xt74qr4nm18g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74qr4nm18g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19360616  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June 16, 1936 text The Kentucky Kernel, June 16, 1936 1936 2013 true xt74qr4nm18g section xt74qr4nm18g Best Copy Available

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KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

NEW SERIES NO.

16. 19.16

I

RECORD ENROLLMENT INDICATED
SENIORS JOIN ALUMNI HANKS

CLUBS END

4-- 11

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Registration Is 14
WILL SPEAK AT
Over 1935 Period
CONVOCATION

DOCTOR McVEY

iiniii

WEEK'S MEETING
AT UNIVERSITY
719

Attend Sixteenth Annual
Junior Week of State

NINETY-

-

FIVE

"Streamlining in the Arts and
Literature" will be Subject of President's

m

Clubs; Officers
Elected

COUNTIES

Nearly 600 Kentucky farm youths
were on the campus last week at-

tending the sixteenth annual Junior week of the Kentucky Associaclubs which
tion of Junior
closed Friday night. Hie representatives were quartered while
here In University dormitories.
Officers elerd at the closing
meeting Friday night were El wood
O'Neal, Gallatin county, president;
Mary O. Carman, Fayette county,
and Laura Johnson,
4-- H

I

5

--

Keen Johnson, president of Alumni association accepts check from 1936 seniors enrolling them ui
alumni ranks.
Lieut.-Oo- v.
Left to right: Robert Hensley, treasurer of senior class; Frances Kerr,
Keen Johnson; Elvis J. Stahr, .president, and R. K. Salycrs, secretary of Alumni association.

Conferring of Degrees On 342 Members
Of 1936 Graduating Class Is Climax of
Commencement Week; Parren Speaks

4-- H

PALMER ACCEPTS
GOVERNMENT JOB
Dr. E. Z. Palmer, associate professor of economics in the College
of Commerce, left Lexington Saturday for Philadelphia where he has
accepted a position as senior industrial economist on a national government project on "Reemployment
opportunities and recent changes in
Industrial Technique."
Daring Doctor Palmer's absence,
his classes will be conducted by Dr.
C. C. Carpenter, also a member cf
the faculty of the College of Commerce.

i

t

RO.T.C Joniors to
Train at Fort Knox
Commissioned Officers

tlr.

Aho Will Undergo Train-

The 1936 Commencement activities were climaxed Friday, June 5,
with the presentation of diplomas
to 342 graduating members of the
senior class, in the Alumni gymnasium.
About 3,000 visitors were
present to hear Dr. Thomas Parren, Sugeon-Generof the United
States, deliver the principal address.
Baccalaureate services for the
graduates was held the day before
In Memorial hall when the Rev.
McDay H. Lichliter, DD.. pastor of
the First Congregational church,
Columbus. Ohio, spoke on "The
Voice of Promethus."
Before that many other special
features had contributed toward
making it one of the most successful commencements in the University's history.
Alumni class day, in which the
class of '34 and all classes ending in
"1" and "6," participated. For the
first time in the history of the
school, the senior class turned over
to the alumni president, a 100 per
cent record of enrollment in the
alumni group. In impressive ceremonies, Elvis J. Stahr, senior president, presented Lt. - Gov. Keen
Johnson a check for dues into the
alumni body.
al

WOMAN

LEADER

TO APPEAR HERE

newly commissioned
sity and 56 junior R. O. T. C. men
second lieutenants from the Univer-wi- ll
entrain for Fort Knox Wednes- Mme. Marie Michelet, Interday to undergo a period of training
nationally Known Head of
at that government post.
Women's Organizations, to
The period for the new officers
Address Groups.
ladts 15 days beginning June 17, and
the junior men will be at camp tor
Mme. Marie Michelet, of Oslo,
six weeks, beginning the same date
Most of the cadets will entrain in Norway, a noted leader among the
Lexington Wednesday.
women of the Scandinavian countries and one of the great women
of the world, will be the principal
speaker for the Home Economics
conference to be held on the campus
narty-eig-

ht

Sulzer to Attend
Radio Institute

of Kentucky studios
of radio station WHA3. Louisville,
will salute the Radio Institute to be
held In Jackson, June 18, 19 and 20,
with a broadcast of "The Invention
of the Cotton Oln." and educational dramatization In a series which
ran weekly this spring and which
bore the general title, "Epoch Discoveries of the East."
The broadcast will be critically
analysed and discussed by the Institute from an educational point
of view. Elmer O. Sulzer, director
of tne University studios, will atUniversity

June

17, 18

and

IS.

Madame Michelet is honorary
president of the Norwegian Housewife association, president of the
Scandinavian Housewife association and
of the
Country Women of the World. She
is In the United States at present
to attend the convention of the
Associated Women of the World,
which met in Washington, D. C,
the first week In June.
Mrs. Michelet will speak to the
tend.
Home Economics students at 11:15
Directors of all of the 23 listena. m., June 17, 18 and 19, In Room
ing centers maintained by the Uni- 202, Agriculture
building.
The
versity studios have been Invited to theme of her lectures will be on
"Woman's Contribution to the Present Situation." These lectures will
BARRON TO STUDY
be open to the public.

IN LONDON, PARIS

Jaaeph Barron, lecturer In the
hMury of art at the University, has
lets granted a summer scholarship
fc
graduate study by the Institute
f International Education, New
York City. This graduate study In
at history of art will be at the
of Art and Archaeology of
University of Paris, and at
of
mm Oourtauld Institute of Art In
In-M- at

I

Mrs. Michelet will also speuk to
the students In the class "Advisers
of Girls and Deans of Women" on
Friday morning at 8:25, Room 204,
Administration building.
The Fayette County homcinakers
will entertain in honor of Mrs.
Michelet at 4 p. in. Thursday. The
International Affairs Study Class
of the University of Kentucky will
give a dinner In her honor on Wednesday evening, June 17. at 6:30
o'clock In Uie University Commons.

were
Commencement
exercises
bezun at 10 a. m. President McVey
presided and introduced the speak
er. Doctor Parren, whose subject
was "Prologues." Dr. Warner Hall,
pastor of the Maxwell Street Presbyterian church, delivered the benediction and invocation. Music was
provided by the University Philharmonic orchestra and the Men's
Glee club.
Following the principal address,
degrees were conferred upon the
graduates by President McVey. The
class then took the senior pledge.
The singing of .Alma Mater by the
entire group closed the ceremonies.
Marshall for the day was
B. E. Brewer. Classes, degrees
and faculty members were marched
into the hall according to their

Well-Know-

E STUDENTS

GET POSITIONS

Marjorie Fieber
Represents State
At N.C. Festival
1936

Graduate Is Kentucky's
Official Sponsor at
Laurel Festival

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rank.

.

5

Wednesday night preceding the
exercises, the annual senior ball was
held in honor of graduates In the
Music was
Alumni gymnasium.
furnished by Johnny Hamp and his
orchestra. The senior ball queen
was Wllma Taylor, Louisville, a
member of the graduating class.

Lecturers
Will be Here for First

Four

Dr. Frank L. McVey, president of
the University, will be the speaker
at the first convocation to be held
during the summer session, at 10
a. m. Thursday, June 18, In Memorial hall. Doctor McVey's subject will be "Streamlining in the j
Arts and Literature."
Dr. Jesse Adams, professor of the
philosophy of education, and director of the summer session, will
preside and introduce President
McVey.
New and old summer students will be welcomed to the University.
. AOAHff
OCSS
Included on the stage will be the
deans of the various colleges, Dr.
Dr. Jesse Adams, professor of
Paul P. Boyd, arts and sciences; Dr.
the philosophy of education, is
Edward Wiest, commerce; Dr. WilDirector of the 1936 summer
liam Taylor, education; Dr. Wilsession.
liam Funkhouser, graduate school;
Mrs. Sarah Holmes, dean of women, and Dr. T. T. Jones, dean of
men.
Another feature of the assembly
will be group singing to be led by
Miss Mildred Lewis of the Department of Music.

Lt.-C-

University To Be
Host To Visiting
Faculty Members
i

ing Period

I

er and he was introduced by Lt.- -i
Gov. Keen Johnson, president of the
alumni group, who presided.

The military field day, held on
Stoll field, May 27, In which the entire corps of cadets were reviewed
by officers of the United States
army and senior cadets were presented commissions as second lieutenants in the Officers Reserve
Corps. Recently, President McVey
received notification from Fifth
Corps area headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, that the rating of the
University Corps was adjudged "excellent."
Alumni day was held Thursday,
June 4. It opened with registration
at 9 a. m. Class day exercises were
held at 10 a. m., class reunion
luncheon at noon, baccalaureate
services at 3 p. m., tea for alumni
at Maxwell Place and the alumni
banquet at 7 o'clock at the Lafayette
hotel. A. B. Chandler, governor of
Kentucky, was the principal speaks

n

HISTORY GROUPS

Two Weeks
Four prominent visiting lecturers will come to the campus this
week and next,, for the first term
of the 1936 summer session, and will
deliver addresses and hold conferences In their special fields.
Dr. Spafford Ackerly, Louisville,
a member of the staff of the University of Louisville Medical school;
Madame Marie Michelet, Oslo, Norway, a noted leader among women
of the Scandinavian countries; Dr.
Arthur C. Cole, Cleveland, Ohio,
professor of History at Western Reserve University, and Dr. Malcolm
MacLean, Minneapolis, Minn., dean
of the general college at the University of Minnesota, are the visiting professors and lecturers who
will feature the first two weeks of
the summer term which opens at
the University Monday.
Doctor Ackerley will be on the
campus Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday of this week and will
discuss "Mental Hygiene" oa these
three days before the School for
Doctor Ackerley
Health Officers.
Is a psychiatrist and specialist In
mental hygiene.
Madame Marie Michelet will be
here Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of this week and will speak to
the home econpmlcs students at
11:15 a. m. each of the three mornings in Room 202 of the Agriculture
building. The theme of her lecturers will be "Woman's Contribution to the Present Situation." She
will be the principal speaker at the
home economics conference and will
also speak to students In the class
"Advisers of Girls and Deans of
Women" Friday at 8:25 a. m. in
Room 204 of the Administration
building.
Fayette County
will entertain with a tea In
honor of Madame Michelet at 4 p.
m. Thursday, and Wednesday night
the International Affairs class of
the University will give a dinner In
her honor at 6:30 o'clock In the
University Commons.
(Contuiuvd on Page Three)
Home-make-

rs

WILL HEAR COLE

Marjorie Fieber, a graduate of
the University in June, left yesterday for Asheville, N. C. where she
Editor-AuthWill be Prin- will be the official sponsor of the
state
the ninth
cipal Speaker at Third An- nual of Kentucky at festival to anbe
Rhododendron
nual Historical Conference held there from June 15 to 19.
' Miss Fieber, the daughter of Mr.
Here.
or

Dr. Arthur C. Cole will be the visiting lecturer at the third annual
Historical conference to be held on
the campus Thursday and Friday,
June 18 and 19, under the auspices
of the Department of History at
the University.
Doctor Cole, who holds his Ph. D.
is a member of the faculty at Western Reserve University. He is editor of the Mississippi Valley Historical Review, and the author of
several works, including "The Whig

Party In the South" and "The

Ir-

repressible Conflict."
He will speak during the two-da- y
period to various groups on
subjects of interest to students of
history. On Thursday he will speak
on three occasions, concluding the
day's activities with an address at
8 o'clock in the auditorium of the
Training School.
Friday he will speak twice, at
11:15 a. m. and at 3 p. m., both
times in Room 303, Frazee hall. His
subjects will be of wide range in
subject matter.

j

Announcements
Announcements from the office of the Dean of Men follow
Fraternities are urged to make
:

their report to this

oflit--

tely.

Wanted: Engineering student
for two day. Apto
ply to this office by 8:30 a. m.
today.
copy-map-

'and

Mrs. C. W. Fieber. Nicholas- ville, was chosen for this honor from
among all the women students attending the University during the
past year. She was appointed by
Oov. A. B. Chandler.
A member of Delta Delta Delta
social sorority, Miss Fieber has been
outstanding during her undergraduate days. She has been a
year book beauty, an R. O.
T. C. sponsor, and has held numerous other positions of honor.
Ken-tucki- an

100

fered;

'X:Y7

V;

CurLar-

Courses Will be OfFaculty Numbers
173 Members

Over

Deans Will be on Speaker's
Platform; Miss Lewis to
Lead Singing

President

Officials ExpresH View
rent Session Will be
gest in University's

IMPORTANT DATES
ARE ANNOUNCED

JESSE ADAMS WILL
PRESIDE AT ASSEMBLY

DR.

Etwaod O'Neal, Gallatin County Youth, Is New

Slmpnon county, secretary-treasure- r.
They were inducted by T. R.
Bryant, assistant director of the
Department of Extension, of the
College of Agriculture.
Winners of the farm demonstrations were Robert Kirby and Paml
Davie, Warren county. The award
for the championship of the home
demonstrations was won by Jewel
Moore and Frances Farmer, Jackson county.
The medal presented to the most
outstanding girl in home economics
by Phi Upsilon Omicron, honorary
home economics society, was won by
county.
Joyce Cotton,
Madison
Winner of the award which goes to
club member
the outstanding
was Robert Kirby, Warren county.
While attendance of youths was
nearly 600, the actual number was
county
much higher. Eighty-nin- e
agents, 33 county home demonstration agents, 30 women leaders, five
men leaders, added to the 301 boys
and 861 girls makes the total atcounties
tendance 719. Ninety-fiv- e
represented.

DIRECTOR

Talk

HAVE REPRESENTATIVES

Y

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1936

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, JUNE

VOL XXVI.

i

OP

WELCOME

Department of Bacteriology
Places Nine Students
In Various
Positions
Nine students in the Department
of Bacteriology, Including seven who
were graduated at the June commencement exercises and two who
will be candidates tec degrees at
the August commencement, have
already been placed in positions,
according to Dr. Morris Scherago,
head of the Department of Bacteriology at the University.
Tom Snyder, Lexington, who will
be a candidate for the master's degree in Bacteriology at the August
commencement,
has accepted a
teaching fellowship at the University of Cincinnati Medical school
for the coming year. J. L. Stokes,
Irvington, N. J., who received his
M. S. in Bacteriology in June, has
accepted a research fellowship In
marine bacteriology, the first part
of which will be spent in work at
Woods Hole, Mass., this summer,
following which he will go to Rutgers University for several months'
work.
Elizabeth Jolly, Lexington, who
received her M. S. in Bacteriology
in June, is medican technologist for
the Lexington Public Health Center. John Brumeclc, Lexington, who
has his B. S. in Bacteriology, is
technician on the staff at the Good
Samaritan hospital. Susan Johnston, Lexington, who also received
her B. S. in Bacteriology In June,
will be at the Lexington Clinic assisting Dr. E. S. Maxwell.
Robert Lubitz, New Haven, Conn.,
who also has obtained his B. S.
degree, will continue his work in
the Graduate School. Seymour
Panzer, New York City, plans to do
graduate work in bacteriology at the
Michigan State Graduate School.
Henry Harris, Franklin, who was
graduated with honors in June, and
who also received departmental
honors in bacteriology, will study
at the Vanderbilt medical school.
Edna Smith, Lexington, who will be
a candidate for an M. S. in Bacteriology in August, is city bacteriologist at Jefferson City, Mo.

Indications were yesterday afternoon as the first day of registration
was completed, that attendance figures would exceed those of a year
ago when enrollment was doubled
over any previous year. Fourteen-hundrand seventy-nin- e
had registered at 4 p. m. when the office
closed.
That the 1,720 enrollment record
established last summer would be
surpassed is thought to be almost
a certainty by registration officials.
The last date upon which a student
may register is Monday, June 22, it
was announced.
Dr. Jesse Adams, director of the
summer school session, declared yesterday that requirements to fill the
needs of the Increased number of
students would be filled. Almost 400
courses In every field of work will
be taught under the supervision of
175 University and visiting faculty
members.
A wide range of
activities will also be available to
all students, lt has been announced,
including concerts, lectures by noted
speakers, social affairs, and other
special events.
Both the men's and women's dormitories are open to students and
meals may be obtained at the University Commons on the third floor
of McVey hall. The first session will
close July 18.
Three convocations will be given
this term. The opening assembly
will be held Thursday, June 18, when
Dr. Frank L. McVey, president of
the University, will greet the new
students. Gov. A. B. Chandler, chief
executive of the state, will be the
speaker of the last convocation, July
8.
The Coffer-Mill- er
players will
also appear here for convocation
ed

extra-curricul- ar

July

2.

Courses given during the summer
are designed primarily to meet the
needs of teachers who wish addi
tional training in their special fields
and who desire to work for degrees,
either bachelor, masters, or doctors
Teachers in public, private,
and
parochial schools, supervisors,
college Instructors in all lines
cipals, superintendents, college and
of work will be available during tui
te
summer.
work to
enable college students to make up
lost work or advance their standing
is also on the program.
Among the
activities of a social nature is the annual
summer school picnic to be held at
the Lexington reservoir June 30. A
summer school party has also been
planned by Mrs. Sarah Holmes,
dean of women, to take place June
27 in Patterson hall.
prin-juni-

or

Under-gradua-

extra-curricu- lar

Museum Will be Open
To Summer Students
Hours of Anthropology, Archaeology Display Are
Announced
The museum of the Department
of Anthropology and Archaeology
will be open to summer school students four days a week, lt was announced by Julian Boxley, summer
custodian.
Prehistoric skeletal remains of various types and ages are among the
many interesting pieces of display
being shown. The skeletons of centur-

Indians, pottery, horns
and other interesting historical artifacts will be shown.
Hours which the museum will be
open are as follows: Tuesday, 3 to
5 p. m.; Wednesday, 10 to 12 a. m.;
Friday, 3 to 5 p. m., and Sunday, S
y-dead

of Kernel Will
Break Six Years of Silence

Today9 s Edition

Kernel, will also act as editor of the
Ross Chepeleff,
Breaking a silence of six years, summer edition.
today's issue of the Kentucky Ker- when he gets back from a visit to
nel bursts forth for the first time his home in Quiucy, Massachusetts,
In a summer school session since will be managing editor. James
Haglt-- r
has abandoned the comAugust 22. 1930.
It was baik in the heydey of 1927 fortable coolness of his Minnesota
that a summer edition of the Ker- home to be business manuger.
The Kernel will appear weekly
nel was first conceived. Despite the
sununer heat and heavy summer and will be placed in each student's
sucmail box. Publication day is Tuesschool work the paper was a
day.
cess.
Following the edition of 1927 other
ATTEND! PKESS MI.ET
editions appeared in 1928, 1929, and
1930 including the issue of July 4,
Victor R. Portmann, associate
1930. The summer Kernel went into hibernation after 1930 not to professor of Journalism, has returned to his duties here alter atblossom out again until today.
Summer publications will be un- tending the summer meeting of the
der the supervision of Jes.se E. Kentucky Press association at DanProfessor Portmann Is a
Adams, head of the summer school ville.
e,
member of the executive committee
session. George M. Spencer,
ef
of next year's of the association.

to

5 p.

m.

By BELMONT RAMSEY

Beat-tyvill-

editor-in-chi-

K. O. T. C. "EXCELLENT"

Dr. Frank L. McVey, president
of the University, Saturday was
notified that the R. O. T. C. unit at
the University had been given a
rating of "excellent" as the result
of the annual inspection held here
May 20.
UBItAKY

PHIZES AWARDED

Henry H. Hornsby, Lexington, has
been selected as the winner of the
first prize of $30 in the first annual
library contest sponsored by Judge
Samuel M. Wilson, Lexington, lt
was announced at commencement
exercises. Second place In the contest, carrying an award of 120, was
won by Philip E. Haring, Hatfield,
Pa.

* Best Cop
THE KENTUCKY

Page Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
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from its halls to do their woik within the state
and are today found in eery community woik-inr
effectively to make the institution
thoroughly understood.
known and more
Gradually over the yeais of infiltration of
these bundled, of giaduates will leaven the
Kentucky will tealie the value
whole lump.
of the University and of the entire educational
sxsteni, and moie and more of the necessary
funds will be provided for the supott of the
sc liools.
I he legislature
neei has appropiiated an
adecpiate amount1 in am one year considering
the gieat demands iiwm t lie University and the
need of more rapid expansion, but the time i
coming At hen the leadership which Doctor
has given, and the services which the faculThe sm
ties have rendered, will be rewarded.
dents going out year bv year arc advance agents
Lexington I. aider.
of higher ccluration.-7- 7r
Mc-Vc-

TELephones:
News. 9 ft. m. to 4 p. m., Univ.
Sun138. Business, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., Univ. 74.
days and after hours, city 2724.

HERE SHALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN

GENERAL ANNOUNGEMI

WELCOME
For the first time in six yean, 77iir Kernel, as
the official organ of the student lxxly, is again
able to welcome visiting faculty members and
students.
It is glad of the opportunity to be
able to do so, and it will adapt its jnilicies according to the needs of summer session students.
For a jx'iiod of five or ten weeks the University will be the "cxjHiinient station" of many
students new to the campus or to the state. It
is to be noicd that the students who attend in
order to improve their sensibilities and their
cultural individualisms, find the means offered
to be ample in order that they may do so.
Prf.ident McVcy has said, "The University
is a spirit." We believe this, and we believe
that the spirit of a great summer session is able
to cast the white light of knowledge to all
who are willing to bask in its rays.

THE FUTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY

N

Xotice to Students
Classes begin today. Registration will continue for students arriving Lite until Monday.
June 22. June 22 is also the last date upon
which a student may be droped without a
grade. The last date uon which a change can
be made in registration or schedule is June 19.

Library
The Library building will be ocncd at 7
a. m., this including the loan desk and reserve
reading rooms, and departments will be ociied
at 8 A. M. Closing is at 10 o'clock eac h night except Saturday and' Sunday. Hours for the se
two days arc from 2 until 5:."0 P. m.
,S
hedule
Spallord Ackerly. mental hygiene
Ji nf. 10-- Dr.
lecturer, will address Public Health school.
Jine 17 At 11:15 a. m.. Mine. Marie Michelet
will address home economic students in Room
202, Agriculture building (just west of Memorial hall). A dinner in Madame Mithe-let'- s
honor will be given at fi:30 o'clock in the
University Commons.
Frank L. McVey, president of the
Jine 18-- Dr.
University, will be convocation speaker at 10
a. m. At 11:15 a. m., Dr. Arthur C. Cole will
lecture to history students in Room 302. Fra-zehall. At 11:15 a. m. also, Macamc Michelet w ill sjjeak in Room 202, Agriculture building . Doctor Cole will lecture again at 3 p. m.
in Frazce hall and at 8 o'clock in the Training School auditorium. Madame Michelet
will be the guest of the Fayette County Home-maker- s
at 4 P. m.
Michelet will again address
June
home economic students at 11:15 a. m. Doctor
Cole will speak in Room 302, Fraz.ee hall, at
1 1 : 15 a. m. and again at 3 p. m.
Snorts: Camfeatures:
June
Kastle hall. City
pus tennis courts behind
Entertainment:
Swimming.
golf courses.
theatres.
Downtown
services in all Lexington

The commencement exercises at the University of Kentucky in l'J.'ifi marked the 69th year
of the institution's life. Growth has characterized its record, a growth that has been more
marked than in any other period during the
presidency of Dr. Frank L. McVey, regarded as
one of the four or five preeminent educators of
the United States.
The development of the institution has not
been confined to matters physical. There has
been a constant addition to the number of campus buildings and the facilities of the colleges
have been greatly improved.
But at the same
time there has been substantial progress in
things spiritual and intangible, in the prestige
of the University, in the spirit of devotion on the
part of faculty and students, in matters of discipline, in morale and moral strength and energy, and in the standing of the crown of the
whole educational system in the state itself, indicating a better appreciation of its functions
and its indispcnsability.
Doctor McVey, always working steadily and June
quietly, sound in judgment, sure in his movechurches.
ments, strong, dignified, able, and persistent, has
more and more commended thq University to
At last Representative ZioZncheck has had to
every section of the state and endeared himself
be taken to a hospital for observation. His conto its people, not easily won but once jeisiiaded
duct got so eccentric that it was noticeable even
always loyal.
New Yorker.
in Washington.-T- i?
This year 312 students received degrees. Not
all of them, unfortunately, will carry on their
"And yet the paradox of the situation is that,
life work in the state. Many will scatter and
now, when we most need freedom and fearlessfind careers elsewhere, even those born and
the school's handling of the basic issues
reared in Kentucky. The opportunities for em- ness in
of the time, waves of popular hysteria against a
ployment in business, the professions, and the
and fearless scholarship begin to beat over
crafts are limited. Kentucky's resources have free
Glenn Frank of Wisconsin.
the schools."-- Pr.
not been developed as rapidly as have those of
other stales, and it still remains rural in the
We don't see why they took the prize away
character of its population and its activities.
essay
But each year for many years large numbers from the boy who won Eddie Cantor's
lad copied his essay
of young people who have gone through the contest just because the
logifrom somebody else. What could be more
University courses and have learned to apprecontest sponsored by a radio comedian?
ciate the real worth of the institution and the cal in a
Minnesota Daily.
supreme values of higher education, have gone
e

NEW AND USED PORTABLES
NOTEBOOKS 5c AND UP
U OF K STATIONERY 25c
o FOUNTAIN PENS
TENNIS RACQUETS, BALLS AND SHOES
KENTUCKY EMBLEM

SHIRTS
50c

Campus Book Store
McVey Hall

Tuesday. June 16, 1956
UK-WHA-

that

this
campus

w or 1 d

gram for High School Boys and
girls." by J. D. Will lams, director. University High School.

S

are given here which
will be of interest to
LANCASTER ACCEPTS
summer school students. They extend from today through next MonOWENSBORO POSITION
Programs

are thought
day

ad

Today
Max Lancaster, son of Mr.
Mrs. W. H. Lancaster, of DrtnvlBe,
to 12:30 p. m. Bourbon Counhas accepted a position on the adty H Club program.
We wrinkled a troubled brow over three magazine articles we rend 100 to 1:15 p. m. Andy Andervertising and news staff of
Mr. Lancaster
Dally Messenger.
recently; the chagrin, rather, was caused by two of them, the other brliiK
son's orchestra.
f
University
of a more gratifying nature. Recurrently, we note such pieces as these 1:15 to 1:30 p. m. "Journalism for graduated from the
Kentucky. Lexington, last Prldwy,
Laymen," No. 5. by Marguerite
particular two. and because of their triteness and general premature atMclaughlin, assistant professor June 9, with the A. B. degree, matitude, pass them by. Lately, however, there seems to have come about
He waa a
joring in Journalism.
of Journalism.
an unloading sif stories of this type upon the periodical mart, and we
member of Delta Sigma Chi, honWednesday, June 17
orary Journalism fraternity, and
Intend (In a modest way, of course) to try to set right some of the pscmla-author- s 12:15 to 12:30 p. m (ft)
Dairy Talk, assistant editor and sporta writer
of such malignantly oplonatcd sketches.
by H B. Morrison, instructor In on the Kentucky Kernel,
ly
cb) "Timely Pointers
The first of these, which appears under the paradoxical title. "LowDairying,
university newspaper.
Mr.
for the Sheep Ilnlser." by R. C. Lancaster is a young man of great
ering Higher Education," Is pub-Miller, field agent In Animal Hus- promise and has the training and
lished in the current Issue of 8crlb
A. "I was one of a large family
bandry.
ner's. It Is wholly directed against and our income didn't permit It."
ability to make a good newspapw
1:00 to 1:15 p. m. Wesley Morgan, man. We Rre pleased to have Mm
slate universities; in fact the sub
Q. "Well now, Mr. Doe. suppose
cellist.
title is, "The State Universities Face you had to go to college?"
on the staff of the Daily Messen1:15 to 1:30 p. m. Dramattrfetlon
an Acid Test." Its author begins by
ger. Owensboro Dally Messendw.
A. "It would have been an ecoHigh School Graduate Looks
launching a bitter attack because nomic hardship on my
"The
father."
No. 7, directed by
to the Future,"
state universities are not offering
Q. "Do you believe you would
Robert Maloney.
scholarships to enable worthwhile have got to your present position if
but penniless students to obtain a you had gone to college?"
Thursday, June 18
With the result,
higher education.
12:15 to 12:30 p. m. "Cherry GrowA. "I do not."
financially
says he, that the able
ing in Kentucky," by C .8. Walt-ma- n,
Q. "In other words, you owe your
but inferior intellectually are forc- success to not being a college man."
Welch,
Jessamine
N.
instructor in Horticulture.
Robert
scholaring down the standards of
1:00 to 1:15 p. m. The Collegians.
A. "Yes."
county, for the past year graduate
ship. He declares. "The depression
(It should be understood of course 1:15 to 1:30 p. m. "Our Finance assistant in the Department of Gedid not cause, but merely accelerProblems, No. 1. by Rodman Sulso Mr. that there is some textual matter
ate, this tendency." Ah,
ology, has been the recipient of the
livan, assistant professor of ecointerspersed lightly throughout the
Norman Foerstcr has heard of th
nomics.
John A. Bownocker scholarship in
dialogue.)
depression.
Friday, June 19
the field of geology. He will atAll of which proves simply that
I wonder if Mr. Foerster realizes
returns 12:15 to 12:30 p. m. "What Farm tend Ohio State University to do
law of diminishing
exactly what the depression has the
Folk are Asking," by L. C. Brew- further graduate work.
I properly interrelated with the quaddone to our state universities?
While an undergraduate, Welch,
er, College of Agriculture.
ripartite differentia of language, and
wonder If he realizes how adminCola member of Delta Tau Delta, was
istrative officers have torn their coupled with a light case of illegal 1:00 to 1:15 p. m. Kentucky
with the Men's Student
onels.
hair over budget reductions In or- purpose of communication taken 1:15 to 1:3