xt74xg9f5g62 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt74xg9f5g62/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19570517  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 17, 1957 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 17, 1957 1957 2013 true xt74xg9f5g62 section xt74xg9f5g62 Kernel Staff Named For Next Yeai

The appointment of members of
the 1957-5- 8 Kentucky Kernel staTf
was confirmed this Tuesday by
the University Board of Student
Publications.
Frank Strunk will head the staff
ns editor. David Altemuchle,
is managing editor; Ann
Smith, Faducah. news editor: Jim
editor:
Bland. Louisville, make-u- p
and F.d Ford. Berea. sports editor.
Othr appointments to the staff
are Doug McCullouch. feature edi- Cov-iimto- n,

tor; Tracy Walden. society editor:
Bill Mammons,
assistant news
editor; Norma Jean Shelton.
feature editor; Bob Smith,
assistant sports editor; and John
Fseiton. Jim Mampton and Dolores
Landrum, staff writers.
Dr. Nicl Plummrr. head of the
School of Journalism, said that
the staff for the summer Kernel
staff will probably be announced
next week.
The new editors are juniors who

will graduate in 1958. "They are is 2 8.
Ann Smith I a transfer from
all journalism majors.
Is secref ontbonne College for Women. St.
Frank Strunk. Stearns.
tary of Sii:ma Delta Chi and has I on is. Mo, and I'arlurah Junior
She
a 2.8 standing. Me transferred to College. Hrr standlm I
the University from Cumberland in publicity ih.iirm.in for Delta
College last fall.
Zrt sorority, and a member of
Dave Altemuchle is a transfer the Newman Club, league of
from the UK Northern Uxteiision Women Voters, and Voting; Demo-rratShe was a membrr of
Me is president of Si:ma Delta
Chi and was previously employed Junior Panhellrnie.
as a reporter for the Cincinnati
Jim Bland is tiea Mirer of Surma
Times-Sta- r.
Mis overall standing Delta Chi and sports editor of the

2.

n.

Kenturkian Me ha 29 standinff.
Stiunk. Altrmuehle and Bland

are all Korean War veterans.
Snort I ilitor. Id lord. I a
transfer from llerra Collrie and
has a .1.3 standing. He Is a membrr of Sigma Delta Chi and a
delegate to the men's rrshtrnrr
hall eounrll. He was formerly
sports editor of the llerea Cltlen,
community newspaper, and the
Brre. Pinnacle, college newspaper.

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FKANK STRUNK

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ANN SMITH

DAVE ALTEMUEIILK

II) I OKI)

JIM BLAND

GA Officers

ToReceiyePav
n The Fiitnre

Monthly salaries will lie paul to future SGA presidents, vice
of the judiciary committee.
presidents
The motion was passed at Monday night's meeting before
newly-electe- d
olhcers and delegates were sworn in.
and-chairme-

Dave Ravencraft,

elected presi- -

dent last week, will receive

$25,

Vice President Pete Perlman, $20,
and a chairman of the judiciary
committee to be announced, $20.
Henry Jaggers, chairman of
SGA's compensation committee, re-

president
Dick Lehman spent from 60 to
70 hours a month executing his
duties. He said that three of seven
universities contacted replied they
paid student government officers.
The money will come from the
SGA fund, maintained by 50 cents
from student enrollment fees.
Terminating a year as SGA
president, Lehman urged new
members not to "let SGA be just
another organization."
He presented shingles to outgoing representatives Terry
Woolem, Fredda Short, Ed Beck,
Pete Perlman, Jane Brock, Harry
Conley, Nancy Boggs, Terry
Kuester, Geren Bybee, Elsie Kennedy, Luther House, Henry Jagr,
gers, Rcnald Bonnell, Dick
Tom Martin, Ray Trout and
Dave Ravencraft.
ported

that

out-goi-

ng

COMMENCEMENT

classes will be dismissed
Monday, May 27, for commencement exercises,- President Frank
G. Dickey has announced.
. Assistant Dean of Women Jane
Haselden said tickets for reserved seats at commencement
are now available in the office
of the dean of women. Each
graduating; senior may get five
tickets.
All

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Vol. XLVIII

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, May 17. M)"7

Tlii1 first

Little Kentucky Derby was a success witli profits ing committee for the derby

reaching almost $1,000.
James Beazley, alumni fund director, said it would have been satisfying even if the derby had only
broken even financially. He said
the proceeds will come in the
future years.
The derby was patterned after
'The Little 500" at the University
of Indiana. The bicycle race was
financially unsuccessful at IU the

first year, but now several scholarships are given each year.
Carolyn Collier, chairman of the
derby, said at least one I'K scholarship could be given this year.
Mis Collier stated that the derby
was definitely a success.
Miss Collier said that a com- financial report is unavail
Ple
able until the results of the ticket
sales are in. She said approximately 762 tickets are unaccounted
for.

Charles McCullough, ticket chairman, said 850 persons paid 25
cents each to see the Debutante
Stakes. He said around 2,000
people saw the Little Kentucky
Derby.
Miss Collier said $1,446.10 had

been made but this didn't
clude the dance or tickets which
are still out. About $500 was lost
on the derby dance according to
in-

Mr.

Pharmacy
Cornerstone
To Be Laid

sales.
A

was given

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25 financial sponsors
$100 each. Each croup
$25 for stall decorations

would

probably be appointed by Dr.
Frank G. Dickey, University president, before this school year end.
The officers of the committee will
be selected in order that they may
start work on the derby this summer.
Mr. Beazley said. '"The first running of the Little Kentucky Derby
was most successful from many
1
standpoints.
It was colorful
and exciting. (2) It "stimulated a
tremendous spirit in the student
body, and also in the administration. (3) The alumni and friends
(Continued on Page

12)

Farris Says Repairs
Are Now Being Made
On Coldstream House
"We are going ahead in making
the necessary repairs to restore the
mansion at Coldstream Farm." announced E. B. Farris. chief engineer of the Division of Mainten-anc- e
and Operations.
Farris said parts of the mansion
were in bad shape and parts of It
were In good shape. He said they
were painting the exterior of the
mansion, repairing roof leaks, and
fixing gutters.
The chief engineer said there
was an asphalt tennis court and a
swimming jmmiI which had not been

and uniforms.
Department
The UK Radio-Art- s
produced a
film in color used for years.
of the derby. Mr. Beazley said that
lie said pu nic grounds and badthe expense of the film would be minton courts may b" built later
around $250.
;rt Coldstream. He added it may
Miss Collier said the 1938 .steer be necessary to build a parking lot.

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rnsidcut and

Mrs. I raitk C

Ditknj

Corditilh'im itc

Louisville.

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The entertainment

total of

contributed

A

The cornerstone bos will enclose
a formal contract between UK and
the School of Pharmacy establishing the College of Pharmacy as
part of the University, Farris said.
Both President Dickey and Pharmacy Dtan Earl P. Slone will greet
visitors at the ceremony. The invocation will be made by the Rev.
Newton Fowler, minister of Disciples cf Christ students at the
University.
Now located at Louisville, the
UK College of Pharmacy will be
moved to the new building duriivr
the summer. Regular classvs will
begin there in the fall.

Beazley.

and expenses amounted to $1,500,
he said.
Beazley said about $700 was
taken in at the door and it was
believed that about $300 worth of
tickets were purchased in advance

1

117

'EHerJbyEestimties
Net Nearly '.$1,000

Hun-singe-

cornerstone ceremony will be
held today at 2:00 p.m. at the College of Pharmacy Building at
Gladstone and Washington Ave.,
announced E. B. Farris. chief engineer at Maintenance and Operations.
Fairis said the cornerstone box
will enclose a copy of specifications
of the building. It will also contain
a UK catalog and a photograph of
the old Pharmacy Building at

Number

The January, June and August j.radnad s, n ifh tin ir families
The alumni, idth their families
The ftuiiltij and staf with their families

-

and
The friends of the I'uii crsiltj of Krntmhtj
To atdnd the ('oiniuem (incut lid
;

Three-thirt- i

to Tii

ohn

Kernel Kntie

Central Daylight Time'

( hacun a son gout," say the Trench. Roughly translated, this means
"Kadi to his own taste," ami this week's Kutie caused every man
Jacques around the Kernel to flip his beret. She is rbvllis I'owler
of Ashland, an Arts and Sciences fie shii.au anil a Delta eta pledge.

Uaxtcell I'laee

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KENTUCKY KERN TIL, rriday. May

I1F,

17. 10"7

Phi Beta Kappa Society

Selects 14 New Members
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nr. Hatch,

Het.v Kappn. national scholastic secretary.
pnt jjeta Kryipa is generally
honerary .society for students in
the nits and sciences.
ri,coniZt.(j as the nation's earliest
,
Dr. Maur ice A. Hatch, president
1;l..tlc socictv.
el
UK's new initiates arc as follows:
dinner Lois Mae Allen. Arthur L. Brooks
that the nnnual initiation
for the new mcmDtrs will be held Jr.. William J. Collis. Harry L.
Thursday. Mav 23, in the Bluegrass Conley Jr., Elizabeth Joan Fritz.
Mrs. Lois Caminack H ill, Mrs.
Roo:n. Student Union BuildinjJ.
will Jeanctte Hill Jcnninps, Marilyn
Taking olfic? at this time
officers: Jones. Suzanne Shively, Gene
be the following 1937-5- 8
V. Hargrcavcs of the Thomas. Susan Ann Bachmeyer,
Dr. Herbert
College of Commerce, president; Mary Tippctt Daniel, Tilen Flippo,
Dr. E. E. Kraehc of the College of and John W. Smith.
.

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CLAY

NOKMAN

Kentuckian
Staff For '57-95Named By Student Board

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Sam McCandless has bern
named editor of the 1058 Kentuckian by the University Board
of Publications.
Others appointed to the Kentuckian staff are Associate Editor.
Ourney Norman; Managing Editor,
Neal Clay; Sports Editor. Jim
Bland; and Greek Editor, Tracy
Walden.
McCandless, a history major,
tcrved as associate editor of the
1957 Kentuckian. He is president
of Phi Delta Theta. treasurer of
Lances, a member of Keys. Phi
Eta Sigma ODK and a former

i

member of the varsity golf team.
He has a 3.5 standing.
Managing editor of the Kentuckian this year, fiurnry Norman
is a sophomore in the School of
Journalism. He is a pledge to
Sigma Delta Chi, a member of the
varsity track team, the Spiked
Shoe Society and the English Club.
The new Managing Editor, Neal
Clay, is the former editor of the
He is journalism major
and a member of Phi Delta Theta
fraternity.
Jim Bland has been
Kentuckian sports editor, the same
K-Bo-

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Honor Students Told
To Use Psychology

'

MttShrifaian'
(Author cf "Barefoot Boy With Chttk," tte.)

position he has held this year. A
junior journalism major. Jim is
a staff member of the Kentucky
Kernel, and treasurer of Sigma
Delta Chi journalism fraternity.
Tracy YValdcn will hold the
position of greek editor for next
year's Kentuckian. She has been
general secretary to the Kentuc-- j
kian staff for the last two years.
Tracy is a journalism major and
will be the Kernel society editor
next year. She is also a I K cheerleader and a member of Chi
Omega sorority and Blue Marlins.

LANGUAGE MADE SIMPLE: No. 2
Exams loom closer and closer. The sands run out ; the
chips are down. This, you will agree, is no time for levity.
Accordingly, I have asked the makers of Philip Morris
whether I might not dispense with jesting in today's column and instead devote it to a cram course in languages.
Their consent was cheerfully given, for they are fine,
d
men, the makers of Philip Morris, just as
full of natural goodness as the cigarettes they turn out,
just as friendly, just as jolly, just as regular, just as
just as agreeable. "Why, bless you, child !" cried
the makers. ,40f course!" Then they rumpled my chestnut curls and somebody cried "Not it!" and before you
box, a game of Squat Tag was on, and
could say flip-to- p
we played 'til the moon was over the yardarm, and then,
great-hearte-

Helen King
Chosen ODK
Sweetheart

un-filter-

pink and tousled, we all went inside and had flagons of
temperance punch and Philip Morris cigarettes and fell
into our trundle beds and slept the clock around !

Tennessee Governor Frank Cle- traveling, and petitioning, the big
Miss Helen King, executive secment told UK honor students last day arrived. Nearly 10,000 workers retary of the Alumni Association,
Friday that "there is a frontier from all walks of life turned out. has been selected by members of
Roughly 100.000 spectators came to Omicron Delta Kappa, senior men's

open to each and every one of us

But I digress. Today let us turn our attention to the
study of languages.
DolnTrealize how important languages are? I must
confess that, until recently, I did not. "What good will
Spanish ever do me?" I kept asking.
Well sir, I found out. Recently I took a trip to Latin
America, and every day I thanked my lucky stars for
having learned Spanish in college. While my fellow tourists stumbled and bumbled, I was perfectly at home.

there is for each man an Oppor- watch theshow.
honorary, as their sweetheart of
At the day's end, the 1000 acres the year.
tunity Land."
Speaking at the UK Honors Day ofwasteland had been changed inThe- - ODK- - Sweetheart - award is
program, Clement told an audience to an attractive and productive a tradition of the organization-whicof about 3,000 persons that "if you farm. Several crops had been
was initiated on this camwill employ "frontier" psychology
as you go out into the world, you
,
will get the job done."
" 'Frontier' psychology can get
the job done provided you have
.

the heart, the training and the desire," he added. The governor ex- plained that "frontier" psychology
is a frame of mind which causes
the person to look for continual
progress, new ideas, and new fields
to explore.

have become frontier-minde- d
in this country. We cannot prosper, we cannot get along
with any sense of the future and
freedom without a frontier," he
stated.
As an example of what "frontier" psychology can accomplish.
Clement told of the work of J. L.
Fortney, a Kentuckian. who improved the Georgia Baptist Children's Home at Baxley, Ga.
Clement said that Fortney started with only an idea and a slogan
and with these he accomplished his
end. There were 1000 acres of
wasteland which the orphanage
owned and Fortney set out to
change it into a productive farm
and home for 126 orphans.
He used the slogan, "One day's
work or its equivalent," and induced manufacturers to lend him
the equipment fcr one day's use.
After several months of planning,
"We

J

planted. 800 acres of forest had
been cleared, pasture land had
been set aside, two lakes and a
swimming pool had been built, all
within one day.
"It was a great day and it all
came about because of one man's
idea, one man's 'frontier' psychology," Clement declared.
The Sullivan Medallions were
presented to Barbara Roberts and
Dick Lehman by UK President
Frank G. Dickey. The Medallions
go to the outstanding seniors in
the graduating class.
The Honors Day program, organized to recognize the students
who rank in the upper three per
cent of their classes, honored about
180 students.

pus

before World War I. The
honor is given to women members
of the faculty or staff of the University for their contribution to
the welfare of the University and
interest in student activities on
campus.
Miss King graduated from the
University in 1925. In 1932, she
returned to UK to work with the
Public Relations Department. In
1946, she became executive secre- tary of the Alumni Association.
Past recipients of the ODK
Sweetheart award are Frances
Jewell McVey. Sarah Gibson
Blanding, Mildred S. Lewis, Ann
Callihan, Carrie Bean. Sarah B.
Holmes and Marguerite McLaugh- .

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TAYLOR TIRE. CO.
Incorporated

'Complete Automotive Service'
PHONE
400

2-71-

I recall our first stop in Mexico City. I stepped from
the airplane, walked over to the nearest colorful native,
and said. "Hasta la vista, scnorita.- - (Good morning, sir.)
y caUniadadcs sc ayravaban ma y ma
cJ'cro la.s

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"Perhaps by now my footman shall have finished sweeping my chamber," he said. "Wilt thou not come to my

llOUM??"

"G;ac i',us" I said.
Arm in arm we walked to his house, but, alas his
footman bad not yet swept out his chamber. So we each
took a barrel stave and beat the impudent scamp until
it was time for my airplane to take otf.
Aloha, Mexico, brooding land of enchantment!

Needs at

AND ASSOCIATES
UPPER NEAR MAXWELL

cada ilia?" (Has thy footman finished sweeping out thy
chamber?)
"No, sir," he replied in Spanish. "He is an idle rogue."
"How is thy footman called?" I asked.
"He is called Diego," replied my friend, "and the little
daughter of his fat sister is called Juanita. She has two
small books, one gray cat, three black dogs, 24 red
chickens, one fat pig, eight pewter mugs, and a partridge
in a pear tree."
"Wilt thou have a Philip Morris cigarette?" I asked.
"Gracious," he said thanlffuiiv
We lit Philip Morrises and. smoked contentedly the
better part of the day.

,,

Fureu t lU Mexico . . .
U.S.A., land of the long uize and
rvgulnr, the flip-tobox, the fresh, natural, testful tmoke-Phi- lip
Morris, of corrisl -- uhose makers bring you this column
thrvuuhout the school year.
p

2-77-

84

Max Shulman, 1937

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Need For Better Rural Educational Facilities Cited

"Communities which nut
Emphasis should e
whatever the eour-- . ' The
air lor the loV who , tkn th
Into lichts for the football field but :he basic subjects siuhplaced upon of hard and careful work is habit which will induce student to
as Enphsh.
basic- kh-the (ommunitv mut ton. lulowr.s.
uik.
t.vi often the t.y
not enough into books for the li- mathematics and the .sciences. to success
in all human endeavor.-.- "
h.nr a rrvp(tfiil n:.ud for its w ho m.kr the hi h.-t trades 1:1
brary or shop equipment may bo Pupils should not be permitted to said PeYkins.
schools. Pnkms s.ud th..t "In m.dh.nutir.s d.
not i. r.r tl.-failing-temphasize sufficiently the war.te time or to work carelessly
"
To create the kind of climate many hoxr'ow ns all the plaudits pr.u-he
fundamental purposes of educa!

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tion."

John A. Perkins, Under Secretary of Health. Education, and
Welfare, made this statement in
an address given at the three dav
state Rural Development Program

meeting held on the University of
Kentucky campus this week.
Secretary Perkins continued. ' In
such communities, young people
may have difficulty preparing
themselves for careers in science,
agriculture engineering, medicine,
business, teaching, and other careers that will be needed more and
more as our economy develops and
expands."
Good health services can make
positive contributions to a dynamic rural development program."
said the secretary. Rural people
want and need good health facilities but doctors are reluctant to
settle where such facilities do not
exist.

o ca

Strengthening of local public
health agencies by various means
and vocational rehabilitation are
approaches that should challenge

any area desiring to make greater
economic progress, Perkins went on

w

to say.
Economic problems of needy old
people, the totally disabled, and
other such groups, should be looked into. Social welfare programs
that result in developing constructive ways of dealing with these
people's problems arc needed.
Better education is the one factor that is basic to all others in
the development of an area, said

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the- secretary. The financial advantages of education to the individual are great, he added, and
also the community interested in
attracting technical industry holds
out a major inducement if its local
labor force is an educated one.
"Vocational education," Perkins
said, "seems especially attractive
in many rural situations." Vocational programs can give direction
and purpose to young people, especially if they are not highly
toward educational
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MISS ELIZABETH AYERS

MISS BARBARA SHURTZ

Jewell Hall

Alpha Gamma Delta

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goals.

A vocational program, said Per --kins, must not limit itself to the
present important occupations but
must take into account, in so far
as possible, important occupations
of the future. Training so specifically for particular occupations
that basic subjects are neglected
will make it difficult or impossible
to shift occupations as conditions
change or grow more technical,
the speaker said.
Perkins said that there are three
thoughts in preparing the curriculum, whether it be vocational,
college preparatory, or general.

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His name is
BURT HALBERT III

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Leiington, Ky.
Phones:
Representing
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THE KENTUCKY KERN EE. Iridav.

Mav 17. lf).7

Platform
For Better SGA
Use

When elections arc over, political platforms have
served their major purpose: tliey have played a significant part in g( tting candidates elected to the
sought-fo- r
offices. More often than not, they are
left behind along with campaign posters, match-boo- k
debris.
covers, and other
This, we trust, will not be the case with the incoming student government officers.
The victorious Students' Party has a good platform. It contains planks which advocate reforms
that could help this university to become an increasingly better institution.
We would like to believe that this platform, and
not mere personalities, was the deciding factor in
last week's elections.
If this is true, then the students who elected the
new SGA officers expect more than a smile from
them. They expect to see these campaign promises
turned into realities, and they are wholly justified
in doing so.
We urge you, then, Mr. Uavencraft and all you
other newly elected people upon whom the responsibility for effective student government rests not
to take your promises lightly.
Give the students their money's worth: make an
honest effort to fulfill your party's platform.
We ask nothing more.
post-electio-

n

Letters From The Readers

This Matter

Little Derby Lauded

Of Policy...
William Allen White once said, "Consistency is a
paste jewel that only cheap men cherish." We of
the new Kernel staff would like to adopt this as a
kind of motto, or statement of policy.
Since some, perhaps, may be curious as to how
we would apply this statement to tho policy ' of a
newspaper, we shall explain.
In the news columns of the Kernel will be found
no change. As has always been, you will find news
stories written as clearly, as accurately, and as objectively as we can write them. We shall observe
two criteria for selecting this news: interest to our
readers, and common decency.
We w ill not be moved by promises or pressures
from any group political, professional, or social.
As nearly as is humanly possible, we will print the
news as it happens.
It is to the editorial page that Mr. White's statement applies more accurately.
Editorially, we will support anything we believe
will make the University of Kentucky a better
school; we will criticize, anything that stands in the
way of this.
No individual or organization will be considered
immune or privileged. We will not support a cause
simply because the Kernel has done so in the past;
neither will we criticize merely because precedent
says we should.
We will not be bound by chains reaching from
yesterday's opinions; neither will we be entirely
unmindful of the traditions which have been carefully preserved and entrusted to us.
We reserve the right of all free men the right to
change our mind, because we support something
today, does not mean that we must do so next week
or next year.
Believing that only out of disagreement can.
progress grow, we will freely evaluate, interpret,
or criticize anything that is within the scope of
and the University.
'7uls, Vn, "aliau u our iJohcy, and may we always remember that public trust is not personal
. . in the service of the
power, and that we are
in everything republic and to that public
sponsible and accountable."
this-newspape-

...

Honors Day
Was Obscured

The Little Kentucky Derby is over and apparently successful, and we have nothing but praise
for tho entire venture and all those unrecognized
people who worked to make it possible.
It was a noble underrating and one wlu'ch vr

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To the Editor:
This p.tst wick end the campus of

UK. lias experienced
one ol the greatest eents ever held here, the "Little
Kentucky Derby." I am sure that over the coming years
of the University ol Kentucky's existence, many young
boys and girls will have the opportunity to get an education who otherwise would not have been able to had it
the. "Little Kentucky Derby."
not been
I truly think that
is here to stay and that
it will grow with the years and become as big as the
"Little jOO" on the campus of Indiana University.
Willis Ray Haws

lr

the-"l)e- rby

Personnel Defended
To the Editor:
would like to answer the letter written bv William
lirown in the May 10 issue of the KENTUCKY
R.
KERNEL, in which he tells us of the lackadaisical attitude of the stall members in the Administration liuild-ing- .
1

Em in Speech 11, a classroom debate course, and I am
constantly in the Administration Building, talking to the
personnel so I can gather facts for my debates.
Bill says they cade questions. Well maybe they do,
but chances are he's never talked to Dean Mills or Miss
Dorothy Linnville, of the Department of Admissions and
Enrollment. I have disrupted b'oth of these people
numerous times for facts concerning my iiKonsequental

debates.
. He claims they are always passing the buck whenever
they can't answer, a simple question, maybe this is true,
but I'll bet he has never talked to Dr. Chamberlain, vice
president; Dean Martin, dean of men; Dr. Mc Daniel,
jesting bureau; or Mr. Clay Maupin, accounting department. I have made myself obnoxious to these people by
asking for information that is forgotten the second my
classroom debate is ended. Dr. Mc Daniel didn't pass the
buck when I saw him. As a matter of fact, I took twenty- -

trust will be continued down through the years.
As a matter of fact, the whole weekend was notable
social event.
as an
Only one question was left unanswered: Why
include Honors Day in the Little Derby Weekend?
Is it too. insignificant to stand alone?
We certainly don't think so.
The Sullivan Medallions are the highest honor
awarded to UK students. They recognize, the outstanding senior woman and senior man each year.
We feel that the Sullivan Medallions and the
Honors Day program are important enough to
stand alone separated from the Little Kentucky
Derby or any other University activity.
Next year's Little Derby steering committee
might take this into consideration when they plan
'
a w ec kc ml lor the event.
Keep Honors Day and the presentation of the
Sullivan Medallions from getting lost in the Derby
.shuffle. Let these honor students occupy the spotlight for the week.

They deserve it.

five

minutes from his lunch hour, and he didn't seem to

llllIRl
You know Hill. I am a real genuine, nonentity on
campus. I know that I'm insignificant and alter talking
to me you will get the same impression. At the moment,
of my greatest achievement, my Mom whispered to my
Dad that I was suffering lioni delusions of adequacy.
Em just a stupid clod liom New Jersey and the only
lea son why Em allowed to come lsueh a great institution as the I'niversity of Kentucky is because everybody
Icels sorry for me. And if you don't think Em soiiy just
ask the boys who lie with me.
Cranted that 1 nm a mental ciphrtrthat I am
and as meaningless and pointless as my questions are. the administrative personnel hae always lound
time to answer them.
To cite one specific example, and all you did in your
letter was to generalize and poke1 fun, I cite President
Erank Dickey. This morning on May I 1th. I base just
1 fe didn't evade
TpoknTTb him" lor
but answered them: he didn't pass, the buek,
but helped me. Now I say to you. William R. lJrown,
if a president ol this university takes time to speak to
like me, then I can justly conclude that any
a
of the lower personnel would take time to speak to a
Leonard A. Sternman
person like you.
hieon-sequcnt-

thirty-minute-

s.'

al

my-quest-

non-entit-

Trailer ville, Ky.?
To the Editor:
The need for

a

trailer paik on the University of

Ken-

tucky campus is most prevalent. There are approximately
sixty trailers throughout Lexington with students living
in them.
These, students pay from $16 to $21 a month for a
small bare lot that measures about MO feet by 50 feet.
On top ol this outrageous fee. they arc required to pay
for the electricity. The parks, in most cases, are not
mainlined to any great extent. Any improvements thae

are made, are made by the tenants themselves. Then too,
many inhabitants of these, parks do not care what 'heir
lots look like, thcrcfoie any improve mc nts are somewhat
at a loss. Abo people who follow the horse races, constitution jobs, and other things, move in and out of the
p.uks keeping them in a constant state of disorder.
Some ol the I'nivcisitv olticials think that a trailer
paik would degrade the appearance ol the campus and
would compete with the new housing projects: nevertheless (!ooperstf)wn and Shawnee town already have hn;
waiting lists and Shawneetown is vet to be completed.
We feel that the University could easily construct a
p:uk on ihe.uM !.;: :n that- - ii sns.
::.: in
with c lec trie ity, public sewe rs, and water. The University's Maintenance and Opeiations Department toulil
construct the paik in a matter of a tew weeks. The students 1 have talked to aie willing to pay a nominal lee
for a pciiod of time to help pay the cost of the oiiginal
constitution. Alter this time they could pay their utilities and maintain the paik themselves.
I urge the authoiitiis
to consider these few facts.
behe se students vxould appreciate their doing so.
'I
lieve that these students' economic situations would be
gicatly improved.
Kenneth lie an
1

.

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky
Lutrrtxl at the PjsI Olfue at Lexington, Kentuckv. its vcmd tlaM
mutter under the Act of March .I." 1879.
Published weekly during school except holiday and eumi.
SUBSORIPTIO.V PATES

-

1100

lr

wnusirt

ions

* THE KF.NTIT.KV KFRNF.U rrM.iv.

May 17. 1V7-- !S

The Roarirunncr

Runner Has Fond Memories
Of Experiences On Campus
By JOHN MARC I
As

come ami gone, some of them evrn
out earning a living now. The
friends that are still here, the
H)f, the Nose, I'orky and manv
others.
If you don't choose your friends
carefully, you re liable to meet a
few faculty members. They're almost human. The old saying, faculty members should be seen and
not heard, applies only in the
classroom.
During college you meet a lot of
outstanding girls (doubly outstand
ing at the Sigma Chi Perby).

S

(he setting sun dips to the

north (I've been out to the
fond memories drift through
Duf-fal-

ot

my mind.
To say that leaving UK is a joy,
would be a lie. Leaving is sheer
delight man. sheer delight.
As a freckle fared freshman I
stepped onto this campus and into
boys' dormitory.
There were two
outstanding fea- tures In the!
dorms. One was
I'VP SPPn a lnr rf rrrxiH ntVilctoc
me nil
Man, 'come and go. Hagan. Ramsey,
who took every-- l TsiroDolis. Meilineer. Hnrriv nnrl
body s money Kuhn. None were as crazy as big
playing: poker. Lou, the golden Greek. The only
The second fea- man with pigeon toes on
sixture was the teen feet, who could kill size op- the
monitors, more ponents on the backboard.
commonly termMany people have said the
ed the Gestapo. Roadrunncr
an
TI
That's not quite true. An
A.
f
e x - tor is a machine that shakes. I
mr
ft
peUinj you at haven't had the shaUrs since IW
the drop of a weekend!
fifth. Hot heads!
The faculty doesn't really run
I had two roommates (T.
SGA. Nobo