xt74j09w1m4b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74j09w1m4b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420717  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 17, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 17, 1942 1942 2013 true xt74j09w1m4b section xt74j09w1m4b DREAMS

F ELDsKlOUS

Case Will Be Taken
To Court Of Appeals

The KENTUCKY

IKIEHRMIEIL
University of Kentucky, Lexington
FRIDAY, JULY 17, 1942

VOL. XXXIII

IGHTEN

Student dreams of

By "Sonny" White
a fieldhouse brightened this week, whe

President H. 1.. Donovan declared that the unfavorable decision,
of Circuit Judge William H. Ardery, would be apealed.
President Donovan said the case "will le carried to the State
NO. 6 Court of AK-alwhere it is hoped a favorable ruling will be
s

(

REGISTRATION

-

ON THURSDAY
University
the following

Leo M. Chamberlain.

registrar, has
instructions regarding registration
for the second term of the summer quarter, on Thursday, July 23.
"All persons who registered" during
the first term, but paid fees for only
one term, and all persons who wish
to take work in the second term,
but were not enrolled during the
first term, should report to the basement hall of the Administration
building on Thursday, according to
the following alphabetical schedule:
0
a. m.; H
A through G.
a. m.; O
through N. 10:00-10:p. m.; Miscel0
through Z.
p. m.
0
laneous. A through Z,
Following registration they should
report to the main floor of the men's

..

.

tutional a $200,000 appropriation far
capital outlay, in the University bud
get.

Mi?

Judge Ardery stated in his decision
that this money was intended for
use in building a fieldhouse and wait
in no sense an emergency appropria-

1

tion.

.

"The appropriation was not mad
specifically for a fieldhouse," Dr.
Donovan said. "The sum was set
aside by the General Assembly, for
capital outlay, which means the Uni
versity Board of Trustees could
spend the money for any building
it might choose to erect on th
campus."
"It was the intention, however,
of the Board of Trustees, at the
time the appropriation was made t
construct a combination auditoriuna
and field house," he continued.
The Court of Appeals has now
o the
recessed for the summer
case will not be brought before that
body until it convenes this fall.
The Board of Trustees, had been
negotiating for a site for the field
house, but had delayed 'purchasing

9:00-9:550

1:30-2:2-

2:30-3:3-

gymnasium for classification.
Before registering all new under-

graduate students must take the
University
classification
tests by
Thursday noon in Room 9 of the
Administration building.
Those who paid fees for the entire quarter at the June enrollment
should report to the Dean's of tlieir
respective colleges on the main
floor of the men's gymnasium,
Thursday. July 23, from 8:30 a. m.
to 4:30 p. m. for verification of
changes in their schedule of work.
Dr. Chamberlain announced last
week that he expected a probable
attendance of 1.250 students for the
second term of the University's
first summer quarter.

Dramatics Lecture
Presented Today
iHow To See A Play", an open
class lecture by Miss Marguerite McLaughlin, will be presented at 11:15
a. m. today in Room 54, of McVey
Hall.
Miss McLaughlin makes a regular
pilgrimage to New York each theatrical season to see the current
Broadway stage productions. Her
lectures dealing with these plays
are much in demand at the University and are record breakers for
open class attendance.

Kilpatrick Speaks
On "Morale", Tonight
Kilpatrick,
Dr. William Heard
professor of educational philosophy
at Columbia University, will speak
on "Morale on the Home Front and
on the War Front" at a summer
quarter lecture to be held in Memorial hall today at 7:30 p. m.
Following the address by Dr.
Kilpatrick, who is cor.ducting a
special class on the campus at the
present time, there will be an opportunity for discussion and questions on the international situaiion.

any property until after July

To Get Mail Boxes

1.

Judge Ardery's decision cancelled
any action they may have planned.
In declaring the appropriation
invalid. Judge Ardery said: "It is

an evident fact that enrollment " at
the University is decreasing because so many young men are leaving for the war. It is further evident that as enrollment decreases,
to that extent, present facilities will
-

President Herman L. Donovan
carried to the Stole Court of Appeals.

says fieldhouse rase will be

Ordnance Graduates
'In The Army Now'
By Pat Oldham

thirty graduates of the
Ordnance Inspection course are
planning to buy railroad tickets
sometime this week destination unNearly

known.
These inspectors, who started the
course last April, are now really in
Uncle Sam's war for the duration
and six months, subject to be sent
any place in the United States or
i her possessions.
The group whKti has Just completed the three months' training
will receive marching orders from
the Cincinnati Ordnance District.
They will probably be stationed in
Kentucky, Indiana or Ohio, as inspectors of shells, ammunitions,
trench mortars, machine parts, or
any of the numberless cogs in our
tremendous war machine.
According to John McOarvey.

timekeeper
for
the ordnance
workers in the machine shop, the
enroilees range anywhere from 18
to 53 years of age and consist of
women as well as men. Middle-age- d
d
business men,
daughters,
boys not in the army, they all are
ordnance workers now.
The men may be drafted before
they get their appointments but
once assigned to a factory they are
inspectors lor the duration of the
war.
Paula Strother,
Central Kentuckian. speaks for the
women when she' says "the course
isn't child's play. She reports that
they have classes from 8 a. m. until
5 p. m., and study "in between."
"But", she says, "It's interesting,
and I'm being paid to go to school
for the first time in my life."
teen-age-

"HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU!'

Singing Messenger Disrupts
Clark 's History Class

By John Hntcheson
During the summer session, hot
weather and lazy students annoy
and weaken professors, but when
All students planning to enroll crooning messenger boys interrupt
for the second quarter of tn sum- - classes, .that's too much!
Students in Dr. Tom D Clark's
mer teim are asked by Miss Carria
Bean, postmaster, to renew tleir history class found out that he had
postoflice box before the end of a birthday, so arrangements were
made to have the telegraph office
the first term.
boy
This will prevent delay in the send a singing messenger
around to deliver a birthday
delivery of student's mail, site

Students Asked

ured."

Dr. Donovan referred to Judge
Ardery's decision declaring unconsti-

The boy appeared on Tuesday
afternoon and sang, with all the
gusto of a Western Union falsetto,
while Dr. Clark vainly tried to push
boy out the door
After the messenger finisrd the
final strains of "Happy Birthday
To You", he removed his foot from
the door and hurried away.
Dr. Clark reddened to the ears
and dismissed the class.

the

Brewer And Hill
Attend Conference
'

Colonel

B.

E.

Brewer,

ROTC

commandant at the University, ar.d
Dr. Henry H. Hill, Dean of the University, left this week for Columbus,
Ohio, to attend a conference of the.
joint Army-Nav- y
Board for the
Fifth Corps Area.
Color.el Brewer is a member

of

the board, which will determine
future quotas of the Army Enlisted
Reserve for all schools in this area.
It is believed that the Board may
also set up an allotment at the University for the Naval Reserve.

become more adequate."
On the campus, it was commonly believed that one reason for
building a fieldhouse was to attract the State High School and
tournaSoutheastern basketball
ments to Lexington. Present University facilities are inadequate for
handling the large capacity crowds
that throng to these sports events.
The appropriation was one of several passed by the General Assembly last January with a reservation
giving the Govenor authority to
withhold the expenditure in case
war-ticonditions should cause a
decrease in state revenue and fund
were hot available.

Engineers Marooned
When Flash Flood Struck
U.K.

By "Sonny" White
Noah and his Ark had nothing on 15, and the only way the studente
the experience of twenty civil engi- could bring in food was by walking
neering students from the Univer- or riding a mule. Coming and going,
sity when a flash flood in Breathitt they waded across the raging creelt
county last week overran the land holding to a rope.
surrounding Camp Robinson.
Professor Terrell, jokingly comThey were marooned for five days, mented that although there was a
with practically all means of com- food rationing, they subsisted mainmunication and avenues of supplies ly on bacon and beans during their
cut off.
sojourn.
Under the leadership or Professors
Sunday, the boys started to dig
D. V. Terrell and R. E. Shaver, of
the Engineering college, the party their way out. They removed
15 landslides
and
left the campus early this summer approximately
built a bridge 80 feet long, before
for their annual seven week surveying trip, in the 15.000 acre Robinson reaching the highway late that
night.
.
forest, near Jackson, Kentucky.
The engineers who turned sailors
On Wednesday, July 7, the rains
came. .. .setting a record for that were: James Corigan, Lloyd Thomparea of 5.7 inches in two hours. son, James Gardner, Jack Boston,
Buckhorn creek, located nearby, James Caywood, Coleman Clements,
overflowed its banks, and although Thomas Combs, Ben Eubank, Jr.,
the camp escaped damage, every- Howard Freer. Augusta Green,
thing el:e along the stream's course James Gillim. John McElroy. Wilwas destroyed including homes and liam Nickell, Ralph Pickard, Forrest
Rowe. Donald Sallee, Robert Short,
bridges.
Camp Robinson is located five Jr., Joseph Stanton, Richard .Storey,
miles from Kentucky highway No. and William Wichman.

'

* Page Two

.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
"STUDENT

Kentucky Int.ercoI".cim Prw
Kentucky Press AsoetMm

Board of commerce
Nauon. Editorial Assormtioa

Talk

National AdvertsingServklitc.
Cttm PmtMtkm ttuwm

M

AC

NEW

To.M.T.

RATBS
SUBSCRIPTION
1 M One remt
One Quarter
tU signed articles o& coiumnt are to be cmsidered the optnwns of the
jo op pus ta.iprvtjvl
v) 1 wuuto rut

for one week's showing.
The story deals with Mrs. Miniver and her husband, Clem, played
n,
by Greer G arson and Walter
living in a quiet English village. When war is decared, their
son, played by Richard Ney, joins
the R. A. P. How the family manages to do their best to carry on
life as usual; their bravery ur.der
raid alarms; and the rescue at
Dunkirk figure in the moving human interest episodes mingled with
comedy.
Miss Garson's title role is touch
ingly human and Pidgeon typifies
the valor of the British under fire.
Dame May Whitty, as the village
noblewoman presents a whimsical
and at times earnest characterization. Teresa Wright and Richard
Ney carry the young love interest.
Pid-geo-

vrt-liii- ui

iijtaati

J

A

Glamour Gal Reminisces

'41

By Tommye Stewart
was enough of a problem trying to be a beauty back in
It
and that was before a gal had to cope with wartime re-

--

strictions.
but, broth. Not that I know much about being beautiful
er, what I don't know about trying ! I've run the .gamut of
hair stylists and body contortionists and face glorifiers,
and being a glamor puss is a hard job, even without the government's interfering.
A timely film, crammed with acdays I wistfuly remember flipping tion, romance and excitement will
In the old pre-wlipsticks in and out of handbags, letting them roll under the open Sunday at the Ben All theater
when "Wings For The Eagle", starbed without scrambling after them, tossing away old colors ring Ann Sheridan and Dennis
in Raspberry Morgan, makes its local debut
for the latest by Tussy and writing my name
The majority of the story is set
Red in the most public of places.
in the Lockheed Aircraft Plant.
I used to shake my powder puff after using tossing three Here Morgan meets an old friend
or four valuable grains of powder to the winds I used of his. played by Jack Carson, and
his wife, portrayed by Miss Sheriface tissues for everything from polishing my shoes to
Because Carson
ar

latest

my face. J kept twenty nails polished in the very
not to mention the paint job I did on the family

porch.
cabinet just
Now comes the day when I find my make-u- p
another "Hubbard Cupboard" without a grain of powder,
lipsticks flat with the rim of the tube, cold cream that's only
a smear on the lid of the jar, and my last tissues crumpled
and lipstick-smeareOnce I was optimistic about the whole thing. I slipped
an empty lipstick case uncomfortably into my glove, as a reminder, and trucked into the largest local drug store. "Two
lipsticks, one firecracker red and one cherry. A box of special
rachel powder, two packages of face tissues, two jars of cold
cream, and a jar of rouge . . ."People stopped to stare. The
clerk sputtered, reddened with rage, and muttered something
women."
about "the nerve of
I came home sadly. I scooped every blob of cream from
the lids of fifteen jars and put them in the lid on one jar. I
dug out all remaining lipstick butts, melted them down, and
with much gusto filled another empty jar. I stole some nursery cotton from the baby upstairs and now have some tissuesof a sort.
I can remember back in '41 when people wore
and mascara and. occasionally hose. Now we all look like
the "befoces". in the "before and after" ads.
No more
the girdle we might have worn is
we're pulling
just another jeep tire. No more
very poor facsimiles of Veronica Lake while fifty million
bobby pins make a gun or something.
No more glamor or allure or appeal just a lot of
priority drips and droops
Women know "war is hell!"
d.

hair-braine-

,

d

eye-shado- w

bulge-contr-

ol

ps

'

Vice

of the

People

By Bill Goodloe, Guest Columnist
Resorting to desperate measure,
miething must be done about
rubber shortage. The situation he proceeded to call every number
ha become acute.
in the city directory under the
I' s already to tne point where
"Hiils" until he finally found the
the first thing your date does is
tread Us right party. After
the tread. If
ins!i she then speaks the you and and explanation hemuch confusion
to
asked her for
O K..
clambers into the vehicle. If your a date. Her lovely Southern drawl
Ui-- i
are about gone and this girl fascinated him but then he rewill .sull go out with you you know membered she was from Ue North.
it's love
..
.
He became
FROM THE MOB:
made rapid investigations . . . and
A certain Kernel worker, who de-- 1
promptly hung up. (This he inmauds to remain unknown, has sists upon
fc

Uiu

panic-strick-

tragic circumAH because this gal's suntan was
he had met a
" permanent. The dusky maiden is
vety interesting gal. "
would-h- e
Hill, but he couldn't remember her piobabiy still waiting for her
lover.
piione numbM.

a victim of
stance. It seems

been

Jay Wilson

."Mrs. Miiuver", a flitting comI've tried to be a good student under war-tim- e
conditions.
panion piece to "Mr. Chips" opens I've attended military
classes regularly each day.'. . I've read
Tuesday at the Kentucky theater,

Tbc

tIw

By

By "Marky

Editor
Managin" Editor
News Editor
Srts Editor
.Society Editor

Jay Wilson
Ann Markwaroi
Hoiston Thomas
Ditk Oiiiim'ik
Doris Sim.lhon

elite's
SPAB2AEDE

Talkie

OWNED AND OPERATED
MEMBER
Asaoclatum
Lnhiffton

MAMOM

Friday, Jwly 17. 1912

.

dan.

is cheated by
phony engineering school he has
a falling out with both Ann and
Dennis which culminated by Ann
walking out on him, and getting a
job at the plant.
Dennis, who needed no encouragement to make a play for Ann,
now goes to it without pulling any
punches. Love entanglements follow and a surprise ending gives zest
to-- the film.
Lloyd Bacon, who has directed
many a hit film, comes across with
another in "Wings For The Eagle."

Hooey
Polloui
Uy Lys Wallace

Wilma Harper and Bob Davis are
at the "butterfly catching staie",
at least, that is what they do with
their spare time anyway.
Sigma Nu "Don" Laslie must
have a priority on cars and women,
for he showed up with a new car
and a new woman, the other day.
SAE Jim Purser lost his pin. and
a girl found it, now that is a new
way to get pinned, but. we hear
that she returned it.
Alphagam Margaret Jare Wayne,
brunette, and blonde Phi Tau Harold Dewr .make quite a pretty combination.
Sigma Nu Bill Blantcn and Delta
Chi Bill Carroll are both that way
about "Lil" Cook.
Kappa Sig Jark Hill is taking
over where brother Fred left off.
as far as romance is concerned.
The girl Pegfry Johnson.
Kappa Kpie Hughes looked quite
charming barefooted in the delude.
We hear she is kinda lonesome for
Squire, who has left for the Navy.
SAE Sunny Hi'll is not goinu to
be left out. He is dating Ireslimin
I illian Bertram.
Chin Ceo arhart ought to be
n
real happy 'cause John Neville
dropped in suddenly to .see her
the other night.
Milt Ticco and Betty Adams
looked mighty happy and mighty
cool out at Castlewood the other
day.
"PreMy Pat" Gable's young man
in the air corps keeps the postman
busy laden down with daily special
delivery letters.
Hol-ma-

book after book on what to do during a blackout. . . Every
spare moment I dash to the movies to catch upon the latest
propaganda about the enemy but I'm discouraged.

-

We've been

fighting

over seven

Poetry

months and the. only constructive
thing I seem to have done is to
drive my best friend's car, instead

To A Blind Date

Not that tire rationing isn't important . . . not that drinking sugarless coffee is bad . . . not that driv- -'

of my own.

"I'm awfully glad I met you.
I've enjoyed your sparkling, "S without gasoline
without my girdle
wit. . .
cuffless
I had a lovely time, indeed, school inbritchesmiddle
the
But Pal, this wasn't it."
are too much to do.

or going
... oror going to
... wearing
of the night

I'm glad to do it but I'm dis'
couraged.
,
Little girl, do you remember
What will all my preparation . . .
Words so soft and sweet?
my sacrifices . . . and my tense
The loving look within my eyes anxiety over the whole affair
When ere we chanced to meet? I still am two submarines, a bomber
or so, and practically a regiment of
The lime you said you'd love me Japs behind "Orphan Annie.- "Al- ley Oop." and the rest of the comic
nt l,.T, nt l,n,rc

Memories?

lc

mA

Little girl, do you remember? cvalry.

... I knew xou

et me wrong . I love the
D00'
would!
comics. It's just this uncertainty
by Ix)is Ann Mnrkwurdt
. . . this daily dread that some poor,
who
unfortunate enemy soldier
has been expertly trained will do

Darn it

Selected

away with one of jny heroes.
Not since Raven
Sherman
dropped out of the war picture
have I been quite the same, and I'm
...
confident that one more obituary
If our eeneration wants to live in Dn tne ."funny page would be a
a decent world, it will work for de- - death blow.
cent peace terms at the end of this
I'm just waiting for. Dag wood to
get his draft papers and I'm going
war.
A "decent" peace is not going to to give them up altogether,
be enough. To construct a demo- Id rather see my best friend
cratic world out of the blood, the leave,
hatred, the chaos of this war, we
must set our sights on peace plans SEEN ROAMIN'
that are more than decent plans
That sign at the Alpha Xi house
that are absolutely revolutionary." still has me worried. The iign
If we try to crush ai.d humiliate "Rooms For Rent."
the German people, or if we slap a
The women in Civilian Defense
haphazard "peace" together and
s
then retire into our shell, we will evacuating their bridge tabL-- to
sell bunds and stamps in booths in
spawn another Hitler, or worse.
Peace is not a mere absence of local stores.
war. Peace is an achievement. And
this time, as last time, the world's
If you think the guy is patriotic
people will be looking to tne United who' gave the government the rein
states .to lead the way.
. coat from his back, what about the.
This time, we won't let them down little baby who gave his little rub- if we really want the kind of ber panties for the. cause. That's
world we say we do.
what I call patriotism.
EMORY WHEEL
BILL GOODLOE

A Decent Peace

College Gapers

.

;

* Friday. July 17, 1042

Fage Three

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Small Training Plane For Bombers

Platter
Chatter

Wandering
Reporter

BY KELLER DUNN

bv Marv Jane Gallaher
Gentlemen Really Prefer Blonds
Fnbanks-Art- s
and Sciences- Junior
No. I don't because I'm pinned to
.a brunette.
Bet
Hair coloring: hasn't anything to
do with ft. It's a girl's personality
that matters. However. I don't like
bMuji 'bottle' blonds.
Dick

'

or

Hillenmeyer-Comtnerce-Seni-

Lovers of Bob Crosby's old Dixie".

George
No, rot unless the blond hair is
accompanied by big blue eyes, which
combine to have a chemical effect
upon, the blood, causing the heart-t- o
beat much faster.
George

man
I'm no gentleman, and, therefore,
in no position to know.
Joe
I dont think they do. Blonds
really havent a thing over
brunettes when it conies to charm,
its Just that they're more striking
at first
- SophoMarvin
Meyers-Commer-

miS

land style will be glad to see th
familiar names of the bobcate
grouped together again unden
"Sweethearts on Parade" and
Muggsy Spanier's great
Chicago trumpet imparts a great
deal of heat and dive to his new
large orchestra in "America Patrol"
which is backed by a very largi
pleasant version of "More Than Yoi

'

"Tip-perar- y".

8

Mil-Und-

twin motored advanced training plane roars over Ellington Field, Texas, where
d
today new pilots are receiving their wings in the Army Air Force. These sharp nosed,
craft have all flying characteristics of the giant bombers the graduating class at the Texas airdrome soon
A

wicked-lookin-

AT-- 9

g

hiunp-backe-

World In Review

I think the

blonds are o. k., but
you usually can get along better
ce

- Sopho-

more

I'm scared of all blonds 'cause
yom east tell which one is really
blond, and which one is artificial.
Don
depends on the blond. Gentlemen fall in love with blonds, but

It

they marry brunettes.

David
Most of the men in the world
have dark hair, and since opposite
Mahanes-Commerce-Jun-

gentlemen must prefer

blonds.

J.

C

Brunettes (1) look better
the're suntanned, (2) look
(31 kiss much
better in bpstk-k-,
better.
James E.
Yes. They're more appealing and
have got something you just cant
put into words.
K. S-- Bruce "Commerce Junior
I'm indifferent to the color of a
girl's hair. They're all alike as far
as hair goes, and I dont really
think it makes any difference.
No.

when

This past week of war in Russia
has seen the Soviet army withdrawing on all fronts, allowing the
Germans to sweep into the Don
River basin and pour in reinforcements in order to develop a pincher
offensive pointed at the Volga River
territory and the Caucasus, the rich
oil fields of the South.
This vast Nazi offensive, definitely aimed at cutting oft the
Caucasus, would sever the
vital Russian supply lines and
would stake off a neat reserve to
rely on for winter conquest.
The parayzing of southern Russia
is a great threat to the Allied nations. The Nazi thrust from the
north, which is meeting with greater
success than that against the British
in the southern battle fields of
northern Africa, tends to join
Rommel's forces in northern Africa;
the British are making this absolutely impossible.
Although the scene looks black in
Russia, the Reds are far from being defeated. They are continuing
strong resistance, despite a grave
""
lack of equipment.
Slowly but definitely, time has
to work against Hitler again.
Tie-g-

'Growing Pains ' Entertaining
As Gay, Youthful Comedy
By Jay
"Growing Pains", a rather clever
comedy on adolescent youth, kept
Guignol patrons literally in stitches
during its brief run here this week.
Braving a heavy downpour on
Monday evening, and sweltering
temperatures on Tuesday
and
"Wednesday evening,
Lexington's
theatre patrons filled the auditorium
dt every performance.
Notioeabiy styled after the "Henry
Aldnch" series, the play was equally as effective.

WO&on

"hyperficial" vocabulary constantly
crew ripples of laughter.
Miss Beth Caddy, as Joe's younger
sister, gave the outstanding
of the evening. Her complete failure to understand the
peculiar quirps of civilization and
its many restrictions on women
was very ably portrayed. Her transfiguration from a "tom-boto a
lovely, young lady was "super."
Muriel Bartholomew and Irving
Joe Famularo creating the awk- Spaulding gave excellent interpreward, young boy whose poise and tations of the flustered parents
creating have failed to keep up who find their "baby boy and girl"
with his age and emotions. His a young man and woman.

STARTING WITH A
SHOW SAT.

MID-MT-

E

SIGNAL CORPS

Tharpe's

holler-shoutin-

INSTALLS PHONE

He must. If he ever expects to make
. By Jnanite Murphy
effort, hammer the Rusan
Field switchboards and telesians to their knees before the next phones,' similar to those used in the
two months slip by.
front line defenses, have been installed on the campus and are operThe great British Eighth Army ated by R. O. T. C. Signal Corps

sv'"---.-f

all-o- ut

received a shot in the arm upon the
arrival of Australian troops in
Egypt. The British have taken the
offensive after being badly manhandled by RommeL
They are glad to see the reappearance of these troops who were born
with their trousers on and are fearless enough to take the chance of
losing against any kind of enemy.
It is hoped that in the very near
future that General Sir Claude
can receive enough
Auchinleck
Supplies to enable him to make a
big scale attack on Rommel before
the Nazi leader is able to resume
the offensive he so surely held a
few weeks ago.
Auchinleck, who took over the
of the Eighth Army
command
from Ritchie, has halted the British
retreat at what might be called the
11th hour and delivered the Allies
from almost sure defeat.

".

'

M

i

students.

Approximately 30 students, sophoand seniors, are now
enrolled in the University Signal
Corps Unit under the direction of
Lieutenant Murray M. Montgomery.
The alloted quota of 200 is expected
to be reached in the fall with the
increase in school enrollment.
The shortage of Signal Corps
Officers in the Army has led to the
establishment of this unit, as well
as about 10 other schools throughout the country.
As officers, these men will never
be required
to operate radios,
switchboards, telegraphs, etc., or to
lay wire, but they will have to know
how such things are done to enable
them to coordinate the efforts and
skill of the specialists who do the
jobs.
This RO.T.C. unit is normally a
four-yecourse, consisting of two
years basic and two years advanc
es training, Dut it has been shorten- ea in me case of Electrical Engi- Dorothy Love Elliot, as a flirta
to
newcomer
the town, urering bemors in order to hasten
tious
deserves special mention for her
frequent" scene stealing. '
Hal Hackett, as the traffic officer,
Lorraine Landrus, the wallflower,
Hogan Trammell, a "wordly wise"
youth, and C. Edwin Barnes, as the
"Homer of Henry Aldrich" all gave
creditable performances.
mores,- Juniors

ar

fcrlfi-

iimwmm'

inn

hi

isminl

KAY KYSER
Kay Kyser organized his first
band while in college. His "College
of Musical Knowledge" program
and his general style have always
been

directed

toward

coll eg

students, which form the bulk of
his following. His movie appearances have been more successfu
than those of most band leaders.

graduation. Under this plan tin
first class will complete the course
in March, 1943.

SAVE ON

ce

y"

mm

.

STARTS TUESDAY
One of the 10 best films
of ell times

MRS. MINIVER
Ann Sheridan
Dennis Morgan
in
WINGS FOR
The EAGLE

-

BY JIM CARROLL

more

rs

py

ce

It depends apM what's under
the blond hair.
Ralph Parmer - Agriculture - Sopho-

attract

hand-clappe-

will be piloting.

more

with brunettes
Ben Punphreys-Commer-

Know".
If your jazz palate has . become
somewhat jaded of late, you mighi.
try getting your kicks from the
band. This group can use al
the commercial tricks, but goes th
older and better-know- n
one better in its slap-haptreatments of such jive tunes at
"Shout, Sister, Shout", and "I Want
a Tall, Skinny Papa" behind RosetU.

with
WALTER P1DGEON
GREER G ARSON
Ends Mon.
in
CROSSROADS

Hear
the Latest

Your
LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANING

It

15

Discount

RECORDS
HEAVENLY HIDEWAY
Horace Heidi
HE 'WEARS A PAIR OF
SILVER WINGS
Kay Kyaur
I'LL EE AROUND
Cab Calloway
SOMETHING TO REMEMBER
. YOU BY
Claude Thornhitl
NOCHE DE LUNA
Xavnr Cugat

Drive in Service

De Boor
Opposite Stadtuu

Now

PomeU-Lama-

rr

E-E-

Laundry

Cleaning

j

* Friday, July 17, 1942

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Pare Four

iOLDIERS TO DECEIVE KERNEL
As a first step toward presenting a dearer picture of the ser- nice of Remuckians in the present war, a list of approximately
1.200 names of former University students in the armed forces
was recently compiled and released.
Prof. Ezra L. Cillis, chairman of a special committee for the
urvey, alphabetized the names and is collecting information
axHit each man's record in preparation for a book to be printed
fallowing the war.
Special effort is being made to obtain additional names of
farmer students now in active duty to complete the list. All men
ifi the armed forces are urged to write to the University so that
a record of their experiences can be compiled.
This issue of the Kernel will be distributed to over a hundred
camps and will be placed in the reading rooms so Kentuckians
gpay have an opportunity to check tlje list and make additions,
r present information about those listed.
Any member of the University who can supply information
concerning former students in the armed forces is urged to see
Frof. Cillis and give him the information.
Serving with Prof. Cillis on the committee for compiling the
names, and records of students are: Prof. J. S. Horine and Miss
Mary Elizabeth Hanson.
Abbot. John William
Abram, Robert V.
Abramson, Ernest Samual
Adair, Allan Percy III
Adair, John Toomey, Jr.
Adams, Clinton Stanley
Adams, Jerry Prank
Adams, Joseph Edwin
Adams, Staley Fields
Adams, William Blake, Jr.
AdHns, James Edward
Albert, Russell Foster
Alcorn, Edward Brydia
Alexander, Prank Owing
Alexander, Harry S troth er
Alexander, John Thomas
Alexander. Julian Cuthbert
Alexander, Lawrence Jackson
Alexander, Vernon Gayle
Alfrey, Malcolm Pershing
Allen, Ermal Glenn
Allen; Inrin Lou la
Allen, Lynn
Allen, Robert Vaughn
Allen, Samuel L.
Allison, Leslie
Almond, Virgil Leroy
Allphln, Robert Hance
Alverson, Robert Marshall
Ames, Charles Carlisle
Ammerman, Howard Kendall
Amyx. William W.
Anderson, Delynn Edward
Anderson, Maurice Edwin
Anderson, Robert L.
Andrews, James Douglas L.
Andrews, James Douglas
Angelucci, Ann and Paul
Anna, Sylvester Benedict, Jr.
Archdeacon, John Smith'
Ardery, Philip Pendleton
Arnall, David Lin wood
Arnold, Carold Knute
Arrowood, Estill
Ashurst, Keen
Aswerus, Phil
Atchison, Arthur Lemial
Bach, Harmon
Bach, Lawrence Earl
Bach, Stanley M,
Bagby, Robert Clyde
Bailey, Henry Clifford
Bailey, Joseph William
Baker, Fred Rogers
Baker, John
Baker, Robert Allen. Jr.
Balden. William Edward
Balden, William Henry
Baldwin. Paul Henry
Banta, Robert R.
Barclay, Lindsey Hatch
Baril, Chas. Alphonse
Barker, Kenneth Alaster, Jr.
Barr, Dr. Robert Haynes
Barrett, Lynn Culley

Bartlett, Ben Taylor
Bartsch, Richard Walter
Baskett, Jesse Shearle
Ba&sham, Harold Frank
Bastin, Henley V. Jr.
Batterton. Roy Joseph, Jr.
Bauer, Albert Charles
'
Baugh, Dan Ragan
Baumgardner, Curtis Wayland
Bayless, Duard Els worth
Beard. Charles Marshall
Beard, Elliott Bondurant
Beasley. Virgil Kinniard
Beck. Edwin Kertley
Bet-ier-,
.Robert Lee, Jr.
Beers, Everett J., Jr.

Begley, James Garfirld
Bell, James Olin.
Bell. Roscoe Leonard
Bellinger, Ellsworth Alphonso
Benson, Graham Holden
Bernstein, Herman
Berry, David Render
Betx, Albert Leslie
Binkley, Wendell Chester
Bishop, William Thomas
Black, David Leon
Black, Maurice Richard
Blain, Jean Hart
Blanchet, Louie Paul, Jr.
Blandford, William Orville
Blue. James Lincoln, Jr.
Blythe, David Knox
Boas, Wiliam Nelson, Jr.
Bode, John Carman
Boles, John Stanley
Boiling, James Pleasant
Bonta, James Cecil
Bonta, James Donald
Booher, George W.
Boone, Hilary Johnson, Jr.
Borden, Robert Penfleld
Borders, Paul Edmund
Borries, Frank Beale
Basse, Joseph William
Botts, Seth Saunders
Bowen, Grey Woodbury
Bowers, Landon Emanual
Bowling, William Arthur
Bowne, Edward, 3rd.
Bowser, Virgil Smith
Boxley, Julian Wendell
Boyd, Bert
Boyd, Charles CJaude
Boyd, Harry Moorman
Boyd, William Jackson
Bozarth, Andra Murrell
Branaman, Edward Wendel
Bratcher, John