented at the annual Ag banest on the campus.
Initiation will be held April 28 quet Monday night in the Union
in Memorial hall.
building.
Approximately eight junior and
senior men will participate from
Berea college. An award will aloO
be given to the Berea man making
the hiehest individual score.
Phi Alpha Theta. honorary hisTwo rings each of horses, beel
tory fraternity, initiated three stu- cattle, sheep, and hogs. wUl be
dents at a meeting last night in judged during the contest.
the Lafayette hotel. They are JacProf. L. J. Horlacher will deterqueline Bull, graduate student; mine the winner in the sheep diviCanstance Garber, arts and sciences sion; Prof. E. S. Good, beef cattlo;
junior; and Uhel Barrickman, arts Prof E. J. Wilford, hogs; and Dr.
and sciences junior.
W. P. Garrigus, mules.
To be eligible for membership in
the group, one must have had 12
hours of history and a University
standing of 2.

History Honorary
Initiates Students

WILL CONDUCT SCHOOL
Mrs. Pearl J. Haak, food specialist of the agriculture extension department, will conduct a training
school for project leaders of the
Fayette county Community
club from 10 a. m. to 3 p. m.
today at the hostess room of the
Lexington Utilities company.
Home-make-

r's

CONGRESSMAN VISITS
Congressman
Virgil Chapman,
Paris, an alumnus of the University,
was on the campus Tuesday visiting
....
..j u. .iiL itn,uiujr MIU Ilia
uaugi.ter. tnzaoetn urimes Chap- -

-"-

.

nt

ct

Dean Amos To Talk
At Annual Banquet

...

STUDENTJUDGES

sci-nc- es

Gayle W. Starnes, assistant direc- tor of the University extension, was
elected president of Phi Delta Kap
pa, men's honorary education fraternity, at a banquet held Monday
in the University high school cafe
teria, following initiation ceremon-

ences college.

me ans ana

er

.

so- -

Far-quh-

sented and drama m general.
Guignol will have the participat- ing groups as guests at dinner at
6:00 in the Union building.
Dr. McVey will welcome the
guests, after which Capt. Wing, formerly
of
and Paramount studios will speak
on "Hollywood Opportunities."
A series nf roundtahle dismission
wiU be held at 8 p. m.. in the theatre
The costuming discussion will be
led by Miss Pearl Buchanan of
Eastern State Teachers college; directing. Miss Rena Calhoun of
Georgetown college; play selection,
Sam Nuckols, instructor of English
at the University; make-uClarence Geiger, technical director of
Guignol; business administration in
the theatre, Lolo Robinson, business
manager of Guignol; model set
building and designing, Clay Lancaster, designer of Guignol sets.
The festival will close with a
frolic, featuring theatre games, in
p,

r

Will

Denny, Weisenberger
Chosen Attendants;
Kirk To Play
Jean Elliott. Delta Delta Delta,
will reign as queen of the Junior
Prom from 9 p. m. to midnight Saturday in the Bluegrass room, it was
disclosed last night.
Peggy Denny. Independent, and
Mary Louise Weisenberger.
Chi
Omega, were chosen to be attendants to Miss Elliott by the junior
men in an election Wednesday.
A total of 219 Juniors voted in
the election, but the student legislature election board and the junior
prom tocial committee declined to
reveal the number of vote received
by each of the eight candidates in
the race.
Coronation of the queen will take

if

-

V'-.-

honorary agriculture fraternity;
Block and Bridle, honorary animal
husbandry fraternity, and Phil
silon Omicron, honorary home eco- nomics fraternity, during the

gram.
Also on the program, will be the
pledging of new members to Alpha
Zeta, recognition of Phi Upsilon
Omicron
initiates, a humorous
reading by Myrtle Binkley, and
group singing led by Prof. Fordyce
Ely.
Dr. Thomas P. Cooper, dean of the
agriculture college, will introduce
outstanding seniors in the college
and Bill Duty, student president, will
recognize top ranking agriculture
faculty members.
Committees in charge of the banquet are: faculty advisory committee: Prof. L. J. Horlacher, Miss
Laura Deephouse, Dr. Lee H. Town-sen- d,
Prof. E. J. Wilford; decorations: Joyce Cotton, Sara Triplett,
Roy Hunt; arrangements: Louise
McGoldrick, Myrtle Binkley, Benny
Butler.
Program: Alfred Strauss, Dorothy
Angle, Robert Booton; ticket sales:
Glenn Clay, Julien Gillespie, Elmon
Salyer.

-

!

Elliott

sales committee headed by Glenn
Clay. Tickets will be available Monday, in the dairy building or in the
agriculture building.
Awards to outstanding seniors
will be presented by Alpha Zeta,

For Saturday

Sophomore

er, announced yesterday.
This is the first time that
membership
those desiring
have had to file applications.
To be eligible, a student must
have a 1. standing and be interested in animal husbandry.

hi

Livestock Contest Set

INITIATES! 6 MEN

6

f

Reign
Saturday!
At Prom

!!

-

a

She

Awards Will Be Made
At Affair Monday
In Union

the agriculture banquet at 6:30
p. m. Monday, in the Bluegrass
room. Union. Both speakers are
graduates of the agriculture college.
The banquet is an annual
of the agriculture college
and experiment station staffs and
students. Master of ceremonies for
the affair will be Franklin Frazier,
president of the agriculture councl.
Tickets at 60 cents each are oi
sale this week by members of the

banquet Monday in the
Union building.

Ten Are Pledged
By Phi Mu Alpha

PHI DELTA KAPPA

Block, Bridle

Applications
Due By April

productions,

!

Mary
Louise Scott,
Breathitt
county home demonstration agent,
and Curtis F. Park. Menefee county agent, will be guest speakers at

Mary Louise Scott

"Courtship and Marriage" to a
general assembly of students and
faculty members at 4 p. m. today
in the Music room of the Union

Eva Le Gallienne as Hedda (center), Katherine Squire
as Mrs. Elvsted (right), and Earle Larimore as Eilent
Lovborg.

f'
:

Dr. Roy A. Burkhart, leader of
young people's conferences and pastor of the First Community church
in Columbus, Ohio, will speak on

If hv

Royal Family

jScott, Park To Speak
At Annual Ag Banquet

TODAY IN UNION

Play Festival To Feature
Four Dramas And Dinner

What They Think

Mildred Snapp,
"It gives students
something doesn't
they can't blame
else."

I

l

LLD0TT

MS ELECT

?

BUHnriHr)

FOR

A House of Repre-

sentatives general committee approved the selling of late model
airplanes intended for the navy and
army air forces to foreign powers.
The vote came as a result of a
British desire to purchase
0
worth of planes in this country to pit against the air armada oi
the Germans.
Aircraft manufacturers throughout the country prepared to in
crease the facilities of their plants
to further the already capacity production of planes.
When asked whether the sacrifice
ol these late model planes would
weaken our air forces, secretary of
War Woodring stated the house
committee had acted "without coer-

v

I

NUMBER

".. 1910

Scene From 'Hedda Gabler'

bal-lan-

steadily better.
The Nazis' treaty partner, Russia,
is beginning to give them tangible
support. German technicians have
gone into the Soviet to show the
communists how to speed up their
production of agricultural products
and raw materials, which will be
shipped to Hitlerland to dovetail
into the industrial system of that
nation. And there is no way for
the British navy to blockade this
flow of supplies through the late
state of Poland.
Hitler has played his cards well.
Pearson continued, he has left no
opening through which the Allies
can touch him. Under the present
set-u- p
he can last indefinitely. Instead of this waiting war of economic starvation weakening him, it
may, in the end, defeat the Allies.

FRIDAY. MARCH

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY.

Z246

KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

By JIM WOOLDBIDGE

FRIDAY ISSUE

i;
Weisenberifer

jic

'.if
r .?

Kuuub

w.ju

p.

lummy

in.

Bowling, chairman ol the Prom
cial committee, will crown Miss

so-

.as. i

Andy Kirk and his "Clouds of
Joy will furnish the rhythm for
the Prom. Music by the popular
orchestra will be broadcast over
WHAS, Louisville, from 11 to 11:30

Dfmty
Lafayette Studios

HUTTONTO SHOW

p. m.

Feature attractions with the
band are Mary Lou Williams,
only feminine pianist in a major
dance band, Juna Richmond, buxom
blues singer and Pha Terrell, male

HOW PHYSICISTS
PERFORM TRICKS

vocalist.
At the Prom. Lances, junior men's
honorary fraternity, will hold
ir
and ceremonies for IA n!ii
iU conduct the
rbe Prom
traditional tapping. Formal initia- "on is to be held at 3 p. m Sunday
m the Union building.
Preceding the daw
will be given from 7 to 9 p. m. at
Wellington Arms, 508 eat Main
street. Dr. Lysle Croft, assistant
dean of the arts and sciences col- lege, and James W. Wine, law stu- oeni., wm address the group,
Pledges are William Hedges. Mor- ganfield: William C. Penick. Leb- non: Russell L. Gresham. Lexin;
ton; Addison W. Lee in. Louisville:
Robert B. Lander. Elizabeth town;
Robert Spragens. Lebanon.
Bill Corum. MadisonviUe: Paul
Churchill
Combs.
Prestonsburg:
Staney W. Penna, Louisville; Leonard F. Greathouse. Lexington: F
Gaines Sebree Jr.. Ft Thomas: Rav
Johnson. MadisonviUe: H. Bruce
Price Jr.. Lexington: Tom Mahan.
Frankfort; Lloyd B. Ramsev. Lexington; and Hiram Johnson. Corbin
tap-pin-

Demonstrations Billed
t Or Monday A lght
In pj ence Xiall

o""

I

i

Dr. Richard M. Sutton, associa'e
professor of physics at Haverfoid
college, will speak before the mem
bers of Sigma Pi Sigma at 8 p. m.
Monday, April l. in the lecture
room of Pense hall.
WeU prepared to talk on almost '
any phase of physics. Doctor SJt- ton's teaching career began in 1915
when for two years he was assistant
in physics at the East Denver high
school. After graduating from the
University of Colorado and doing
graduate work at Ohio State, he
started on his lecture trips. From
1932 to 1940 Doctor Sutton has visited and lectured at more than fifty
laboratories, universities and colBen L. Williams, junior from Lex- - leges and research and Industrial
ington and editor of the Kentucky institutions.
News Service, was elected president
In addition to his lectures he has
of the University Press Club at a written a number of short papers
recent meeting. An associate editor
on demonstration experiments of
of The Kernel and a member of the
his own design. He has invented apWildcat staff, he succeeds Joe Crea-soproximately 30 such experiments.
senior from Benton.
Curiosities."
"Some Mechanical
Other officers elected were Jim Doctor Sutton's topic Monday night,
Caldwell, Lexington,
will be a collection of original exVincent Crowdus, Morganfleld. secretary; John Samara, Queens, N. Y., periments on inertia, center of gravAll men whw are interested
ity, moment of inertia, acceleration
in
obtaining
scribe: and Jim Wooldr'idge. Hop- - and some tricky aspects of rotation. premises Job working around th
of private home. nJu.hI.1
students and towns- Interested
kinsville, warden.
people are invited by Sigma Pi Sig . leave their names in the fflce of
the election,
Six students and one faculty! Preceding
dean of men immediatelr A
ma and the Dhvsics department to
will be initiated into Phi bridge, who is a freshman journal- omoer or call for students U do
ism major, was initiated into the attend the lecture, it was announced
Upsilon Omicron, honorary horns
this work have already bern
-,
yesterday.
organization.
economics fraternity, at 5 p. m.,
celveit
today, at the home of Miss Dorothy
Union Notes
Threlkheld 265 Rosemont Garden.
Don Lail, promoter of the Union
Following the initiation, a ban- checker tournament, requests that
quet will be held at 8 p. m. in the
aU first round matches be plavt.!
Red Room of LaFayette hotel. Miss
By The Editor
by Saturday, as second round boV
Katherine Hanly Bradley, alumna
begin Monday. Lail said
about-fac- e
yesterday, the men's division of
In an
that ail
of the fraternity and a member of
matches unplayed through Saturthe student standards committee released the following
the Dairy Council of Louisville, win
day will be defaulted and onlv
tlv
innocuous statement: "The student standards commitk on ..you in Pnl v
remaining contestant will "ent- -r
cases where several
tee has taken definite action in the
Students to be inducted are Sara
the second round.
Trinlplt HwiHprsnn' Snnia Berko- students sold or were involved in the sale of bogus
Today
witz, Lexington; Elizabeth Feland,
tickets at the recent state high school basketball tourDr. Roy Burkhart lecture. 3 p
Middletown; Josephine Snow. Dan- m.. Music room.
nament. The committee condemns such conduct and
ville; Ella Landrum. Franklin; and
Carnegie musicale program. 7 30
strongly advises that this practice be not repeated."
Lexington. Miss Myr- Jane Farmer,
p. m.. Music room.
The statement was issued by Bob Nash, chairman
home
tie Weldon, state leader of
McVey exhibit,
o
p. m. Mu.-;-c
of the men's division, after being instructed by the
demonstration agents of the exten-sio- n
room.
committee under Chairman
combined student standards
department will be initiated as
Folk Dunce club. 7:30 p. m . BallFrances Hannah to release all pertinent information exan honorary member.
room.
cept the names of those involved. Nash refused to
The Alumnae chapter of the frat- Lamp and Cross. 4 p. m . Ruum
ernity and faculty members who are
205.
comment as to whether Dean Jones had influenced his
a,mnfl nf Aloha Nu and Omicron
Saturday
decision.
Nu other home economics frateini- Patterson Literary society. 12:45-- 5
The Kernel had asked to be given the information
banquet.
ties, will be guests at the
p. m.. Room 204.
because the news of the arrests had been printed on
Junior prom. 8:30-1- 2 p. m..
these pages and it was only fair to let the public know-tha-t
.Andy Kirk and his orchestra
definite action had been taken. Furthermore, anPlay festival banquet. 6 p. m..
nouncement of the action taken would serve more as a
Room 9.
Group photographs of ROTC ofdeterrent to future violations than would a "hush-up- "
Sunday
sponsors will be taken for
ficers and
attitude.
Patterson Literary society.
the Kentuckian today and Mon- P. m.. Room 204.
But, because this was a first offense and it was conday on the steps of Barker hau
High school art exhibit openiiu:.
Lt. Col. Howard Donnelly has an
sidered in bad taste to print "names" again. The Kernel
all day in corridor of Great hall.
nounced.
agreed to abide by the combined committee's wishes.
All sponsors are requested to apMonday
The men's division has broken its part of the bargain
pear at the hall for a group picInterfraternity council. 7.15-- W)
but we will abide by ours, in spite of the fact that names,
4 p. m., today. Regimental
ture at
p. m.. Room 204.
though erroneous, were released to Lexington and
and battalion officers will not be
Agriculture college. 9 30 p m
4 p. m.. Monday.
photoed until
Louisville papers. James Whitt was not suspended as
Ballroom.
groups
Today's schedule for other
was reported, but four other students were suspended
Phi Beta, 8 p. m.. Room 2wi
follows:
Sigma Phi Sigma, 6 p. in.. Ruo-from the University for a period of two weeks. Two of
10:40 a.m.. cadet officers of Com23a.
these students were at first suspended for the remainder
panies A and B.
High school art exhibit all day
of the semester, but upon further consultation their
11 a. m., cadet officers of Comin corridor off Great hall.
panies C and L.
term of suspension was reduced to two weeks. Leniency
Other Notes
a.jvi p. in., cauci omcers oi um- was proposed by the committee because of the students'
Saturday
pany E.
past records and their assurances regarding the future.
pm w
Modern Dance club.
3 p. m.. cadet officers ot Com- j
i

I

!

Press Club Holds

Election Of Officers

Kampus
Kernels

n,

Home Ec Honorary
Will Initiate Seven

Wool-memh-

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f-

Standards Committee 'Reports

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Bun-roo-

BOTC Photos

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFPTCTAL NEW8PAPXR OP THE BlUUEWTB
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
PUBLISHED
EXCEPT

OP THB

n

DURINO THE SCHOOL YTAR
HOLIDAYS OR EXAMINATION PERIODS

Kntrrrd at the Post Office at Lexington, Kentucky,
matter under the Act of March S, 187.

u

rrond

MKMBER

Kentucky Intercollegiate PreM Aaaoelarlai
Leitngton Board of Commerot
mtMNTtO

POM

MATIOMAL

AOVCItTtMW

National Advertisinf Service, Inc.
r ollrtr Pmhlisbtrt RrprrsrMtUt
New roan N. T.
420 Mniw vc.

Chi,

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aosroa

LM

Aaestes -

aa

Maaciaca

BtTBCRIPTTOIf RATES
$2.00 Out Tear
l.M One Semester
Column Photos Courtesy Lafayette Studios

.oris T. Ici eh art
r Growth's
John H. Morgan

EditoY

I

in

what he believed were the solutions, slating them
point by point. Vital changes which he emphasized in xinting out the means of rorganiza-tiowere the creation of a "national brain" to
advise and regulate government, raising the
birthrate in the middle classes, and economic
freedom in business and agriculture with federal
aid in the control of soil erosion.
It is significant that University students were
not overwhelmed by Dr. Durant's views. That
he gave the student body food for thought, put
the situation and problems in concise words and
phrases, is true. The crowd liked it because the
points were put in such a way as to make it think,
and by a person who was courageous enough
lo pull no punches.

Xrws Editor
Business Manager
Managing Editor

I'airicia Hamilton

Behind
The
Eckel ahl

Jt

7

Assistant Mi.ns.ging Editor
Sport Editor

JOHN SAMARA
JOE CREASON
I. AURA LEE LYONS
CHARLE3 A. SMITH
MABEL LOVENS
LOUISE C ALBERT

1

Editor
Advertlsta? Manager
Proof Reader
Fashion Editor
BOcietv

The Man Who
Came To Our House

-

'$

10 the campus recently must have
gone- awav tongue in check, laughing at the
student Ixtdv. Seaking of ihe beauty and
of the new buildings he mentioned
thai students showed appreciation by keeping
buildings clean, using them with care and common M'llSC.
II lie realh had tongue in cheek, he must
floor of
have vtii the paer. cigarette-strewIf he was sincere and honest, the
i lie I'nion.
that
j.uiiiots must have leen working over-timday.
After all. there are waste receptacles in all the
buildings, including the I'nion, and around the
campus. And thev don't make very good decorations, do thev? Neither does the floor of the
I'nion look vcr well derorated cluttered with
and other cast offs.
pajH--

One visitor

prar-ticahilit- v

n

By
ANDREW C. ECKDAH1

Why Let The Tail
Wag The Dog?

On Pershing Rifles
And Hell Week
i

liaie Itateiiiiiv men. a lew. have berated The
Kernel for txrseeuiing the fraternities because
il then Hell Weeks, vet ignoring the publir exhibitionism ol such campus organizations as
1'eishing Rifles.

home-sick-

.

cam-pa- s

Editorial

a.

An Athlete who
' Harry Denham
is ?. scholar.

ox

bas-de-

we

"squawks"

made by professors,

earn $50 week
during summer
or

year-roun- d
We can use several reliable college
men, during summer or full time, to
operate movie circuits in thentre-les- s
communities. Earnings S.'O.OO a
week and better. Projection equipment, sound films, everything furnished. Xo experience needed. For
complete information write immediately to Southern Visual Equip, Box
ment Co., Department
2404, Memphis, Tennessee.

TAYLOR TIRE COMPANY
(Incorporated)
p
Complete
Service
Vine at Southeastern Ave.
24 HOCK SERVICE
One-Sto-

PHONE 203

p:e-me- d.

goes rather deeply into chemistry
and anotomy and physiology, and is
We went to tire movies the' oilier dav. to see not recommended for those who are
Disnev's Pinocrhio and thev had a movie short Allen,here for s' the ride. Dr. R. S.
custodian, says
the
on baseball, showing ihe iricks of the trade as that Harry has a University average
18. which, so we are told, is con- demonstrated by various plavers. Everything
any
mighty good standing
went smoothly enough until they showed Dizzv sawbones league. He is also inpres
Dean picking a man off first base. "A quick idem of the Pryor
d
society
glance to the bag." said the announcer. " a which pos'tion is generally conced- ed as representing the number one
lightning-likthrow, and he's out."
spot in the department
Which was all right, except thai ihe runnei
Doc Allen said that H. D. is a
sliding into the base was safe, and the picture "practical student, probably the
most practical in the class." and
showed the ump indicating so.
that although he is a scholar, he is
capable of seeing the medical forest
as well as the trees. We asked the
BIG Bl'SINFSS:
TOUCH good Doctor what kind of M. D. he
thought the guy would make and
DEPT.
he said. "Fine,
will probFrom an instruction leaflet put out hv a ce- ably be in the upper group of docment manufacturer: "In using our rement 10 tors." He said he had some other
students, thouuh. who are giving
repair broken articles, put the pieces together Harry a pretty tough tussle scholas-ticalland press the joints as firmly as if you intended
Turning to the muscular side of
to squeeze all the1 cement out; for the less cement you have between the joints the stronger

TTTL- -

J

fIIIJG JIE TIGHT!"
,

It's leap year and any girl could make
this request, according to tradition, but
actually what she'd asking for is one of
the new frocks that hug the wai?t and
shoulders tight and swing out into gay
rhythm. See the collection at IMANGEL'S
for only $6.98. You'll find sportswear
and lingerie and hosiery, too, specially
a cinch!
priced, that'll make
date-makin- g

nt

pre-med-

Manx of them now are changing those same
minds. F.vidt ntlv, they had to be told by some of
ilic active crusaders against the bill. Of course,
vmie would call this welching, but we know, to
lc sure, that, as representatives, they carefully
sampled opinion from their own college and
i law and would not think of lieing influenced
one particular group.
I he Pershing Rifles campus arts are all prcttv
sillv. of course, but there are not any road trips,
there are not anv late hours interfering with college work, there tire not anv downtown exhibitions, and, with the exception of the "camps."
there ore not anv accidents. What is being done

undoubtedly hurting the organization's name
but. with the Union ejecting the acts from that
building, the Rifles week hasn't really hurt the
I'niversitv vet.
is

be Kernel doesn't like 10 he called frate