xt74tm71vw33 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74tm71vw33/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1899 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending  1899 June 1 ) text Catalogue of the Officers, Studies, and Students of the State College of Kentucky, Lexington, Volume 4 (Session ending  1899 June 1 ) 1899 2012 true xt74tm71vw33 section xt74tm71vw33 CATALOGUE
OFFICERS, STUDIES, AND STUDENTS
OF THE
STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY,
LEXINGTON,
WITH A PART OF THE REGULATIONS,
I
SESSION ENDING JUNE 1, 1899.
LOUISVILLE ;
jour: P. Moxrox & C0m1>ANv.
I 1899.
. gf HH ‘

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I
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, l `~
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I

 CONTENTS.
· THE STATE CoLLEcE or Kanrucxv, ............... r
i History, ..................,.... . . . . 1
, Object,. ............................ 2
 _ The Normal School, ...................... 2
5 The Kentucky Experiment Station, .............. 2
i Location, ......................... . . 3
L Grounds,. ................... . ...... 3
j Buildings, . .......................... 4
Development, ..... . ................,.. 5
 . BOARD OF TRUSTEES, . ...................... 7
, FACULTY, ............................. 8
ASSISTANTS, ....... . .................... 9
OTHER OFFICERS, . .............. . . ....... IO
it Tm; Kanruckv EXPERIMENT STATION, ....... . ...... ro
 , Board of Control, ....................... ro
Oflicers of the Station, ................... . . ro
_ DEPARTMENTS, .......................... II
ADMISSION, ............................ I2
Couxsas or STUDY, ..... . ................. rg,
History, Political Economy, and Metaphysics, . ......... I3
Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture, ....... . ..... I3
The English Language and Literature, . ............ 18
' Military Science,. .......... . ........... IQ I
‘ Chemistry, . ..................... . . . . 2O
Mathematics and Astronomy, . .............. . . 23
Modern Languages, ..... . ............... 24
Greek and Latin, ....................... 25
 - The Academy, ......................... 26
The Normal School, ...................... 26
Civil Engineering, . ...................... 29
. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, ....... . . . . 32
A Anatomy and Physiology, ................... 37
. Geology and Zoology, ..................... 38
° Physics, ............................ 42
Entomology,. ......................... 44
DEGREES, ............................. 45
. GROUPING OF COURSES FOR DEGREES, .............. 46
For the Degree of B. S., .................... 46
For the Degree of A. B., .................... 52
. For the Degree of B. Ped., ................... 54
B For the Degree of B. M. E., .................. 57
For the Degree of B. C. E., .... . ............. 59
_ For the Degree of B. Agr., ................... 61
,. sins 

 iv STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
THE ACADEMY, ......................... , 63 `
ASSOCIATIONS, ....... . . . . .... . ........... 68
Literary Societies, ...... . ................. 68
_ Engineering Society, ..............,...... 68
Biological Society, ..................... I . 68
Linguistic Society,. ...,.................. 59
Athletics, ........................... 69 .
ALUMNI, .............................. 70
MILITARY DEPARTMENT, RosTER, ................. 75 I
PosT-GRAI>UATEs, ......................... 76 I
UNDERGRADUATES, .......... . ............. 75 _
REGULATIONS, ........ . .................. 88 1
Traveling Expenses of Students, . ............... 88
College Expenses, ....................... 88
Boarding, ........................... 89
Free Tuition, Beneficiaries, ............. . . . . 90 -_
Appointees to the Normal Course, ............... 9;
Special Courses of Study, ................... 9;
Change of Classification, .................... QI
Affiliated Schools, ....................... 9;
Manual Labor, . ........................ 93
Certificates of Character, . ................... 94
The Monitress, . ......................,. 94
CALENDAR, ............................ 95 `
COLLEGE DIRECTORY, ....................... 96 ,_
§ 7 4
,.4 hin-

 62. .
68
68 THE STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
68
68
69 HISTORY.
69 K GRICULTURAL and Mechanical Colleges in the United States
70  N A owe their origin to an act of Congress, entitled M An act Donating
75 Public Lands to the several States and Territories which may provide
76 Colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts," approved
- 76  i july 2, 1862. The amount of land donated was 30,000 acres for each
88  A representative in the National Congress. Under this allotment Kentucky
88 received 330,000 acres. Several years elapsed before the Common-
88 ~ wealth established an Agricultucal and Mechanical College under the
39 ‘ act, When established it was not placed upon an independent basis,
, 90 . but was made one of the Colleges of Kentucky University, to which
_ 9, ` institution the annual interest of the proceeds of the Congressional land
_ 9, grant was to. be given for the purpose of carrying on its operations.
_ gl The land-scrip had meanwhile been sold for fifty cents per acre, and
i I _ the amount I`€C€lVBd—$I65,000~——lllV€St€d in six per cent Kentucky
gs _ State bonds, of which the State became custodian in trust for the
l College.
` 94 The connection with Kentucky University continued till 1878, when
` 94 the act of 1865, making it one of the Colleges of said University, was
` 95  7 repealed, and a Commission was appointed to recommend to the Legis-
' 96  · lature of 187g-80 a plan of organization for an institution, including I
" an Agricultural and Mechanical College, such as the necessities of the
, Commonwealth required. The city of Lexington offered to the Com-
` mission (which was also authorized to recommend to the General
Assembly the place which, all things considered, offered the best and
. greatest inducements for the future and permanent location of the
College), the City Park, containing fifty-two acres of land, within the
1 limits of this city, and thirty thousand dollars in city bonds for the
A erection of buildings. This offer the county of Fayette supplemented
I by twenty thousand dollars in county bonds, to be used either for the
V erection of buildings or for the purchase of land. The offers of the city
Q of Lexington and of the county of Fayette were accepted by the General
Assemblv.
By the act of incorporation, and the amendments thereto, constitut-
ing the charter of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky,
liberal provision is made for educating, free of tuition, the energetic
young men of the Commonwealth whose means are limited. The
~ Normal Department, for which provision is also made, is intended to aid
V in building up the Common School system by furnishing properly qual-
  ified teachers. This College, with the additional departments which
V will, from time to time, be opened as the means placed at the disposal
 A of the Trustees allow, will, it is hoped, in the not distant future, do a
4 Isaa-

 2 STATE COLLEGE or KENTUCKY.
great work in advancing the educational interest of Kentucky. Being
entirely undenominational in its character it will appeal with confidence A
to the people of all creeds and of no creed, and will endeavor, in strict
conformity with the requirements of its organic law, to afford equal
· advantages to all, exclusive advantages to none. The liberality gf
the Commonwealth in supplementing the inadequate annual income
arising from the proceeds of the land—scrip invested in State bonds, will,
it is believed, enable the Trustees to begin and carry on, upon a scale
commensurate with the wants of our people, the operations of the .
institution whose management and oversight have been committed to .
them by the General Assembly of Kentucky.
LEADING OBJECT. '
In the act of Congress making provision for the class of colleges to ·
which the State College partly belongs, it is declared M that their leading A
object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, ‘
and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as .
are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in order to promote  A
the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several
pursuits and professions in life." To the departments contemplated in —
the act, a Normal School has been added by the State and an Experi—
mental Station by the United States. ,
THE NORMAL SCHOOL. V
The Normal Department of the State College exists under the A;
authority of acts of the General Assembly approved April 23 and April A
29, 1880. Section 7 of the first act briefly defines the object for which
the Department was established, M a Normal Department or course of j
instruction for irregular periods, designed more particularly, but not
exclusively, to qualify teachers for common and other schools, shall be A
established in connection with the College? The second act provides  
the necessary endowment to make the Department effective.  ,
The number of students annually enrolled in the Normal School has V
exceeded expectation. As they come from all parts of the State, and  r
many of them return well prepared for the profession of teaching, they
must greatly promote the efficiency of our common schools generally,
and demonstrate the wisdom of the General Assembly in providing an
inexpensive Normal School, centrally located and easy of access, to
keep the State always supplied with well·trained teachers.
C
THE KENTUCKY EXPERIMENT STATION. ~
This Department of the State College originated in a resolution of i
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, adopted in Septem-
ber, 1885, when the Department was organized and a Director .
appointed. In 1886 the Station was recognized and named by the ‘
A ` ,. dns: 

 srare COLLEGE OF Kiznrucxv. 3
, . General Assembly, and in 1887 it and a similar Station in every other
Slug ~ State were each endowed by Congress with an annual appropriation of
Fe ooo.
ltmt 8I5;[`he work of the Station is directed to two objects: r. To a con-
`qua] stent sucession of experiments made by specialists, in orderto learn
Y Of what applications of science will insure the best returns from the farm,
mlm: the garden, the orchard, the vineyard, the stockyard, and the dairy.
lV1H’ _ 2_ To the publication of bulletins announcing such results of the experi-
°cal€ ments as are found to be valuable to any of our people that seek profit
ddl; from either of those prime sources of wealth-the soil, the flock, or the
herd.
` Results of experiments have been published in nine reports and
V seventy-three bulletins, and general appreciation of their utility is
shown in the fact that, while no bulletin is sent except upon application
SS to , for it, the mailing list of the Station contains more than 8,000 names,
ding ' and is ever increasing. p · U
dies, . With an ample endowment, a large and commodious building
,g as planned for the purpose,- adequate apparatus, a good experimental farm
mote conveniently situated, and seven capable scientists always employed and
wml iu correspondence with other stations, The Kentucky Experiment Sta-
ed in _ tion is not only an important adjunct of the College in the education of
p€,.i_ students for the leading industrial pursuits, but directly or indirectly
through the wide and continual diffusion of knowledge for the benefit
of so large a proportion of our population, it is bound to be extremely
useful to the Commonwealth at large.
the  I LOCATION. I
  The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky is-established
Sc Of in the old City Park grounds of the City of Lexington, given to the
E not Commonwealth for tlns purpose. The site is elevated, and commands
dl be . a good view of the city and surrounding country.
vides Lexington is now the most important railroad center in Kentucky,
_ being in immediate connnunication with Louisville, Cincinnati, Mays-
lhas  ' ville, Chattanooga, and with more than seventy counties in the Com-
zmd -v  monwealth. The long-established reputation of the city for refinement
lthey ` and culture renders it attractive as a seat of learning, and the large
muy, bodylof fertile country adjacent, known as the M Blue Grass Region,"
W an with its splendid stock farms, affords unsurpassed advantages to the
S; to Student of agriculture who desires to make himself familiar with the
’ best breeds of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in America.
GROUNDS.
DH Of The campus of the College consists of fifty-two acres of land, lo-
),[€m_ Catfid Within the corporate limits of Lexington. The South LiH1cstOr1G
EMO,. » SU`€0t electric car line extends along the greater part of its western
V the  _ border. giving opportunity to reach in a few minutes any part of the
,. rms:
I

 4 sTATE COLLEGE or KENTUCKY.
city. The campus is laid out in walks, drives, and lawns, and is
planted with a choice variety of native and exotic trees and shrubs, to ·_
which additions are constantly being made. A portion of the land has
recently been reserved for a botanical garden, in which will be grown the
most desirable native plants, with a view to testing their adaptability to
‘ cultivation, and to give increased facilities to students taking agricu].
tural and biological courses. Two and a half acres, forming the north-
east portion of the campus, inclosed and provided with a grand stand,
is devoted to the field sports of students.
About three quarters of a mile south of the campus, on the Nicholas- .
ville pike, an extension of South Limestone Street, is the Experiment
Station Farm, consisting of forty—eight and a half acres, to which sixty.  
four and a half acres have been added by recent purchase. Here the
field experiments of the Station are conducted, and students have `
opportunities to witness tests of varieties of field crops, dairy tests,
fertilizer tests, fruit—spraying tests, in short, all the scientific experi-
mentation of a thoroughly equipped and organized Station. The front _ ‘
of the farm is pasture and orchard. The back portion is divided off
into two hundred one-tenth acre plots, for convenience in making crop  .
tests.
BUILDINGS. ,
The main college building is a structure of stone and brick, 140
feet long and 68 feet in width. lt contains the office of the President
and of the Business Agent, and on the third floor, counting the base-
ment floor as one, is the chapel, in which each day the students and _
Faculty meet, and in which are held public gatherings and such other
meetings as bring together the entire student body. The remaining Y
space in this building is occupied by recitation rooms and by the society I
rooms of the students.  
The Station building is a handsome structure, well planned for the  I
object for which it was made. It is seventy feet in length by fifty-four
feet in width, with a tower projection in front, and an octagonal pro-
jection eighteen by eighteen on the north side. The building is two _
stories high, and a basement eleven feet from floor to ceiling. The `
main entrance is on the first floor, on the west side of the building, `
through an archway fifteen feet wide. The basement is occupied in part _
by the Station and in part by the College. The next floor above is g
devoted to ofiice and laboratory work of the Station, while the upper
floor accommodates the College work in Chemistry.
The building devoted to Mechanical Engineering covers altogether
an area of about 20,000 feet, is constructed of stone and pressed brick,
. and is well furnished with modern conveniences for work in this branch
of engineering.  g
Two large brick dormitories on the campus afford boarding c0n·  
veniences for students who wish to lessen expense in this direction.
Other buildings on the campus are a brick dwelling for the President  ·
and a cottage occupied by the Commandant. —
l .
‘ " ,.. mm

 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY. 5
mls · ·· srthntrr
bs to Sorence Hall, built during the year r 97 or e epar men s 0
d im n Natural Science, is 96 x 97 feet, of pressed brick trimmed with Bowling
,,, the Green limestone. The wxde halls, the numerous and spacious lecture-
ity to morris, laboratories and otlices 1n1ts three stories are conveniently ar. ·
Tim, V ranged, well lighted, and the rooms well furnished,.
Qcrth On the Experiment Farm are a brick dwelling occupied by the
mud, Director oi the Station, and the usual farm buildings for the care of
tools, the protection of stock, and the like.
iolas- .
iment DEVELOPMENT.
si t - . . .
B ,1}; The growth of the College from year to year 15 shown in the follow-
have lllg Sl1HlII12.l`y I · I ' ` ·
test _ r55q, To establish and endow a college, chiedy for instruction in agriculture and the
si, , mechanic arts, an act of Congress apportioned to each State, for each of its Senators and
xpm-l` Representatives in Congress, 30,ooo acres of the public land.
from . rang, The General Assembly of Kentucky having accepted the State’s portion under
Bd Oii the conditions prescribed, established the Agricultural and Mechanical College, making it
crop J one of the colleges of Kentucky University, then recently united with Transylvania Unr-
V versity and located at Lexington, citizens of Lexington and its vicinity donating $110,000 to
the Curators of the University to buy a site for the College. The General Assembly having
authorized the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund to sell the 330,000 acres apportioned to
I40 Kentucky, by the mismanagement of the Commissioners agent the State realized for its
ident , land only $165,000.
bask} , rB66. The College opened with a President, four Professors, and a Commandant.
d 1878. Dissatisfied with the management of the College by the Curators, who were eu-
3 an · ‘ ’ ' l A embl severed the connection with the Uni-
, gaged in a long factional strife, the Genera ss y U
other r versity, and appointed a commission to re-locate the College, to provide for its continuance
ining _ in operation till re-located, and to prepare " a plan for a first-class University." Kentucky l
met},  ‘ University claiming and retaining the former site of the College, the sole property left the
V latter after tllE severance was an income of $9.900 derived from the land grant.
 ` 1880. The City of Lexington offering the City Park of tifty—tw0 acres as a new site for
I- the , the College, and also $30,000 in bonds, andthe County of Fayette offering $20,000 besides,
'·f0UT the General Assembly ratified the selection of a site made by a majority of the commission,
pro. and located the College permanently in Lexington.
. two ` IHBD. To provide teachers for the Common Schools of the State and for other schools,
' the General Assembly added to the College a Normal Department, which should admit,
The 5 besides other students, one from each representative district every year free of tuition.
dmgv 1850. To further endow the College and to enable it to purchase apparatus, machinery,
. pafi iinplcments, and a library; to maintain the Normal Department, and to defray other neces-
vg is A sary expenses, the General Assembly imposed a tax of one-half cent on each hundred dollars
lpper ` of the assessed value of all property in the State liable to taxation for State revenue and
belonging to its white inhabitants.
/ 1880. The Classical and Normal Departments and the Academy added.
Ether IBSZ. The College Building, the First Dormitory, and the Presidenfs House completed.
¤I'1Cl<, 1885, The Com1nandant’s House reconstructed.
auch 1587. To enlarge by experiments and to diffuse the knowledge of agriculture, an act of
Congress established, under the direction of the Agricultural and Mechanical College iu
COD. ‘ €¤Cl\ State, an Agricultural Experiment Station, appropriatiug for its support $15,000 per
annum.
tlOD· 1887. The Department of Civil Engineering established, an experimental farm offorty-
ldéllt ~ eight acres purchased, and the College greenhouse built.
xB89. The Experiment Station Building completed.
1890. The Second Dormitory completed.
· 2
,.. nina:
I

 . 6 STATE COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
1890. For ‘* the more complete endowment" of Agriculture and Mechanical Cqllcgm
an act of Congress appropriated to each State $15,000 for the year ending june go, 1390.;,;],1
the same sum with an increase of $I,00O per annum for ten years, after which the maximum
_ of $25,ooo should continue without change. Of the amount thus annually appropriated, the
College receives 85 per cent. and the school of the colored people at Frankfort I5 pm- Cem
· 1891. The Department of Mechanical Engineering established.
1892. The Mechanical Building and Workshops completed. :
1894. Greenhouses for the Experiment Station built. V`
1895. The Annex to the Mechanical Building and the Insectarium for the Station built. `
1897. The Department of Electrical Engineering established. Additions made to the i
Greenhouses and Insectarium. ~
1898. The Building for Natural Science completed.
1898. Sixty-four and a half acres added to the Experimental Farm, making II] in all. A
Increase ty Pr0perty—T11e property of the College is estimated to be worth $5oo,ooon10re  
than it was eighteen years ago.
Incrsrzrerf Tmc/zcr:—Before 1880 the College had six Professors; it now has sixteen .
Professors and eleven Assistants.  `
lmrmse ty" C`m¢r.vz.r—Before 1880 the College offered a single course of study leading to ‘
a degree; it now offers eight. `
Increase qf.Stud2nIs—The number enrolled during the session of 1898-99 is about 4Eo, · A
considerably the largest in the history of the College. .
Incrmse ty" G¢·ur{ualt·.r—No fact more distinctly marks the growth of the College than
the increase in the number of its graduates. More students were graduated in 18971lmn V
were greduated in the first seventeen years, and the number of those graduated during the
last fave is greater than that of the first twenty-seven. _
I
l .
i ‘ ,- BW BI!

 Cclleges, `
¤89¤.. A
  BOARD or rRusrEEs.
iated,the
rer cent. ._ .,E
· HIs EXCELLENCY GovERNoR WILLIAM O. BRADLEY,
_ _ CHAlRMAN EX·OFFICIO.
ZlDI1l7l1lll.
d h .
Em E PRESIDENT JAMES K. PATTERSON,
MEMBER EX·OFFICIO.
Sin all.
'mmm TERM EXPIRES JANUARY, 1900.
s sixteen  · GEN. D. C. BUELL . . . ....... Paradise ....... Muhlenberg County.
md, ]_ C, FLOURNOY, Esg ......... Fulton ....~.... Fulton County.
' mgm V HON. ]. T. GATHRIGHT ....... Louisville ...... jefferson County.
bout M . HON, A. P. GOODING ...... . . .Mays1ick ....... Mason County.
*I·l0N. CLARENCE U. MCELROY .Bowling Green . .Barren County.
leggenlmn HoN. W. F. PEAK ........... Bedford ........ Trimble County.
1 Yllflll
urmg The TERM EXPIRES JANUARY, 1902.
GEN. E. H. HOBSON .......... Greensburg ..... Green County.
]0IIN G. MATTHEWS, Esg ...... Barbourville .... Knox County.
HoN. HART BOSWELL ......... Lexington ...... Fayette County.
]oIIN B. KENNEDY, Esg ........ Paris ......... Bourbon County.
CAPT. THOMAS TODD .......... Shelbyville ..... Shelby County. I
I TERM EXPIRES JANUARY, 1904.
; D. F. FRAZEE, Esg ........... Lexington ...... Fayette County.
JUDGE WILLIAM H. HOLT ...... Frankfort ...... Franklin County.
JUDGE JOSEPH I. LANDES ...... Hopkinsville .... Christian County.
j. B. l\lARCUM, Esg ........... jackson ........ Breathitt County.
3 R. C. STOLL, Esg ........... Lexington ...... Fayette County.
 , * Appointed to succeed Gen. Buell, deceased.
. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
WILLIALI H. HoLT,
` Chairnmn.
A. P. GOODING,
]oIIN B. KENNEDY,
D. F. FRAZEE,
· R. C. STOLL.
  VIcToR E. MUNCY,
_ Swcrvmry qfth: Buard and Ig/` the Cwnmillez.
.. mm:
f

 (In the order of appointment.) .
JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON, PH. D., LL.D., F. S. A., Presidmi,
Prepssor ef History, Polilical Economy, and Metaphysics.
JOHN SHACKLEFORD, A. M., Vice-Preszocnt,
Pr%ssor of English and Logic.
JAMES GARRARD W1—11TE, A. M.,
Przwssor zf Illathemalics and Aslronomy.
]01—xN HENRY NEv1LLE, A. M.,
Pr¢*ssor ef Greek and Latin.
WALTER KENNEDY PATTERSON, A. M.,
Princzloal sy' the Academy.
JOSEPH HOEING KAsTLE, PH. D., »
Prqfcssorqf Chemistry.
RUR1c NEv1LLE R0AR1<, PR. D.,
Princrfal 1y" the Normal School. _
JOSEPH WILLIAM PRYOR, M. D., .
Przfessor of Anatomy and Physiology. ’ `
FREDERIC PAUL ANDERs0N, M. E., Al
Pr¢_Ws.ror of Iilechanical Engineering.
CLARENCE VVENTWORTH MATHEws, B. S., T
Professor nf Bolany, [·/urficulfure, and Agriculfure. A
ARTHUR MCQUISTON MILLER, A. M.,
Prrgkssor cf Geology and Zoology, V
MERRY LEw1s PENCE, M. S.,
Professor of Physics.
PAUL WERNICKE, l
I Professor of Modcr11 Languages.
JOHN PASCAL BROOKS, M. S., _
Professor of Civil Engineering.
MATT1s0N BOYD JONES, A. B.,
Commandant and Prnfessor of M1'll·Ld7] Scienee.
% ,
yl ‘     {Env

 ASSISTANTS.
. joma LEWIS Loom, A. B.,
First Assistant in the Academy.
ROBERT LEE BLANT014, M. Lrr.,
Assistant in Greek and Latin.
]0sE1>1~1 M0R·r0N DAVIS, A. B., B. S.,
Second Assistant in the Academy.
VICTOR EMANUEL Muncv, B. S.,
Third Assistant in the Academy.
JAMES RICHARD ]0HNs0N, B. M. E.,
Assistant in S/top-work and Drawing.
ERNEST FRANK Bkoww, A. B.,
Instructor in Eloeution.
CHARLES RALPH STURDEVANT, M. E.,
Assistant in Electrical Engineering.
. SAMUEL CARRUTHERS DEB0w, B. M. E.,
Laboratory Assistant in Ex_1$erz'mental Engineering.
MILFORD WHITE, B. C. E.,
Assistant in the Normal School.
i jour: ’1`HE0D0RE FAIG, M. E., I
. Assistant in Mechanz'oal Engineering.
" JAMES EDWARD SAUNDERS,
` Assistant in Woodwork.
. ]0sEP1-1 D1c11>LET0N BEATTY, M. S.,
· Follow in C}zemistr_1’.
. LA FAYETTE BRECKINRIDGE Bkocx, B. S.,
Fellow in Biology.
SAXE DABNEY AVERITT, B. S.,
Fellow in Botany.
l

 OTHER OFFICERS.
Il/IRS. LucY BERRY BLACKBURN, _
Ma1z1`tresx. A
JAMES GARRARD VVHITE,
‘ Bushes: Illzmagcr.
JOSEPH WILLIAM PRYOR, M. D.,
Surgeon q/`the Battalion.
Miss MARY HODGES,  ·
Stermgragfher.
VICTOR EMANUEL MUNcY, »
Secretary ¢y'the Faculty. _
BOARD OF CONTROL.  _
HON. HART BOSWELL, Chairman .......... . ..... Lexington.  
HoN. JOHN T. GATHRIGHT ....................... Louisville. L
CAPT. THOMAS Toon .............. . ............ Shelbyville.  L_
PRESIDENT JAMES K. PATTERSON, Ex-ajiczb ........ Lexington. {
DIRECTOR M. A. SCOVELL, Ex-ajisz`0 ............. Lexington.   O
IZ  11
OFFICERS OF THE STATION. y q
MELVILLE AMASA SCOVELL,  J pl
Director. ·t il
ALFRED MEREDITH PETER, I tl
Chemist.  
HENRY ERNEST CURTIS,  
Chemist.
HARRISON GARMAN,
Entamalogxkt and Batanist.
CLARENCE VVEN'1"»VORTH MATI{EWS,
' Hurt1`cult1¢r1`:t.
EnwARn RnoRER,
Steungrapher.
JOSEPH NELSON HARPER,
Sujerzhtmdent lf/IFIIEIJ Experiment: and ljairyman.
i .
`i _ ,,.. nina:
r

 · DEPARTMENTS.
· The studies of the State College are distributed into seventeen
 i U. S. WEATHER BUREAU.
 ;_ Orssmwmz, D. H. I-IERNDON.
  There has been established at the College by the U. S. Department I
 Y of Agriculture a Station of the \/Veather Bureau, with.f1rst-class instru-
SZ  mental equipment, which is working in close connection with the College
  and Station. Students who are interested in the study ol meteorology
 * and kindred seienees will find at this station a rare chance for special
`Q  investigation, as all students interested are welcome to such benefits as
  the Station affords.
_,.. ~¤¤¤·•

 DEPARTMENTS.
The studies of the State College are distributed into seventeen
_ Departments, each in charge of a responsible head, the heads consti-
i tuting the Faculty. Chronologically the Departments are:
A I. History, Political Economy, and Metaphysics.
i II. Botany, Horticulture, and Agriculture.
III. The English Language and Literature.
. IV. Military Science.
' V. Chemistry.
` VI. Mathematics and Astronomy.
` VII. Modern Languages.
VIII. Greek and Latin.
IX. The Academy. I
J X. Pedagogy, or the Normal School.
XI. Civil Engineering.
` XII. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering.
. XIII. Anatomy and Physiology.
XIV. Geology.
XV. Zoology.
XVI. Physics.
XVII. Entomology.
.·.. ·¤¤s»·

 ADMISSION.
Applicants for admission to the Freshman Class in Science are
examined on the following subjects :
1. Advanced English Grammar; Composition; Rhetoric and E
. Synonyms. .
2. Descriptive, Political, and Physical Geography.
3. The History of the United States; General History, equivalent
in amount to Anderson’s General History.
4. Arithmetic; Algebra through quadratic equations, as presented
in Wentworth’s Higher Algebra; Plane Geometry, as presented in the
first two books of Beman & Smith’s Geometry.
Applicants for admission to the Freshman Class in Classics are
examined on the same courses in English and Mathematics, and also on .
the following books or on their equivalents :  _
3. Smiley and Storke’s Beginner’s Latin Book; Viri Romas; ten ·
lives of Nepos ; {ive books of Czesar; Daniell’s New Latin Composition.
4. White’s Beginner's Greek Book; ]acobs’ Greek Reader; five `
books of Xenophon’s Anabasis. {
The satisfactory completion of the course in the Academy entitles
the student to admission into the Freshman Class without further exam- I
ination. Students from M aiiiliated schools " who present certificates
showing that they have completed a course of study equivalent to the
course of the Academy will also be admitted without examination. All -
other applicants must, to be admitted, satisfy the conditions prescribed
above.
i _ ,
‘ _ ...· mam

 COURSES OP STUDY.
I. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY, AND
~ METAPHYSICS.
PRESIDENT PATTERSON.
` The course of instruction in this Department includes an outline of
. Ancient, Mediaeval, and Modern History. Attention is given to the
am various forms of government, their characteristic features and points of
A difference, to the progress of civilization, the origin and development of
and ` parliamentary government, the rights and duties of citizenship,
ln the period covered, Modern History and the History of England
I and the United States occupy the most prominent place.
[ent Walker’s Science of Wealth is made the basis of instruction in Polit-
ical Economy. Students are, however, made familiar with the prin-
[ted . eiples upon which rest the rival doctrines of Protection and Free Trade.
the The study of Mental and Moral Philosophy extends through one
year. Sir \Villiam Hamilton is used as the basis of instruction in Meta-
are physics, and janet in Morals. Concurrently with recitations from these
,0,, authorities, the pupil is made familiar with the principles upon which
_ rival systems of philosophy and morals are based and the arguments I
ten , by which they are maintained. Ancient a11d modern systems are thus
ion. ’ brought under review, and the necessary data furnished upon which to
five _ ground intelligent opinions.
MBS ‘ II. DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY, HORTICULTURE, AND
am ‘ Aomcurrune.
ates »
the E Pnorizsson i1AT11Ews.
1bAg " This Department occupies rooms 011 the first tloor of the Natural
* 6 ` Science Building, including a general laboratory, a lecture room and
‘ advanced laboratory, and an instructor’s office.
Each laboratory is suitably furnished with tables, water and gas tix-
tures, charts, etc., and the lecture room with opera chairs, a stereopticon,
etc. The further equipment, both for elementary work and for the use
of advanced students, is new and of the best quality, and includes an
. ample supply of compound and disseeting microscopes for the individual
use of each student, several first-class microtomes, ovens, and steriliz-
mg apparatus, together with delicate balances and other apparatus for
U the study of plant physiology.
Among other facilities for study, the Department possesses a green-
V house (85 x zo feet), giving an opportunity for the continuous study of
3
,.. wm —

 I4 srATE COLLEGE or KENTUCKY.
living plants throughout the winter months and for experiment work in
plant physiology. Y
The herbarium contains a nearly complete representation of the flora 3
of Kentucky, with a considerable number of foreign exchanges. lt is due
_ primarily to the efforts of the late Dr. Robert Peter, who made a quite
extensive collection of Kentucky plants about sixty years ago, and also
exchanged specimens with the prominent botanists of that day, thus , 4
forming the nucleus of the present collection, which therefore possesses 1
considerable historical value. Constant additions are now being made
to the herbarium by collecting excursions over the state and by ~ l
exchanges with other institutions. ¤ ¤
The Department Library is receiving constant accessions of care- ' `
fully selected books, and already contains the most