xt74mw28b149 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74mw28b149/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky 1974 course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- University of Kentucky Bulletin- General Information for Undergraduates, Vol. 66, No. 5, 1974-1975 text University of Kentucky Bulletin- General Information for Undergraduates, Vol. 66, No. 5, 1974-1975 1974 2013 true xt74mw28b149 section xt74mw28b149       »‘f` F   A '   1       ‘ fw          
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    rl] inclusive by the University of Kentucky 40506.
  ,     Second class postage paid at the Post Office, Lexing-
  l {     ton, Kentucky.
    ll Volume 66 May 1974 Number 5
A * UK Bulletin prepared by the Office of Admissions and Regis-
_   trar, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506.

 S f I f t'
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PUBLICATIONS ornisn 1NF0RMAr1oN
The following oollogos issue com-so and information Specific information about different parts of the Univer-
cuiierihs which may be requested through the dean’s office sity’s program may be ¤btamed by directing inquiries to
of the individual colleges or the Dean of Admissions and members of the administrative staff. The post office address
Registrar is: University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506.
Agriculture Graduate School Tel: 606 258-9OOq . . . .
Allied Health Professions Law General information, admissions, transcripts of credits-
Amhitcctum Libmr Science Dean of Admissions and Registrar
Community College System Mcdicgle Student Affairs—Vice President, Student Affairs
. . Living Accommodations-
Dentistry Nursmg . . . . .
. Hous1ng—Umvers1ty Housing Office
Edufatloil Phaimacy . Dining—University Food Services
Engmcermg . . Sciclal Pmfessmns . A particular college and its program—Dean of the college
The following material also 1S available from the Regis- . . . .
tmI,S Officg Community Colleges—V1ce President of the Community
. . ` . . College System
— f
Unggggy acglgiggtucky Buuetm General Infmmatmn or Graduate Work—Dean of the Graduate School
. .gI . . . . Student Financial Aid-—Director of Student Financial Aid
University of Kentucky Bullet1n—Academ1c POl1C1€S and . . . . . -
Course Dcscriptionv General publications about the Uruversity—Duector of
Schedules of Classcg University Information Services
Fall Semester ` Placement Services—Director of Placement Services
Spring Semester Counseling and Testing Center-Directors of Counseling and
. Testing
Summer Sessions
Extension, Evening and Correspondence Courses—Univer-
COMMUNITY COLLEGES sity EXt€I1SiOIl Office
The University has two-year community colleges at Fort Knox Ccntefr Fort K“OX» K<°=¤t¤<>kY
Ashland, Cumberland, Elizabethtown, Hazard, Henderson,
Hopkinsville, Louisville, Madisonville, Maysville, Paducah, *·rhe ohiycisiry Academic Policies and course Descriptions cafe-
Prestonsburg, Somerset and a Technicallnstitute at Lexing- ;‘;§O;Sghd;%;‘1;t‘g\$i‘;ilfg° Cflnfgfxge`ag;‘i‘?;‘;I:§g::g*£::;isfgtiglj
tOI1. lI`lfOI'I1'1&t1OI1 abOllt the COITlIl'1l.1I11fy College System ghe Gralduate School Office. Additional or replacement copies may
· - . · e purc ased through the University Bookstore.
may be gbtmncq bY contactlng Community College Reference copies are distributed to all high school counselors and
SYSEBITI Off1C€, U1'11V€IS1ty of K€Ilfl1Cky, L€X1I'lgf0I1. public libraries in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
I
2

 I
Sources of Information ................................ 2
Calendar ........................................ 4
The University ..................................... 7
Admission and University Requirements ....................... 11
Fees .......................................... 18
Special Academic Programs .............................. 20
Living Accommodations ................................ 25
Financial Aid ..................................... 29
Libraries ........................................ 35
Student Services and Activities ............................ 37
Cultural Opportunities ................................ 45
Colleges ........................................ 46
Agriculture . ............. . ...................... 47
Allied Health .................................... 48
Architecture ..................................... 5 1
Arts and Sciences .................................. 54
Business and Economics ............................... 61
Dentistry ...................................... 62
Education ...................................... 64
Engineering ..................................... 66
Graduate School ................................... 69
Home Economics .................................. 7l
Law ......................................... 73
Library Science ................................... 75
Medicine ....................................... 76
Nursing ...,................................... 78
Pharmacy ...................................... 80
Social Professions .................................. 81
University Extension ................................. 85
Community Colleges ................................. 91
Index ......................................... 92
Campus Map ...................................... 96
n

 1974 Four-Week Intersession Octgber }5—'§ues;i}nv;I;$?)dJgne_forsapplygng ger ggmisflon or re;
a mission or e prmg emes er or ca egories 0
· _ _ · · · · · _ undergraduate applicants
Apglgnl r·gg0:r?;ys,:n`:ri;111;r£;)rrfigpmngetioge;igu;??3r§;r;5;r?;r;?e October 21—Monday-—Last day to withdraw from the University
annneenrs and receive any refund l _ . I
May 13__M0ndey.Registretien October 29——Tuesday—Last day to pay graduation fee in Billing and
May 14-Tnesdey.C1ess work begins Collections Office for a December. degree
Mey 15..wednesday..LeSt dey to enter en Organized class for the Noggrnber 7—Thursday—Sprmg advising conference for new fresh-
M;;l¥;f;ri§.i(:1I;y_LnSt day to dren e ednrse without e grade November 7jThnrsday—Last day to withdraw from a class before
May 27—Monday—Memorial Day (Academic Holiday) fmal °Xammat{°n$ _ _ _
May 28—Tuesday—Last day to withdraw from University and re- N°"€mb°*` 8“F¤{1aY‘1975 Spring Advismg Cmlference for new
eeive any refund advanced standing (transfer) etudents, Commumty College trans- _
May 28——Tuesday—Last day to withdraw from class before end of fer students- md the Yeadmlsswn   ¤°¤'d€€1`€e Students
session November 11-22——Monday through Friday—Advance registration for
June 1—Deadline for applying for admission or readmission for the 1975 Svnng Semester
1974 Fall Semester for all categories of undergraduate applicants, November 28, 29, 30—Thursday through Saturday—Thanksgiving
other than non-resident freshman applicants, for whom April 1 Holidays (Academic Holidays)
Shall remain as the deediine . December 13—Friday—Class work ends
June 11-Tuesday—End of Four-Week Intersession December 16-21-Monday through Saturday-—Final examinations
June 13—Thursday—Al1 grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4 p.m. December 21—Satu.rday—End of Fall Semester
All grades are due in the Registra.r’s Office by 4 p.m. three days
after final examination is administered.
1974 Summer Session _
1975 Spring Semester
June 1—Deadline for applying for admission or readmission for the _ _ _ _
1974 Fall Semester for all categories of undergraduate applicants, Janflary 13- ]—4°‘M°¤deY and Tue$day‘C1a$$1f1cat¤0¤ and TeE1$tY3‘
other than non-resident freshman applicants, for whom April 1 tum _
Shen rernein es the deadline January 15—Wednesday—C1ass work begins
Jung 10-Mpnday.RegistIe;i0n January 21—Tuesday-—-Last day to enter an organized class for
June 11—Tuesday—Class work begins SPYUIE Semester
June 14——Friday—Last day to enter an organized class for the 1974 January 27_M°¤d¤y_L¤$t dey to die? ii e0\1!Se without 3 Bride
Summer Session February 13—Thursday—Last day for filing application for a May
June 21—Friday-—Last day to drop a course without a grade degree in College De¤¤’S Office
June 24` 25-Monday and TueSday.LaSt days for filing appiiceiipn February 13——Thursday——Last day for payment of registration fees
for an August degree in College Dean’s Office IH order to avoid cancellation of registration
July 1-3-—Monday through Wednesday—Summer Advising Confer- M&ICh.7_FYid3Y_L3S€ day to withdraw from the University and
ence for new Community College transfer students enrolling in Teeeiye any refund
the 1974 Fei} semester March 17-22—Monday through Saturday—Spring Vacation
July 4—Thu.rsday—Independence Day (Academic Holiday) March 24j—Monde.y——Last day to pay graduation fee in Billing and
July 8, 15, 22-—Mondays—-Summer Advising Conference for readmis- C0]-1eeU·°¤$ Office for 8 May degree ,
sign students enrolling in the 19 74 Fai] semester March 31—Monday—Last day to withdraw from a class before finals
Juiy 8-29—M0nday through Thm·sdey—5ummer Advising Confer- April 1—Tuesday—Last date for out-of-state freshmen to submit all
ence for new freshman students enrolling inthe 1974 Fall Semes- igquilfed d0<;\¤¤e1‘1€Stl¢0 §eil;l$g1‘;·8gffiee for admission to either
ter e summer erm or o t e Semester
July 9—Tuesday—Registration automatically cancelled if fees not ADYU 1?T¤eSd¤y—De8dli¤e f01‘f¤PDg1i¤S f0I admisiion OI readmis-
paidin full sion or any summer term or categories o undergraduate
July 10——Wednesday——Last day for paying graduation fees for applicants.
August degree in Billings and Coueetigns Office April 10—Thursday—1975 Summer Session Advising Conference for
July 12, 19, 26——Fridays and Monday-—Summer Advising Confer- new freshmen
ence for new advanced standing (transfer), auditors, and non- APYU 11—F1'idey—1975 Summer Session Advising C0nfeIence for
degree students enrolling in the 1974 Fall Semester new advance standing (transfer) students. Community College
July 23——Tuesday—Lgs1; day to vvithdraw {-mm e class before the end transfer students, and the readmission and non-degree students
of the Summer Session April 14-25—Monday through Friday—Advance registration for
August 6—Tuesday——End of Summer Session 1975 Fall Semester
August 8—'I‘hursday—All grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4 p.m. May 3·$¤f¤!d¤y·‘E¤d of class work
May 5-10—Monday through Saturday—Final examinations
May 10—Saturday-—End of 1975 Spring Semester
May 1é)—lSIatu(rday—Co3111menFement Exercises
une — on ay—Dea ine or apply for admission or readmission
1974 Fan Semester for lthe 1975 Fall Semester for all categories of undergraduate
app icants, other than non-resident freshman a plicants, for
June 3—Monday—Deadline for applying for admission or readmis- whom April 1 shall remain as the deadline D
sion for the 1974 Fall Semester for all categories of under-
graduate applicants, other than non-resident freshman applicants, All grades are due in the Registrar’s Office by 4 p.m. three days {
for whom April 1 shall remain as the deadline after final examination is administered. (
Augu;tdI26, g;—Monday and Tuesday-—-Classification, registration [
an op-a
August 28—Wednesday—Class work begins _
September 2—Monday—Labor Day (Academic Holiday) 1975 Four-Week IUt€i’$eSS10Ti 1
September 3—Tuesday—Last day to enter an organized class for Fall ¤
Semester April 1—Tuesday—Deadline for applying for admission or readmis-
September 9—Monday—Last day to drop a course without a grade sion for any summer term for all categories of undergraduate
September 27—Friday—Last days for filing application for a De- applicants
cember degree in College Dean’s Office May 19—Monday—Registration
4 A

 May 20—Tuesday—Class work begins ; - A   V,  ;,
May 23—Friday—Last day to enter an organized class for the Inter- ` `· -   __2
session  g _ ' V as _,,}f
May 26—Monday—Memorial Day (Academic Holiday) Q J ’  
June 2—Monday—Last day to drop a course without a grade   .. `
June 2—Monday—Deadline for applying for admission or readmis- L   y , » f  
sion for the 1975 Fall Semester for all categories of undergrad- f`f’ _4,_    
uate applicants other than non-resident freshmen applicants, for " ~  ;}gj»r@,_, V ‘* u V' .
whom April 1 is the deadline *’  jr;    ‘ V __  { A  
June 1—Last day to withdraw from class before end of session · _ " ‘V¢>~,€ ;  V ' ` `  
June 1—Last day for payment of registration fees in order to avoid `       f ‘·;_‘
cancellation of registration ‘~\\__   »:e-· ,· 2
. June 4—Wednesday—Last day to withdraw from University and \`~ ‘  
receive any refund Q I   ,
June 17—Tuesday—End of Four-Week Intersession ‘
June 20—Friday—All yades due in R.egistra.r’s Office by 4 p.m. XZ _
1975 Summer Session ·_;   V /4 ·
* s r
Jime 1—Deadline for applying for admission or readmission for the   , ___ L -
1975 Fall Semester for all categories of undergraduate applicants, A   » r * "'  ’ Q  
other than non-resident freshman applicants, for whom April 1   »   v_  . »L_ . \  {
shall remain as the deadline W · ¤` 5-   ·· { _ Qjwd _
June 16—Monday—Registration ‘ _ ·     , ' _     -_ "
June 17—’I'uesday—C1ass work begins ·_ s 2; ’%= ~ ' `{   ;%;{g;_
June 20·—Friday—Last day to enter an organized class for the 1975   -     » K , _ a j;
Summer Session   y I 2;   J ·s A; ;»  
Jl-I-D9 21*-F1’id&Y—L&St day to drop a`c0u.rse without a, grade g;""I§ $*-"‘     _ e ZL -·¤= I QV I
June 30-Monday——La.st day for payment of registration fees in '_ ‘“ Q i aj _`•J? I `
order to avoid cancellation of remstration `L ‘§>,i if · { ‘
July 1—Tuesday—Last day for filing application for an August , ,_ { `\3· .-,
degree in College Dean’s Office     ’   j; }
July—Summer Advising Conference for new Community College "'°- V" _ .' _g;_{ V A`_»i   is-   J
transfer students enrolling in the 1975 Fall Semester {és » _ {  ‘> s?  “  
July—Summer Advising Conference for new freshmen enrolling in ‘ “ _   ·*i§‘_  J
the 1975 Fall Semester   A. I s isi .;
July 4—Friday—lndependence Day (Academic Holiday) ` ~ »"`$: - i »   ‘ Q ` ‘
July 16—Wednesday—Last day to withdraw from University and (  .     _ ` —   · ~, i
receive any refund. (   ‘ V ·
July 17—Thursday—Last day for paying graduation fees for August  JAR ` V ·· ’-’»
degree in Billings and Collections Office < ”V’i*;. V V ` , `» {
July-—Summer Advising Conference for new advanced standing — __ ‘   _ ·g V ,.:,~ ge   _
(transfer), auditor and non-degree students enrolling in the 19 75 ‘ · { ra fi { · .      ~*`
Fell Semester " _ § _ "“ -_ ·
_ July 29—Tuesday—Last day to withdraw from a class before the end "· Q _ 4 , V  {
of the Summer Session   = — ·~· :··~gg·y.»6—»—Qg.q
July—Summer Advising Conference for readmission students enroll- , ;`    
ing in the 1975 Fall Semester .*3, _; `   ·‘   “
August 12-Tuesday—End of 1975 Summer Session , # _`
August 15—Friday—All grades due in Registrar’s Office by 4 p,m.   __ " ° * i (
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V

 Th U ` `ty
A university is a gathering plaoe for those who wish to Have the desire to take a responsible part in the
learn. It is a place where new ideas arise and old ones take society in which hg Oy she [jpg;
on new shapes and colors. For new students it may be
different from anything previously known, having left the These are the marks of an educated man or woman and it
shelter of home and familiar ways of learning and moving is the aim ofthe University to assist the student in attaining
toward a life hwere he or she will have the chance to be them
largely on their own. \_ __ _ _'
It is a place of broad opportunity, where libraries, labora- F5 1 Z I  ·· _ ·“ J sr jg e, _ ~·" ,
tories, and men and women of knowledge are gathered in T ‘ -· • il; g, .   M"?   ~ · ·-·—
one community to afford the student the chance to leam   ‘ T} ; r  7;;   .;- t ’   `  
the best that has been discovered and to develop fully his or _ il · Q ~ 9 ··—.,~}:—· L_ Y * ’ · s. T
her abilities. It is also a place of quiet meditation and ‘_ ~  j_i<.';’_·-   . `T
, shaded walks, of cheering crowds and lively debate, of i V ;'°,j,`—’ _;f»f4.. AT   · .
T people of many interests, and, most importantly, a place     · _;- ,, _ __.
where the student can mature—mentally, physically, and i T b , ‘ lm Y T ’
emotionally. I ,_     _
The search for new knowledge is an unending adventure `    ,   ag ]   f .
in which both the faculty and students take part. This  ·T _   .; ‘ i'f; :·_ _ ,‘   `
seeking results in a continual expansion of information in    ij    »·J `,4?L.‘ .
every field of concern known to mankind, while providing g.     J `}, Z *5 , `
and developing leaders. It is thus that higher education “     .é.·g>°’T;  TT ‘
. . . . . [ g _ .  .4 V siffiee j \»'
carries out its purpose as the chief instrument designed by .   'grl 2 ,_ , _   1;,: §; ·
society to provide the leadership necessary to the upward   ·.  ` ` —   1. A
march of civilization.  · ·   tf    , ` .
On a university campus the student is still taught in the (    ’ ·P.·£`f T" " ·`*€’ °l  lei “  y 
classroom, but is also made more familiar with the other  ,,r_§,v;s·;¤    r _    
places of learning, particularly the libraries and laboratories, _?    4Q[ ,=»· g,_,gQ_ M ” »· . S _ —,;,¥__"    ”  
or workshops. The student may not decide upon a field of   .·   _ , · T Q`  ’ ·  .— A    
study during the first years, but as interests become stable    t,T"e   T"` ._ i rp ‘  ___ ;_·  
and increase in depth, the student reaches out more and I i ` i g    t ,;:iY___!, "`*’T 
more. In advanced courses, undergraduate as well as grad-      
uate, he or she may work with a considerable degree of     r;;f1.Q_§;·h‘-;—i5:aie:;··.·W
independence from the professor. _ —  'ZT4i·,_YTt       °· T —· j
Given these opportunities the University of Kentucky   `           is-i ···t
student should:    ’‘       ,.V·_ §.;2· ~‘T { Tl ` °  `¢ `?·rr;~i _»` ·a .'j‘?‘;s_;Ll1..a “{“.  l
Widen his interests and develop an inquiring atti-   [TQ",  ` t .
tude; aware that "to become a man of learning is an   T . ' ‘ *   i, x, ·
i enterprise ofa lifetime. "  3  ‘  T T    
l _ Gain broad knowledge and understanding as well as TT  T  " T
i   intensive familiarity with his or her main field of .  . T
T  interest and become well prepared for the work , _   g _,__. , .
I ; chosen; have an appreciation for the jiner things of     ». _   _ W
life and possess a moral purpose. Q    'gir `‘ ’  egg  "‘ _·  .." T — ·   ,‘·*f·.»$L
I Learn to see the relationship between one idea and *   _. __T‘ j . I T . TT
another and as a consequence, use logic to overcome {   .‘`‘ 's?` " · -· .-
D bias and to exercise restraint;   -· TT 1 T°   °T'· T         -;      
a Recognize the importance of maintaining physical i T   , ·    T LT ’*{ ,  a  g
i health and vigor; s   [`i ?Qs*=l‘;* .—.» . . F . . s `*°'T"’¥» *‘  ·‘   ·.  fst ._.. .  
7

 THE FOUR FUNCTIONS OF   UNIVERSITY 2. The Research Function
The primary responsibility of an institution of higher It -1S the bus1ness»of·a state university to advance the
. . frontiers of knowledge in all areas of concem to modern
learmng 1S the betterment of human welfare. When the . . ,
. . . . society. Much research, in 0.her words, should be done
University of Kentucky elected to be a university as op- . .
. . . with no compulsion other than the urge to see beyond the
posed to a hberal arts college or professional school, it was , .
. . . . . present borders of man s knowing.
bound by the traditions of American higher education to
. . . . . . On the other hand, the research program of a state  
function in certain ways. Thus, it established itself as a . . . . . . 1
. . . . . university, and particularly a land-grant institution, cannot 1
complex institution with both a liberal arts school and a . . . i
. . . ignore the contemporary requirements of state and nation.
number of professional schools. It committed itself to a . .
. . Rather, the program should be effectively correlated with
broad program of quality research; it embarked upon an . . . .
. . . . non-tuuversity research, and it should seek solutions to the
extensive program Of gmduatc Studies; and It dcdlcatcd acute problems of society whether tl1ey are economic tech-
itself to accumulating and preserving knowledge and to nolo bal Social cultumlor moral
maintaining an atmosphere which would contribute to high g1 ’ ’ `
mteuectual cndcavm-' 3. The Extended Services Function
1. The Teaching Function
The state university has found that it cannot have the
-Out of the undergraduate colleges and the graduate desired impact on society unless its teaching is extended
schools of America come the greater portion of the nation’s beyond the campus classroom, unless its research is in some
leaders and its better citizens. The curricula of a state measure translated into economic and social improvements,
university should be so designed and its teachings so direct- and unless it leadership and example elevate the cultural
ed that the state and the nation will have more men and and moral tone of the nearer and farther communities in
women of intellectual interest and achievements; men and which it has its setting.
women possessing character, ideas, ingenuity, moral respon- _ _
sibility, and general competence; men and women who can 4* The Library Functmn
provide the knowledge and technical skills to cope with a _ _ _ _ _
national and world situation growing ever more complex W1th°Pt an _ad°qu?t€ hbmry °°H°°t1°“· a_ umvcrslty
and difficulg would find it impossible to perform its teaching and re-
search functions properly. But over and above these
r p   y          Q requirements, the preservation of books and other materials
S ~  ,;,·,  ·¢'F’=   g   is a vital function of society.
I   ji .l° ·     ,,   DIVISIONS AND BUREAUS
’ % c     Q .  ,__ In contributing to the welfare of the state through re-
   Yg, V » ‘       search, experimentation, and public service, departments
~**`   . , .   ”     make important contributions. In addition, certain divisions
_ t , ·   i     and bureaus have been established specifically for these
I           purposes. Included in this group are the Experiment Station
  V.       ,  , ·’ .rij {gt?  and the Cooperative Extension Service of the College of
,—,_, x   —   i ':"1‘ ‘ O — "T   [  m y   Agriculture, the Office of Development Service and Busi-
  -bt;-y . Ak,  ji    ,_  ness Research, the Bureau of Government Research, the
gjfgi     _ 1 ‘ .  >t S  “/V   ` ;,l   Bureau of School Services, the University and Educational
‘”         , H * LQ. `       Archives, the University Placement Service, The University
  \\ _,  Press of Kentucky, Telecommunications Studios, the In-
.   ·.‘‘ ”` __     "  :,'Y éi{ _ . dependent Study Program, the Extension Class Program,
JQ i          Y the Evening Class Program, the Community College System,
  > A   ,5* " the Audio-Visual Services, the Department of University
 ·‘ ` '   Information Services, the Engineering Experiment Station,
  " the Kentucky Research Foundation, the Child Guidance
¤;;;j·¤¤, Service, the Social Research Consultation Service, the .
  — , _ University Hospital and related services, the Bureau of
    ‘ ‘   Community Service (Sociology), the Computing Center,  
. y A » Conferences and Institutes, the Council on Aging, the ?_
g .   Donovan Senior Citizens Fellowship Program, the Ken- >
1 _   tucky High School Speech League, the Civil Defense Pro-
. · _ gram, the Continuing Education Program, the University l
Center for the Handicapped, the Office of Pre-Admissions, f
Q Y  , I the Center for Learning Resources for Allied Health, and
‘* · I the Institute for Planning and Administration.
8

 - ·.   yi is _  ’·’ _»,`~` er 1 l_ ‘·. Q    
Over a century ago the miracle of publ