xt74f47grd2j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74f47grd2j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19350305  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  5, 1935 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  5, 1935 1935 2013 true xt74f47grd2j section xt74f47grd2j Best Copy Available
TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL,

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ftfj

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXV.

INTO THIRD YEAR
IN WHITE HOUSE
President Encounters Condi
lions Vastly Different, Yet
Strangely Reminiscent
of 1933

Against

Rebellion

Rill Is

Work-Reli- ef

Foremost
March

4

(INS)

President Roosevelt began his third
year In the White House today under conditions vastly different from
that squally fourth' of March two
years ago Yet rather strangely
reminiscent.

as then, he is confronted
with something of a crisis. Two
years ago It was financial. He was
inducted into office to the doleful
dirge of bank doors banging shut.
Today his immediate crisis Is legislative. The music for his second an
nlversary n the White House Is
the growing of a recalcitrant congress that threatens to get out of
hand on a number of issues.
Foremost Is the senate rebellion
against the $4,880,000,000 work-r- e
Now,

lief bill.
Next is the readiness of congress
to vote the $2,500,000,000 soldiers
bonus, which would upset Mr.
Roosevelt's fiscal plans, and per-halead to currency inflation
upon which he Is not yet willing to
embark.
Then there is the deadlock over
program, which
his
involves old age pensions and some
form of unemployment Insurance,
and the fact that a hostile senate
is preparing a vigorous investigans

social-securi-

ty

tion Into the operations of the

NRA, Keystone of the Roosevelt
Recovery Program.
As for Mr. Roosevelt, philosophically starting the last half of
his administration, he is determined to "stop this business of
direct relief."
He is now convinced,
after
months of eperience, that millions
of ' people will not seek gainful
employment so long as they are
from the Fedassured of hand-ou- ts
He
eral or State governments.
recently said so, in effect, while
discussing the work-relibill with
congressional advisers.
ef

SIGMA CHI ENDS
PROVINCE

MEET

Delegates from Two States,
National Officers Attend
Two-Da- y

District

Convention

DANCE ENDS SESSIONS
of Kentucky
The University
chapter of Sigma Chi fraternity
were hosts on last Friday and Saturday to a conference of the Ken
tucky-Tenness- ee

province

of

the;

organization. A large number of
Kentucky alumni, visitors and delegates from other chapters were in
attendance.
Outstanding events of the conference were the initiation on Friday evening of nineteen men from
the Kentucky and Centre college
chapters, followed by a buffet supper at the Lafayette hotel and a
theatre party at the Ben All
theatre, where two famous Sigma
Chi sound pictures were shown, and
the conference banquet and conference formal dance held Saturday
night at the Phoenix hotel.
Business sessions of the confer
ence were held at the chapter
house, located at Rose and Kalmla,
Friday afternoon, Saturday morning and Saturday afternoon. They

were presidede over by Dr. William
B. Ricks, Clarksvllle, Tenn., Grand
Praetor of the Kentucky-Tennessprovince. Delegates from the Kentucky chapter were Wttlllam Swiss-heland Elvis Stahr.
Toastmaster at the banquet was
Owen Lee, Lexington attorney, and
guest speakers
were Hamilton
Douglas, Jr., Atlanta, Qa , national
president of Sigma Chi, Chester W.
Cleveland, Chicago, Grand Editor
of the fraternity publication, and
Charles H. Eldridge, Chicago, Executive Secretary.
ee

m

Student Offered
State Church Post
Oarvioe Kincaid, Richmond, first
year student in the Law college,
was recently recommended for the
position of full time state field
secretary of the Kentucky Christian Endeavor at a meeting of the
executive board of the union held
In Louisville last week.
Mr. Kincaid, who Is present publicity director for the association,
was highly praised for his work In
editing the first state paper of the
organisation recently by members
of the board.
Be was unable to accept the position offered, however, because of
work at the University,

4

ViXL

Marjorie Powell Will Portray
Role of Juliet in Fifth
Production of
Season

Measurements For
Rings To Be Taken

NEW SERIES NO. 40

Xavier University Will Be
Last Opponents of Wildcats,
Southeastern
Co-Champio-

Community Concert to Pre'
sent Jose Iturbi, Famous
Artist in Fourth
of Series

Kentucky

Measurements for senior rings
will be taken Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, March 13, 14,

Frank Fowler, director of the and IS, in the Administration
Guignol theater, will havo th
building, according to an anleading role In the fifth production
nouncement made by L. O.
oi me season or the lit ie theater,
Balfour Company, which re"Romeo and Juliet," to be pre
ceived the contract.
sented the week of March 18. The
Representatives of the comcast for the productvm was an
pany will be In the main hall of
nounced Saturday by the director.
the building between the hours
Marjorie Powell, attractive and
of 9 and 12 a. m. and 1 and 3:30
talented veteran actress frnm Rniri.
p. m.
win. Long Island, New York, will
piay me uue roie or Juliet.
A most brilliant cast has hon
selected to support the two starring
roles.
The cast follows:
Mercutio, friend of Romeo Fred- ric Andre DeWilde.
Peter, servant to the Caoulet
Allen Relniger.
Dr. and Mrs. Frank L. McVey
Benvollo, friend to Romeo Leon
Return from First Vacaard VanArsdale.
tion for President in
Tybalt, of the house of Camilet
Several Years
OlUe Williamson.
Lady Ctpulet, mother of Juliet
Mrs. H. C. Robinson.
ARE GONE THREE WEEKS
Capulet,
her h u s b a n d Paul
Mansfield.
President and Mrs. Frank L. Mc
Montague,
Vey have returned to Lexington and
father of Romeo
John Davis Haggard.
the University after a short cruise
Lady Montague, his wife Mari- - to Bermuda. The trip was the first
vacation that President McVey has
anna Lancaster.
naa for several years.
Romeo Frank Fowler.
Mr. and Mrs. McVey sailed from
Paris, a young nobleman Russell
New York on the 16th on the "Pan
Schofleld.
American." They were in Bermuda
Nurse to Juliet Dorothy Dyer eight days,
and back in New York
Rodes.
on the 27th. They returned on anJuliet Marjorie Powell.
other Munsen liner, "The Western
World."
Rosaline Marianna Lancaster.
Mrs. McVey said that they were
Friar LawrenceGeorge
White
sincerely glad to be home. They
runlan.
An Apothecary Ollle Williamson. characterized Bermuda as ' "a toy
Utopia In the middle of the ocean."
It is the oldest self governing British colony, and has many quaint
customs.
"There ear no automobiles. All
the transportation Is carried on by
Helen Rich, Covington, and Wilbicycles, light
carriage, . horses,
liam O. Miller, Brooksville, were trains and boats. We used all of
1935 Kentucki-an- s, the modes but
the winners of the
the horses and the
offered as prizes to the membicycles, and If we had stayed
ber of the committee of 240 maklonger we would have been on them
ing the highest grades on the too," said Mrs. McVey.
"Know Your University" examina"While cn the island we stayed
tions given at the committee meet
at the Parish of Paget. We visited
ing last Thursday night.
St. George's, the old capital. This
The original plan was to give is the show place of the island," exbut one Kentuckian, and that to go plained President McVey, "even as
to the onje making the highest our Man o' War is the attraction
grade. However, in view of the
here In Lexington. We visited the
fact that Miller's grade was but new capital, Hamilton, and stayed
slightly lower than that of Miss
quite a bit."
Rich's, it was decided to award a there
The trip was taken in order that
Kentuckian to Mr. Miller.
McVey might get some
Dean Jones gave an Informal President
needed rest. For diversion
speech on the responsibility evolved much several water color sketches.
did
on the members in having been he
chosen to represent the University
In their home county. This was followed by a short skit, given on
how to contact the graduating high
school seniors. Refreshments were
served after all business was conCoach Wynne to Begin Footcluded.

i

.

T

...

Saturday night

3

ference game.

Will Start Soon

FOREIGN POLICY

THEME OF TALK
A. A. Rerle, Recent Speaker

at UK Convocation, Makes
Address over National and
Columbia Networks.

"When there is a foreign problem, the soundest way to approach
it Is to straighten out the home
situation, for most foreign problems have domestic roots." This
was the conclusion reached by
Adolph A. Berle, Jr., New York
City Chamberlain, In an address
last Thursday over the National
Broadcasting company networks.
The speaker stated that because
of the constant flow of funds from
one country to another, the first
and greatest force which must be
studied In determining foreign
forces is that of mobile capital.
On the grounds that long-terforeign debts are very seldom paid,
Mr. Berle suggested that "we might
begin to wonder whether the cultivation of foreign loans was ever
desirable at least In a country like
ours where we do not struggle for
foreign territories or Ironclad control of foreign markets." He expressed the opinion that where our
have succeeded
manufacturers
abroad, it has been due to the peculiar efficiency of the product, not
because of tariff monoply.
Mr. Berle's address was the fourth
In a series of broadcasts on "Critical Problems of American Foreign
Policy," sponsored by the Intercollegiate Council in cooperation with
the Nationol Advisory Council on
Radio In Education, and the National Broadcasting Company, The series is a part of the Intercollegiate
Council's program for promoting
the study and discussion of leading
problems In world affairs.
m

ball Drills on Monday,
March 18

Spring football practice will officially start on March 18, according to an announcement made by
Head Coach Chet Wynne. On that
date work will begin definitely under Coaches Wynne, Twomey,
Grant, Pribble, Mosely, and Snivels

All students who have played before or who wish to play football
are invited to come out and try
out for the team. Complete uniforms and equipment will be given
every candidate and every one will
receive a chance to show what they
can do.
Students who wish to obtain
equipment before practice officially opens, can get it from the
equipment manager In the Alumni
gym. Some of the coaches will be
out on the football field every day
from now on to assist anyone who
wishes to go out before the 18th
for the purpose of getting into

Tied

the final

W
Team
Loulsana State.. 12
11
Kentucky
7
Tennessee
9
Vanderbllt
8
Alabama
4
Florida
Mississippi State. 5
4
Oeorgla
Georgia Tech ... 5
5
Mississippi
3
Auburn
1
Sewanee
I
Tulane

JOSE ITURBI

The Community Concert Association of Central Kentucky will present Jose Iturbi, internationally
famous Spanish' pianist, as the
fourth attraction of its series at
8:15 o'clock Thursday evening,
March 7, in Memorial auditorium.
Admittance will be limited to mem
bers of the association and no

'BALLET

con-

Opp.
L Pts. Pts.

0 576 362
0 518 231
4 388 365
6 573 537
7 475 433
3 227 224
5 419 398
5 316 316
6 350 386
7 411 465
9 319 378
7 172 314
16 401 745

RUSSE'

TO APPEAR HERE

single admissions will be sold at
the door.
Since Iturbi's sensational debut
in this country In 1929, he has
played more concerts than any
other artist except Paderewskl. He
has been heard with every import

in

training there, later studying in

Barcelona and at the Paris Con
Recently
servatoire.
the French
government decorated him with the
Cross of the Legion of Honor.

REPORT IS GIVEN

GARDEN CENTER

ON COLLEGIANS

TO HEAR EVANS

Dr. Walter Jessup of Carne
gie Foundation Says the
"Rah-rah- "
Type Is Fast
Disappearing
PEACE POLL IS CITED
The typical "rah rah" college boy
who went to college to enjoy life,
yell his head off, and die for dear
old Alma Mater, is disappearing
from the campus and is being re
placed by the student Interested in
world affairs and social and politi
cal economy, according to Dr. Wal
ter A. Jessup in his first report as
president of the Carnegie Founda
tion for the Advancement
of
Teaching.
To college students throughout
the country, this is of particular
significance,
as it concurs very
closely with a recent query made
by the Literary Digest to various
college editors in regard to the
truth of the statement. As added
evidence of this statement, the
recent peace poll is pointed out, as
it proved among other things that
students of today are more serious- minded than their predecessors of
the twenties.
However, while putting in a good
word for the average college stu
dent, Dr. Jessup also sounded a
warning that a struggle for survival
among American colleges was imminent. Already, he said, there are
some American institutions that are
so far from fulfilling their func
tions that they might as well a ban- don the struggle. "Survival will be
conditioned by intelligent leadership, high morale, and the courage
to be sincere with the students by
selecting and educating them only
in the field of institutional competency and in that field doing a
genuine and significant job," Dr.
Jessup said.

Bizet
Meyerbeer
Cave
Mendelssohn
Dameron
The Ghost's Dance
TICKETS NOW ON SALE Baritone Solo Aire Varle. .Harlow
Robert Griffith
Friedmann
Colonel W. Basil's Ballet Russ-e- a, Slavonic Rhapsody
The concert next Sunday will be
the largest touring comWopany having appeared in nearly presented by the University direcmen's Glee Club under the
every large city in the U. S. and tion of Miss Mildred Lewis.
Canada since last September, will
be brought here under the auspices
of the Lexington College of Music
at Woodland auditorium, Wednesday, March 6.
The largest audience of the Ballet
this year was at the bull arena in
Mexico City where 19,000 persons
saw the performance.
The best Law College Dean and Prof.
weeks receipts were received in
A. J. Olney to Speak on
Chicago during Christmas week
Program of Fifth Session
where $50,000 came into the box
office.
of Garden Center Meeting
Persons In "Who's Who" of the
Dr. A. E. Evans, dean of the ColBallet Russes are: Colonel Wasslly
de Basil, director general and lege of Law, and Prof. A. J. Olney,
creator of the Ballet Russes. He instructor of horticulture at the
University, will speak this afterwas originally a military man, being wounded several times, having noon in the fifth of a series of six
decorations be- Garden Center programs being held
earned twenty-on- e
fore he entered the artistic world; on consecutive Tuesdays at the
Rene Blum, artistic director of the University Museum under the ausBallets, is also the director of the pices of the Department of UniGrand Theatre in Monte Carlo versity Extension.
Arranged by Mrs. W. T. Lafferty,
where the Ballet is a great attraction every April; Lubow Tcherni-chev- secretary of Women's Club Service
who is in charge of Col. at the University, the meetings
Basil's Ballet School, is a well have attracted garden lovers from
known dancer of the former Russ- 20 counties of Central Kentucky.
ian Imperial Ballet; David Lichlne, The meeting today is to be presided
k
young dancer, who is creator of the over by Mrs. T. H. Corman,
Garden Club, Lexington, and
ballets "Nocture"
and "Imagin-airesTatiana Riabouchinska. the will include discussion of the basic
daughter of the late Czar's private subject, "Trees and Shrubs for
banker who joined the ballet at its Public Places."
The meeting will open at 10 a m.
inception ; T a m a r a Toumanova,
daughter of a Colonel in the Czar's with a discussion of "Beautifying
army; and Leonlde Mssine, Maitre the Highway," by Mrs. O. M. More-lan- d
of Lexington. The morning
de Ballet and creator of many of
session will also include an address
the ballets.
on "American Arboretums," by Miss
Reservations may be made by
Lexington,
communicating
with Miss Anna Carrie Lee Hathaway,
Ooff, Lexington College of Music. and a discussion of "Conifers for
Emphasis", by Walter W. Hillcn-meye- r,
Tickets may be obtained from her.
of Hillenmeyer Nurseries.
ranging in price from $2 .83 to $1.13.
An open forum on the morning
discussions will precede adjourn -MAKE INSPECTION TOl'R
mentment for luncheon. The program will be resumed at 2 p. m.
The members of the student with an address on "Our Native
branch of the American Institute Trees," by Professor Olney. Followof Electrical Engineers were taken ing this Dean Evans will discuss
on a tour of inspection of the Lex- "The Rights of Abutting Property
ington telephone
exchange
as Owners in the Streets," and the
guests of the Lexington Telephone afternoon session will adjourn with
Company,
Wednesday
morning. a discussion of "Women on Park
They were shown the various equipBoards and Park Board Policies,"
ment and the method of procedure by Professor N. R. Elliott, professor
of landscape architecture and florifor placing long distance calls.
culture at the University Experiment Station.
,

a,

Ken-wic-

";

J

Aspect of North End of Campus
Disappears; Storm Sewer Work Is Finished
The

war-tor-

n

aspect

of

the'

Saint-Sae-

Famous Dancing Troupe Will
L'Arleslenne"
Perform at Woodland
Fackeltanz in B flat
Auditorium on
Overture in Fingal's
ant orchestra and has made as
March 6
many
appearances
one

War-Tor- n

northern end of the campus is no
more. No longer does the ungainly
looking
bulk of the
steam shovel chew contentedly on
huge mouthfuls of the campus. No
longer do the squat figures of the
tank-lik- e
tractors lumber deliberately across the broken terrain. The
storm sewer has been completed!
The sewer, extending from the
old Frankfort pike to the Tate's
Creek Pike, has been under construction by the PWA laborers
since last June. The leveling and
grading of the part of the campus
through which It has passed should,
according to Superintendent Crut- -

The University concert band was
heard in a concert Sunday afternoon at Memorial hall by perhaps
the largest audience ever to attend
the Sunday afternoon muslcales.
This was the second and last of
a series of programs presented by
the concert band under the able
direction of John Lewis, Jr. The
band was attired in their full dress
uniforms and responded to their
leader's direction with perfect harmony.
Oriffith, the featured
Robert
soloist of the afternoon gave a delightful Interpretation of Harlow's
"Aire Varle". Mr. Griffith's talent
was notable even in so artistic a
group as that of the university concert band, and his playing was excellent. He responded graciously
with the selection of "O Dry Those
Tears" by Del Riego.
The program was as follows:
March Militaire Francaise

Finale from the "Suite Algerenne"
Prelude from the Suite N.o 1

New York season, always to crowded houses. He is a native of Valencia and had his first musical

PROF. CLYDE SPEAKS

Prof. Paul H. Clyde, of the History department, gave an address
illustrated by moving pictures to
the young men's class of Christ
department of build- the campus has been completed, it Church last Sunday at the invitacher, of the
ings and grounds, be completed by will be seeded and replanted. Now tion of Stephen S. Hubard. a senior
the 15th of this month.
that the sewer has been completed in Arts and Science College. Dr.
Consisting of a huge concrete the building and grounds depart- Clyde spoke on the "Japanese Manbox, the sewer, its top level with ment can continue with its plan dated Islands."
the ground in back of Btoli field, of expanding the Botanical GarV. W. C. A. CROl'P TO MEET
provides there a neat concrete walk. dens.
This walk replaces the slappy, preh
The World Fellowship group of
traversed by
carious
I'NDERGOES OPERATION
the Y. W. C. A. will meet at 3 p. m.
numbers of football fans during the
Wednesday In the Woman's buildla-season.
Miss Susan Mulllns, of Wingo, ing. A Russian program has been
Eliminating all danger of flood
senior in the College of Arts and planned, with members of the group
damage, which has cost the UniSciences, and a member of the reviewing recent articles on Rus0
versity in the neighborhood of
Women's Athletic Association, sub- sia, which have been published In
since 1928, the sewer Is distinctcurrent magazines. Betty Dlmock,
ly an advantageous addition to the mitted to a minor operation yesterleader of the group, will conduct
campus. When the grading and day morning at the Good Samarithe discussion.
leveling of the excavated portion of tan Hospital.
foot-pat-

$70,-00-

Musketeers Seeking Revenge
Will Meet Ruppmen in
Second Game of Season Thursday
KENTUCKY ENDS LOOP
SCHEDULE WITH WIN

University Orchestra, Under
Scores 53 to 19 Victory Over
John Lewis, Jr., Plays
Vanderbllt with Guards in
Before Record Crowd

The final ratings follow:

FROM BERMUDA

Spring Practice

In

ns

UK Concert Band
Is Featured At
Sunday Musicale

Atlanta, Ga., March 4 (INS)
The University of Kentucky
and Louisiana 8tate were today
of the Southwestern
Conference
basketball championship, following the Wildcats
53 to 19 victory over Vanderbllt

McVEYS RETURN

Kyians Are Given
As Contest Prizes

Is

With Hueys Five

as ten

ALUMNI GYM

KENTUCKY

OF

Frank Fowler to Have Lead Spanish Pianist
In 'Romeo and Juliet Next Will Be Heard
Presentation of Guignol ThursdayNight

IJRILLIANT CAST IN
CONGRESS THREATENS
SUPPORTING ROLES
TO GET OUT OF HAND

Washington,

XAVIER GAME

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1935

ROOSEVELT GOES

Senate

tjlS Thursday night at

Starring Role
By JOE QV1NN

Rounding out their perfec t Southeastern conference campaign with
a 53 to 19 victory over Vanderbllt
in Alumni gym Saturday night,
Coach Adolph Rupp's Wildcat court
squad will play their final schedule
game of the season when they oppose Xavier University

of Cincin-

nati, Thursday night, on the local

court.
When the 'Cats met Xavier lat.1
month in Cincinnati before more
than 5,000 spectators, they
to the limit before they
overcame the valiant Musketeers. Since that contest. Xavier
has been strengthened by the addition of a 6 foot five inch pivot
man whom Coach Crowe expects
will give big Leroy Edwards plenty
of trouble.
Expecting a close battle and willing to take no chances of ending
the season disastrously,
Coach
Rupp held a stiff practice session
yesterday afternoon instead of giving the team the usual Monday
rest. He was dissatisfied with the
caliber of play that the team displayed against Vandy and was anxious that the 'Cats be In the best
possible condition
for Thursday
night's fray.
With Warfield Donohue and Big
Jim Goforth giving a brilliant exhibition of long range shooting.
Kentucky's Wildcats had little difficulty in subduing Vandy s Commodores, although the entire team
played sluggishly throughout most
of the contest.
fin-al-

Kentucky's

high-power- ed

ly

shot-

gun, Leroy Edwards, was completely surrounded by Vandy opponents
and had few opportunities to run
up his already impressive total.
The Wildcats failed to rebound
their shots with the usual accuracy
(Continued on Page Four)
v

Mrs. Estes Presides
At League Meeting
The Child Clinic committee of
the Junior League held its monthly case conference yesterday afternoon at Neville hall with Mrs. J
A. Estes presiding.
Those present included Prof. G
B. Dimmick, director of the clinic.
Mrs. F. J. Ratliff, assistant to the
director, and members of the Junior
League who work on the various
cases.
At each conference a summary
of the cases that have been studied
during the preceding month is presented and includes a history ol
the cases, a report of the psychological examinations of the eases, and
remedial suggestions and procedure.

Kampus
Kernels
F. E. R. A. payment was made
yesterday afternoon in the businea
office. All Undents who nave not
as yet received their pay for February MUST call at the biuineui
office this morning, as the sheet
have to be sent to Louisville immediately.

There will be a meeting of th
male chorus of "Pinafore" at 6
o'clock Thursday afternon in trie
music department. It is imperative
that every member of the chorus
be present at that time.
The Sophomore commission will
meet at 7 o'clock Thursday night
in Boyd hall.
There will be an important meeting of Omlcron Delta Kappa at 6
p. m. Thursday, March 1, in White
hall.
The "How to Study" group, led by
Prof. Ralph Wood, will meet at 4
p. m. Wednesday, March 5, at thtV. M. C. A. rooms in Alumni hall.
-

members are urged
to finish up their faculty interviews within the next two or throe
days. It is also suggested that they
go to the Library and look over Um
exhibits on the first floor.
Ail University debaters must be
present at a very Important meeting
in Room 231, McVey ball at 1:30
tonight.
(Continued

on Page Four)

* Best Copy
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-

THE FORGOTTEN
CHAPERONE

The munitions Industries, appar
ently, have things their own way

won one game out of twelve, but
there Is one explanation that will
suffice for Its failure and that was
because the students would not
turn out to see them play. The
main reason for this was that the
only available playing field was
Epplng Park, and as you all know
it is quite a distance from the
campus. No university athletic team
can win games without the support
of the student body, and thst is the
basic answer for Kentucky's poor
showing in the college baseball
world last season.
Last year's diamond team was
the first one to appear at Kentucky
since 1930; consequently it Is logical reasoning that it would not win
the majority of Its games. No team
can be a success the first year
being the fatal cause.
The lads who composed the 1934
team had not played together since
1930
when they played on the
Freshmen team, and the three year
layoff proved to be too detrimental.
When the Athletic Council installed baseball in the 1934 athletic
schedule, they appropriated $600 for
the cause, and as far as can be
learned only about $250 of this was
spent, the team using automobiles
for their road trips Instead of

dancers and
rapturous strains of music of
the usual fraternity formal Is a
group of humble souls whose pres
ence Is taken for granted and to
trains.
whom usual courtesies are aften
After considering this at Us full
overlooked We refer to the chaper- value we ask If this Is a waste ot
ones.
Surprisingly, many students feel money to give the boys who attend
Hint they have greatly honored a the University a little pleasure in
member of the University staff the only sport they happen to care
when they ask him and his wife for. In fact, the only possibility
to chapcrone a dance. They feel some of them will ever have of
that to permit them to enter the making a college letter.
Kentucky could have a fairly sue
gymnasium In mouse-lik- e
humility
and to sit in the darkened Incon cessful baseball team if the footspicuous corners on hard chairs for ball practice field could be utilized
several hours for the purpose of for a baseball diamond it was once
hearing an orchestra of doubtful situated there, and so why can't
merit and watching the youths go it be put there again?
into a dance is a rare privilege.
We could schedule games with
However, if one would take the southern universities and colleges
time to read a newspaper account who do have nines, as well as
of such a dance and compare the schools north of the Mason and
list of chaperones given therein Dixon line. If the diamond were
with those actually present, he placed near the campus the stuwould see quite a dlscrepency. In dents would turn out for the games,
other words, a number of the Uni- and Kentucky could have a moderately successful team.
versity staff are actually
and fail to show up.
Last week at such a dance a
INTERNATIONAL
young University staff member and
CONTROL
his wife were chaperoning the
function. Determined not to be wall
"O War, I hate you most of all
flowers they arose and began dancfor this, that you do lay your hands
ing. Shortly, therafter, a young ag- on the noblest elements in human
gressive male stepped out and character, with which we might
tagged the staff member's wife.
make a heaven on earth, and you
Was precedent thus to be broken use them to make a hell on earth
and was courtesy to chaperones on Instead. You take even our science,
the way to Inauguration? Not at all. the fruit of our dedicated IntelliThe young swain took one look at gence, by means of which we might
build here the City of God, and,
the staff member's wife, who
was much better looking using It, you fill the earth Instead
than the majority of the girls there, with new ways of slaughtering men.
murured an indistinct "Excuse me, You take our loyalty, our un
I thought you were someone else," selfishness, with which we might
make the earth beautiful, and using
and left her standing there.
This Is merely an example of one these our finest qualities, you make
of the extreme discourtesies. Less death fall from the sky and burst
glaring ones occur at every dance, up from the sea and hurtle from
and there Is no excuse for them. unseen ambuscades 60 miles away;
Let's try to be ladies and gentle-we- n you blast fathers In the trenches
and not forget the "forgotten with gas while you are starving
their children at home with blockchaperone."
ades; and you so bedevil the world
that 15 years after the Armistice
A MAJOR SPORT
we cannot be sure who won the
game of baseball is con- war, so sunk in the same disaster
The
sidered by American people as the are victors and vanquished alike.
national pastime, but at the Uni- If war were fought simply with evil
versity of Kentucky it is considered things, like hate, it would be bad
a waste of time. Why? Because a enough, but, when one sees the
few of the schools In the South- deeds of war done with the lovelieastern Conference, of which Ken- est faculties of the human spirit,
tucky is a member, have the idea he looks into the very pit of hell."
Harry Emerson Fosdick.
that the diamond game is nothing
The remarkable scheme of the
but money wasted, and they figure
they can not afford to spend money United States to establish Inter
on a sport that does not put large national control of the arms Indus
try received a blunt attack by
profits Into the cash drawer.
It is true that last year Kentucky Oreat Britain over the proposed
had a baseball team and it only1 arms treaty last week at Geneva.
Amid the swirling

i.he

In England.

Earl Stanhope, British delegate
to the Permanent Conference Com
mittee on Arms Reduction, pro
posed three vital modifications to
the American draft which left
nohtlng but a system of export
licenses which Is already used by
his country. He was certainly cor
rect when he stated these modlfl
cations were tendered In order to
"simplify" procedure at least as
far as preat Britain Is concerned
The American plan advocates the
regulation of arms traffic and
manufacturer, establishment of
supervisory body which would send
special committees to the various
countries to verify their armament
reports, and the publicity of arma
Lord Stan
ment expenditures.
hope's criticism of "too ambitious,'
in reference to the proposed super
visory body's preferring a plan of
nations' filing reports at Oeneva,
reeks of the smug suggestions and
hypocritical "assistance" pompously offered by leaders of the muni
tions Industries.
Surprisingly enough, France supported the United States in the
Oeneva dispute as did Poland
Italy supported Oreat Britain, and
for the first time, America is given
the responsibility of guiding an Issue through debate In this historic
conference city.
We might well wonder what England's attituie toward this drastic
situation would be If she were to
conduct a munitions inquiry in the
same manner as did the Senate in
Washington. The plan responsible
for the Oeneva dispute was pre
cipitated by the recent Senate In
vestigatlons, and it appears that
only the United States has been
progressive enough to procure facts
to prove that the present mode of
existence of the munitions Indus.
tries is detrimental to the welfare
of eve