xt74b853hz47 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74b853hz47/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680219  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1968 1968 2015 true xt74b853hz47 section xt74b853hz47 Tie Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Monday Evening, Feb.

19, 19G8

UNIVERSITY

OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LIX, No. 101

orehead Faces
'Freedom' Issue

V.V

By DARRELL RICE
MOREHEAD A free speech revolution apparently is brewing
at Morehead State University. It comes in the wake of the Kentucky Conference on the War and the Draft, held at UK Feb. 10
and attended by several Morehead students and professors.
About 10 Students and fac- - tract will not be renewed for
ulty members at Morehead are next year. He feels his having
circulating a petition against a spoken out for the rights of stuROTC pro- dents to discuss controversial
compulsory two-yegram that is to go into effect
in the student newspaper
next fall. The action is being played a large
part in his contaken despite administrative tract not being removed.
pressures against the move. '
There are also rumors of other
Plans to circulate the peti- professors' contracts not being
tion were first formulated at a renewed.
regional workshop at the antiThe petition against compulwar conference here. Some 20 sory ROTC now being circulated
people from Morehead attended was first read at a Feb. 15 disthe conference.
cussion group meeting, the Free
At a general session of the Forum.
conference, Kenneth Vance,
It requested that "the presiMorehead communications pro- dent withdraw the compulsory
fessor, told the group of the element of the ROTC program,
"conditions of fear that exist or failing, to withdraw the proon the Morehead campus."
gram completely."
"There has not been an obThe petition went on to say
jective debate on Vietnam this that compulsory ROTC is detriyear," he said, "and it seems mental to the academic program,
to me that any place called a that it limits the choice of classes
men may take, and that it is
university has to have this."
One Morehead student went immoral because it forces all
to Washington, D.C., in Octo- men, in order to get an educaber for the antiwar march on tion, to leam to kill.
the Pentagon, and Prof. Vance
Roscoe Playforth, dean of the
said Morehead's president, Dr. College of Social Studies, was
Adran Doran, publicly made de- present at the meeting and asked
for the name of the student who
rogatory remarks about the student after he returned.
read the petition.
Dr. Doran has said of acaDean Playforth told the studemic freedom at Morehead, ac- dents they were "playing with a
cording to Prof. Vance, "There dangerous thing" in circulating
are trains going east and there the document.
are trains going west. Anyone
Someone asked him why the
who doesn't like it here can students had not been consulted
catch one of those trains."
about having a compulsory
Mr. Vance said, "I have ob- ROTC program. He answered
tained a copy of the Bill of that the Board of Regents had
Rights, and I am going back made the decision and that it
to Morehead and hang it over was "none of the students' busmy desk."
iness."
He also announced plans to
He was then asked if a memstart a Morehead chapter of the ber of the Student Council should
American Association of Uni- not have been on the board when
versity Professors (AAUP)-t- he
the decision was made.
first meeting of which has been
Dean Playforth answered that
set for Feb. 22.
he did not "care about the StuIn an interview after his talk, dent Council."
Prof. Vance said he had received
The petition has been
a letter saying his teaching con- on Page 5, Col. 1
ar

Stroke Right, Stroke Left
"Stroke right, stroke left, now for a turn . . ."
might be going through Ann Strunk's mind as
she practices for the Blue Marl in show March 9.

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

But whatever the freshman from Louisville might
be thinking, she churns a graceful stroke in the
Memorial Coliseum swimming pool.

8 University Students Named
As Woodrow Wilson Designates
The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship
Foundation
has designated 1,124 college
seniors from schools all across
the country and Canada as "the
best future college teacher prospects on the continent." Eight
are UK students.
Designates from the University are: Crawford II. Dlakeman
Linda D.
Jr., anthropology;
Crabtree, political science;
David C. Fannin, English;
Michael T. Heath, mathematics; John D. Howell, English;
Lesley R. Lisso, French; Robert D. Trent, mathematics; and
Edith L. Vance, English.

and Kentucky Southern
lege, with two.

son

Col-

Included on the honorable
mention list from UK are Jose
A. Alcala-RuiSpanish; Arvin
H. Jumpin, English; Larry W.
Mitchell, psychology; and Kath-erin- e
P. Osolnik, German.
z,

The University was second in
the number of designates from
Region VII which includes
Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi
and Tennessee. Vanderbilt University had the highest number, with 11.
As a result of a reduction

in

Ford Foundation support for
the Wilson foundation, Wood-roWilson now will provide
only 50
graduate
w

schools to
have designates were Western
Kentucky University, with one,

Other Kentucky

first-ye-

school and 200 Woodrow Wil

Dissertation

Fellowships.

Ford donated $1.2 million this
year to the foundation.
Sir Hugh Taylor, president
of the foundation, explained
that out of funds from other
sources, the foundation expects
to support 100 American students with direct grants as
Woodrow Wilson Fellows.
The foundation now sees its
role "to identify for graduate
departments those students who
in our view have the best potential for college teaching."
Sir Hugh stated the policy
the
change in announcing
Wilson designates.
Woodrow
He said graduate deans are now
receiving a list of the designates with the recommendation
that they are "worthy of financial support in graduate school."

circu-Continu-

'Foreign Aid Paid For In Blood'

Educators Condemn New Draft Regulations

NEW YORK (AP) -- Educators at several large universities say the abolition of draft deferments for most
graduate students could threaten research, reduce the
supply of future teachers and cripple graduate school
enrollments.
Some administrators denounced the new policy as
d
and several said other systems of drafting
from the affected group could have cushioned the
impact.
They spoke out Friday after the Johnson administration abolished graduate draft deferments except for
medical and dental students, students in related fields
short-sighte-

Dr. Lewis W. Cot h ran, dean of the UK Graduate
Sthool, has said that new Selective Service regulations
could reduce graduate enrollment here by one third.
aitd those who will have completed two or more
years of their studies by June.
At the same time the National Security Council suspended indefinitely the official list of essential activities and critical occupations that Selective Service
tlraft lxards have used as a guideline in making occupational deferments.
Administration officials estimated that 150,000 or
more men would be drafted as the result of the changes
in graduate deferments.
Logan Wilson, president of the American Council
on Education, the leading association of colleges and

universities, said of the change, "In my judgement
this is a short sighted decision.
"In addition to the handicaps it places on advanced
level education, its implications for the long-rang- e
trained manpower needs of the nation are alarming.
"The decision means that most college graduates in
1968 and students ending their first year of graduate
school in 1968 will be drafted in the near future,"
Mr. Wilson said.

"This means that our graduate schools in the future
will be increasingly populated by women, older persons, those who have physical disabilities and, ironically enough, foreign students," declared Maurice Mitchell, chancellor of the University of Denver.
"U.S. draft boards are turning over educational
facilities in this country to foreign students while our
boys go off to fight,' Dr. Mitchell said. "This seems
to me to be foreign aid paid for in blood."

Harvard President Nathan Pusey said the decision
"threatens the country with an inordinate reduction in
the first two years of graduate student enrollment"
and said it "cannot fail to have unfortunate consequences in the future by interrupting the flow of
college and university teachers and research workers
at a tims when the need for them is accelerating."
Robert H. Baker, dean of Northwestern University's
graduate school, said, "a significant portion of future
teachers and researchers will be siphoned off which

will have profound implications to the country as a
whole."
"The limitations of this ruling and other policies is
that they may lead very shortly to a shortage of trained
people in diverse fields, especially teaching," said Dean
Colin S. Pittendrigh of the Princeton University graduate school.
"The Defense Department may be dissatisfied with
its new group of recruits. They're going to have a
group of older men, primarily intellectuals, who are
not the most useful kind of troops," he said.
Several administrators said their schools would be
hurt financially as well as academically by the change.
"The financial consequences could be catastrophic
for Georgetown, for almost no reduction in operating
costs will be possible," declared the Rev. Thomas R.
Fitgerald, academic vice president of that university in Washington, D.C.
Dr. Baker said Northwestern would have financial
problems next year because "commitments of space
and faculty for the graduate school would not be olfset
by enrollment income."
A number of educators, including Yale President
Kingman Brewster, said they believed there should be
no student deferments and the nation should employ
a system of random selection for the draft.
"It would be better to eliminate all deferments and
to draft by lot across all years of students' careers,
Continued on Page 5, Col. 1

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Feb.

19G8-

19,

-3

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S;.'
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Liz Bamett, sophomore home management and
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* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

18

KERNEL, Monday, Fcl. 19,

Defend?

Who Will Il Called? Who Will Be

Some Questions And Answers On The Draft
The Associated

Fret

Perhaps no subject is of more
immediate concern to college men
today than the draft.
Faced with the prospect of
death or injury in a war whose
virtue seems obscure or nonexis- tent to them, many students explore every loophole of Selective
Service regulations and some
actively defy draft laws at great
risk.
Blood has been spilled, prison
terms meted out, fines assessed
all as repressive measures against
the most rebellious element, those
w ho will not serve in the Vietnam
war under any conditions.
Most, of course, will follow
the decision of their draft boards,
serving if they must, escaping if
they can.
But draft calls are climbing
again as the armed services face
the task of replacing the two-yemen drafted at the start
of the Vietnam build-u- p
in late
1965 and early 1966.
Who is being drafted now,
how many draftees go to Vietnam, who is being deferred? The
answer to these and other questions appear below and come from
Selective Service headquarters
and the Department of Defense.
The material was assembled by
the Associated Press.

Q. What arc those
'

kv

V

J

.jut

-

v

y

j

(.
j

I
.

ar

Q. Precisely who is being
drafted now what age?
A. Most inductees are between
20 and 21. In recent months,
the average age has been 20'2.
But special, individual circumstances have meant the induct-- ,
ion of much older men.
Q. Is marriage or fatherhood
ground for deferment?
A. Neither is ground for deferment without further qualification. If a man maintains a bona-fid- e
family relationship with a
child or children he has ground
for deferment whether or not he
is actually their father. As for
marriage, it is frequently a factor in deferment on grounds of
hardship.
Q. What are the ground rules
for student deferments?
A. The law provides that anyone "satisfactorily pursuing a
e
course of instruction at
a high school or similar institution of learning" shall be deferred until he graduates or
reaches age 20, whichever is
earlier. Regulations permit the
e
deferment of a
college
full-tim-

full-tim-

student "satisfactorily pursuing"

his studies until he graduates,
drops out or reaches the age

M

,11

Pools of blood spot the pavement
where theseOakland, Calif., anti-dra- ft
demonstrators have been
clubbed to the ground by city
police.
Q. Do a student's marks mean
anything?
A. Class standings and grade
averages do not determine deferments. But the student must
of 24, whichever comes first. Also permitted is the deferment
of graduate students in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, osteopathy or optometry,"
or in such other subjects necessary to the maintenance of the
national health, safety or interest as are identified by the director of Selective Service upon the
advice of the National Security

Council."

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"other

sub-

jects"?

A.
The National Security
Council has not yet identified
any other graduate studies,
be "satisfactorily pursuing" his
studies.
Q. What docs "satisfactorily
pursuing his studies" mean?
A. He must be steadily earning credits toward obtaining his
degree in normal time.
Q. Arc students being drafted
out of college?
A. Dropouts, including those
who have failed to earn their
credits, may be drafted but we
are not taking satisfactory students out of college.
Q. What constitutes a hardship case and how is it handled?
A. The regulations provide for
deferment for "any registrant
whose induction into the armed
forces would result in extreme
hardship to his wife, divorced
wife, child, parent, grandparent,
brother, or sister who is dependent on him for support, or to
a person under 18 years of age
or a person of any age who
is physically or mentally handi-- .
capped whose support the registrant has assumed in good faith."
The term "extreme hardship" is
not defined.
Q. How big arc draft calls expected to be in 1968?
A. We are not in a position at
this time to comment on the outlook for the next fiscal year but
calls so far this year totaled

34,000 for

January,

23,300 for Feb-

ruary and 39,000 for March.
Q. How does this compare
with last year?
A. For the first half of 1967,
the calls were at a relatively
low level, averaging about 15,000
per month. In the last six months
of 1967, the average rose to alout
22,000 a month.
Q. Will the calls balloon when
it becomes necessary to replace
the two-yemen rushed into
uniform at the beginning of the
Vietnam build-up- ?
A. With the Army now in the
midst of a major replacement
cycle for draftees originally inducted in the calendar year
1966, we can expect a relatively
high level of draft calls to be required through June. Beyond
that it is difficult to project because of variations in enlistment and
and because planned military force
levels also affect draft calls.
Q. When is a boy supposed to
register for the draft?
A. Within five days after he
reaches 18.
Q. Where must he register?
A. A local draft board or special registrar.
Q. What happens if he fails to
register in the specified time?
A. He is subject to possible
delinquency
proceeding which
could result in his classification
as
and his being put on a
priority list for induction. In an
extreme case, he may be prosecuted by the Justice Department and face prison and fine.
ar

LANCES
JUNIOR MEN'S
HONORARY
is now accepting
applications
for membership,
Prerequisites
are a 2.50 over-al- l.
junior or
semester sophomore
standing, and campus activities.

second

Send applications, including
all campus activities and offices
to:

CIRCLE

STEAK HOUSE

Phone 299 4710
Across from A&F
Between Lime and Bryan Station Road
ON NEW CIRCLE ROAD

DON

GRAETER

410 Rosa Lane

By

40S08

February 21

Q. What actually happens
when a boy registers?
A. He goes to the local Ixnud
or special registrar and signs
his name in a register. A clerk
prepares a registration form.
The lxy signs it. This fulfills his
legal obligation to register.
Q. What happens next?
A. Either immediately or, under unusual circumstances, within the next few weeks the registrant fills out a questionnaire
with information affecting his
draft status.
Q. When does he get his classification?
A. As soon as his draft Iward
meets after it receives his questionnaire and any other pertinent evidence he may wish to
submit. In a simple case, he
would be classified about a
month after registration. A complicated case could take longer.
Q. Does being ordered to take
a physical examination mean
that induction is near?
A. Generally, yes. It is usually
given about 60 days before prol-ablinduction.
Q. How does a boy appeal a
classification he disagrees with?
A. His notice of classification
tells him that he may notify his
local board in writing that he
desires to appeal.
Q. How docs joining a reserve
unit affect a boy's draft status?
A. All members of the military components of the reserve
are deferred from the draft it-

classification

changed over

the last few years?

There are no standards for
classification; that is, all reungistrants are considered
less they can prove their eligibility for another classification.
Q. But haven't there lccn
changes in minimum standards?
A. The last change, effective
November 1966, dealt with mental standards. Now a man who
scores below 10 on the Armed
Forces Qualification Test, which
is a general intelligence examination, is rated F and rejected. High school graduates who
score between 10 and 30 arc inschool graduducted. Non-hig- h
ates scoring 10 to 13 must also
show an aptitude for a skill in
two of seven areas: infantry
combat, armor, artillery and engineering combat; electronics;
motor
maintenance;
general
maintenance; clerical or general
A non-hig- h
scliool
technical.
on the
graduate scoring
test need show only one aptitude to be accepted.
Q. How much time passes between getting induction orders
and actually having to report
for duty?
A. The law requires at least 10
days. We are currently averaging about 20 days' notice.
Q. Arc draftees going into any
service but the Army?
A. Except for those who enlist
before induction, the answer is
no.
self.
Q. How long does a draftee
have to serve?
Q. In the current situation,
A. Not more than two years.
how much time usually passes
classification and
between
Q. What percentage of draftees have gone to Vietnam since
induction?
the big build-u- p of 1963?
A. More than two years.
A. No precise statistics are
Q. How hav e the standards for
available but the Army estimates;
of its drafthat about one-thir- d
tees will serve in Vietnam. Based
'2.1
,
on draftees from August 1965
if
through last October, this would
mean that about 200,000 draftees have served or are serving in
Vietnam.
Q. How can a boy who is
drafted become an officer?
A. If he qualifies, through
tests and his performance in basic and advanced individual training, and applies, he may enter
A.
Officer Candidate School with
the understanding that he will
'
serve two years from the date
of his being commissioned an
officer.
Q. How is the performance of
local boards monitored?
A. The general public, the
press. Congress and draft registrants themselves are very effective monitors of the Selective
Service law. In addition, each
state director maintains contact
with local boards through representatives whose titles and exact functions vary from state to
state. And national headquarters
maintains liaison with state
directors and state reserve units
through two regional field officers in each Army coqjs region.
These field officers have no authority over state directors. The
local lx)ards are under the state
director and state directors unThe chance of being killed or
der the national director.
maimed for what they perceive
Q. How arc draft quotas set
an obscure or unworthy cause
for each local board?
motivates some students to reA. ICach local lioard rt'x)rts
sist the draft in any way they
how many men it has available
can, and thus avoid the fate of for induction. Each state adds
this 9th Division soldier.
the reV)its of its hoards and
gives a state total. A nationwide
The Kentucky
ratio is calculated between the
total draft call and the total
Thu Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky. Lexnumber of available men. Each
ington, Kentucky 4U50U. Second class
posUKe paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
state and local Ixiard is tlun reMailed live time weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
quired to draft that same perperiods, and once during the summer
centage of its own available resession.
Published by the Doard of Student
gistrants. In other words, the
Publications, UK Post Office liox 4a.
lit gun as the Cadet in lbM and
number drafted by any !oard is
as the Kernel
published continuously
the same in relation to the numsince 1W15.
Advertising published herein Is inber available to that Imard as
tended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
the national call is to the numbe reported to The Editors.
ber available nationally.
e

A

t--

u

A

Iernel

A.

16-3- 0

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Tcb. 19,

1968- -5

NASA P rograms Also On The Wane

Defense-FundeBy WALTER GRANT

WASHINGTON (CPS) -Troubles may be just beginning
for university graduate students
and professors who depend on
the Defense Department and the

space agency for fellowships and
funding of research projects.
The Federal Government's
budget problems have forced
both the Pentagon and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to reduce support
to universities during the current
fiscal year. And the outlook for
fiscal 1969 is not much brighter.
Although some universities
are already feeling the pinch,
most will not feel the full impact
of the decrease in financial support until April or May, according to an official in the Pentagon's office of research and engineering.
The budget cuts are having
a wide variety of effects on universities. Some graduate schools
may be forced to accept fewer
students next fall due to the

Research Sure ToDwindle

d

lack of fellowships and research smaller amount about $3 mi- spending reductions will have
opportunities. Faculty hiring at llionwill come from applied re- more effect on graduate fellowsome graduate schools is at a search, which includes most of ships than on research. NASA
r
standstill, and many more schools the classified research projects gave 750 predoctoral
will be unable to support faculty in universities sponsored by the fellowships in 1967, but will be
and student research projects this Defense Department.
able to give only 75 this year.
summer.
In the space agency, the The overall NASA program of
Private schools with little or
no endowments will be hurt more
than some large state universities, like the Universities of Michigan and California, which are
heavily endowed. Some of the
major private universities like
Stanford and Harvard also have
three-yea-

support to universities has been
cut from about $117 million in
1967 to less than $100 million
this year, a space agency official
said. NASA's sustaining university program was cut from $30
million to $10 million.

large endowments which will
help offset the loss of federal
support.
reOverall, University-base- d
search in the Defense Department
has been reduced in $238 million
for 1968, compared to $261 million in Fiscal 1967 and $299 in
1966. Of the $23 million reduction this year, about $20 million
will come from the area of basic
research, defined by the Pentagon as projects "seeking to develop new knowledge." The

Free Speech

Continued from Page One
lated for about four days now.
Bruce Bostick, a Morehead student, estimated that about 300
to 400 signatures
had been
gathered.
The group is hoping to have
1,000 signatures before presenting the petition to the univer-

sity's administration.

Prof. Vance said of the reactions to the petition, "Generally,
the students have been courte-

ous."
But he said he had approached six faculty members and
all of them had been "afraid"
to sign.
Bostick said, "It's going as
good as we can expect, but there's
an awful lot of students who are
afraid to sign."
He said some students had
expressed fear of losing theirjobs
with the university if they signed,
and others said they thought their
grades might suffer under some
professors.
Some professors had given him
their support, he said, but were
afraid to sign "because they
planned on coming back next

year."
Bostick, who is something of
a novelty on the Morehead campus with his
blond hair, encountered at least
one unpleasant incident while

circulating the petition.

That occurred in the student
grill when he became involved
in a heated discussion with some
service veterans about the war
in Vietnam.
A large group of students
crowded
and some
around,
started shouting "Cut his hair"

and "Kill the
tard!"
Otherwise,

long-haire-

d

President

U4

n

bas-

he says, he has

had no problems with the students. But he said he is planning to get his hair cut "for
the sake of the movement."
Bostick has had trouble with
the school's housing system. He
moved from one dorm to another
over the weekend because of what
he called "repressive measures"
in the first one.
He said he continually has
been fined 25 cents during room
checks for having an antiwar
poster on the wall of his room.
He moved out of that dorm,
and when he went back the next
day to get his mail, he was told
that the dorm had been declared
to him by the dormioff-limi-ts

tory director.
He said he went in anyway,
though.
Bostick said plans for the future atMorehead include handing
out leaflets and working for an
open forum for students in the
campus newspaper.
"But we're trying to work on
one thing at a time," he said.

Draft Rule Condemned
Continued from Tare One
undergraduate and graduate,"
said James M. Moudy, chancellor of Texas Christian University in Fort Worth.
"It would have been preferable . . . had the decision been
to select a portion of the required numbers from each of
the seven age groups from 19
through 26," said Harvard's Dr.
Pusey.
Graduate schools have been
worrying about the drought of
deferments since
Johnson signed the 1967 Selective Service Act nearly eight
months ago.
The act provides for deferments only for graduate students in "medicine, dentistry,
veterinary medicine, osteopathy
or optometry, or in such other
subjects necessary to the maintenance of the national health,
safety, or interest as are identified by the director of Selective
Service upon the advice of the
National Security Council."
Graduate students for the

ooo l

ministry are exempted without
regard to the council's views.
The effect of the suspension
of the lists of essential activities and critical occupations on
persons with occupational deferments was not immediately
clear.
Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey,
national director of the Selective Service System, noted in a
telegram to all state draft directors that local boards would
retain "discretion to grant, in
individual cases, occupational
deferments based on a showing of essential
community
need."
The security council made no
mention of changing rules for
deferring students seeking baccalaureate degrees.
The graduate student change
applies to incoming und first-yegraduate students. There
are an estimated 400,000 male
students receiving their bachelor's degrees this year and an
estimated
100,000 first year
graduate students.

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mmaylbe fill's because yoin'ire ami
fimtdliforiidhuiaL
There's certain campus talk that claims
individuality is dead in the business world.
That big business is a big brother destroying initiative.
But freedom of thought and action, when
backed with reason and conviction's courage, will keep and nurture individuality
whatever the scene: in the arts, the sciences,
and in business.
Scoffers to the contrary, the red corpuscles of individuality pay off. No mistake.
Encouraging individuality rather than
suppressing it is policy in a business like
Western Electric where we make and pro

vide things Bell telephone companies need.
Because communications are changing fast,
these needs are great and diverse.
Being involved with a system that helps
keep people in touch, lets doctors send cardiograms across country for quick analysis,
helps transmit news instantly, is demanding. Demanding of individuals.
If your ambition is strong and your abilities commensurate, you'll never be truly
bappy with the status quo. You'll seek
ways to change it and -- wonderful feeling! -some of them will work.
Could be at Western Electric.

Western Electric
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-- TUT KENTUCKY

KERNEL,

Monday, Teh.

10G8

If),

The ( Campus Mock Election Comes Of Afje

College 'Primary' Could Be The 2nd Largest

By PHIL SEMAS .
WASHINGTON (CPS)
In
any flection year there are always numerous mock primaries
and elections on college campuses.
In 1968 these individual local
primaries will be pushed into the
background by Choice '68, a national primary to be held April
24 on more than 1,000 college
campuses. The organizers of the
primary say they already have
1,100 schools with
million students signed up to
participate, including almost all
of the large schools. They hope
to have at least 1,500,