xt751c1tfp8n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt751c1tfp8n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580926  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 26, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 26, 1958 1958 2013 true xt751c1tfp8n section xt751c1tfp8n i

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McCOIRT

CAMPBELL

Freshm en Pie as e d, Be iv ild ered By UK S ize
The fall semester seems to have opened with a flurry
of excitement and enthusiasm for freshmen here at UK.
A small purvey taken thi3week Indicates that freshmen
Are well pleased but a little bewildered at the'size of UK
and. the number of students. Following are comments"
taken at random from freshmen on campus.

d
Dan Campbell, a
student from Lexington
Catholic Hi School, says. "I like UK but I think it's a
big change frcm high school. I expect to get out of UK
Just what I put into
Eotson, holder of a General Motors academic
scholarship, pre-lamajor, and a graduate of Belfry
Hi School, made these remarks. "It's a big place. I think
pre-me-

it-Tho-

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Try outs For
Guignol Play
Set Sunday
Tryouts fcr the first Guignol
Theatre production, "The Caine
,"
will be
Mutiny
held in the theatre in the Fine
Arts Building Sunday at 2 p.m.
cast-ther- e
le
are
In this
about 20 characters, none of which
has been cast. Director Wallace
N. Briggs invites all students, men
and women, who are interested in
theatre activity
sl
Sunday, even
to come to
though only men will be needed
in the cast cf The Caine Mutiny

it's one of the best. I looked over a lot of universities
before I came here and I liked this one best. There are
a lot of pretty girls around here but I think there's goin?
to be a lot more studying to do."
John McCourt, an English student from Lexington
Catholic, says. "I like the University as a whole but I
don't like these late classes."
Of the female side. Glenda Moore, a math major
from Western Hi School, had this to say. "I like it Just
fine so far but a couple of things have confused me some.
Registration was! the most confusing day of my life. The
time gets me mixed up too. I don't :are what time we're
on but I wish we could run on one or the other."

r
I think freshmen should b wftmv! twit hn
says Gay Hartowe. a chemistry major from Morrhead.
I liked the preparation for registration we received uuX
I love the University as a whole."
Louise Whitehou.se,' a home economics student from
Lexington Lafayette wound up our poll by saying, "Ifa
so big it's not what I thought it would be but I like It
a lot. I like the freedom of choice we have in selecting
our subjects. That seems to be the big difference between
this and high school."
If this poll represents the bulk of freshmen on campua
it indicates that they are very satisfied but Just a llttlo
confused at what they have found at UK. So are senior.

17;

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TTTT17I
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Ccurt-Martial-

VolumcL

'Wild' Cat
Al Olc Miss

Lexington, Ky., Friday, Sqtemler 26, 1958

Number

4

all-ma-

extra-curricul-

ar

try-out-

Court-Martial-

."

The first meeting of the Guignol
Players,
dramatic organization, will be held Monday
at 4 p. m., in the Laboratory Theatre. Actors, carpenters, painters,
seamstresses, ticket sellers, and all
other interested may attend.
l"
"The Caine Mutiny
will cpen Monday, Nov. 3,
and run throughout that week,
with the exception of Wednesday
aJl-tude-

nt

C6urt-Mar-tia-

night. Nov.

5.

.

The Players will hold tryouts for
Albert Camus' "The
Also Lucille Little and
pose" Monday. The play will run
Wallace Briggs will present a cutting from "The Four Poster" at
the Player's meeting.
Cross-Puf-O-

23-2- 5.

ct.

Kentucky Faces Johnny Rebs
In Civil War-Lik- e
Encounter
Kentucky's first two opponents,
Hawaii and Georgia Tech, have
discovered that the 'Cats are on
the prowl this year and are capable of throwing a bomb into the
plans of Coach Johnny "Vaught
and Company as the Mississippians
try for the Southeastern Conference crown that shpped through
their fingers last year to be picked
up by Auburn.
Although
polls listed
Mississippi as high as fourth while
pre-seas-

on

Civil Engineers Hear Ta Ik
By ASCE National Head
The national president of the gineering, said Louis R. Howson,
American Society of Civil En- "because you can't push something
gineers, in addressing the UK you can't keep up with."
An engineer must continue to
student chapter yesterday --said.
We're all students. Some of - ua'bea student as long as he con- may have teen at it longer than tinues to be an engineer, he said.
He stated that until an engineer
others, but when we stop studying,
puts his tools to work and starts
we drop out."
"You have to keep up with en-Z- D contributing himself to engineering, his tools are merely symbols.
Howson told the group that
character, ' integrity, personality
Pictures
knowledge were four - requiID pictures taken at registra-.- . and which
sites
rank highest in a study
tJLoniMU fce given out before the
made by the Carnegie Foundation
Auburn fame. The date will be on, the top qualities of an engineer.
announced later.
He fctreed - the - need for more
Students who do not receive" emphasis in good public
their ID cards before the Auburn in engineering. He said relation
a good
game may use their stamped
engineer is a good public relations
yellow fee blip for admission.
man and that the 41,000 engineers
Pictures taken last spring are
in ASCE can do more to raise the
now being- given out in the lobby
civil engineering profession than
of the Ccliseum 9 a. do. to 4 p. m.
daily. Students must present anyone ouUide or important in
their receipted yellow fee slips the public relations field.
Elaborating on the idea of pui)-- :
. in order to get an ID card. Late.
present their Jic( relations, he said engineers
registrants must
receipted yellow fee slip to be need to "have .the public know
stamped by the ID department' what engineers do."
daily in the lobby of the ColiThe ASCE president said the
seum 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Pictures Engineers' Joint Council had dewill be taken at a later anfined public relations aa "Good
nounced date.
Continued from Page 5
--

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ng

By SCOTTIE IIELT

When Kentucky's football Wildcats hit the lielcl of battle against the Ole Miss Rebels
in Memphis tomorrow night, Look, out! The contest coulil prove to be one of the bloodiest
duels .(ought in the OI Dixie since the days of the Civil War.
the Colliermen were not even
rated, impressive 31-- 0 and .13-- 0
victories .over, their first two foes
have raised the UK rating until
now they are ranked fourteenth
and seventeenth in the UPI and
AP polls respectively. Ole Miss has
a ninth-plac- e
rating in the AP
showing in the
and a tenth-plac- e
UPI.
Tech and crew, after being completely surprised with the
new strategy of long-di- s
tance passing combined with, an
equally -- as- erncient outside run
ning attack and an inside charge,
are quick to comment that the
'53 edition of the Wildcats have a
tremendous potential and will not
be quite as cooperative in turning
over and playing dead as they did
a year ago.
Instead, the Johnny Rebs of Oxford may well be up against a
bunch of Rebels themselves as the
'Cats attempts to gain revenge for
last season's 15-- 0 licking handed
them in Lexington on way to a
disastrous, if not for the Tennessee win, 7 season.
'Kentucky presently, along with
Florida, occupies
the unusual
position as the SEC team atop the
heap.- - Collier- will be placing 'his
chances for the wntiiti?a. sf

Warning to all University
f
Kentucky pranksters:
Don't try to steal that life-sir- e
Wildcat which Ole Miss studenU
are displaying on the Oxford campus. It's for real.
Following
their campaign I
"cage the Cats." in tomorrow
night's tussle with Kentucky in
Memphis, the student body has
already done Just that.
A borrowed Wildcat from the
Memphis Zoo has been caged for
exhibition as the student body
points its powerful, but obviously
alarmed, football team toward
Coach Blanton Collier's league-leadigridders.
The Reb players look to the
Same M tne mast important of tho
season. In the past a victory over
the Wildcats has meant a South- tern Conference crown for the
men of Coach Johnny Vaught.
Kentucky also represents tho
strongest foe on the Ole Miss
sencame until Louisiana Stale on

!

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his team in that slot for at least
another week in a starting combi- nation that is predominantly Jun- -

in classification with
just a smattering of promisinr
sophomore talent.
Expected to get the nod lor the
November
Continued from Page 6 ior-seni-

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Ken-tuckia- ns

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Name Contest
The Kernel is sponsoring a
contest to name the coed picture of the week that will appear
in the Kernel every Friday. See
picture at right).
The contest is open to all
stiidents of the University &nd
a -- valuable- prize will be given
to the winner. Send your entries
to Kernel Office, Journalism
Building.
Entries will be Judged on
cleverness and originality. The
contest will close Thursday,
j

Oct. 9.

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The UK bulletin board, traditionally a campus eyesore, and character-ktlcaU- y
a final resting place for all eutdated pobters, announcements,
advertisements, etc., gets an Interested spectator in pert Kathy Kupert,
a freshman radio arts major frm Grayson, Ky. Kathy, it. seems, was
contemplating joining Pershing Kifles" when our photoxrapher
caught ber.

* '1

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KERNEL, FriiLiy. Sept. 2f, 1958,

UK KKML'CKY

Homecoming, Directory
On SC Agenda Monday

OPEN MONDAYS 9 TO 9

t

Reports of the committee on the homecoming dance and the
Mudent directory committee will head the agenda of the first Student
Congress meeting Monday night at 7.
Other Items are the reports of the election and publicity committees, discussions of the travel bureau, student Insurance program,
the World University Drive and debate team appropriations and an
Harold Markesberry, social chairNSA report by Pete Perlman.
of Student Congress man, is In charge of arrangements.
Members
nthered governors attending the Program chairman Is Mrs. James
Governors' Conference here at Cox.
UK
student wives desiring
Saturday's football game.
membership In the Dames Club
may join at this meeting.
CHI O PLEDGES
Chi Omega sorority will hold an
open house from 8:30 to 10 Sunday night In honor of Us new Computer Solves
pledges.

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GRADUATE AID
"New Varieties of Financial
will be discussed by Dr.
Etudents" will be discussed by Dr.
Herman Spiyey, dean of the graduate "school,, at the .Ora.duate. Club
meeting Tuesday at 8 p.m. in room
128 of the SUB.
Thomas Greenland, club president, urges all graduate students
to attend to meet their dean and

to meet graduate students from
other departments.
He added, "In as much as many
of these grants have to be applied
for a year in advance, we strongly
urge any Interested senior to attend so that he can make application now for- - his first year of
graduate study."
FASHION

SHOW

fashion show will highlight
the UK Dames Club's first meeting of 'the school year at 7:30
p.m. Wednesday at the SUB ballA

J

room.
Club

'.

members, wives of University students, will model clothes
furnished by Four Seasons. Mrs.
Exhibits have played a prominent part in the activities' of the
new U. S. Information Agency
Paris Youth Center, located In the
Intellectual and artistic heart of
the French city. Among the exhibits which averaged more than
3,000 visitors during month-lon- g
showings are: "City Planning in
the U. S.," "Eight American Artists," and "Four American Artists
in. Paris."

.it

First Problem

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The University of Kentucky's
new electronic computer solved Its
first problem on the campus this
week, performing what may be a
valuable service for. the coal in-

dustry. .
Working out a formula by- a process known as linear programming,
the machine presented in two
minutes an answer that would
have taken at least eight hours
with a desk calculator.
Dr. Richard S. Mateef , new head
of UK's Mining and Metallurgical
Engineering Department, presented
this problem to Dr. John W.
Hamblen, director of the computing center:
Five different types of coal were
available, each with different
chemical analysis. Some were of
superior quality but expensive to
mine; others were more easily
mined but Inferior in quality. Ma-tewanted to find a combination
of the five types of coal which
would meet certain performance
requirements at a minimum cost.
Two minutes after these data
were fed into thej machine, the
correct blending proportions were
produced. Mateer and Dr. E. M.
Spokes, professor of mining engineering- at UK, said such information could result in cheaper coal
and increased production for industry.
The electronic computer was installed at the University earlier
this month. It will be used chiefly
for research and instruction.
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To make you look your best
Full Fashioned WON DAM ERE SWEATERS
A marvelous blend of fur fiber and lambs wool with

er

matching skirts and tapered slacks.
0.98 ta 14.98
Solid Colors
Tweeds
Plaids
1

"HTeak
Brown.

Willow

Green
Embassy

Bl oomfielcf S

Blue

Rocket
Red

.

236

NIGHT
DICK WALKER'S Orchestra

l
'

i

...

and many
other

inc

New

Shades

MAIN ST.

E.

Your First Flying

Lesson!

O
FRIDAY

'

w"

.

SATURDAY NIGHT
"SMOKE" RICHARDSON'S Orchestra
PRIVATE

13 Miles
Richmond Road

.

i
'

DINING

ROOM

-

41

i

er

For Reservations

mm

ir

AVAILABLE

Phone

i

dmv.,

;

V

.,l,..A.B,as;
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When you wind your wotch, it may seem like
just a few twists of the wrist to yog
but for
your watch, if s almost like setting off on a
journey. Is it any wonder
then that your watch begins to grow weary
after a while? You can hardly expect such a
delicately-balanceinstrument to remain in
perfect running order indefinitely.
To insure longer life and constant accuracy,
your watch requires cleaning and oiling at
least ones a year. So bring it in for a checks

un todav.

127 W. MAIN

"

PHONE
Store Hours: 9 to 5 Daily

r

"

Flyings a breeze with today's
simplified training methods and
foolproof aircraft. Forget everything youVe ever heard about
the special mental or physical
aptitudes needed to become a
pilot. Today, private flying's for
every qneL But you don't have
to take our word for it. Try it

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It

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90

'"w

round-the-worl- d

i,

--"

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and see. This is. your invitation
to take your first7 flying lesson
free. Take advantage of this
offer now. Call for your appointment today.
Investigate our
BUDGET FLIGHT TRAINING PLAN
less than S10 per

BOHfAER FLYING SERVICE
(lncorpoMttJ)

2-62-

BLUE GRASS FIELD

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PHONE

4-51-

45

I

1

* y. i'"

krNIt(KN

Mil

.

Big Social Whirl Forecast A t UK
Frances Thornbury KD to Tom
the women get theirs on Sunday.
Much celebrating should follow White TKE.
Kay Baker KD to Don Mills.
event, and don't jet excited
Another big year for social this you. hear the horn blowing
Jackie Sellers KD ' to Corky
(vents l. fully upon us now and' wheh. people screaming rveryone'a
and
Miller.
this promises to be even bigger
Just showing off their new pledges.
Jane Marvin Brock ADPi to Roy
and bftter than last. year. Before
Next weekend is going to be an IWoodall DTD.
I give you a preview of this year's
social events, I want to say wel exciting one. Sororities will, show
Ell Runyon ADPi to Lee Eaton
come back to you old students off al! their new pledges Friday DTD.
and hello to all you new fresh-- j night at pledge presentation and
Jackie Jordan ADPi to Harry
will find the Sigma
p en and transfer students. I hopej Saturday
Lee Conley DTD.
I'll be seeing all of you every' Chi's putting these same pledges
Jan Long ADPi to Eric Mangle-- i
to the test at the annual Sigma
week' about this time.
son. .
,
Chi Derby. Saturday Night brings
It's poing to be a big. big season on the Key's dance where the most Ann Shelby WcbbADPi to John
for the social minded people. The
sophomore woman will Hoffsteder PiKA.
bg occasion for this weekend is, beautiful
be chosen.
Deedre Dyke ADPi to Pat Kirk- ol couie, pledge days. Fraternities
As you can see, we have two patrick SAE.
pick up their pledges today and big
weekends ahead and a look at
Barbara Dawson KAT to Buddy
the' social calendar will show you Willis PDT.
more big weekends so get ready
Shirley Park KAT to Dick Dean
we forecast some big doing at UK:
KS.
Lanre's Carnival and Dance,
Homecoming, Fershing Rifles Corn- nation Ball. Greek Week and the
UK Invitational Tournament.
By the way, we play Tennessee
at Knoxville this year so you'd
819 EUCLID
better start planning - for.- that

Mary Charles Stacy KAT to
Reese Bcntly ATO.
Marcia Oivannl KAT to Charlr

ROIU.RTS
Kernel Society Editor
By ANN

j

Strid.
Hannah Hume KAT to Glen
Balrd SPE.
Wilma Jean Dorrah KAT to Bill

MB.

TKE.

j

j

i

;

Mary Ellen Barber DZ to Bill
Nelson PKT.
Peggy Sisk KD to O. T. Maddux Jr.
Charlene Schiebel KD to Dave
Ravencraft KS.
Helen Shuck KD to Frank
Wagner KA.

ir

TjpUU are needed for work
on the new Student Dirrctory.
They will he paid X5c an hour.
Thoe Interested are aWed to
apply now In room IJ7 of the

Susan Hardisty KAT to Dirk
Howe SAE.
Ede Russell KAT to Bill Hardy
KA.
Carla Green DZ to Alan McFee

t

11

H'ontvd

Ash brook.

i

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Sue Hamilton KD to B b

'

Dave Franta established a new
UK fieliman bro.d Jump mark of
23 8" in 19;.

Oum set a
mark of 50 3 in tin-- '
U. mret at Dayton.

UK's

Buddy

National

AA

440
,

new-freshma-

n

Ohio, in 19i7.

j
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weekend.

Please leave any notices of pin- nings, engagements or marriages
on my desk in the Kernel office
at the Journalism building or call
Bye now See you around
campus.

The 'Saddle

Spur

&

Presents

.

...

TINNED

French KAT to Barney
Farnham' AXPA Cambridge.
Sherl Martin, KD to Grier Davis,
SX, Davidson. N. C.
Donna Lawson KD to Fred
Pfarrer, AXP, Purdue.
Ann Morgan DZ to Frank Brad-shaHelen

sit

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It

V

as

A

I

THE
FUN TOPPERS

w

SN.
Connye Williams AGD to Bill

I

Hammons SX.
Beverly Price XO to Terry
Schneider KA.
Lynna Chase XO to Brian Hogg

sx.

For Reservation

ENGAGED
Margaret Combs KD to Joel
Watson SAE.
Jo Ann George DZ to Charles

Browning PKT.
Gregg Rhodemyre KAT to Russ
Zachem LXA.
Randi Richards KAT to Fred

i

V

Myer SAE.
Libby Hanna XO to Jim Miller

PDT.

Call
Dancing Friday and
Saturday

'Saddle

From 9 p.m. 'Til 12

2-41-

26

GEORGETOWN ROAD

&

or

4-58-

39

Spur
PHONE

MARRIED
Margaret Orr XO to Howard
Stephenson PiKA.
.,

FLOWERS

ill

For Any

3

INVITATION
TO
STUDENTS

1

Occasion

September

CALL

28

1958

Michler Florist
DIAL-3-0-929

417 East Maxwell
'joe-joe-

chemise

"

'58 fashion in
"
echoes the lengthsweaters.
ened, lanky look of the sloppy oe
era while introducing a new era of
tidiness. We point to the interesting
d
almost to the
placket
hem, and shining with metal buttons.
(wool and vicara),
In
The essence of fall
"Joe-Joe-

rubber-necke-

Jan-kha- ra

sizes 12.t.
Success Skirt in worsted Bermuda
sizes 12.91.
Flannel,

32-4- 0

jjRf V HW5i

in

rim

.

Phone

Southland Dr.

Morning Worship: 9:30 A. M.
Dr. Leslie R. Smith, Minister
Chapel Choir (Student Choir)
Church School Class

- GIH3

26

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Featured in Glamour
and Mademoiselle.

Distinctive Gifts at

SQUAW BOOTS

DISCIPLES STUDENT

FELLOWSHIP

Coffee Time: 10:30 A. M.

Split Deer Skin.
Turquoise and Rust

11

Mr. Arthur Wake

Dr. William R. Baird

Moderate Prices

$5.95:

Chapel Choir Rescarsal: 5:00 P. M.

Student"" Lounge-

-"

(Jennings Memorial Room)
-

BERMUDAS
And

SLIM JIMS

-

Clinton Henderson and Bill Barr
students "
ywnjstcr
6.00 P. M. Cost Supper
(Fellowship Hall)

6:30-7:4- 5

Morning Worship: 10:50 A. M.
Dr. Smith

and Chancel Choir

P. M: Fellowship Hour--

"

(Scout Room)

Recreation, Study, Worship

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(DISCIPLES OF CHRIST" ..

Waihabl Cotton Knits
Navy 'BIm

FUmroIs

OPEN FRIDAY
NIGHTS 'TIL 9 P.M.

Short and Walnut Streets
'

"iA'xinRtons Student Chunk"

if

l

* Why

The Kentucky Kernel

The fall

Univihty of Kentucky

Font OflM-Pvifclmbrd four

T.riUrrA

f

e

nrrond tlms miltif unfit f h Act of Mwk 3, 1879.
I.rlnf1on, Krnt- ky
limrt a wrrfc diinnt'tb refulur hool yriir etrpt holidayi and rxam.
ot

SIX DOLLARS

A SCHOOL

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

-

YEAR

,f

.

v.

'

ef

Larky ,VavJi

Ahvt Errratieti, Chief News Editor

,

Sports Editor

lkSanx,-Clii- cf

Ann Robebts, Society Editor

7ay Aikkt,

Business Manager

Norman- McMuliin, Aiccrthing Manager
-

John Mitchell, Sa

Marilyn Lyvcrs and Judy PennebaLcr, .Proofreaders
FRIDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Bill, Hammons, Editor
Janu

ItAnwisoN, Associate

Editor

might relax their standards sorae-aawhat, thus partially nullifying the
higher requirements. This we doubt
No conscientious teacher would
liberately thwart, plans whicJu.wlo;h,s "ork and
ofin'g him students whpvrealize they

a close look at the next fresh- you see on campus. Probably
you'll find him a bit bewildered by

n

semester's confusion,
but otherwise he Ix)ks like most other
UK students.
He isn't. He's diseased.
body is impos
That
has becomfc the
sible carrier
University's most serious malady
academic insufficiency and, iflig- tires tell an accurate story, chances
i
i
.l
t.
are me ngnt oir nis sopnomore-jra- r
will never dawn here.
Last year 51 ner cent (1.093- of
did not make 22.0
standing. That means they wtnTTcI
have been on probation under the
new ruling. If alter another semester
they still did not make a 2.0, they
would be dropped from school.
Of last year's sophomore class," 534
of 1,317 did not make a C average.
This brings to 49 per cent the total
of the lower two classes which would
have been on probation. The figures
decreased to 26 per cent for juniors
and 10 per cent for seniors.
T.When the University decided last
May to raise the overall average required to remain in school to 2.0,
there was a series of reactions. Some
we among them thought "it was a
giant- step forward, with eventual
possibilities of raising not , only the
quality of work- students must produce, but thereby also elevating the
University's statns as an educational
week-ol-

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of-wha-

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that professors

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we'll be glad to print them.
Your Tetters ill-help
the Kernel
staff in planning future editorials,
features and the like because they
indicate your thinking on current
events. We have the space and the
interest in your opinion; we hope
you'll write and let us know your
.

-w-

x

views.

our letters column.
We aren't asking you

Letters should be addressed to the
f
and may be placed in
the University post office without
any postage. They may be up to 250
words in length and preferably
written, double ' spaced, although
'ldhgtiafkf will' be acceptable"
..Ki.M,wi ..it Cl"
in r.ior
III WIVIVI IU LV f'ULMiailCll, till 1,.
inni. tt v wh
all recpiests to withhold names from'
published letters, and under Ken- tucky law there is no authority
which legally can force us to divulge

to write
us so we can take editorial potshots
at you. Your letters are more of a
- barometer of campus clouds than you
realize, and that is our
primary reason for warning thenV"

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editor-in-chie-

type-probabl-

ni-niui-u-

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your name.
. You. have our invitation to write,
our assurance that we wiy listen to
any opinionwhether complimentary
or derogatory
and our promise to
keep any confidences you may request.
We'd like to find both our mailbox
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it.
iv'ywf,!! bu UIU1UJ11J.I.UH.1UIIJ, unit
arc invariably opinions and incidents
Vtucli might bear 'mentioning and
which we never hear about. The only
person who can tell us about them
is you, the reader.
We would like to reach a point
where our letters column' would be
w
feature of the editorial
a well-reapage, but we can't unless someone
starts the ball rolling. If you have
a fiipe about our coverage, write
us; if you want to gTipe or comment
cn anything, write us. If yout re-marks are reasonable and .legitimate,

choice.
We feel this hurts everyone
Rush is never too pleasant,
but obviously it is a necessary chore
and it surely is a job that must be
smokers and the preference party done well and not "rushed" into.
If UK fraternities feel their system
meant the fraternitv met a nrnsner- is weak here, certainly the uisli protive Ted
four times.
qwVut claim that this is ample gram deserves a complete study.
time; on the contrary, it is not. What Neither the system used before 1957
is worse, the rushee, who is probably
or its abbreviated substitute have
lar less clear on what he is looking proved to be satisfactory.
for than the fraternity, was forced to
In considering rush changes, some
make such an important decision in fraternity men have mentioned a dea mere four meetings.
layed rush as a possible remedy, biit
Before 1957 IFC contended that if such a system were adopted the
fomertings were ITOtWy ampie,. "dirty rush" problem might become

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concerned.

,rh

would spend most of its time handl- ing violations and in such a case the
improvement of the fraternity system
might have to take a back scat,
The best answer lies in lengthening
the present early rush to at feast live
visits by a prospective pledge. Al- though such a change would bring
howls of protest from .xpaiiy, it ap- pears that the fraternities' would lose
nothing but their :tiriie. This com- modity is a necessary expenditure if
each group and the UK fraternity
svstem as a whole Is to'prosper.

The Farewell Train Blues

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We are beginning to feel a bit- piqued because
contains- -:
the usual publicity handouts by the
pound every day, but pitifully few
letters from our readers.
The Kernel would like once again
to emphasize that we welcome letters
from our readers on any subject,
critical or full or praise to print in

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s.

Help Wanted: Mail
our-mailbo-

tory .once again and in every fraternity house there now exists a relax ed air.' The driving rush period
being concluded, we now have time
to evaluate rush in the light of practicality rather than expediency.
It is obvious that a check of the
1957 fall rush figures prove that more
men were out this fall than last, but
this does not prove that rush was
better or worse than in 1957.
In 1957 1FC began a slightly revised rush system than the one used
previously. Before that time UK fraternities held two invitational parties
before their final party on preference
night. The two invitationals plus the

kme-niciidiii-

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institution.
- Others suggested

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ap-)ca- rs

must .work. nar;cieT):tHJrse. by course
it they intend InetTrainhrichool
We have applied the consequences
of the new acadernic requirements
primarily to freshmen because others
.l
Tilling
nm luc a
t&ttlfirst semester figures indicates vividly
leadership that four meetings might
that the student body had better. do be too many. IFC felt that many
MJUlt' scliuUsUl
and rushees became discouraged with a
quickly.
rush. But certainly
long, drawn-ou- t
A repeat performance of their
the record has not shown in the last
standings this year could have dis- two years a big increase in
the.
astrous results for the Ireshman class. number of men pledged and a de- Once a good average has been crease in
the number of drop-outachieved, it is not difficult to mainLast year, to counter;?., the length
tain. But anyone who has been in of rush, IFC changed the rush sys- college a year knows that pulling up tern by
eliminating one of the invita- a sub-pa- r
average is an exhausting, tional parties.
The reasoning here was
often discouraging task.
to decrease the number of drop-out- s
We are not qualified to tell you from rush.
This was the intent, but
how to do suitable work here, nor is
this an admonishment to buckle
down. We merely intended to present Disappearing Americana
the. facts from last year; you may
digest or reject them as you wish.
But we will say this: Being on
ARTHUR EDSON
probation is no fun, and coming
AP Newsfcatre
Writer
from behind is never as easy as start- - WASHINGTON To anyone brought
ing and staying ahead. And when the up in a railroad town, the blackest news
semester's grades come. out, we'll be from the nation's capital hasn't been the
among the first to say:
misfortunes of Sherman Adams or ..even
"
the perils of Quemoy.
"We told you so."
No, it was a prosaic little item which

well-scrubbe- d

2,018)-freshme-

Sports Editor

Half Will Fail

Take

the

Hfxt

Scot-ti-

after two fottnal rush sessions it
that it has only sated wear and
tear on fraternity men and rti slices.
The change has not improved rush
in the way it originally was intended.
In order to. make rush "easier on
everyone" the fraternity, governing
group has sacrificed one important
asject of rush: They have given themselves far less chance 'of mating the
rushee
right choice, in regard- to-and probably even worse, they have
lorced many a rushee to make a too-ha-

UK fraternity rush is his-

:

Fhoiogreplier

Rush?

Hurry-U- p

aud our letters column. overflowing
.

every day.

yards like mother7 hens washing errant
chicks.

r

Trains

were

interwoven wilh
Monett life that it would be hard to
dredge up the first memory of one any
more than an "Iowa boy could recall his
1'
first corn stalk.
Kut there was one winter's uip, when
predicted that, except for commuter
the snow seemed mountainous, when
trains, the last passenger coach would
drifts were high and so were the doubts.
go out of business by 1970.
Could anything operate in si(.h weather?
No passengerjrains?VVhat-kinof a
And then, here she came! The strug
transportation world is this?
gling little engine had icicles clinging to
Everyone knew the old patient was her nostrils and she was so covered with
ailing, of course. Each fiscal report had snow she looked, like a steaming igloo.
said that passenger travel was going down,
The noise she made remains: with me yet.
down, down.
I'll swear irwas-contented chortle.
Let's move up in time a little. Oil
Hut railroad men have been such prohad replaced coal as fuel in the big
fessional weepers that it was easy to keep
passenger engines, and huge beasts they
on believing that the malady, though
'
serious, would hardly be were.
undoubtedly
Before old No. 10, the pride of the
fatal.
Frisco Line, pulled out each night for
Then came the final, chilling diagSt. Louis, the engineer would build up
nosis, by an examiner for the Interstate
tcam. Flames shot from her oil burnci;,
Commerce Commission, Howard HOsmer.
He said that not since 1890 have rail-- ' flashing a red light and creating awesome
shadows. The-stati- on
vaiihM.
vviud.
roads tarried as Tew " passengers "as '"they"'
did last vear. And Hosmer Jnredicted that.' The I conductor checked his watch, gave
.1 ,
'
II
barring a railroad xniraciethe
..Hiiii-?n- J
inc:! a.
r
"
strained lorwaid
and parlor car would disajcar by 19(35
At this moment rath night a switchand the last intercity passenger coad
man indolently stcpfxd in front of the
would go by 1970.
slow moving engine and ambled laily to
from Monett, Mo. and
To an
the other side. I he monster never juiic
jail-roathe ie arc hundreds ol
got him. Hut it secincJ to me then to be
towns like it in this country this
one of the most daring, courageous arl
was bleak news indeed.
dam fool acts of all time. And it still decs.
For a railroad town of 30 or 40 years
Well, the automobile, which is utoie
ago had a'xrsonality all its own.
convenient, and the airplane, which is
into town. Freight engines grunted and
laster, have done their dirty woik, biing-- '
huffed determinedly.
Switch
engines
ing this tribute and (his confession.
UKHed restlessly as they scurried about the
It has been )eus since '1 'have been on
ImorUut engines pulling regal pjss- - a train. And it's a sorry business for an
cnger trains whistled importantly for at- - old passenger train
lorr to have to !ac
teutiou, anU.a.cear track as
lo admit that he. too, helped kill it
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foe! and tomy ttvlf
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Have a real

cigarette .
have a CAf.lEL

?ust Party

Parties, Mich as the one a bore in the Chi Omfft house were common
daring the rushing-- of over 400 students on campus. Rush ends tonight
with preference nifht. Marian
and Barbara Wall,