xt74tm71z14f https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74tm71z14f/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700917  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 17, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 17, 1970 1970 2015 true xt74tm71z14f section xt74tm71z14f Kmtocky Keenel

Tme
Thursday, Sept.

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

17, 1970

Vol. LXII, No. !0

Time. Place. Manner' Rules Formulated
By TOM BOVVDEN
Assistant Managing Editor
The Dean of Students Office
'has formulated a set of guidelines to regulate time, place and
maimer of the activities of student organizations.
The new policies stem from a
section added to the code of student conduct in August requiring
the dean of students to "promulgate regulations" specifying
"the times when facilities and
premises are available for use
(by student organizations), the
maimer in which they may be
used, and how they may be reserved."
The guidelines were formed by
Dean of Students Jack Hall and
his staff with the advice of a
committee of five students and
five faculty members.
The advisory committee included
Student
Government
President Steve Bright and Dr.
William Plucknett, department of
chemistry.
Approved in Essence
Although Associate Dean of
Students Ken Brandenburgh said
the policies have been approved
in essence by the Vice President
for Student Affairs Office, the
exact wording of the regulations
is not yet firm.
Previous to the code change
requiring the regulations, the
Dean of Students Office maintained no formal control over
time, place and manner of organizational activities.
-

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The new regulations, portions applicant's name and position in
of which are paraphrased here, the University, general nature of
the event, date and time, facilrequire that:
Reservations
ity requested, names of
In instances when persons
persons who are to speak
or perform, special arrangements
from outside the University community are to speak or perform, required and any other inforwhen outdoor facilities are re- mation required by the officials
quired, or when the capacity responsible for the area reof the requested area exceeds 100 quested.
And, except in special cirpeople, reservations must be
made on certain forms.
cumstances, as determined by the
These forms will ask for the vice president for student affairs,

these reservations must be made
43 hours in advance to permit
proper preparation.
y Registered student organizations can request campus facilities only through its officers designated on the application for
registration or a member of the
organization designated for that
purpose on the application.
Open Discussion Area
The new guidelines also establish an open discussion area, now

planned for the area between
Limestone Street and the Alumni
Gym.
It will be available to any
registered student organization
for a maximum of two hours
to conduct an open discussion
or other program.
And the open discussion area
will be immune to the above
rules pertaining to requisition of
facilities.
Continued on Pace 2, CoL 4

33 'Drafted Into Service

Employes Get Emergency Plan

diverse departments, including felt his
and held available for call. One
assignment would be danCommunications, Photographic,
gerous, other arrangements could driver, previously selected, will
Postal, Printing, Purchasing and be made.
be alerted.
The UK Business Services DiBusiness Services and Stores OpThe "Outline of Action Plat "
Xerox Copier
vision has mailed a confidential
is divided into four phases and
memorandum entitled "Outline erations.
"One Xerox machine will be
No Compensation
reads (in part) as follows:
of Action Plan for Emergency
selected for use at the Command
Situations" to 33 University emPhase I, Alert
All of the employes are paid
Post.
"Phase I, Alert At this time
"Phase III Actual disrupployes.
a straight salary and would not
The memorandum details action or disorder on Campus which
receive any compensation for the a determination will be made
tion to be taken by these employextra duties assigned them. In that because of gatherings, meetrequires the use of either Cames in the event of a serious camthe event there is a serious dem- ings and demonstrations a possipolice
pus Police or
forces. Action required as dicpus demonstration.
onstration on campus, these em- bility exists for further trouble.
Most of the employes named ployes would, in effect, be on
"Mr. James O. King, Acting tated by situation.
Business Manager, will advise
in the memorandum did not know
V "Phase IV
Formal Declaralert.
they were to serve in such a
James Ruschell, director of his Directors of the existence of ation of Emergency When a formal declaration of emergency is
capacity until they received the Business Services, indicated any Phase I Alert.
"All information,
memo this week.
made by appropriate authorities,
rumors,
employe who would not perform
this will be disseminated by all
The employes are all super- his duty would be fired. However, statements and actions observed
appropriate means.
visory personnel and come from he added that if an employe relating to potential trouble will
be related directly and promptly
"A Command Center will be
i to Mr. Joe Burch, Director, Safeestablished at a previously designated point.
ty and Security.
"Phase II, Full Alert-W- hen
Communications
a condition of Full Alert exists,
"All necessary fire guards will
Mr. King will inform all Direcbe called upon to report to their
tors.
posts.'
"All campus police will report
"Communication Services
immediately on campus full
(will) verify (that a) security guard
f
strength.
"I i
(is) on (the) telephone switclung
Full Alert
equipment, Rose St. Parking Car-agand that General Telephone
"Each Director will notify
persons previously designated of Co. has qualified servicemen
Full Alert. Persons designated as present.
Services
Fire Guards will report to desig"(Communication
nated stations if Full Alert is
will) close all entrances into Communication Services except door
given after 5 p.m. or before 8
a.m.
on South Side (and) use electron"Fire Guards will receive inic door control or closed circuit
TV as may be necessary to monstruction and guidance on duties
itor those seeking entrance. .
prior to any possible trouble.
Services
Plant will send an
"(Communication
"Physical
electrician immediately to the will) consider thf possibility of
closing Main Campus switchvicinity of the trouble spot.
board during late hours and us"Six veliicles will be immediately pulled from use, will be ing Med. Center board only.
N
completely serviced ready for use.
Continued on Pare 5, CoL 1
V
..
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,
By FRANK S. COOTS
Editor-in-Chi-

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I Hit WHO???

Senior Sue Little was only trying to have a good time.
Sue, president of Keeneland Hall, was hostess to a group
of distinguished officials including President Otis Single-tar- y
Wednesday night at the hall. The motifwas Hawaiian
and entertaining (!) skits
for the informal
were planned.
time rolled around, Sue was right
When
on top of tlie action. She plastered an actress square in
the face with a pie. But bits of tlxe impolite pastry-whi- ch
off into space.
must have had some crust-sai- led
And onto President Singletary's right pants leg.
The two presidents held a quick summit conference
that featured a very embarrassed girl and a rollicking
and forgiving man.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sqt.

2

17, 1970

Ginger To Enter Politics
Plans Race for School Post

HOT DOG!
Wieners Safe, Caterer Asserts
By MARGARET SHADBURNE

Kcrnd Staff Writer
Hot dog fans, worry no longer. The wiener you've been
game this Saturawaiting will be served at the
day.
A rumor stemming from a routine inspection by the
Kentucky Board of Health had it that the hot dogs served
by the Ted Osbom Catering Service at UK atlJetic functions were not up to par.
University Athletic Director Harry Lancaster quelled
the rumor, explaining that the Osbom service, which has
been under contract with UK for four years, will continue
to serve hot dogs this year.
Osbom backed Lancaster's statement, assuring that the
investigation was merely "routine", and that nothing is
wrong with his hot dogs. Osbom said the Health Board
did not criticize his food, but did offer ways in which to
improve the University's facilities at the stadium.

Qt's

Easy To

adFRANKFORT (AP)-T- he
ministration appears ready to
grant one of its deans a leave of
absence to run for state office despite some expressed concern it
would set a shaky precedent.
The matter involves Dr. Lyman Cinger, associate dean for
Undergraduate Teacher Education and Certification.
He confirmed today he plans
to run as a Democrat for Superintendent of Public Instruction
in 1971 and let his friends know
that "when the proper time
comes, I will announce."
Free Talent Tap
President
Otis
Singletary
brought up the subject to the
Board of Trustees during a lunch

eon Tuesday at which no news
representatives were present.
Reliable sources said the consensus was favorable except for
comments that no UK official
ever had been granted a leave
to run for political office and
that the move could open the way
for both parties to tap university talent freely for next year's
statewide campaigns.
Republican Cov. Louie B.
Nunn, the board chairman, reportedly made no comment at
the luncheon, nor gave any indication of how he might vote

when the question comes before
the board officially.
Cinger said university regulations for the faculty clearly
permit a leave for political purposes.
"I've been at UK for 27 years
and have never had a sabbatical with pay," he said. "But I
wanted to do nothing to embarrass the university and that's
why I have not asked for pay."
The State Superintendent's
post pays $20,000 a year, which
Cinger said is less than his current salary.

Administration Sets Policy
Continued from Pate One
Instead, the area will not be
available for reservation more
than 43 hours in advance, and
requests can be made as late as
one-ha- lf
hour before the planned
event.
Student Code
The registered organization

ie Right!

The Kentucky Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel. University
Station. University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second cUu
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$9.45
Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor Managing Editor .... 275-17Editorial Page Editor.
Associate Editors, Sports .. 257-17Advertising. Business, Circulation

SoSCO m Allen, Lambda Chi Derby Queen

which requests to use the area
will be responsible for ensuring
that discussions or programs held
do not violate the code of student conduct.
In addition, the open discussion area can be reserved in
excess of two hours if no other
requests to use the area have
been received at the time 30
minutes remains of the original
reservation.
Another section of the new
policy requires that student
organizations file a copy of any
poster, handbill or other announcement at the East Information Desk of the Student Center.
Brandenburgh

emphasized

that the new policies apply only

to members of registered student
organizations acting in their official activities. Individuals, he
explained, are. free to demonstrate, picket or hand out leaflets in any manner not prohibited
by the student code.

Put your best face forward

i

New Ideas,
New Faces and
A New Yearbook

X

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;

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The KENTUCKIAN
o Senior Supplement

o Signatures Under Each Photo
o Ten Seniors Per Page

N

-

;

Photographic Services will start
making senior pictures on September 21.
4.

HAZEL

COLOSIMO
Copy Editor

i
i

j

U

Y

o Actual Size Photos At Right

Make your appointment as soon
as possible by calling

j

Assistant Editor

o A Look At The Last Four Years

258-482-

;

i

o Come As You Are Photos

i
i

Editor

RICK UTTERBACK

In May

f

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GRIMSLEY

SUSAN

LARRY KIELKOPF

Photo Editor

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Sept.

Students Like
TV Lectures
aiRIS LEVITT
Kernel Staff Writer
"Televbion, when properly
applied, can do some educational
tasks not accomplished in any
other way," said Dr. Paul II.
Owens, director of the Division
of Media Services. He is the
for the new television programs utilized on cant-pu- s
and throughout the state.
Owens has directed surveys
on the UK campus and other
universities across the country
with results showing that 90 percent of those questioned agreed
that televised lessons were satisfactory, and 52 percent replied
that the broadcasts were more
personal than those of a professor presented to a class of 75
to 100 students.
By

Communicate A Message
Owens felt that a possible
factor causing students to prefer
closed-circu- it
lectures is the aid
of visual images, such as film

kJ

clips, graphs, and charts wluch
help the instructor to communicate his message to his students.
The telecasts also require more
detail and organization than the
traditional lectures.
UK's Television Center prepares videotapes of instructional
material for the classrooms,
which are televised via closed
circuit. Programs now televised
include Political Science 151,
Agriculture 102, Freshman English 101, as well as engineering
and business courses.
Motion Pictures
The Television Center is also
involved in the broadcasting of
WBKY-Fa radio station based
on campus, as well as motion
picture productions and broadcasting programs for the state
educational television network.
Such programs as "Conversation", "Panmed", and "Agriculture Extension" are among the
productions presented on the
State ETV Network.

rVf X

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lloha Oe!
Mrs. Kathryn Roberts, head
resident at Kecncland Hall,
dresses up each year to entertain the girls.
The Hawaiian get-u- p was for
Wednesday night's informal gathering that included Dr. Robert
Zumwinkle, vice president for
student affairs; Dean of Students
Jack Hall, and President Otis A.
Singletary (See Page One).

Woodland Tennis
Shop

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'sir,..? ll

'($

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Li

17, 1970- -3

Tennis Rackets Restrung
Complete line of Rackets and
Apparel

Corner of
E.
Kernel Photo By Dick Ware

High-Maxwe-

ll

Across from .Woodland

TODAY and
TOMORROW
TODAY
Seeletas rr Leflbas, pre-la- w
honorary, will have Ita first business
at :30 p.m., Sept. 17, In room
meeting
111 Student Center.
Keataekr Babes, UK'i glrU drill
team, will hold an informal
at 7 p.m.. In room 245 of
the Student Center, for aU
who
are interested in Joining or girls are
who
Just curious about the group.

Keatacklaas Interests

la Dlsatvaa

tags Staacnts (KIDS) will be recruiting volunteers until Sept. 17. Applications and information may be picked
up at tables in the Complex Commons, Donovan cafeteria or the Student Center or in the Human Relations Center, room 120, Student Center.
Msdlcsl
Cemmlttee
Far Hamaa
Rlffcts, Kentucky chapter, is sponsoring a talk on "Shifting Forces In
Medicine," by Dr. Ollie Fein from the
Health Policy Advisory Center in New
York. Everyone is invited to come at
7:30 p.m.. Sept. 17, to room MN363 of
the Medical Center.

TOMORROW
Blaegrasa Masleal Theatre Ensemble,
specializing in music from Broadway
Comedies, will play at the Unitarian
Church on Clays Mill Road, Friday
and Saturday nights at 8:30 p.m. Admission is $2. $1.50 with ID.

UK Law geheel will hold a practice
court with a simulated case of rape.
This mock courtroom scene will take
place Sept. 18 at 1 p.m. and is open
to the public

COMING UP
Treaaers Fall tryouts are from T to
9 p.m. Sept 22 In the Agriculture Science Auditorium and Sept. 23 in room
309 Student Center. Singers, dancers,
tumblers. Instrumentalists whatever
your thing is, come out and do it.
For further information, call Buddy
Cash at
it
A
class. "English as a
Seeead Laagaage." is now being offered for students, professors and all
residents of Lexington, Kentucky. The
class, sponsored by the Fayette County Adult Education Department, meets
each Tuesday and Thursday from 6:30
to 9:00 in the Commerce Building,
rooms 420, 422 and 443. The course is
free and books are furnished. Anyone
who is interested should contact Mrs.
Emphasis is
Joyce Cash at
1.

non-cred-

6.

vocabulary,
placed on conversation,
grammar, idiomatic
pronunciation.
exchanges.
speech and cross-cultur- al
AeUen Coalltlen (ACT) will meet at
8 p.m. Sept. 21 in room 24S Student
Center to coordinate an
All interested stuhousing survey.
dents are urged to attend.

NOW SHOWING!
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Park

* Crude Communication
The motion stated that if a
University member wishes to appear before the Board either as a
representative for a group or as an
efindividual, he must submit a
unsophisticated if not insincere
fort to establish communications written request to President Single-tarPresident Singletary then rewith the University community.
views the request, decides on its
importance and relevance to the
Board. If the President decides
favorably on the request, it is sent
to a committee of five Board memalternatives:
EDITOR'S NOTE: John Junot is a senior bers who have three
to let the petitioner appear before
Arts and Sciences student.
to
Till now, relatively few have realized the Board, to make a motion
the
"
of student strikes, the Board basedonthepetitionoror
quality
each assuming the other side would yield to refuse
recognition of both petior compromise. And that the sum of wealth
tioner.
and
would remain constant. There
In accepting a motion presented
by lawyer Tom Iicll at its Tuesday
meeting, the Board of Trustees
made what must be viewed as an

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power

reason why that shouldn't
be the case, and if the technique endures
long enough to be recognized as a legitimate action, like a labor strike, that
will be the case. That is, an established
etiquette or procedure will gradually and
informally be recognized by both sides,
and may even be formalized in law.
Unfortunately, it can't be that way
here and now. There is a "holy war"
attitude on both sides of the dispute.
Compounding this is the fact that the
university is in a political vise. On the
right, there is the state government, a
small army of bureaucrats and two-b- it
political hacks, pimping for votes among
a populace temporarily run mad by a
world that seems to be crumbling faster
than usual, off on one of those intense
hating jags this country sees at least once
every ten or twenty years. They are
aided by lesser bureaucratic pimps on the
campus.
On the left, much more nebulous, but
perhaps no less powerful, is a mood, a
t,
frustrated hostility, a
residing in practically every student, but
intensely concentrated in a few dozen.
And lurking in the background is the
the Underrevolutionary subculture,
ground, eager for new recruits, eager to
see more students "radicalized", hungry
for more soldiers and support troops. (Do
not imply a moral judgement from that
statement. Any group competing with
another for its citizens wants it opponent
to fail, constantly points up its failures,
and tries to make it fail.)
In truth, though, very few in any
campus faction are callous manipulators
or provocateurs. Perhaps there are none
in these halls. But there are many sincere and idealistic individuals with varying objectives and principles, who have
not reviewed their goals and tactics in
a long time, and have not considered
the logical consequences of their actions.
Perhaps there will be no review, or
perhaps there has been enough already,
so that all sides will maintain their collision courses, the university will be demolished, and the survivors will plunder
its ruins for material to use in the next,
bigger battle.
And even if these individuals do review themselves, they might come to
the same conclusions.
And even if they don't, there is such
a history of distrust, bitterness, and bad
blood, that negotiations seemed doomed
from the start.
In summary, in campus politics, as in
international politics, it is not safe to
assume that the "ultimate weapon" will
not be used, or that war will be avoided,
simply because it's too horrible or nobody wanted it, if for no other reason
than hating, after loving, is the most
gratifying human activity. Considering
that, and what I have described above,
campus war seems not only likely, but
almost predestined. No single person,
group, or coalition can control or direct
the immediate destiny of this school.
And if UK is destroyed, and remember
only history is without hope, it will be
an irony. That is, it has taken much
struggle to get students to realize they
are adult human beings, to feel human,
to feel dignity, to feel free and responsible for their futures. But that struggle,
that coming of age, that new energy,
has triggered other energies, and created
a situation where it's impossible to exercise humanity, dignity, freedom, or responsibility.
And, again ironically, if that is the
case, the university will have done its
duty, even in its death.
For we will have been educated.
With a vengeance.
is no real

spoiling-for-a-figh-

For the University community
to view such a ridiculously

time-and-ener- gy

consuming plan as the
Board University comanswer to
munication problems would be a
grave mistake. It would seem that
at least one lesson would have been
learned from last spring's unrest.
When there is an immediate crisis
or urgent demands, quick and available communication channels with
the Board are absolutely necessary
to prevent aggravation of a tense
situation.

The Board must come to a realization of the essentials of two-wa-y
communication and make that
awareness known by sophisticating
its efforts, if it expects the University community to accept those efforts in good faith.

Kernel Forum:
the readers write

44

Well

...

at least they're bathing

The Kentucky
,

Unanswered Questions
For Student Coalition
An open letter to the Student Coalition:
e
ad
I was impressed by your
in the Kernel. Before I sign a paper

ESTABLISHED

99

Iernel

University of Kentucky
1894

THURSDAY,

SEPT.

17, 1970

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Frank S. Coots III,
Bob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Jean Benaker, Managing Editor
Jeff Inipallomeni, Sports Editor
Dahlia I lays, Copy Editor
David King, Business Manager
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Tom Bowcfen, Ron Hawkins, Bradley Jeffries, Jerry Lewis, Mike Wines,
Assistant Managing Editors
Editor-in-Chi-

full-pag-

giving you the authority to "speak up
for me and defend my right to study,
teach, or work uninterruptedly," which
would effectively give you the right to
bring a lawsuit in my behalf and to use
my name and number in any way you
see fit, I would like to have answers
to two very important questions questions which you have thus far answered
only in the most general and evasive
terms:
1. You

are called the Student Coalition.

the time your ad was published
you stated that there were well
At

over 200 members of your organization. Exactly how many of these
e
stumembers are actually
dents at the University of Kentucky?
full-tim-

are called the Student Coalition.
is that originally
your organization was called I IPCV
(Help Prevent Campus Violence).
Apparently some other organizations were interested in the same
concept of academic freedom, and
you formed a coalition with these
organizations. Exactly what are the
names of these other organizations?
Exactly how many of these are
recognized student organizations at
the University of Kentucky?

2. You

My understanding

Several students besides myself have
expressed interest in the Student Coalition, but are, like me, unwilling to give
unconditional support to you until we
can receive satisfactory answers to these
questions. For this reason, I encourage
you to give a prompt and public answer in The Kentucky Kernel.
Barbara Sutherland
Telecommunication
Sophomore

Kernel Soapbox
Roller and UK's

True-Blu- e

By MARVIN RUDNICK

EDITOR'S NOTE: Marvin Rudnick is
a second year Law student..
Members of the University community
that follow the sports pages in the news-p- a
pen have been exposed to a report by
a St. Petersburg, Florida journalist who
released a story implying that Dave Roller,
a UK student and football player had
received a bonus for choosing to enroll at
this institution over an inferior offer from
the University of Tennessee. What may
have just been table talk between Roller
and the writer has turned into a nationally
published article raising commensurate
speculation as to the articles veracity and
the University's propriety.
Local newspapers have condemned the
journalist for "irresponsible journalism"
and other epithets that could reasonably
be affixed to such reporting. Of course,
such reporting can never be condoned
unless the allegations are true. Little if
any information concerning the charges
has been brought to public attention. In
fact, the incident has been deleted from
the newspapers and given its death by
some unknown city or sports editor.
Unfortunately, thousands of UK fans,
students and taxpayers (who subsidize
the football program) have been dealt
another low blow. It seems that the truth
has been kept from those who desire it
most. What may be striking in this case
is the fact that the University has chosen
not to persue the matter. For a Journalist
to print such nonsense and not be forced
through a court of law to prove it is unfair. And for the University to sustain
such charges against its athletic practices

Jerseys

without sueing the journalist and his newspaper for libel and damages is an abdication of responsibility toward its students,
alumni, and taxpayers
Such a suit will serve many purposes.
If such practices exist, then punishments
could be meted out to the fraudulent
parties of the athletic department. If
they do not, the University will be able
to exonerate itself in the eyes of the public and prevent such irresponsible journalism in the future. Regardless of who
is at fault, at least the truth will be
known.
If the University chooses to forget the
incident, which is often the case, a statement from the athletic department should
be made reassuring the students that its
football team is made up of amateurs
not professionals. Above all, a statement
from Mr. Roller is expected.
Another report that Mr. Tommy Bell,
a UK trustee, local attorney and National
Football League official had promised to
negotiate Mr. Roller's contract with the
professional teams also needs clarification.
On the surface, it seems Mr. Bell isacting
as a private attorney in the negotiations
for Mr. Roller. When was the attorney
retained and by whom? The University,
Mr. Roller, or was it at the time of
The
signing Mr. Roller's grant'in-aid- ?
public will never know the truth to these
stories circulated nationally until one of
the concerned parties answers the charges.
Until that time comes, many avid supporters will wonder whether the athletic
department it really wearing "true-blu- e
Jerseys.'

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KY

KTRNTL, TliuiMl.iy,

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970 -- 5

Blight Appoints SAC

Student Government President Steve Iirinht lias appointed
.seven persons to the Student
Ad visory Committee (SAC) to the
Dean of Students.
HriM was reque.ttcd by Dean
of Students Jack Hall to .select
the committee.
The seven appointees are Carl
W. Brown, chairman; Steve
Steve Daub, Sara
Donna Spangler, Graeme
Browning and Willie Cates.
Hall said the group will meet
with him "from time to time
in an advisory capacity."
The committee will present
"campus views in general as
e,

'

S

in addition to
they see them
their personal opinions, added
Hall.
The first SAC, a
committee, was formed last car u hen
Hall asked Student Government
President Tim Futrell to appoint
members.
That committee advised Hall
on such issues as women's hours
and the Free University.
n

Kernel Photo by Bob Brewer

Robbie Barclay, coordinator of the Free University class, "Seeing things clearly," ponders a point

during Wednesday's session. It was the first day
of Free U. classes this semester.

INTERCOLLEGIATE RUGBY

Emergency Plan Circulated

eral way because he had not
Continued from 'Page One
actually seen it.
Services
"(Communication
After Padgett learned that the
for installation of temwill) plan
porary lines as may be required. Kernel had received a copy of
"(Duplicating Services will) the memo from a UK employe,
move Xerox from Office of Legal the presidential assistant said
Counsel to Command Central. he had misunderstood the re"(Motor Pool will) provide porter who earlier questioned
him, and stated he had in fact
driver and one vehicle for Command Center for use as mes- seen the memo.
Ruschell, also apprised of the
senger.
"(Photographic Services will) leak, then claimed that the memo
provide photo coverage as re- was "no big secret."
The Kernel, however, has requested."
The rest of the memo lists ceived word that the Business
the job each employe will per- Services Division is checking
with the 33 employes involved
form.
to determine who released it to
Tom Padgett, special assistant to President Otis Singletary, the Kernel.
claimed that this document did
Tightened Security
The memorandum is only one
not indicate the University administration was expecting any facet of tightened security on
trouble, but that the administra- campus. Safety and Security and
tion wanted to be prepared in the the Student Affairs office have
event of an emergency.
He said the primary purpose
of the plan was to set up a network to gather and disseminate
information.

SUPER ART
SALE!

Confidential Document
The memorandum came from
Ruschell's office, but when the
Kernel questioned Ruschell as
to the content of the memo, he
said it was an "administrative
and
document
confidential"
added that Robert Zumwinkle,
vice president for student affairs,
would be the man to talk to.
Zumwinkle said he knew of
the memo but stated he could
not cite any specific information.
Padgett said he also knew
about the memo but asserted he
could only discuss it in a gen

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used); molding lengths; rare driftwood; posters; old photographs;
architectural renderings; unclaimed
picture framing.

Modern Graphics
Reduced to Sell!

Thurs.

Fri.

.

similar plans of action, according to Padgett and Ruschell. Besides this, all faculty and staff
members have received new identification cards in an effort to
bring Safety and Security records
up to date.
Other sources have reported
that department heads throughout the University have been requested to recruit people from
their faculty to serve in an as
yet undetermined role.

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