xt74b853fs6m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74b853fs6m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19201112  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 12, 1920 1920 2012 true xt74b853fs6m section xt74b853fs6m Best Copy Available

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON. KY., NOV. 12. 1920

VOL. XL

Phi Kappa Tau Installs
Chapter At University

ARMISTICE OAY MARKED
BY BATTALION PARADE

No. 7

Students to Answer Cost
of Education Questionnaire

Department of Economics
Another Fraternity Enters TAU BETA PI PLEDGES Sirens, Whistles and Bells SENIOR STUDENT TO
RECEIVE GOLD KEY
Kentucky Initiation
Will Tabulate UnderSIX NEW MEMBERS
Announce Eleventh
November 5 and 6.
taking.
Hour.
Delta Sigma Pi to Cooperate With
Kappa chapW of Phi Kappa Tau J. W. Crenshaw Chosen Honor
of the Junior
fraternity was formally Installed at
Class.
the University of Kentucky Friday and

..f

--

Saturday, NoVember 5 and 6. The Initiation exercises began Friday and
were completed Saturday night with
The
ci banquet at the Phoenix hotel.
guests of honor were: Dr. E. E. Brandon, vice president of Miami University; R. K. Bbwers; M. M. Amerlne;
national officers, John Y. Brown, Delta Chapter, ;Cepe College and members of Theta chapter of Transylvania
College.
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity
was founded March 17, 1906 at Miami
University, Oxford, Ohio, the university known as the mother of fraternities. Phi Kappa Tau fraternity has
chapters at Ohio State University at
Columbus; Ohio University at Athens,
Ohio; Mount Union College, Alliance,
Ohio; Miami University, at Oxford,
Ohio; Illinois University, at Campaign, 111.; Coe College at Cedar
Rapids, Iowa; Centre College, Danville, Ky.; Transylvania College, Lexington, Ky.; Muhlenberg College at
Allentown, Penn. At a recent convention held at Indianapolis, Indiana,
charters were granted to locals petitioning from the University of Ken--

to

Continued on Page 5.

.V
ALPHA 2ETA HOLDS
PLEDGING1H

CHAPEL

Honorary Agricultural Fraternity Chooses Men Making Best Grades.
Scovell chapter of Alpha Zeta, honfraternity held
agricultural
pledging exercises In chapel today at
the fifth hour.
The qualifications for Alpha Zeta
are scholarship, leadership and character. The men chosen this time were
s
of the Junior and
from ithe
Senior classes, making the highest
s
those
grades. From this
having most ability as leaders were
selected.
Alpha Zeta was founded at Ohio
State University November 4, 1897,
and Scovell chapter founded November

orary

Ml

two-fifth-

two-fifth-

8, 1912.

The members of (the active chapter
H. O. Sellards, Edward Johnson,
J. H. Atlerson, Oakley Brown, Hershel
J. Well and Clifton U. Jett.

are:

1

Among the early arrivals for the
Home Coming celebrations was John
E. Brown '03, of Shelbyvllle, president
of the Alumni Association, and Mrs.
wn, who were planning to take
part In every phase of the entertainment,
i

Man

Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineering
fraternity, held its annual pledging
xerclses last Friday. This .fraternity
maintains high standards of scholarship Jn taking only the fourth of the
class that have measured up to the
requirements
throughout the three
years preceding. Last year R. E.
Dealtry, of Brazil, was chosen honor
man and will receive one hundred dollars in gold at graduation.
E. L. Baulch, R. E. Dealtry, F. D.
R. N. O'Hara,
Weatherholt,
Fred
Houston-Shaand Bishop Hines, com
pose the active chapter. J. W. Cren- ishaw pvas chosen honor man of the
Junior class this year, and the follow
ing men in the Senior class were
pledged: Emmett Shultz, Henderson;
Ell Zuckerman, Russia; Fred Luker,
Louisville; H. L. Thomson, Provi
dence; W. D. Thompson, Falmouth.

MATRIX TELLS STORY
OF PLEASANT OCCASION

Account of Theta Sigma Phi
Installation Appears in
Official Magazine
By Marguerite McLaughlin

Sweet with the romance of our Old
Kentucky Home was the Initiation of
Phi Sigma, the University of Kentucky
journalistic club Into the national
order of Theta Sigma Phi. WJe received our honor guest and installation
officer, Harriet Dally, In the morning
and lunched at the cafeteria at noon
just to try to, make ourselves feel
like the day was an ordinary one and
keep down our feeling of superiority
over the rest of the mere mortals with
whom we hobnob daily from becoming
apparent.
But honestly that was an
for our future
effort. Fortunately
standing we were able to fly the campus at an early hour. We motored to
Idlewlld, a beautiful rustic cottage on
the banks of the Kentucky river. The
day was perfect. It should have been of
course, for no other kind of day would
have suited or fit in the story. The
head of the Department of Journalism
had invited us to the annual journalism picnic and we accepted for ourselves and our guest.
We arrived at the river in the early
afternoon and swimming, rowing and
dancing at Cherry Lodge were our
main diversions until the picnic lunch,
after a round of yells, songs, and
"thank yous," we rowed across the
river to Idlewlld and were Initiated.
Continued, on Page 5.

DOCTOR SAMPEY TALKS
"I believe in the United States of
America as a government of the peo
ple, by the people, for the people;
whose just powers are derived from
the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic, a sovereign nation
of many sovereign States; a perfect
union, one and inseparable, established
upon these principles of freedom,
equality, justice and humanity, for
which American patriots sacrificed
their lives and their fortunes. I
therefore believe It lis my duty to my
country to love it; to support Its constitution; to obey its laws; to. respect
its flag, and to defend it against all
enemies."
Lexington Post No. 8, American
Legion requested every patriotic man,
woman and child to recite the American's creed given above at 11 a. m. on
November 11. Sirens, whistles and
bells announced the time of beginning.
The program given on the campus
of the University opened (with a review of the battalion. The review was
received by President McVey, Doctor
Sampey, Armistice Day speaker; Dean
Massie, Father Punch and all of the
men in the (University.
The remainder of the program follows:
"America" Band.
Prayer Dean Massie.
Reading of the names of University
men who lost .their lives in the World
War.
"Old Kentucky Home" Band.
Introduction of Speaker Dr. McVey.
Address Doctor Sampey.
Prayer
Father Punch
"Star Spangled Banner" Band.

JOURNALISM FRAT

PLEDGES FIVE MEN

Five men were pledged to Alpha
Delta Sigma at the meeting held in the
Journalism building, Wednesday at
the fifth hour.
Those to receive the honor were:
Fred Augsburg, Lexington, a member
of the 8 tan? of The Kernel and Ken- tuckian; Emmett Swisshelm a major
in the Department of Journalism and
a featuro writer of note; Dlllard Turf
ner,
of the Law Journal;
Gerald Griffin, sport editor of The
Kernel and H. B. Lloyd, business
manager of The Kernel.
Immediately following the ceremony
the men were entertained at luncheon
by the members of the active chapter.
editor-in-chie-

From the Files of
0
51 Years Ago.
November 10. Frank Le Itond
Vey born, Washington, Ohio.

Mc-

Progressive Business Men
of State.

COOPERATION

Delta Sigma Pi the professional fra
ternity which will be installed in the
school of commerce of the University
soon, will give each year to a senior
majoring in economics, a gold key.
The one receiving the key will be
chosen with regard to his scholarship,
leadership and promise of future usefulness and need not to be a mem
ber of the fraternity. The members
of the faculty of the University school
of commerce will decide each year
who will receive the key.
This fraternity gives this key each
year In every college in which It has
chapter, This helps to stimulate
interest in the schools of commerce.
The chapter of Delta Sigma PI at
toKentucky is expected to
ward forwarding cooperation between
the students in the school of commerce
of this University and the progressive
business men of Lexington and the
State.

KENTUCKY

ENGINEERS

.

GET SOCIAL FRATERNITY

URGED

A questionnaire, the purpose of
which is to gather facts which will
enable the Department of Economics
and Sociology to undertake a study
of the cost of living among the students of the University of Kentucky,
has been prepared by the department
and will be given to all students to fill
out next week.
This investigation of living expenses will be conducted by the class in
Statistical Method, which will also
compile the facts. It Is hoped that by
this means an accurate estimate of the
individual cost of an education In the
University of Kentucky may be obtained. The information is to be taken
by college, class and sex, with the aim
of finding out total and apportionate
expenses.
No questionnaire is to be signed and
all individual information is ito be
strictly confidential. When each student receives his questionnaire, he is
asked to fill it out carefully and ac-- .
curately in order that accurate statistics may be compiled for catalogue
purposes and general information.
President MoVey has written a letter urging the 'students to fill out the
questionnaire accurately and

Twelve Men Are Charter
Members of "Triangle"
. Dean Gives Toast
Triangle Fraternity.
The Kentucky Engineers fraternity which was organized here last year
with itwelve charter members and one
honorary member, has been granted
membership as a chapter of the National Triangle fraternity.
After being recognized by the Council and
Senate of the University as a local
fraternity, it began to prepare a petition to the National Triangle fraternity. This was completed and accepted
In May, the votes of the active chapters and National Council being unanimously in favor of the petition.
The Installation of the Kentucky
Chapter was held Saturday night,
October 30, in .the ball room of the
Lafayette hotel, by two members from
each of the four active chapters, Purdue, Wisconsin, Illinois and Ohio
State. Speeches were made by F. N.
Schustedt of the University of Wisconsin, who is president of the National Organization; Walders, also of
Wisconsin; Bussy of Illinois; Finch
of Purdue, and D. V. Terrell of Kentucky
Dean F. Paul Anderson delivered a toast and extended his best
wishes to the new fraternity.
The Triangle Review, the official
organ of the National Fraternity,
speaks of the Kentucky chapter in the
Continued on Page 8.

E

WILL BE FRIDAY

NIGHT

Prexy Unable to Be Here;
Writes Greeting to
Alumni.
Committees on arrangements
for
the Home Coming celebration met
Monday evening at the Phoenix hotel
to make final plans for the entertainment of the alumni who are expected
to return ito Lexington to see the
game.
The first event of the program will
be a dance Friday evening from 8 to
12 o'clock in the ball room of the
Lafayette hotel, to be followed on Saturday by; an old fashioned football
rally in the chapel at 11 o'clock, the
reunion luncheon at the Lafayette
hotel from 12 to 2 o'clock and finally
tho Homo Coming game.
Doctor CUcVey has sent the following letter of greetings to the alumni
of the University.
Dear Friends:
I am taking this opportunity of
welcoming you on the Home Coming Day to the University, and at
tho same time to tell you how
glad wo are that you are to, be
here with us.

I

Centre-Kentuck-

Continued on Page

5.

I

t

* t

m

YtititL ENTUCKY KERNEL
EXCEPTION IS TAKEN
1

TO

KERNEL

EDITORIAL

Stroller Champion Differs
With Editor as to the
Performance.
The editor

The Kernel is in re- kcipt oflhb following letter:
J' Nothing Is more odious to tho
Writer's mind, than communications to
newspapers In which wrongs or alleged wrongs are discussed and personal grievances are debated for tho
benefit of tho public. However, In a
case in which the roputatloho"f a
student organization Is
(cssailed, when a "rap" is taken at thb
Try-ou- t
Committee of Tlio Strollers,
nnd more or less unkind remarks are
hurled at those students who were
made" members of Tlio St'roile'rs, 'the
(writer feels that some effort should bo
made to bring the facts before the
student body.
r
tlt Is generally understood that the
writer of the editorial headed "Amateur Night," which appeared in the
last issue of The Kentucky Kernel, was
not the
but one of his
j
assistants, but las the
as the writer understands it, is responsible for the editorial policy of his
paper the remarks which will be made
wijl of necessity be directed at him
with the hope, however, that the author of the exaggerated article In ques-tipwill take the' time to read the
facts in the case.
While welcoming constructive criticism in any form whatsoever The
Strollers still desire the criticism to
be based on fact. The writer pleads
guilty to the charge that the acts
presented Amateur Night were somewhat below the average; to the remainder of the charge the plea will be
not guilty.
The hundreds of students who
crowded into the chapel Amateur
Night seemed highly entertained by
the 'iRube act, a poorly prepared
blackface and a worse burlesque."
In passing we wonder just what the
writer of the editorial had for dinner
thai night that caused him to have
such an outlook on life. 'Perhaps he
had attended the Ada Meade the night
before and was suffering, because of
o"f

.

Editor-in-Chi-

Editor-in-Chie-

n

the contrast;
"We were led by misinformation to
expect an- entertainment o merit,"
says the article.
"Misinformation"
proved an able leader and the editor
a willing follower when one considers
the remainder of the article. As the
writer shall endeavor to stick to the
truth and nothing but the truth In
the- remainder of this communication
it" is suggested that the editor secure
ait interpreter or guide before
what is to follow.
.'Seventy-onapplicants wore accepted to full membership in The Strollers. Not many more than thlB tried
out. In fact, so far as we are able
to learn, only one or two Freshmen
without connections were refused admittance," boldly states the article.
Records of the committee show that
apabout one hundred and twenty-livplicants submitted their names and
that of this number more than one
hundred appeared before the committee. The facts speak.'
"Three priests, so we are told,
crawled onto the darkened stage,
died, and forthwith became members."
Aptly expressed we must admit but
without a semblance of truth. "Misinformation" leads again, disguised as
"wo are told." Tho facts are: Two
of the three priests were admitted as
Strollers because they had speaking
g

e

e

parts in two nets Jin whioh they tried
lt jtFjo editor stjjl
tjio dny beforc.
flit leary of (heir
a
perhaps n
private. .try-ocou'lu be'.krrangel).
Tho writer admits that some mistakes mny have been made; after hearing recitations ami witnessing,
plays for four afternoons rtnd- two
nights; after hearing everything from
"Roses are, red and violets are blue,"
to "Friends, Romans, countrymen,
lend me your eara," tho patience of
nny committee is 'likely to bo ex
hausted. Mistakes may have been made
in previous years and the writer is
willing, to wager that .mistake
will
ho made 'in tho future.
Having had
s
occasion to witness tho
last
year and having seen the annual Stroller play of last year, '"The Climbers,"
the writer Is led, to beljove that Judged strictly on the merit shown In tho
possibly three of tho
amateur
"Climbers" cast would have mado tho
Strollers.
a
The Strollers had undertaken
larger program this year than ever
before and plans were made for enlarging the membership.
The plans
now contemplate the presentation each
month of some sort of entertainment
for tli' student body. Several other
plans now are under consideration for
making The 'Strollers' one of the largest and strongest organization on the
campus.
It is not the writer's desire to start
a controversy in this matter and 'this
communication,
which the writer
trusts will be published, should set the
facts before the student body. Let
this be considered final.
Respectfully yours,
A Stroller:
miC

n

ono-ac-

t'

try-out-

try-out-

o

Y. M. C.

A.

By George Gregory.

lUHIVFRSITY
.

Mi

111

EXTENSIONe

Vi

,

111

T

Be Held.

CIGARETTES, CIGARS and TOBACCO

"k
Tho Department of University ExBring Your Kodak Films Here5
tension of tho University of Kentucky,
.
Opposite Campus
Is planning an Interscholastic League
for accredittcd high schools of tho
State. r Announcement, of plans ,for
such league was mado foliowing a recent mooting of tho Committee, on
Unersity Extension.
The League will include at present
activities In debate and also In athNothing aids the
ability of a team more1 than
letics. ,Tho .accredited high schools outfits Of tinSquestoned quality.
n
of the State will be (invited to Join
the league In these two activities. The
We .carry a complete line of A. J. Reach & Son's sport'"
plan calls for a iserie3 of contests ing goods.
among the schools that are members
CO.
. HAY HARDWARE
of either, group; and a final series of
(Incorporated)
contests in an annual tournament at LEXINGTON
KENTUCKY
the University in May;
The League is organized under the
direction of an Executive Committee
composed of the Director of University
Extension as chairman. The professor
Incorporated
of public speaking at the University
Is a member of this executive comDAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
mittee and he is at the same time
PHONES 1854-368- 0
WHITE LINE TAXICABS
director of debate: The Director of
Physical Education at the University,
CARS FOR TOURING
CITY RATES 50 CENTS
who is also director of athletics in
PHOENIX HOTEL LOBBY
the League, is the third member of
the State Executive Committee.
Schools accepting membership in
the league will be grouped into districts and local committees appointed
MISS AMERICA
for series of contests will be held In
both debate and athletics and the winMIDDY SUITS AND MIDDY BLOUSES
ners of these contests will come toABOVE ALL
gether in a final tournament at the
University.
CHARM
IN BEAUTY
VALUE
Such leagues as these are in opera-tioin a number of states in connection with the state universities. The
Incorporated
University of Texas, University of Indiana, University of North Carolina,
THE CADEN DRUG COMPANY
Michigan and a number of others have
in successful operation similar leagues.1 REMEMBERED THE DISCRIMINATING TASTE OF THE COLLEME
Wellington Patrick, Director of UniSTUDENT IN CARRYING WHITMAN'S.
versity Extension here, is expecting to
send announcements to the various
high schools throughout the State in
A WAY TO SAVE MONEY!
Professor W. H.
the near future.
Mlkesell, director of debate, Is making
Five Dollars on Each Club Enrollment.'
plans for the work of debate, and
Professor S. A. Boles, Director Of
Physical Education, is making preparations for the forthcoming season
in athletics.

SPORTING GOODS
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Reserve Annual Space

sororities, .organizations and clubs desiring to reserve
space in this year's Kentuckian should
see Fred Augsburg at once. Single
pages this year are $20 while two
pages are offered at the reduced price
of $35. A payment of 25 per cent.
Is required when the space is reserved.
Tho balance is due January 15. No
space will be reserved until' the initial
payment is made.

.1

offers to, the students of the University a complete
assortment of Stationery, Candies and Toilet Articles. Prescriptions filled promptly.

Inerscholastic(Debating. and
Athletic Contest to

DOCTOR NOE- - 8PEAKS
The growing interest in the Y. W.
C. A. was evidenced by the large number of men, as yet the best attendance
for a single meeting this year, present
to hear Professor Noe.
Doctor Noe kindly substituted for
the speaker of the evening, Mr.
Charles Manning, who was unexpectedly called out of town. He spoke on
"Idealism."
Doctor Noe said: "The future of
America lies in its youth, and largely
that part of its youth which is in col- lcge. Education is idealistic' but we
would not have it otherwise. I am
happy to be an Idealist, for as such
I can keep company with Shakespeare',
HEAR SUPT. GEORGE COLVIN AT
Washington,
Lincoln and Wilson.
THE Y; M. C. A. SUNDAY NIGHT
Idealism is the fundamental factor in
the building of a successful life."'
State Superintendent of Public In
THE STORE THAT OFstruction, George Colvln, will give the
third of the Life Work Series of Lec
FERS RELIEF FROM
tures, which are being given by tho
Y. M. C. A. Mr. Colvln will speak on
HIGH PRICES
Teaching as a Life Profession." He
if, n forceful speaker and all men interested in teaching are' especially in
vited to' hoar him at the"Y" rooms,
Sunday at 6:30 p. m.

All fraternities,

...

University Pharrrilacy

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
'"AUdlENCE

s

ALWAYS RIGHT''

What does an actor think of his
Wllber Mack, popular
maintains 'that ah actor's
nttitudo toward patrons is largely tho
key to succes"84 or. failure. "In addition to ability to entertain, all suc
cessful actors always maintain profound respect f or their audlonce,"
comments Mr. Mack. "Standing back
stage, one frequently hears an entertainer denouncing his audlenco as un.'
intelligent,
I havo watched
tho careers of several such entertainers who always blamo their failuro
to win applause on the audience, and
without exception such actors never
advanco far in the profession. Tho
best entertainers regard their audiences as judge and jury. Tho verdict
of audiences is a'ceopted without question by the intelligent actor. If ho
fails to go ho either abandons his
faulty material or so alters it as to
make it acceptable. The actor is a
merchant trying to sell his wares, and
if he has material that audiences won't
buy and pay for in the coin of applause, then the sensible player stocks
up with a better grade of merchan
dlse."
audkmco?

the

Drama
y Frad K.

Auitburi

would
be successful
in business
Do You Know That
Ned Wayburn staged his, first Broad-wa- careers as well as In affairs of tho
musical show at the old BIJou heart.
Theatre In 1897. It was called ".The
STROLLER PLANS.
Swell Miss Fltzwell," and tho producer
Elaborate plans for the coming year,
not only played a part In "It, but did a
Including a series of entertainments,
piano act
wore discussed at tho Stroller tea,
DRAMA
COMMUNITY
Monday afternoon in tho Little TheaThe' community drama program for tre, at which the newly elected memthe year in Lexington was mapped out bers of tho organization wero welcomat a meeting o those interested In ed. Short talks wero made by Prof.
the movement last Monday night in M. H. Mikesell, director of tho Little
the ball room of the Lafayette hotel. Theatre; Carol Sax, head of the DeTalks were made by Doctor Frank L. partment of Art and Design and Enoch
McVey, Miss Julia Connelly, Prof. L. Orehan, who for many years has been
L. Dantzler, Prof. E. F. Farquhar and faculty advisor of the organization.
t
Following the talks, a
skit
Dean P. P. Boyd.
Plans tfor the coming season include was presented by Lucy Smith, Troy
plays given by Perkins and John Dundon, entitled
a number of one-ac- t
In "The Ideal Wife."
Miss Smith showcommunity drama organizations
the Campus Playhouse, a student's ed especial talent in the interpretaopera in the Woodland Park Audi- tion of her role. Perkins and Dundon.
torium, pageants, classical dancing were adequate in their respective porand community musicals. The Little trayals- of the husband and lover.
Theatre will continue to be the mecca
"Christian" Cast
for local community dramatists.
The Stagecrafters of Transylvania
College have selected the cast for this
Alexander, Crystal-Seer- .
Alexander, the world's greatest mas- year's presentation, "The Christian."
ter of mental mystics, is the' attrac- Violet Young and Walter Mulberry will
tion this week at the Lexington Opera have the leads. Other members of the
House. He is perhaps the one indi- cast are: Ruth Rouse, Carl Fortune,
vidual who has done more than any Howard Stephenson, Harlie Smith,
other to concentrate the attention of Len Smith, Elizabeth McLeod, Emmett
the general public on the various Moore and Howard Wright. ''The
phases of psychic phenomena. At the Christian" is a" much heavier play than
opening performance Monday night has ever been attempted by the StageAlexander delighted several Univer- crafters and will require professional
sity students by telling them that they acting by those taking the leads.
y

one-ac-

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Miss Buzzard Speaks
At Y- W. C. A. Meeting:
-

Xmas Stationery

Miss Buzzard) of the Lexington Y
W. C. A. was the speaker at the Y.
W. C. A. meeting at Patterson Hall,
Sunday, November 7. In her talk she
explained the three sides of the Blue.
Triangle, one of which stands for the
mind, the second for the body and the
third for the spirit. Miss Buzzard
also .explained some of the girls' clubs
which have been organized at the Lex
ington Y. W. C. A. The purpose of
these clubs is the development of tho
three sides of the Triangle.
Another interesting feature of the
meeting was a reading called "The
Sceptic" which was given by Margaret

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LEXINGTON,
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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
KERNEL now order.

KENTUCKY

THE
Published

every

Friday

the

throufhout

College yenr by the mudent body of

the Unlvemlty of Kentucky.

-

Kentucky Kernel I the official newspaper of the Unlvemlty. It l lued with
n view of furnlnblriK to Itn RUbicrlbors all
the college new of Kentucky, together
with ft dlgCBt of Items of Interest concerning the universities of other states
and Canada.

The

Subscription, One Hollar and Fifty Cent
Year. Five Cents the Copy.
as

Entered at Lexington I'ontofllco
mall matter.

second-clas-

s

Editor-ln-chl-

ROBT. J. RAIBLE, '21

Managing Editor
Martha Buckman, '21
Associate Editors
Emmett Swlsshelm, '23 Donald Dinning, '22
Mary Archer Bell, '21 Adele Slnde, '21
Thompson Van Deren, '21

Of courso such chlld'splay

is harmless in itself, but one confuses

such nonsense with the ribbons of real
worth that the Strollers and honorary
their
societies use to distinguish
pledges. Tho names of those "locals"
betray their dependence upon tho
men. Tadpoles confess their relation
to tho Fish, the nuts are only an
attraction for squirrels, the Fig leaves
claim the Garden of Eden as their
birthplace; as for the rest, their names
Wo admire the
are
few women who still remain immune
to tho attractions of exciting curiosity. If, however, any of them wishes
to start a society of this typo there is
nn abundance of names awaiting them.

faithful band that has stood by ia
everything undertaken heretofore.
Ere wo can accomplish all, however,
that now is included in our program,
we must have faith.

The Procrustean Bed
A Department of Prejudice
By Trey Lawsen

Perkins

"Romance never really died In the world until the first woman put on a
H. L. Mencken.
flannel
badge. But put them in a tight place
Criticism of "Blind Youth:" Darkness. and watch them melt. Propose to ono
of them a task requiring
imposing more
Criticism of "The Trail of the Lone- dence and
some Pine."
than a physical effrontery, and observe
This play begins: "Hev ye sed eny his brummagem front gently ooze into
av'em them domed rovenooers around a soft, slimy, subaceous mass; turn to
here?"
liquid, and eventually pass off in the
Therefore everyone knows how it form of a stenchful gas.
o
ends.
o
More than all, however, I dislike
fellows who parade their own petty
Our enthusiastic reporter is at it
prejudices, likes and dislikes, and
again. There was plenty of spirit at
Confessions of a
Coke-Guzzltheir immaterial ideas on unessential
game Saturday, but to say that It
the
subjects.
"flowed from the stand, backing them
Apologies to St. Augustine)
(With
up as in the good old days," seems to
If there is any fellow I dislike it is
Every normal woman longs at
us an undue reflection on the morals one who is habitually
punctual.
of our Wildcats.
Puncutuality is undoubtedly the con- some time in her life to play the
cept of a child-likmind. It is the vampire.
night-gown.- "

self-con-

t,

er

Reporters
Katherlne Weakley, '21
Anna loulse Connor, '23
Irene McNamara, '23
Katherlne Conroy, '23
George

Gregory,

'21

Elalo

Ruche,

'23

Adallne Mann, '22
Esther Harris, '22
Raymond Kirk, '23
Lucille Moore, 21

e

Business Manager
H. B. Lloyd,

'21

Tho Kernel wishes to say that the
rumor that it would devote
of its space to advertising,
to editorials, and
to answers
to editorials is absolutely without
foundation.
one-thir- d

Advertising Staff

one-thir- d

Burton Prewltt, '22.
J. E. Claunch, '24
Harold F. Walts, '23

Manager

Circulation

Glean Tlasley, '22.
12, 1920.

NOVEMBER

FRIDAY,

or "KENTUCKY"
There was a picture of the captain
of the football team of Ohio State University in last Tuesday's Herald under
the heading "Leading State to Victory
ThBs Year."
The writer attended a collegiate conference last year where no less than
five universities in various states were
giving yells for "State."
These facts precipitate the question:
why designate the University of Ken
tucky as "State"? When the official
name of this school was State Univer
sity of Kentucky, there was doubtless
a reason for calling it "State," but the
name was changed about five yearo
ago to "University of Kentucky,"
"STATE"

one-thir- d

UNIVERSITY SENATE
NAMES COMMITTEES
Council:

President,

Deans, Regis-

trar, Chairman Graduate School

Com-

mittee and Professors Tuttle and Good.
Athletics: Professors Tigert, chairman, Curtis, Funkhouser, Grehan.
Bulletins: Professors Glllis, chairman, iDantzler, Goble, Roberts, Johnson.
Chapel Exercises: Professors
chairman, Davis, Mikesell and
Lampert.
Commencement Exercises: Professor Shull, chairman, Professor Good,
Mikesell and
Professors
assistant,
Brinkley Barnett, Colonel Freeman
and Major Tucker.
Student Social Affairs: Dean
The writer is informed that the only
chairman, Dean Simrall, ProfKentucky institutions
of collegiate
Chalkley, Assistant Professor
rank which actually bear the name essor
Jewell, Major Tucker, Professor Nich- "State" are Kentucky State College,
near Frankfort, and State University olls.
Graduate Study: Professors G. Ter
of Louisville on West Breckinridge
rell, chairman, Tuttle, Tuthill, Good,
street in Louisville. Both these are
negro schools; so now a reference to Johnson.
Library: Professors Tuttle, chair
"State" could, properly only be apman, G. Terrell, Dantzler, Noe, Zem- plied to one of these negro schools.
"Kentucky," on the other hand is brod.
Oratory and Debate: Assistant Prof"
much more definite. Michigan, Wisessor Mikesell, chairman, Professors
consin, Illinois and other larger uniNoe, Farquhar, Roberts.
versities are called by the name